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They had more in common than just a scream, whether they faced Dracula, Frankenstein's Monster, the Mummy, Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde, King Kong, the Wolf Man, or any of the other legendary Hollywood monsters. Some were even monsters themselves, such as Elsa Lanchester as the Bride, and Gloria Holden as Dracula's Daughter. And while evading the Strangler of the Swamp, former Mis They had more in common than just a scream, whether they faced Dracula, Frankenstein's Monster, the Mummy, Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde, King Kong, the Wolf Man, or any of the other legendary Hollywood monsters. Some were even monsters themselves, such as Elsa Lanchester as the Bride, and Gloria Holden as Dracula's Daughter. And while evading the Strangler of the Swamp, former Miss America Rosemary La Planche is allowed to rescue her leading man. This book provides details about the lives and careers of 21 of these cinematic leading ladies, femmes fatales, monsters, and misfits, putting into perspective their contributions to the films and folklore of Hollywood terror--and also the sexual harassment, exploitation, and genuine danger they faced on the job. Veteran actress Virginia Christine recalls Universal burying her alive in a backlot swamp in full "mummy" makeup for the resurrection scene in The Mummy's Curse--and how the studio saved that scene for the last day in case she suffocated. Filled with anecdotes and recollections, many of the entries are based on original interviews, and there are numerous old photographs and movie stills.


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They had more in common than just a scream, whether they faced Dracula, Frankenstein's Monster, the Mummy, Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde, King Kong, the Wolf Man, or any of the other legendary Hollywood monsters. Some were even monsters themselves, such as Elsa Lanchester as the Bride, and Gloria Holden as Dracula's Daughter. And while evading the Strangler of the Swamp, former Mis They had more in common than just a scream, whether they faced Dracula, Frankenstein's Monster, the Mummy, Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde, King Kong, the Wolf Man, or any of the other legendary Hollywood monsters. Some were even monsters themselves, such as Elsa Lanchester as the Bride, and Gloria Holden as Dracula's Daughter. And while evading the Strangler of the Swamp, former Miss America Rosemary La Planche is allowed to rescue her leading man. This book provides details about the lives and careers of 21 of these cinematic leading ladies, femmes fatales, monsters, and misfits, putting into perspective their contributions to the films and folklore of Hollywood terror--and also the sexual harassment, exploitation, and genuine danger they faced on the job. Veteran actress Virginia Christine recalls Universal burying her alive in a backlot swamp in full "mummy" makeup for the resurrection scene in The Mummy's Curse--and how the studio saved that scene for the last day in case she suffocated. Filled with anecdotes and recollections, many of the entries are based on original interviews, and there are numerous old photographs and movie stills.

37 review for Women in Horror Films, 1940s

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jim Dooley

    Although I preferred his previous book, WOMEN IN HORROR FILMS, 1930s (because I prefer the horror films of the 1930’s), this is another excellent introduction to the performers who made hearts beat a little faster, either at the theater or at home late Friday nights watching monsters parade across the television screen. I have only one very strong disagreement with the contents: Mank included Patricia Morison, but excluded Ramsay Ames. For Morison, he lists “Hitler’s Madman,” “Calling Dr. Death, Although I preferred his previous book, WOMEN IN HORROR FILMS, 1930s (because I prefer the horror films of the 1930’s), this is another excellent introduction to the performers who made hearts beat a little faster, either at the theater or at home late Friday nights watching monsters parade across the television screen. I have only one very strong disagreement with the contents: Mank included Patricia Morison, but excluded Ramsay Ames. For Morison, he lists “Hitler’s Madman,” “Calling Dr. Death,” and “Dressed To Kill” (the Sherlock Holmes movie), and I don’t consider any of those to be true horror movies. Granted, Ramsay Ames only made one horror movie, but it was “The Mummy’s Ghost” and not much is available about her. What is told was quite informative. Special highlights for me were: * The tragic stories of Anne Nagel and Jean Brooks ... truly heartbreaking; * New levels of appreciation for the overall talents of Maria Ouspenskaya, Elizabeth Russell, Louise Allbritton, Gale Sondergaard and Anna Lee. I knew they contributed wonderful moments to films that I’ve loved, but ... wow!; * Head-shaking evidence that Hollywood had no idea of how to “develop” stars in the 1940’s who didn’t come to them pre-packaged. Jane Randolph, Peggy Moran and Anne Gwynne immediately come to mind. * I knew very little about Simone Simon, Ilona Massey, Acquanetta and Lenore Aubert when I began reading other than being able to identify them in movies. I really appreciated the insights. Although he doesn’t admit it, the writer has his favorite ... and she is Evelyn Ankers. Of course, she is arguably the most famous of all of the performers in the book, she played some very memorable horror roles (and played them very well) ... and, oh, that scream! Although the book is about the women, there are naturally stories about the men, too. Lon Chaney, Jr. is seldom shown in a flattering light (and Mank’s side remarks are an indication of his lack of enthusiasm for him), Fritz Lang is shown as a vindictive monster, and there were producers with the morals of a newt. Boris Karloff, Glenn Strange and George Zucco receive accolades. And Rondo Hatton raises thoughts of melancholy. Like the 1930’s book, WOMEN IN HORROR FILMS, 1940s sent me back to my film collection to enjoy old favorites, and to the streaming channel guides to add titles I’d missed to my Watchlist. In the final analysis, the book is a celebration of these films and the work of these performers, both in horror movies an in other memorable films. It was an enjoyable read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Knutson

  3. 4 out of 5

    Fantasi

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    Joe Blow

  5. 5 out of 5

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    Spenser

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sally Stark

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  9. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Fowler

  10. 5 out of 5

    James T.

  11. 5 out of 5

    David Willard

  12. 5 out of 5

    OTIS

  13. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dean

  15. 4 out of 5

    Electricblue

  16. 5 out of 5

    Thommy

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dean

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    Nathan

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    Justin

  20. 5 out of 5

    WitchyFingers

  21. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jbondandrews

  23. 4 out of 5

    Yasmin

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chris.s

  25. 5 out of 5

    McFarland

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    Morgan

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    Dani

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    Grace Suarez

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    Bill C

  31. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Zaccaria

  32. 4 out of 5

    Siti Norshahirah

  33. 5 out of 5

    Holi Bats

  34. 5 out of 5

    Dinah

  35. 4 out of 5

    Lars

  36. 4 out of 5

    Chandré Louw

  37. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

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