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Bringing Knowledge Back in: From Social Constructivism to Social Realism in the Sociology of Education

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'This book tackles some of the most important educational questions of the day... It is rare to find a book on education which is theoretically sophisticated and practically relevant: this book is.' From the Foreword by Hugh Lauder What is it in the twenty-first century that we want young people, and adults returning to study, to know? What is it about the kind of knowledge 'This book tackles some of the most important educational questions of the day... It is rare to find a book on education which is theoretically sophisticated and practically relevant: this book is.' From the Foreword by Hugh Lauder What is it in the twenty-first century that we want young people, and adults returning to study, to know? What is it about the kind of knowledge that people can acquire at school, college or university that distinguishes it from the knowledge that people acquire in their everyday lives everyday lives, at work, and in their families? Bringing Knowledge Back In draws on recent developments in the sociology of knowledge to propose answers to these key, but often overlooked, educational questions. Michael Young traces the changes in his own thinking about the question of knowledge in education since his earlier books Knowledge and Control and The Curriculum of the Future. He argues for the continuing relevance of the writings of Durkheim and Vygotsky and the unique importance of Basil Bernstein's often under-appreciated work. He illustrates the importance of questions about knowledge by investigating the dilemmas faced by researchers and policy makers in a range of fields. He also considers the broader issue of the role of sociologists in relation to educational policy in the context of increasingly interventionist governments. In so doing, the book: provides conceptual tools for people to think and debate about knowledge and education in new ways provides clear expositions of difficult ideas at the interface of epistemology and the sociology of knowledge makes explicit links between theoretical issues and practical /policy questions offers a clear focus for the future development of the sociology of education as a key field within educational studies. This compelling and provocative book will be essential reading for anyone involved in research and debates about the curriculum as well as those with a specific interest in the sociology of education.


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'This book tackles some of the most important educational questions of the day... It is rare to find a book on education which is theoretically sophisticated and practically relevant: this book is.' From the Foreword by Hugh Lauder What is it in the twenty-first century that we want young people, and adults returning to study, to know? What is it about the kind of knowledge 'This book tackles some of the most important educational questions of the day... It is rare to find a book on education which is theoretically sophisticated and practically relevant: this book is.' From the Foreword by Hugh Lauder What is it in the twenty-first century that we want young people, and adults returning to study, to know? What is it about the kind of knowledge that people can acquire at school, college or university that distinguishes it from the knowledge that people acquire in their everyday lives everyday lives, at work, and in their families? Bringing Knowledge Back In draws on recent developments in the sociology of knowledge to propose answers to these key, but often overlooked, educational questions. Michael Young traces the changes in his own thinking about the question of knowledge in education since his earlier books Knowledge and Control and The Curriculum of the Future. He argues for the continuing relevance of the writings of Durkheim and Vygotsky and the unique importance of Basil Bernstein's often under-appreciated work. He illustrates the importance of questions about knowledge by investigating the dilemmas faced by researchers and policy makers in a range of fields. He also considers the broader issue of the role of sociologists in relation to educational policy in the context of increasingly interventionist governments. In so doing, the book: provides conceptual tools for people to think and debate about knowledge and education in new ways provides clear expositions of difficult ideas at the interface of epistemology and the sociology of knowledge makes explicit links between theoretical issues and practical /policy questions offers a clear focus for the future development of the sociology of education as a key field within educational studies. This compelling and provocative book will be essential reading for anyone involved in research and debates about the curriculum as well as those with a specific interest in the sociology of education.

38 review for Bringing Knowledge Back in: From Social Constructivism to Social Realism in the Sociology of Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kitty Red-Eye

    (Author's article on Spiked http://www.spiked-online.com/newsite/... ) (Author's article on Spiked http://www.spiked-online.com/newsite/... )

  2. 4 out of 5

    Duong Tan

  3. 5 out of 5

    Talin

  4. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alex Birchall

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christy

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bernard Vasconcelos

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gregory Anderson

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anthony F Loughland

  10. 5 out of 5

    Adriana Marrero

  11. 5 out of 5

    J. Boo

    Young started his career as a stereotypical educational theorist of the 1960s/70s, but had a child, and as a result seems to have moved to the "we should be teaching students things instead just having them talk about their feelings" side. Interview with author here. https://www.theguardian.com/education... Young started his career as a stereotypical educational theorist of the 1960s/70s, but had a child, and as a result seems to have moved to the "we should be teaching students things instead just having them talk about their feelings" side. Interview with author here. https://www.theguardian.com/education...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hala Edward Bitar

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kyrill

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lastri Ermawati

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  17. 5 out of 5

    Frank Spencer

  18. 5 out of 5

    Madmedea

  19. 4 out of 5

    TP

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amber Garrison Duncan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Diya

  22. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Naughton

  23. 4 out of 5

    David

  24. 4 out of 5

    LPenting

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pio

  26. 4 out of 5

    Hoa Nguyen

  27. 4 out of 5

    Veronique Legendre

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shirin

  29. 5 out of 5

    Zilany

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lizzie Grace

  31. 4 out of 5

    GETU SHIFERAW

  32. 4 out of 5

    Sharif

  33. 4 out of 5

    Julia Long

  34. 5 out of 5

    Son Hank

  35. 5 out of 5

    Hanna Korsun

  36. 4 out of 5

    Nhien

  37. 4 out of 5

    Haile Getaneh

  38. 4 out of 5

    Emily

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