counter Stories For Children - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Stories For Children

Availability: Ready to download

Contents: - The Selfish Giant - The Nightingale and the Rose - The Devoted Friend - The Happy Prince - The Remarkable Rocket - The Young King


Compare

Contents: - The Selfish Giant - The Nightingale and the Rose - The Devoted Friend - The Happy Prince - The Remarkable Rocket - The Young King

30 review for Stories For Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    I think it's interesting that when Oscar Wilde wrote for adults, he wrote in a very dry, irreverent manner. But when he wrote for children, he wrote melancholy, reverent works of beauty. I suspect it has something to do with his old witticism: 'If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise they'll kill you.' This is how you have to approach social commentary with adults. But I think with kids you don't have to add that extra buffer zone of wit, because kids can handle the truth. I think it's interesting that when Oscar Wilde wrote for adults, he wrote in a very dry, irreverent manner. But when he wrote for children, he wrote melancholy, reverent works of beauty. I suspect it has something to do with his old witticism: 'If you want to tell people the truth, make them laugh, otherwise they'll kill you.' This is how you have to approach social commentary with adults. But I think with kids you don't have to add that extra buffer zone of wit, because kids can handle the truth. As E.B. White put it: "Anyone who writes down to children is simply wasting his time. You have to write up, not down. Children are demanding. They are the most attentive, curious, eager, observant, sensitive, quick, and generally congenial readers on earth. They accept, almost without question, anything you present them with, as long as it is presented honestly, fearlessly, and clearly." Assuming this is true, (and I suspect the author of Charlotte's Web has some notion of how to write for kids), it would make sense that Wilde wouldn't fool around with irony and witty banter, and just get down to business. These stories don't mess around. They will break your heart. The final story in the collection "The Young King" gave me chills. The illustrations by P.J. Lynch just make everything that much more powerful.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Illustrations by P.J. Lynch prompted me to read these stories again. There really are some wonderful ones in here, including especially Little Hans (the Devoted Friend) in his cottage, and the funny fireworks. But the tales, oh, they're always worth a reread. So much richer than typical 'children's' stories, even richer than Andersen. And melancholy, satirical, joyful, cynical, and hopeful by turns (often actually in the same story), just as one would expect from Wilde. Discussable, too. What do Illustrations by P.J. Lynch prompted me to read these stories again. There really are some wonderful ones in here, including especially Little Hans (the Devoted Friend) in his cottage, and the funny fireworks. But the tales, oh, they're always worth a reread. So much richer than typical 'children's' stories, even richer than Andersen. And melancholy, satirical, joyful, cynical, and hopeful by turns (often actually in the same story), just as one would expect from Wilde. Discussable, too. What do you think of the ending of The Happy Prince (avl on Project Gutenberg)? (view spoiler)[“You have rightly chosen,” said God, “for in my garden of Paradise this little bird shall sing for evermore, and in my city of gold the Happy Prince shall praise me.” I don't understand the Christian viewpoint... the Happy Prince gave away all his gold to help the poor, the people that God is not helping... did Wilde put that in to please the publisher, to make himself look good, or (hide spoiler)] could he possibly have been sincere?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Graeme Syed

    Great book! I remember having stories from this book read to me at school and enjoying them thoroughly. Thirty years has changed nothing in terms of my enjoyment both personal and vicarious through my own children. I have now reread all the stories and have introduced some to the classroom. Oscar Wilde has an interesting way of writing. It makes it a bit difficult to read out loud sometimes as the brain is programmed differently to the way Wilde writes. It should be remembered that whilst this n Great book! I remember having stories from this book read to me at school and enjoying them thoroughly. Thirty years has changed nothing in terms of my enjoyment both personal and vicarious through my own children. I have now reread all the stories and have introduced some to the classroom. Oscar Wilde has an interesting way of writing. It makes it a bit difficult to read out loud sometimes as the brain is programmed differently to the way Wilde writes. It should be remembered that whilst this not necessarily wrong, it may be worth a quick practice prior to public delivery to eliminate the possibility of becoming tongue-tied here and there. The Selfish Giant is still my favourite and is about a giant who owns a beautiful garden. Initially he refuses to share his garden with the children but he eventually sees the error of his ways, relents and is rewarded by being taken to Paradise. I particularly like the fact that there is good dialogue from the giant and from the winter elements (the wind, hail, snow and frost etc.) which means I can have a good play with voices and accents when reading aloud. This all helps in making it a really popular choice for a five minute end of day story in class. Some of these stories are told with a firm Christin ethic which also means that they could potentially be spun into RE lessons as the morals of the story could easily be expanded on. However the best thing about these stories and where their true value can be found is in Wilde's dazzling ability to describe scene, sentiments and characters in a richness of language not often found (in my view) in many books today. The stories are quite clever and while superficially entertaining, they also have a lot going on under the surface. Because of this, I would suggest that these stories are suitable for reception up to year six.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jay Moran

    Oscar Wilde's children stories showed me the impact literature could have on people. This book was read to me on numerous occasions by my parents when I was growing up, and I can remember my dad openly crying in front of my sister and I whenever he finished The Selfish Giant or The Happy Prince. To see the impact these stories had on an adult really intrigued and perplexed me as a child, and I think it's the beginning of my love of literature. Each story is told in Wilde's breath taking, melodio Oscar Wilde's children stories showed me the impact literature could have on people. This book was read to me on numerous occasions by my parents when I was growing up, and I can remember my dad openly crying in front of my sister and I whenever he finished The Selfish Giant or The Happy Prince. To see the impact these stories had on an adult really intrigued and perplexed me as a child, and I think it's the beginning of my love of literature. Each story is told in Wilde's breath taking, melodious prose that just drenches you in emotion and stunning imagery. While some stories are more forgettable than others, each has its own voice, its own strength, demonstrating that Wilde was definitely one of the most wonderful writers we've ever had. Reading this as an adult or a child is an absolute pleasure and I insist on everyone sitting down and reading The Selfish Giant at least.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tom Garback

    ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️💫 Critic Score: B Reader Score: B+ These three charming but entirely sad stories exemplify Wilde’s witty bite, which might make them too elevated for kids. You can see the author’s love of gardens/birds/flowers here, and I found each story moving, though with increasingly less power. The illustrations are gorgeous, making for a beautiful keepsake.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Suey

    Interesting biblical-like stories, but I wouldn't consider them for children necessarily. Interesting biblical-like stories, but I wouldn't consider them for children necessarily.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Raksha

    Sad and dark stories, but nevertheless beautiful tales. I got it from the library to read to my 5-year-old but I think he’s too young to understand these stories. I enjoyed reading them and curious to read and know more about Oscar Wilde. Water colour illustrations by Charles Robinson are mesmerising.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    It was OK, but my kid hated it. These dark, ironic stories are not really for children. She wouldn't finish it after the first three stories were each worse than the next. Anyone looking for something a little off will not be disappointed though. Fantastic illustrations. It was OK, but my kid hated it. These dark, ironic stories are not really for children. She wouldn't finish it after the first three stories were each worse than the next. Anyone looking for something a little off will not be disappointed though. Fantastic illustrations.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Joel

    Worth reading for “The Nightingale and The Rose", “The Devoted Friend", “The Young King" and “The Happy Prince". These stories are written in a way simple enough for children to enjoy, but with enough depth to leave the more mature reader deep in thought. Although I would have preferred the religious symbolism to be a little more subtle, the fables are well written with both charm and wit, challenging you on numerous aspects of life. Worth reading for “The Nightingale and The Rose", “The Devoted Friend", “The Young King" and “The Happy Prince". These stories are written in a way simple enough for children to enjoy, but with enough depth to leave the more mature reader deep in thought. Although I would have preferred the religious symbolism to be a little more subtle, the fables are well written with both charm and wit, challenging you on numerous aspects of life.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kiddo

    This is not what I was expecting. For one thing I really don't know what age this is appropriate for. One review says ages 5 and up. There is some moralizing, the Christ child even appears. There is some death, by suicide and over exertion for an unappreciative friend. There is also wry humor, but when do kids start to get that? This is not what I was expecting. For one thing I really don't know what age this is appropriate for. One review says ages 5 and up. There is some moralizing, the Christ child even appears. There is some death, by suicide and over exertion for an unappreciative friend. There is also wry humor, but when do kids start to get that?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Pretty depressing bunch of stories.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    an absolutely stunning book with three wonderful stories. this is definitely a book i can see myself coming back to time and time again

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    A book filled with lovely, but sometimes sad stories, some of which quite dark which might make them a bit too much for younger children. You can tell that the author loved anything to do with nature as he mentions gardens, flowers and birds a lot but in such a beautiful way. It felt like the stories each had their own message to the reader, something to be learnt from each one.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emma Hurley

    I read this book as a child and although some of the pictures inside absolutely terrified me, I remember enjoying the stories quite a lot! Looking at the illustrations now, they are absolutely beautiful.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Booklover

    Best story was "The devoted friend". Others were so-so. Best story was "The devoted friend". Others were so-so.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marietje

    These stories are too gloomy for children. Always a good rescuer dies.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emma Meakin

    Beautiful!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    I admit to skimming this one, because I own O.F.O.W.W.'s complete shorter fiction and have read these stories many times. I WANTED TO SEE ARTWORK BY BRILLIANT IRISH ILLUSTRATOR P.J. LYNCH. --- First story was "The Selfish Giant," my favorite Wilde story and one of my favorite fairy tales in the universe. Two full-page illustrations, one border panel, and one tiny final image. I would have loved to have the last image be a full-page, because it's the most emotional moment of the story. (view spoil I admit to skimming this one, because I own O.F.O.W.W.'s complete shorter fiction and have read these stories many times. I WANTED TO SEE ARTWORK BY BRILLIANT IRISH ILLUSTRATOR P.J. LYNCH. --- First story was "The Selfish Giant," my favorite Wilde story and one of my favorite fairy tales in the universe. Two full-page illustrations, one border panel, and one tiny final image. I would have loved to have the last image be a full-page, because it's the most emotional moment of the story. (view spoiler)[ Seeing the Giant lying dead "covered with white blossoms" after the Christ-child takes him to Paradise deserves a whole page. When I was much younger I read another illustrated version of the story where the last illustration was the boy and giant, from behind, walking away hand-in-hand. Makes me cry just thinking about it! (hide spoiler)] --- Then came the finest illustrations in the book: those for "The Nightingale and the Rose" (okay, it's a tie with "The Remarkable Rocket" which had SPECTACULAR images but I liked these better). So gorgeous, and the emotion is deep and subtle and sad. My favorite page in the whole book ^. --- Third, "The Devoted Friend," which is a little less lush and a little more bumbling. The best illustration was a full-page moody scene of little Hans stumbling against the storm. Otherwise, not the most interesting tale to visualize, and Lynch's beautiful realistic watercolors don't serve the tale perhaps as well as frenetic Quentin Blake (see: all Roald Dahl books) sketches would. --- "The Happy Prince" is another of my favorites, but most of the art didn't focus on the Prince (shown once in full) or even the Swallow. Still, gorgeous, and I realize that the back cover of the book does show them together: Another tear-jerker, and again I would have liked a full-page treatment for the final image. --- "The Remarkable Rocket" had many illustrations, and all with great zest, composition, and expressions on the characters' faces. --- Lastly, "The Young King," a darker, more rambling, and moralistic tale. Not my favorite, but some lovely/creepy pages: Avarice and Death and I don't even know why there are dragons, but cool. --- These stories are unabridged and, along with the great illustrations, make this a pretty perfect version of Oscar Wilde's Stories for Children.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joy Weese Moll

    This book contains six of Oscar Wilde’s stories for children, drawn from two separate collections he published when his two sons were small (a fact I learned from Collins Complete Works of Oscar Wilde: Centenary Edition — nothing so boring as biographical data is present in this volume). This is a large format book with pictures of various sizes. Most two page spreads have at least one picture, but there are a few that are only words. The full page illustrations are lovely, but I was entranced b This book contains six of Oscar Wilde’s stories for children, drawn from two separate collections he published when his two sons were small (a fact I learned from Collins Complete Works of Oscar Wilde: Centenary Edition — nothing so boring as biographical data is present in this volume). This is a large format book with pictures of various sizes. Most two page spreads have at least one picture, but there are a few that are only words. The full page illustrations are lovely, but I was entranced by the long columnar illustrations such as one that conveys a great sense of distance with undulating hills, sheep and a herder, a rocky crag and further mountains. Aside from some of the words being difficult for the modern reader, I also thought the violence would give some parents and grandparents cause to hesitate before reading these to children. I’ve read Bruno Bettelheim’s Uses of Enchantment and understand that a child’s mind perhaps needs more violent images than modern adults are fully comfortable providing. Still, I would worry about this gruesome passage at the beginning of “The Young King” describing what happened after a son was born of a princess and her unsuitable lover. Her baby was stolen in the night to be delivered to a childless peasant and then… Grief, or the plague, as the court physician stated, or, as some suggested, a swift Italian poison administered in a cup of spiced wine, slew, within an hour of her wakening the white girl who had given him birth, and as the trusty messenger who bore the child across his saddle-bow, stopped from his weary horse and knocked at the rude door of the goatherd’s hut, the body of the Princess was being lowered into an open grave that had been dug in a deserted churchyard, beyond the city gates, a grave where, it was said, another body was also lying, that of a young man of marvellous and foreign beauty, whose hands were tied behind him with a knotted cord, and whose breast was stabbed with many red wounds. p. 74 There are other gruesome scenes in that story. On the other hand, that is a finely crafted sentence with perfectly chosen words and some underlying humor. Fortunately, “The Happy Prince” and some of the other stories have fewer passages that would illicit squeamishness in modern readers. More on my blog: Book Review: Stories for Children by Oscar Wilde and a Wilde visit to St. Louis

  20. 4 out of 5

    Congetta

    These stories were darker than I expected and they made us sad, but we were glad that we read them together. I would like to read some of his other stories. I read his novel decades ago, so I may have to reread now that I am older.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nux

    "Stories with morals in them... though not the usual ones you'd try to convey to children. Well, perhaps the last one is conforming a bit more to the general moral message contained in such stories. I like them, though despite the last story I still think that it might not be for the very young as some of the concepts might be a bit difficult for them to chew. But it's a nice collection of smart stories with (less idealistic and more realistic) moral to the stories. ^_^" "Stories with morals in them... though not the usual ones you'd try to convey to children. Well, perhaps the last one is conforming a bit more to the general moral message contained in such stories. I like them, though despite the last story I still think that it might not be for the very young as some of the concepts might be a bit difficult for them to chew. But it's a nice collection of smart stories with (less idealistic and more realistic) moral to the stories. ^_^"

  22. 5 out of 5

    Magenta Cooly

    Oh my gosh! My quest for the long lost book is over! I was 8 when my mom first read this to us from the library; I'm 21 now, and ever since then I've been trying to find it. The only thing I could remember about it was a nightingale, a crying tree, and a rose in the street. Everyone I asked, like me, had no idea which book I was talking about. At long last! It's recommended to me by Goodreads for becoming a fan P. J. Lynch. I will never forget this wonderful moment (^0^) Oh my gosh! My quest for the long lost book is over! I was 8 when my mom first read this to us from the library; I'm 21 now, and ever since then I've been trying to find it. The only thing I could remember about it was a nightingale, a crying tree, and a rose in the street. Everyone I asked, like me, had no idea which book I was talking about. At long last! It's recommended to me by Goodreads for becoming a fan P. J. Lynch. I will never forget this wonderful moment (^0^)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Emily G

    I remember some of these stories by Oscar Wilde from childhood, but some were new to me. One thing I didn't realise was that Oscar was obviously a religious man by the imagery used in a few of the tales. All the stories are deeply bittersweet or tragic, and reinforce my distaste for human nature. That said they all have a message if looked for, and I think should all be read by everyone at least once in their life. I remember some of these stories by Oscar Wilde from childhood, but some were new to me. One thing I didn't realise was that Oscar was obviously a religious man by the imagery used in a few of the tales. All the stories are deeply bittersweet or tragic, and reinforce my distaste for human nature. That said they all have a message if looked for, and I think should all be read by everyone at least once in their life.

  24. 5 out of 5

    penelopewanders

    Here as a ring. Highly moralistic indeed. Some classics, but the most fun was to find quotes from these stories as chapter headings in The Indiscretion by Judith Ivory which I was reading at the same time. I do prefer the vein of Wilde who wrote The Importance of Being Ernest, and even The Picture of Dorian Grey. Glad to have read these, though.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Martyn

    I thought I would love these stories, Oscar Wilde is up there with Shakespeare as my favorite playwright, but in the end all the death and covert christianity was just too much. My daughter said she loved it and to be fair gave me some great summaries that showed how much she took in but I'm not so sure that these stories would hold many children these days. I thought I would love these stories, Oscar Wilde is up there with Shakespeare as my favorite playwright, but in the end all the death and covert christianity was just too much. My daughter said she loved it and to be fair gave me some great summaries that showed how much she took in but I'm not so sure that these stories would hold many children these days.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Karen Margrethe

    With that certain Wilde-wit, Wilde does something magical with his stories. His words carry such brilliance, wisdom and entertainment all at the same time. He competently tackles themes both of ethics, love, beauty and faith. This book was a special treat since one of my favourite illustrators, Lynch, did the beautiful illustrations for the modern fairy tales told by Wilde.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    I very much enjoyed Wilde's writing style. The way he makes fun of the fairy tale as a genre was entertaining. However, I didn't care much for the religious overtone, and had some trouble making out if he was being serious or not. I very much enjoyed Wilde's writing style. The way he makes fun of the fairy tale as a genre was entertaining. However, I didn't care much for the religious overtone, and had some trouble making out if he was being serious or not.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    These stories are so beautifully written. The words flow almost like a poem. I was surprised at their deep meaning and religious aspects. My kids really enjoyed them, as did I. The paintings in the book were breath taking.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    More than a picture book - but the illustrations are beautiful! Purchased this book at the Trinity College bookstore after Michael Wilcox read two stories to us on our bus ride into Dublin.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Stephen Fry's reading of these classic stories is warm and witty. Stephen Fry's reading of these classic stories is warm and witty.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.