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In these wonderfully illustrated tales, renowned storyteller Howard Pyle carries us back to the enchanting world of King Arthur and his Round Table. The book chronicles the adventures of Arthur as he draws the sword Excalibur from the anvil, proving his right to the throne, and as he courts and wins the heart of Guinevere. Later he suffers the treachery of the wicked Morga In these wonderfully illustrated tales, renowned storyteller Howard Pyle carries us back to the enchanting world of King Arthur and his Round Table. The book chronicles the adventures of Arthur as he draws the sword Excalibur from the anvil, proving his right to the throne, and as he courts and wins the heart of Guinevere. Later he suffers the treachery of the wicked Morgana le Fay and witnesses the tragic fate of the Enchanter Merlin. In Pyle’s classic retelling, the legends come alive in unsurpassed vividness. More powerful than any of Merlin’s spells, The Story of King Arthur and His Knights has enthralled and delighted generations of readers fascinated by chivalry, magic, and the unforgettable drama of medieval times.


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In these wonderfully illustrated tales, renowned storyteller Howard Pyle carries us back to the enchanting world of King Arthur and his Round Table. The book chronicles the adventures of Arthur as he draws the sword Excalibur from the anvil, proving his right to the throne, and as he courts and wins the heart of Guinevere. Later he suffers the treachery of the wicked Morga In these wonderfully illustrated tales, renowned storyteller Howard Pyle carries us back to the enchanting world of King Arthur and his Round Table. The book chronicles the adventures of Arthur as he draws the sword Excalibur from the anvil, proving his right to the throne, and as he courts and wins the heart of Guinevere. Later he suffers the treachery of the wicked Morgana le Fay and witnesses the tragic fate of the Enchanter Merlin. In Pyle’s classic retelling, the legends come alive in unsurpassed vividness. More powerful than any of Merlin’s spells, The Story of King Arthur and His Knights has enthralled and delighted generations of readers fascinated by chivalry, magic, and the unforgettable drama of medieval times.

30 review for The Story of King Arthur and His Knights

  1. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Note: this book inspires brave deeds and noble speech. I was so surprised at how much I enjoyed this book. It was written in the 1800's, yet the feel and pace of this book was so modernly refreshing. I finished it in less than a week. It's not as complicated as Shakespeare to read, and I found myself gasping aloud when something happened that I had not expected- there are countless plot twists. Each chapter had me engrossed more and more. And, I feel compelled to say that the Catholicism found th Note: this book inspires brave deeds and noble speech. I was so surprised at how much I enjoyed this book. It was written in the 1800's, yet the feel and pace of this book was so modernly refreshing. I finished it in less than a week. It's not as complicated as Shakespeare to read, and I found myself gasping aloud when something happened that I had not expected- there are countless plot twists. Each chapter had me engrossed more and more. And, I feel compelled to say that the Catholicism found throughout this medieval world was so delightful to read. Unlike Ivanhoe, this book has the Church present but it doesn't bash her. Howard Pyle's art at the introduction of each chapter was, alone, something to die for. His artwork flowed perfectly with his writing. Five stars. Definitely would reread.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lesle

    Extremely detailed, readable, filled with an enchanting, and chivalry version of the story of King Arthur and His Knights. Howard Pyle tells the story starting from the beginning through almost all the notable Knights. You can feel his love for the legends as they come through the pages. The morals are detailed at the end of most of the major books, like making a symbolism of Excalibur and the sheath of truth and faith. The Knights of the Round Table had to prove they were high-minded, honorable Extremely detailed, readable, filled with an enchanting, and chivalry version of the story of King Arthur and His Knights. Howard Pyle tells the story starting from the beginning through almost all the notable Knights. You can feel his love for the legends as they come through the pages. The morals are detailed at the end of most of the major books, like making a symbolism of Excalibur and the sheath of truth and faith. The Knights of the Round Table had to prove they were high-minded, honorable, a gentleman, and full of valor. The Knights were the best of the best in King Arthur's Kingdom. All of the Knights swore the Pentecostal Oath that embodied the Code of Chivalry. Which I had lost the words in memory but, realized how much I love the Oath. We all should take the oath to remind us how to become a better human and how to treat others in our lives: “ I will develop my life for the greater good. I will place character above riches, and concern for others above personal wealth, I will never boast, but cherish humility instead, I will speak the truth at all times, and forever keep my word, I will defend those who cannot defend themselves, I will honor and respect women, and refute sexism in all its guises, I will uphold justice by being fair to all, I will be faithful in love and loyal in friendship, I will abhor scandals and gossip-neither partake nor delight in them, I will be generous to the poor and to those who need help, I will forgive when asked, that my own mistakes will be forgiven, I will live my life with courtesy and honor from this day forward.” This was the covenant of their Knighthood. They would be gentle to the weak, courageous to the strong, defend the helpless and all women should be held sacred. They would be merciful to all men, true in friendship, and faithful in love. This was their Oath and each Knight would take the Oath on the Cross of his Sword. The tales of the dashing King Arthur, Wizard Merlin, Queen Guinevere, and the noble Knights of the Round Table as they battle and romance their way through enchanted Camelot is a thrilling adventure of the glorious age of Chivalry and Honor!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Reem Ghabbany

    to be honest I struggled with this read some passages absentmindedly just because I wanted to be done with it. the story is good and might be enjoyable for some.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amalie

    Due to Howard Pyle being reproduced by multiple people, there might be some confusion. This is called "The Story of King Arthur and His Knights". It's divided into 6 sections. Arthur and Guinevere Lancelot Tristam and Iseult Elaine the Fair Sir Galahad The Passing of Arthur Each of these sections carries sub-sections/chapters. This version is certainly the most comprehensive for kids without or less with Arthur-Guinevere-Lancelot triangle and more on the great adventures of the Knights of the Round Ta Due to Howard Pyle being reproduced by multiple people, there might be some confusion. This is called "The Story of King Arthur and His Knights". It's divided into 6 sections. Arthur and Guinevere Lancelot Tristam and Iseult Elaine the Fair Sir Galahad The Passing of Arthur Each of these sections carries sub-sections/chapters. This version is certainly the most comprehensive for kids without or less with Arthur-Guinevere-Lancelot triangle and more on the great adventures of the Knights of the Round Table. This contains almost all the Arthurian characters, other than Fisher King. The story of the "Sword in the Stone" repeats here. After Arthur, it was once again done (but not the same sword) by Sir Galahad, the son of Sir Lancelot and Elaine. I'm so glad this had the story of Tristam and Iseult which has many elements used in the forbidden love story of Lancelot and Guinevere by Sir Thomas Malory. Really, I think this was never there in Geoffrey of Monmouth's version, the beginning of the tales of Arthur. In other words, perhaps there had never been an affair between Sir Lancelot and Guinevere. This version more favours that legend, though they had been very close, they never committed adultery. It is simply a villainous plot of the Knights, Mordred and Agravain. Then Mordred is not fathered by King Arthur. This books has no incest or adultery mentioned. Also, there are some beautiful illustrations!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    DNF (for now) at 51% This is a book that I've been "currently reading" since August, meaning that I've been reading the chapters here and there for 5-6 months. For now, seeing this book on my currently reading shelf when I've barely touched it since school started is just stressing me out lol. I think I'll go back to reading a chapter here and there when school ends and for now, I won't rate this book. DNF (for now) at 51% This is a book that I've been "currently reading" since August, meaning that I've been reading the chapters here and there for 5-6 months. For now, seeing this book on my currently reading shelf when I've barely touched it since school started is just stressing me out lol. I think I'll go back to reading a chapter here and there when school ends and for now, I won't rate this book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Judah

    I Finished!!!!! It only took almost a year but a finished. I've attempted to read Pyle before , but his 'Robin Hood' was rather dry and I moved on to other things (AKA I'll have to catch up on Robin Hood later). Pyle really seems to get into his element with Arthur and it shows. Nearly everything is fun. Pyle pops in with notes here and there explaining moral and his prayers for the reader, with makes me want so badly to learn about him. Interestingly I noticed Pyle has a thing for raven haired, bl I Finished!!!!! It only took almost a year but a finished. I've attempted to read Pyle before , but his 'Robin Hood' was rather dry and I moved on to other things (AKA I'll have to catch up on Robin Hood later). Pyle really seems to get into his element with Arthur and it shows. Nearly everything is fun. Pyle pops in with notes here and there explaining moral and his prayers for the reader, with makes me want so badly to learn about him. Interestingly I noticed Pyle has a thing for raven haired, black eyed women with coral lips---- nearly all the beautiful women of note ad described this way. While not a straight narritive of the Arthurian saga, Pyle presents different stories in arches. I want to say he almost does them like fairy tales, but there is too much intertwining and continuity between them for that to be a apt description. Some things are out of the ususal order (Merlin's death for example) , which I'm not sure is intentional or not seeing Pyle continued his saga in 4 sequels (how 'Robin Hood' is his best known book I haven't a clue, since he spent much more time on Arthur). For parents, there is some heavy violence carried over from the legend, but mostly its kept to tasteful level (the worst is short descriptions of swords cleaving through helms into the skull). Magic is present but minimal, Merlin is a wizard/sorcerer but makes ample mention of God (so he's not a pagan here), Morgan is also one but presented here as one boiling with vengeance. The lady of the Lake and other Faye are presented as magical creatures who use 'white magic' but all in a sort of heavenly/fairy tale way. God is extolded in the best ways, and Pyle even illustrates the book himself. Though he has this weird habit of drawing Arthur (even in stories from his peach-fuzz youth) as a sort of grizzled 45 year old man. In fact almost all the knights are portrayed in this fashion even though they mostly fall in the 20-39 year old age range. The only thing I dislike, is the Gawiane chapters at the end of the book seems overly rushed and lack Pyle's ususal attention to detail. One part has Gawain's, loose his temper (AGAIN) and strike a knight so hard it his sword cuts past the skull, leaving the man gargling for merchy on the ground. After his temper leads him to shamefully smack the mans wife into a bleading blackout, he carries the man to rest (cause he feels guilty) and... Later they have dinner together and chat. what? Sir did you forget the gapping wound in your head with the probably swelling brain? Anyone? Unusually sloppy. Of course when Gwen hears what a pompus jerk Gawain is being again, she says he's putting his calling to shame. Course he hears her and presumably before they start fighting again, Pyle tells us Gawain will prove his noble nature and gentleness in the last chapter. OK. So King Arthur has this plot, and the end of it he gets saved by a particularly ugly but nice old lady. He promised her shed get to pick a knight from his court to marry. Of course she picks Gawain because (no really these are her reasons): he's got an air of nobility, a gold circlet and an attitude. XD Everyone seems depressed because Gawain's has to marry her, and when he does he spends the day after the service in his chambers having a pity party. Eventually that night he realizes that he should probably do his husbandly duty and guiltily visits her in the dark. She of course is in no mood for that since he's been a jerk, and he appoligizes and goes to fetch the light she requests. When he comes back, surprise! She's a smoking hot woman. She tells him she has to spend half the day as a hag and half the day as a hottie, and asks him how he'd like it? Of course being an arrogent male, he says he wants her hottie side at night to himself. Wrong answer,try again. So he tries again. Surprise I'm hot all the time and was just testing you! What?????¿??????????? It would be the worst story ever had Pyle not included a lengthy note about how a man should take his duty as he would marriage. I see what he was aiming for, but he promised Gawaine would learn not to be a jerk. Something tells me his editior gave him a page limit, and that's why Gwaine shorts out here. My brother tells me that Gwaine resurfaces in the sequels so hopefully the breaking of Gawaine happens then. Otherwise, best book of the year!!!! I need to find book 2 now....

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jazzy Lemon

    Good reading for kids. Not bad for adults either.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Widyanto Gunadi

    To whosoever withdrew the mighty holy sword, Excalibur, magically held together by an ultra-powerful sealing magic cast by the wizard Merlin, into a rock, will be crowned as King and granted the prestigious privilege to lead and rule over Brittania. To a young boy named Arthur, whose aristocratic knightly conducts and virtues had enabled him to be bestowed with such honorable position, a duty and responsibility so burdensome shall also be carried out, and the ultimate task was this: to maintain To whosoever withdrew the mighty holy sword, Excalibur, magically held together by an ultra-powerful sealing magic cast by the wizard Merlin, into a rock, will be crowned as King and granted the prestigious privilege to lead and rule over Brittania. To a young boy named Arthur, whose aristocratic knightly conducts and virtues had enabled him to be bestowed with such honorable position, a duty and responsibility so burdensome shall also be carried out, and the ultimate task was this: to maintain and defend the peaceful state of the country of England, as well as bring forth the dream of long-standing unification and fellowships with the other neighboring states, making it a reality through effervescent display of chivalry and gallantry. Howard Pyle's pristine medievalesque writing tonality, adding a layer of refined classical touch and influence to his text, engrossingly rich in poetical sounding elements. In spite of its old, ostensibly outdated language, due to the author's previously mentioned narrative style, nonetheless, it was an absolutely integral key device for the manuscript, auxiliary to help it achieve for itself a fairytale-like literary effect. Pyle's take on the renownedly well-known legend was also supplemented by rigorous, artistic, and grandiose illustrations, which have assisted the readers in keeping their active imaginations aligned with the world and era, in which the saga was set in. School-aged children, as well as younger readers, may also find a boundless delectation with this book because of its facile, easy-to-follow plotting, spellbindingly predictable outline, and clear-cut quixotic adventures and battle scenes, reaching for an unblemished tale, full of wonders to satiate their little, curious minds. Lastly, aside from being only a fun-filled reading material to vanquish boredom while waiting for the passing of time, this fantasy novel could also become as good introductory point as any other versions of Arthurian legend retellings available to this day, for those of you looking to study an essentially fundamental piece of European history, which had left quite impactful heroic code of ethics, rooted deep inside the subconscious mindsets of its current people, incorporated into their everyday morality standards.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alexandria Steele

    Whew! I finally finished this book. I've been trudging through for over 4 months. I HATED reading this book. I thought that it was boring and the language was hard to understand. I gave it 3 stars because, although I didn't like reading it, I like having read it. The legend of King Arthur is such a big part of our literary heritage, and I'm glad to learn a little more about the character of Arthur. Each chapter is more or less a story on its own. The beginning of each chapter started out so bori Whew! I finally finished this book. I've been trudging through for over 4 months. I HATED reading this book. I thought that it was boring and the language was hard to understand. I gave it 3 stars because, although I didn't like reading it, I like having read it. The legend of King Arthur is such a big part of our literary heritage, and I'm glad to learn a little more about the character of Arthur. Each chapter is more or less a story on its own. The beginning of each chapter started out so boring! Some night would ride off on some ridiculous quest and get into duels because someone insulted his knighthood or said their lady was more beautiful than his. For me, the story started picking up about halfway through each chapter and I got interested. But then as soon as that chapter was over, the next chapter would start and it would be boring again. One thing I loved about this book was the illustrations. I think they were ink drawings and they were incredibly detailed and beautiful. All, in all, good book. I'm glad that I read it, and I'm glad that I'm done reading it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    D.N.

    Still one of the best stories ever written for children and young people, and my favourite retelling of the Arthurian legend. A delight to read to my kids at bedtime. Pyle's illustrations are beautifully elegant, whimsical, and refined in style. Revisiting this series again for the first time since childhood. Still one of the best stories ever written for children and young people, and my favourite retelling of the Arthurian legend. A delight to read to my kids at bedtime. Pyle's illustrations are beautifully elegant, whimsical, and refined in style. Revisiting this series again for the first time since childhood.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alan Allis

    Not bad. Interesting.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    I definitily not going to read another book by this author, I really did not like his writing style. It was like reading a wikipedia page but ten times worse. He also made me dislike or pity all the character in the book, while he was trying to make the readers like them. Arthur is a creepy, Gawaine is a like a moody teenager, Merlin is a creeoy toward beautiful young girls, Pellias was tricked and kidnapped (but it was made to look like it was an honour that he was able to go to the fairy world) I definitily not going to read another book by this author, I really did not like his writing style. It was like reading a wikipedia page but ten times worse. He also made me dislike or pity all the character in the book, while he was trying to make the readers like them. Arthur is a creepy, Gawaine is a like a moody teenager, Merlin is a creeoy toward beautiful young girls, Pellias was tricked and kidnapped (but it was made to look like it was an honour that he was able to go to the fairy world) and Guinivere is just there. This makes me hesitate to read any other arthurian legends books. 😪

  13. 4 out of 5

    Devin

    The book "King Arthur and his Knights" by Howard Pyle is a very fast read book. The Diction used in the book is not complex at all and the story is fairly easy to follow; If one looses track of the plot at one part in the book they can pick it back up again very quickly because of the format. This book is written to were there is a set of short stories, however there is still an overall plot. I would rate this book four out of five stars because of the format. Each of these short stories are mos The book "King Arthur and his Knights" by Howard Pyle is a very fast read book. The Diction used in the book is not complex at all and the story is fairly easy to follow; If one looses track of the plot at one part in the book they can pick it back up again very quickly because of the format. This book is written to were there is a set of short stories, however there is still an overall plot. I would rate this book four out of five stars because of the format. Each of these short stories are mostly about two knights that are jousting for their honor. With each of these stories mostly being about honor there are however parts about other things such as love. When King Arthur finds the woman he loves most out of everyone in his kingdom he does everything to receive her affection from spying to see what she likes, to defending her fathers castle. I would recommend this book to anyone who loves mid-evil literature because it takes a short time to read and appears to follow the correct historical aspects.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Leon Henderson

    This is a classic epic that generation upon generation has been introduced to in one way or another. This book by Howard Pyle is the most complete glimpse into the world of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. It is a bit dated in Pyle's writing style, despite the fact that it was written in the 20th century, however, I suspect, it is a well executed attempt at writing in the style of Middle English. The stories are compelling. The characters are fresh yet familiar. Something I recomm This is a classic epic that generation upon generation has been introduced to in one way or another. This book by Howard Pyle is the most complete glimpse into the world of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. It is a bit dated in Pyle's writing style, despite the fact that it was written in the 20th century, however, I suspect, it is a well executed attempt at writing in the style of Middle English. The stories are compelling. The characters are fresh yet familiar. Something I recommend for anyone who loves adventure.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lady Clementina ffinch-ffarowmore

    What I liked most about Pyle's Arthur stories was that despite being a young persons' or children's book, it doesn't ever read like he's writing down to children-the stories have 'morals' too, like children's books but they are only the tiniest bit preachy not too much (like some others). I enjoyed reading these but couldn't help thinking about how even entertainment or a search for adventure involved things like jousting in which someone invariably got hurt and quite badly, at times. What I liked most about Pyle's Arthur stories was that despite being a young persons' or children's book, it doesn't ever read like he's writing down to children-the stories have 'morals' too, like children's books but they are only the tiniest bit preachy not too much (like some others). I enjoyed reading these but couldn't help thinking about how even entertainment or a search for adventure involved things like jousting in which someone invariably got hurt and quite badly, at times.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gustavo Carvalho

    What can I say about this book? First of all, I'm a non-native speaker so, in the beginning, I found the book difficult to read because of the old English words: thee, art, thou, hath etc. But I got some help with some of those words and the other ones you can simply figure it out in the context. After some time I was reading a "modern English" book. Second, I really enjoy reading it and was involved with the stories of King Arthur, Merlin, Sir Pellias and Sir Gwaine. The story, at the beginning, What can I say about this book? First of all, I'm a non-native speaker so, in the beginning, I found the book difficult to read because of the old English words: thee, art, thou, hath etc. But I got some help with some of those words and the other ones you can simply figure it out in the context. After some time I was reading a "modern English" book. Second, I really enjoy reading it and was involved with the stories of King Arthur, Merlin, Sir Pellias and Sir Gwaine. The story, at the beginning, was all about describing scenarios and that can get you bored but if you give the book a chance it will hook you. If you like medieval stories and Arthurian characters I recommend this book for you.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tony DeHaan

    I really liked this book, these Arthurian told by Howard Pyle. There is The Sword in the Stone of course, and Merlin, and also lots of lesser-known adventures. This book is over 100 years old, and Pyles language is rather archaic, with loads of "thee"s and "thou"s. Take this sentence for example: "Alas! my dear young knight, what hath happened thee to bring thee unto such woful condition as this which I behold?" Don't be put off by this, it's all immensely readable and enjoyable! I really liked this book, these Arthurian told by Howard Pyle. There is The Sword in the Stone of course, and Merlin, and also lots of lesser-known adventures. This book is over 100 years old, and Pyles language is rather archaic, with loads of "thee"s and "thou"s. Take this sentence for example: "Alas! my dear young knight, what hath happened thee to bring thee unto such woful condition as this which I behold?" Don't be put off by this, it's all immensely readable and enjoyable!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    Once I settled into the Old English style of writing, this collection of stories about King Arthur and his knights was charming and entertaining. I only gave 4 stars because I thought it was too long of a compilation. If this book were half it's length I would have enjoyed it all the more... without the mental weight of "I need to sit down and finish that book..." Once I settled into the Old English style of writing, this collection of stories about King Arthur and his knights was charming and entertaining. I only gave 4 stars because I thought it was too long of a compilation. If this book were half it's length I would have enjoyed it all the more... without the mental weight of "I need to sit down and finish that book..."

  19. 4 out of 5

    Myla

    I was curious and it was available...it was fine. They didn't have much regard for women and as for the knights, they were kind of a twisted type of chivalry...all mixed up with pride and a quick temper. I was curious and it was available...it was fine. They didn't have much regard for women and as for the knights, they were kind of a twisted type of chivalry...all mixed up with pride and a quick temper.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Sas

    Pyle's retelling is delightful, although I can't help but be struck by the feeling that it's his pseudo-medieval prose, more than anyone's, that the Monty Python team are spoofing in The Holy Grail, which is kind of odd since he's an illustrator from Delaware. Pyle's retelling is delightful, although I can't help but be struck by the feeling that it's his pseudo-medieval prose, more than anyone's, that the Monty Python team are spoofing in The Holy Grail, which is kind of odd since he's an illustrator from Delaware.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Hilary Forrest

    Phew! That was a long read aloud with the kids. I think next time I will stick to something more digestible and more focused on King Arthur himself. But, that said, I am glad to have read it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    zane deann

    It's finally over!!! It's finally over!!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Juliana Lira

    Very fun to read! It's a children version of King Arthur's stories and it is very good as a introduction for new readers and young ones. Very fun to read! It's a children version of King Arthur's stories and it is very good as a introduction for new readers and young ones.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    3.5 So chivalrous are the men. So malevolent the women. So enchanting are the settings. I liked this story. I did find I was easily distracted, hence the reason I did not give 4 stars.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nicky

    I absolutely loved this book. Being in 7th grade when I read it, the old language they used were at times a bit confusing and made me have to reread some parts, but overall I understood it. I'd heard very few things of King Arthur before I read it, but regardless it was easy to jump into. The author switching to second person occasionally made me feel like I was back in kindergarten listening to my teacher tell me a story, which was very relaxing and made me want to continue. It wasn't a chore t I absolutely loved this book. Being in 7th grade when I read it, the old language they used were at times a bit confusing and made me have to reread some parts, but overall I understood it. I'd heard very few things of King Arthur before I read it, but regardless it was easy to jump into. The author switching to second person occasionally made me feel like I was back in kindergarten listening to my teacher tell me a story, which was very relaxing and made me want to continue. It wasn't a chore to read; it was a fun adventure. The morals of each chapter were wonderful too. The way the author addressed them sometimes at the beginning or end of the chapter had me either eager to read more or satisfied putting it down. Again, I can't stress enough how relaxing this book was. The stories being fairly short made it easy to find small amounts of time during the day to read and get immersed, while also letting you go without the dread that you'll have to find your exact place on a page when you read again, or forgetting what happened and having to read a few pages back. They had short bursts of moral to keep me going through the day but also longer stories to get cozy during the night. The only reason why I wouldn't recommend this to anyone is that again the old-timey speech they use can be hard to follow; however if you read a few pages in and think you can handle the plethora of metaphors, personification and forgotten words, this will surely be a classic that you can come back to again and again. This is the definition of the cozy-by-the-fire feeling that so many other books fail to give you. Borrow it from the library, friend or family member, or just buy the book, you will not be disappointed. King Arthur and His Knights is truly one of the best books I've read, five stars.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chellie Sommerfeld

    Family favorite An old family favorite. The kindle edition is as good as the printed edition. It is easy to listen to with the voice to text technology. I highly recommend it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jack

    Every once in a great while, we are reminded of a part of ourselves that has grown faint or blurred by time. Reading Howard Pyle's stories of the Arthurian legend brought into clear focus what must have been at least a partial contribution to my childhood desires to right wrongs, and to protect those who could not protect themselves. But beyond physical action, there is a kind of true devotion and honor to these knights sorely lacking in many modern heroes. In fact, if they were to be pitted aga Every once in a great while, we are reminded of a part of ourselves that has grown faint or blurred by time. Reading Howard Pyle's stories of the Arthurian legend brought into clear focus what must have been at least a partial contribution to my childhood desires to right wrongs, and to protect those who could not protect themselves. But beyond physical action, there is a kind of true devotion and honor to these knights sorely lacking in many modern heroes. In fact, if they were to be pitted against the cunning, devious, underhanded villainy of today, one wonders how they would respond. What is strength, courage, honor? If we make a few mistakes, or stray from the path, are we lost? Why do some fail in perfection, but succeed in goodness? How does a good man lose his way, and regain it? How do friends come to feud, and can they be reconciled? What is true villainy? This book addresses a lot of these sorts of questions surprisingly well. I leave you, reader, with this quote from King Arthur himself: "Boisenard, how is this? Wouldst thou tempt me to violate mine honor? It is not very hard to die, but it would be very bitter to live my life in dishonor; wherefore tempt me no more, but do my bidding and hold thy peace."

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jeri

    Howard Pyle captured me with the tales of Robin Hood, so I bought up all of the tales of Arthur and his knights (several books). This is my first foray into these tales, and it was a treat for me to finally acquaint myself with the famous knights and their deeds. I loved reading of heroic adventures and men with a strong sense of honor. Also, for someone who usually roots for a happy ending, it's fun (although not very suspenseful) to read along and know that the heroes will always eventually suc Howard Pyle captured me with the tales of Robin Hood, so I bought up all of the tales of Arthur and his knights (several books). This is my first foray into these tales, and it was a treat for me to finally acquaint myself with the famous knights and their deeds. I loved reading of heroic adventures and men with a strong sense of honor. Also, for someone who usually roots for a happy ending, it's fun (although not very suspenseful) to read along and know that the heroes will always eventually succeed. After reading something like Ayn Rand's thousand-page opus, Atlas Shrugged, it was a breath of fresh air and some good old-fashioned entertainment. I love this set of Pyles' books, because these specific editions are sturdy paperbacks whose spines do NOT crease! They are also filled with Pyle's wonderful illustrations of the characters and events. Also, if you're thumbing through the book looking for a particular story, the headings of each page tell the contents of the page, and there are small notes along the sides of the text as well. These were great for me since I rarely remember to use a bookmark!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Migelle Dominic

    The book, The story of King Arthur and his Knights by Howard Pyle is written filled with violence, romance, conspiracy, and death. It uses a lot of vivid details, like a movie projected into your head while reading. Any reader will feel awed and sorrowed for the characters who were mainly impacted by the conflict. The story is third-person narrated, and each chapter, the narrator changes from character to share their opinions of what's going on. As long as a reader have a sense for time apprecia The book, The story of King Arthur and his Knights by Howard Pyle is written filled with violence, romance, conspiracy, and death. It uses a lot of vivid details, like a movie projected into your head while reading. Any reader will feel awed and sorrowed for the characters who were mainly impacted by the conflict. The story is third-person narrated, and each chapter, the narrator changes from character to share their opinions of what's going on. As long as a reader have a sense for time appreciated in history, real or a myth, this story will not be a bore and is worth reading. However, one flaw is that it did not have a satisfying ending. It didn't explain a lot in the ending, as if the resolving of the conflict can only be determined by the prediction of the reader. In my opinion, it's still worth reading because I got to learn a lot about the poor boy who pulled out a sword in a stone and became king.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    It was a fun read-aloud with the old fashioned words and syntax, and fun to share classic legends with my kids. We all had fun trying to speak like the knights. I was a bit surprised that Sir Lancelot and Sir Galahad did not enter the story, but apparently they are covered in other volumes. My sons (11 and 4 years old) really enjoyed this book, but my daughter (8 years old) hated it. I don't think the one dimensional female characters turned her off, but simply that she had no interest in jousti It was a fun read-aloud with the old fashioned words and syntax, and fun to share classic legends with my kids. We all had fun trying to speak like the knights. I was a bit surprised that Sir Lancelot and Sir Galahad did not enter the story, but apparently they are covered in other volumes. My sons (11 and 4 years old) really enjoyed this book, but my daughter (8 years old) hated it. I don't think the one dimensional female characters turned her off, but simply that she had no interest in jousting. The knights were eager to fight to the death with the slightest provocation, which greatly amused us.

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