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Extending the Table: A World Community Cookbook

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Picture a vast table with room for everyone and laden with taste-tempting dishes from over 80 countries. Peach Chutney from Botswana, Ginger Cooler from Ivory Coast, Pork Vindaloo from India, Buyani's Chicken Soup from Indonesia, Rice Noodles with Vegetables from the Philippines. You do not have to leave home to experience a wide variety of foods from other countries and t Picture a vast table with room for everyone and laden with taste-tempting dishes from over 80 countries. Peach Chutney from Botswana, Ginger Cooler from Ivory Coast, Pork Vindaloo from India, Buyani's Chicken Soup from Indonesia, Rice Noodles with Vegetables from the Philippines. You do not have to leave home to experience a wide variety of foods from other countries and to learn about other cultures. Interspersed among the recipes are stories about how hospitality is practiced around the world.A cookbook in the tradition of More-with-Less Cookbook written by Joetta Handrich Schlabach with recipe editor Kristina Mast Burnett.


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Picture a vast table with room for everyone and laden with taste-tempting dishes from over 80 countries. Peach Chutney from Botswana, Ginger Cooler from Ivory Coast, Pork Vindaloo from India, Buyani's Chicken Soup from Indonesia, Rice Noodles with Vegetables from the Philippines. You do not have to leave home to experience a wide variety of foods from other countries and t Picture a vast table with room for everyone and laden with taste-tempting dishes from over 80 countries. Peach Chutney from Botswana, Ginger Cooler from Ivory Coast, Pork Vindaloo from India, Buyani's Chicken Soup from Indonesia, Rice Noodles with Vegetables from the Philippines. You do not have to leave home to experience a wide variety of foods from other countries and to learn about other cultures. Interspersed among the recipes are stories about how hospitality is practiced around the world.A cookbook in the tradition of More-with-Less Cookbook written by Joetta Handrich Schlabach with recipe editor Kristina Mast Burnett.

30 review for Extending the Table: A World Community Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Steve Miller

    This is one of my two favorite cookbooks. I have been cooking out of it for years. The recipes are delicious, filling, and sensible. I truly enjoy the variety of dishes from around the world. If you buy it, get the ring-bound version. It's by the far the easiest to use. The ebook is not very well done, and could use a revision. The only way I have managed to use it is book mark the index and some favorite recipes This is one of my two favorite cookbooks. I have been cooking out of it for years. The recipes are delicious, filling, and sensible. I truly enjoy the variety of dishes from around the world. If you buy it, get the ring-bound version. It's by the far the easiest to use. The ebook is not very well done, and could use a revision. The only way I have managed to use it is book mark the index and some favorite recipes

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cherie Palmer

    Interesting book on the foods and recipes of cultures around the world

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mikejencostanzo

    This is my favorite cookbook of all time. It is put out by the same folks who did the Mennonite classic More With Less a number of years ago. It's like More With Less in that it's got all sorts of healthy, from scratch, down-to-earth recipes... but thoroughtly saturated with ethnic diversity! And I'm not talking about your typical run-of-the-mill "international" cookbook that offers Americanized versions of Italian veal parmesian, Mexican fried rice, and Irish soda bread. Rather, this book offers This is my favorite cookbook of all time. It is put out by the same folks who did the Mennonite classic More With Less a number of years ago. It's like More With Less in that it's got all sorts of healthy, from scratch, down-to-earth recipes... but thoroughtly saturated with ethnic diversity! And I'm not talking about your typical run-of-the-mill "international" cookbook that offers Americanized versions of Italian veal parmesian, Mexican fried rice, and Irish soda bread. Rather, this book offers recipes for stews that you'd find at a harvest festival in Ghana, pasta that you'd find sold by an Egyptian street vendor, and vegetable platters that an Iraqi mother would arrange. The reason these recipes are so diverse (and so authentic, I might add) is that they've been contributed by missionaries & national Christians around the world. An added bonus is that many contributors sent in stories of God's provision, and personal accounts of the role of food & hospitality displayed in various cultures around the world. The authors have interspersed these stories amongst the recipes on each page. A testimony to the authenticity of the recipes occured one time when I made a meal of falafel and tabouleh for a friend who had just returned from a trip to Israel. She complimented the dishes for being "just like what I ate while on my trip." Another final thing that I've really enjoyed about the recipes from this book is that not only are they from prosperous nations with diets heavy in meat... they also come from countries where grains, legumes and vegetables form a large staple of the diet. This cookbook has served to put me in good stead in knowing how to prepare a wide variety of healthy and interesting meals using low-cost ingredients such as beans and lentils. --Jen

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alexis

    A cookbook!?! So, I didn't actually read it... I have owned this book for less than two months, of that time, I have been home for less than one month. In this short time, I have already used this cookbook more than the scores of other cookbooks that I own. I really love this cookbook. The recipes are doable (even for me, kitchen clutz extaordinaire -- I have wrecked boxed jiffy corn muffin mix). Last night I made Croatian Stuffed Sweet Peppers. They were the best stuffed peppers I have ever had A cookbook!?! So, I didn't actually read it... I have owned this book for less than two months, of that time, I have been home for less than one month. In this short time, I have already used this cookbook more than the scores of other cookbooks that I own. I really love this cookbook. The recipes are doable (even for me, kitchen clutz extaordinaire -- I have wrecked boxed jiffy corn muffin mix). Last night I made Croatian Stuffed Sweet Peppers. They were the best stuffed peppers I have ever had (um, they ware also the only stuffed peppers I have ever had...) but these were wonderful inspite of the fact that I made them. This cookbook delivers three-fold. 1. The recipes are relatively easy and contain ingredients that are readily available, even in Klamath Falls. 2. The recipes are healthy AND delicious. 3. The recipes are truly international and appear to be really very authentic (Although, admittedly I can't pretend to be an international cuisine expert). What is more, the book is dotted with a wealth of international wisdom and general gee-whiz type geography/social studies information. Further, this book was commissioned "to promote global understanding and celebrate teh variety of world cultures." It succeeds beautifully. This book along with Animal, Vegetable, Miracle is dramatically changing the way our family eats and thinks about food. With this book, one is armed to prepare affordable, nutritious, fullfilling, and tasty recipes.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Katina

    My dear sister got me this book for Christmas. I love it. It's more than a cookbook. You might say (or should I say "cliche") that "it's a way of life." The book is an extension of the "More with Less" concept - a cookbook written by Mennonites to explore what food can mean as communion, what food means to the global community, issues of hunger, and how to use less thereby feeding more people. I very much enjoy reading the stories about the communities who created the recipes and, thus far, I hav My dear sister got me this book for Christmas. I love it. It's more than a cookbook. You might say (or should I say "cliche") that "it's a way of life." The book is an extension of the "More with Less" concept - a cookbook written by Mennonites to explore what food can mean as communion, what food means to the global community, issues of hunger, and how to use less thereby feeding more people. I very much enjoy reading the stories about the communities who created the recipes and, thus far, I have also enjoyed the recipes. The way they are written can be a bit confusing - there is no list of ingredients upfront so you have to read the whole thing to make sure you've got your bases covered and to get a sense of how best to prep. Some of the ingredients (margarine) are a little low-cal and old school for my tastes, but that's easily rectified with a little butter and interpretation. I still have the section on veggies to read, but I've been paging through before bed and will continue to do so until I'm done reading the whole thing.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    I've sampled from this text since the early- to mid-90s. And not once has it failed to make me appreciate how home cooks the world over feed their families using meager ingredients. Undoubtedly, the least complicated dishes in this book tend to shine brightest. For example, the idea to combine milk and grapefruit juice offers up a sublime refreshment that I patiently wait for every January/February when ruby red grapefruit come into season. I have to stop myself from drinking gallons upon gallon I've sampled from this text since the early- to mid-90s. And not once has it failed to make me appreciate how home cooks the world over feed their families using meager ingredients. Undoubtedly, the least complicated dishes in this book tend to shine brightest. For example, the idea to combine milk and grapefruit juice offers up a sublime refreshment that I patiently wait for every January/February when ruby red grapefruit come into season. I have to stop myself from drinking gallons upon gallons of this Dominican treat. If nothing else, the recipes in this book can aid in the process of emptying an overstocked pantry. What to do with leftover couscous or cornmeal? Why, mix them with cooked greens or make a simple vegetable sauce to eat them with. I might not have survived graduate school without this book. It enabled me to live on a meager $20/week for groceries. In DC, that's quite a feat. But, it's possible, and healthy given the right mindset and appreciation for non-animal proteins.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Katy Harris

    This is a wonderful cookbook! I would give it 10 stars if I could. Some of my favorite international recipes are in this book, along with pictures of the people from whom the dishes come and stories of the different meals' significance in the country it is from. Most of the recipes are from Africa, Asia, or South America. The recipes are written very well, not too difficult, and decilious. The indredients are not hard to find. The book even includes a "drinks" and a "breads" section that include This is a wonderful cookbook! I would give it 10 stars if I could. Some of my favorite international recipes are in this book, along with pictures of the people from whom the dishes come and stories of the different meals' significance in the country it is from. Most of the recipes are from Africa, Asia, or South America. The recipes are written very well, not too difficult, and decilious. The indredients are not hard to find. The book even includes a "drinks" and a "breads" section that includes a favorite of mine, Native American Fry Bread. Another recipe I have eaten a lot is Egyptian Rice and Lentils. An extra bonus is the index by ingredient, so if you have something on hand you are looking to prepare it is easy to locate a recipe. I love this book!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

    I give an automatic three-star minimum to any cookbook that features Filipino recipes. True, they misspell "merienda," and the picture of pancit has both chopsticks (Filipinos usually eat with fork and spoon, or with hands), and more broth than pancit usually has. Still, I love this book's spiritual, mindful approach as much as its predecessor's, "More-with-Less Cookbook." I've only tried one recipe so far--bunny chow, or bread bowl curry--and look forward to making maqloobeh and other recipes. I give an automatic three-star minimum to any cookbook that features Filipino recipes. True, they misspell "merienda," and the picture of pancit has both chopsticks (Filipinos usually eat with fork and spoon, or with hands), and more broth than pancit usually has. Still, I love this book's spiritual, mindful approach as much as its predecessor's, "More-with-Less Cookbook." I've only tried one recipe so far--bunny chow, or bread bowl curry--and look forward to making maqloobeh and other recipes.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    For being a fairly random collection of recipes from many different contributers, I've never had a recipe in here that I made and didn't like. Maybe there's just enough so I can pick the good ones. [return][return]Also has lots of personal accounts of travel to parts of the world with far more scarcity than many of us in the States are used to experiencing. The accounts come off as pretty genuine though. For being a fairly random collection of recipes from many different contributers, I've never had a recipe in here that I made and didn't like. Maybe there's just enough so I can pick the good ones. [return][return]Also has lots of personal accounts of travel to parts of the world with far more scarcity than many of us in the States are used to experiencing. The accounts come off as pretty genuine though.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Superb! Easy to use recipes, suggestions for substitutions, wide variety of dishes from ALL over the world. Recipes taste great. Educational blurbs about different eating habits around the world (with socially conscious info), if you like context. Has basics like: how to make yogurt, chai, salsa, and tortillas. Both geographical and recipe indices. If I could only own ONE cookbook, this would be it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jackie Bridgen

    Wonderful recipes in the spirit of 'More with Less' - but I'm surprised more people haven't commented on the narrative aspect - it's compelling reading, I sat down and read it from cover to cover, between the recipes and all. Moving, heart breaking, heart warming, life changing stories, make you want to add the narrative to your own family meals, if not to go out and do something for social justice, if not to change the world. Wonderful recipes in the spirit of 'More with Less' - but I'm surprised more people haven't commented on the narrative aspect - it's compelling reading, I sat down and read it from cover to cover, between the recipes and all. Moving, heart breaking, heart warming, life changing stories, make you want to add the narrative to your own family meals, if not to go out and do something for social justice, if not to change the world.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    Published in the 80's, "in the spirit of More-With-Less," also a Mennonite cookbook, and also ahead of its time. Now, these ethnic recipes/meal ideas seem much more familiar than they must have 20 years ago. If you like ethnic food and enjoy reading stories about people in other countries, this is a great book! It's full of ordinary recipes from other parts of the world and features very easy-to-find ingredients. Published in the 80's, "in the spirit of More-With-Less," also a Mennonite cookbook, and also ahead of its time. Now, these ethnic recipes/meal ideas seem much more familiar than they must have 20 years ago. If you like ethnic food and enjoy reading stories about people in other countries, this is a great book! It's full of ordinary recipes from other parts of the world and features very easy-to-find ingredients.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    This excellent cookbook uses economical ingredients to make flavorful dishes from around the world. When I make one of the recipes, I get out the world atlas and show my children the location of the country and I read the information about the dish and the local people. We all enjoy it!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Miriam

    There are some great recipes in this book, and most of them are relatively inexpensive to make. I do think that, like it's predecessor, this book gets a little too preachy at times. It is a great resource, though, and one of my favorite cookbooks. There are some great recipes in this book, and most of them are relatively inexpensive to make. I do think that, like it's predecessor, this book gets a little too preachy at times. It is a great resource, though, and one of my favorite cookbooks.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brigid

    I own this book. It was a gift when we were married. I love it, and use many recipes regularly from it. It gives me a change to learn about new foods, and find new things to make with the same ole stuff.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    If you like foods from around the world, this cookbook is for you. I've made dinners with Indian, Ethiopian, and Italian themes all from this book. Part of a series that includes Simply in Season, a cookbook focused on eating seasonally. If you like foods from around the world, this cookbook is for you. I've made dinners with Indian, Ethiopian, and Italian themes all from this book. Part of a series that includes Simply in Season, a cookbook focused on eating seasonally.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nelleke Plouffe

    This is a book of every-day recipes from all over the world. They are easy to prepare and generally do not require terribly exotic ingredients. Judging from the comments of people I know from different countries, the recipes are authentic as well (Yes, that's the way we make it...). This is a book of every-day recipes from all over the world. They are easy to prepare and generally do not require terribly exotic ingredients. Judging from the comments of people I know from different countries, the recipes are authentic as well (Yes, that's the way we make it...).

  18. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    My favorite cookbook. Recipes from around the world. Everything from party dishes to everyday cuisine. Some are simple and adapted; others are fully authentic. I've made about 130 recipes from the book over the last 10 years. My favorite cookbook. Recipes from around the world. Everything from party dishes to everyday cuisine. Some are simple and adapted; others are fully authentic. I've made about 130 recipes from the book over the last 10 years.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    In addition to being a great cookbook, it's a great reminder while cooking of global poverty as well as local abundance. In addition to being a great cookbook, it's a great reminder while cooking of global poverty as well as local abundance.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Breckbill

    The most exciting of my dad's standard meals is included in this book: Chicken Adobo. Also many thanks to Joetta Schlabach as a pastor as well as a fantastic cookbook editor! The most exciting of my dad's standard meals is included in this book: Chicken Adobo. Also many thanks to Joetta Schlabach as a pastor as well as a fantastic cookbook editor!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This is a great book if you like to cook, especially if you like to cook food from around the world and also like some inspiration at the same time.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Best around-the-world type cookbook I've ever seen; will be using this in real life and with my children's school. Best around-the-world type cookbook I've ever seen; will be using this in real life and with my children's school.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lars

    Better even than the recipes (many of which are simply superb!) are the stories that are interspersed with them.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    We have loved EVERY recipe we have tried! The recipes are relatively easy, but come out tasting like food from your favorite (fill in the ethnicity) restaurant!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Erika Nerdypants

    I don't own this one, but I wish I did! I don't own this one, but I wish I did!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Janelle

    Narratives, recipes and wisdom from all over the world

  27. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Mathewson

    This cookbook has lots of easy, healthy, global recipes. There are a few that we make over and over. Excellent everyday resource.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Johnson

    Favorite cookbook EVER. Recipes from around the world with ingredients readily available here. Lots of delicious recipes.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Wonderful!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kim

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