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There's no such thing as business ethics. How can that be? Because a single standard applies to both your business and personal life-and it's one we all know and trust: the Golden Rule. Now bestselling author John C. Maxwell shows you how this revered ideal works everywhere, and how, especially in business, it brings amazing dividends. There's No Such Thing As "Business" E There's no such thing as business ethics. How can that be? Because a single standard applies to both your business and personal life-and it's one we all know and trust: the Golden Rule. Now bestselling author John C. Maxwell shows you how this revered ideal works everywhere, and how, especially in business, it brings amazing dividends. There's No Such Thing As "Business" Ethics offers: * Stories from history, business, government, and sports that illustrate how talented leaders invoked this timeless principle * Examples of difficult business decisions-layoffs, evaluations, billing clients, expansion-and how the Golden Rule applies to each * The five most common reasons people compromise their ethics-and how you can prevail over such moral obstacles * How applying the Golden Rule to business builds morale, increases productivity, encourages teamwork, lowers employee turnover, and keeps clients coming back. John C. Maxwell not only reveals the many ways the Golden Rule creates the perfect environment for business success, but does it with great wisdom, warmth, and humor. Backed by flawless research and the ideas of history's best thinkers, this engaging book brilliantly demonstrates how doing the right thing fosters a winning situation for all, with positive results for employees, clients, investors, and even your own state of mind. Business runs much more smoothly, profits increase, and you know that you've set the groundwork for years of future prosperity. . . and it's all thanks to the tried-and-true Golden Rule.


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There's no such thing as business ethics. How can that be? Because a single standard applies to both your business and personal life-and it's one we all know and trust: the Golden Rule. Now bestselling author John C. Maxwell shows you how this revered ideal works everywhere, and how, especially in business, it brings amazing dividends. There's No Such Thing As "Business" E There's no such thing as business ethics. How can that be? Because a single standard applies to both your business and personal life-and it's one we all know and trust: the Golden Rule. Now bestselling author John C. Maxwell shows you how this revered ideal works everywhere, and how, especially in business, it brings amazing dividends. There's No Such Thing As "Business" Ethics offers: * Stories from history, business, government, and sports that illustrate how talented leaders invoked this timeless principle * Examples of difficult business decisions-layoffs, evaluations, billing clients, expansion-and how the Golden Rule applies to each * The five most common reasons people compromise their ethics-and how you can prevail over such moral obstacles * How applying the Golden Rule to business builds morale, increases productivity, encourages teamwork, lowers employee turnover, and keeps clients coming back. John C. Maxwell not only reveals the many ways the Golden Rule creates the perfect environment for business success, but does it with great wisdom, warmth, and humor. Backed by flawless research and the ideas of history's best thinkers, this engaging book brilliantly demonstrates how doing the right thing fosters a winning situation for all, with positive results for employees, clients, investors, and even your own state of mind. Business runs much more smoothly, profits increase, and you know that you've set the groundwork for years of future prosperity. . . and it's all thanks to the tried-and-true Golden Rule.

30 review for There's No Such Thing as "Business" Ethics: There's Only One Rule for Making Decisions

  1. 5 out of 5

    Steven Walle

    This is a masterful written book on Ethics. John C Maxwell teaches us that there is no such thing as business, spiritual ethics, family ethics, but only Ethics. Maxwell teaches us that we must live all aspects of our lives by one standard and that being (The Golden Rule.) In other words do not focus on living the good life, but rather living a life that is good. I highly recommend this book to all. Enjoy and Be Blessed. Diamond

  2. 4 out of 5

    Isil Arican

    I bought this book after attending an executive leadership bootcamp, and many folks there were raving about Maxwell books. It took me a couple hours to read this, and I am not impressed at all. This feels more of a Kindergarten book than a management/leadership book. The whole book (104 pages) can be summarized as: - Be nice to people - Do onto others as they do onto you - Be honest I also hate anecdotal cherry picked simple examples picked to prove a point. "John was nice to his business partner on I bought this book after attending an executive leadership bootcamp, and many folks there were raving about Maxwell books. It took me a couple hours to read this, and I am not impressed at all. This feels more of a Kindergarten book than a management/leadership book. The whole book (104 pages) can be summarized as: - Be nice to people - Do onto others as they do onto you - Be honest I also hate anecdotal cherry picked simple examples picked to prove a point. "John was nice to his business partner once, and ten years later the partner gave him a bigger contract..." I am sure there are thousands of cases that are not like this, and when someone tries to explain why we have to be nice with another possible gain it drives me nuts! We should be nice to people not for the chance of getting a better contract in the future but because we are humanists. I am not saying the advice in this book is worthless, but it is pretty much common sense, and not really as deep as I would expect a 'business book' with a name "101 Ethics". This was not worth my time, but at least marked it off as "read" on my reading list.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Allison

    This is not a serious business ethics book and doesn't try to be. It's business guru-type book with the noble, if failed, objective of teaching managers how to be ethical. This is not a serious business ethics book and doesn't try to be. It's business guru-type book with the noble, if failed, objective of teaching managers how to be ethical.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Waris Ahmad Faizi

    Phenomenal! John Maxwell has hit the ball out of the boundary. He did an amazing job at conveying the importance of living an ethical life. He expands on the Golden Rule, the only rule we really need for all ethical guidance, and crafts a succinct explanation for how to apply it. Some parts of the book may even make you just wow. If you only want to read one book about ethics, this masterpiece would be the greatest choice.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Wayland

    I wouldn't have finished this book if it wasn't required for a graduate course I am enrolled in. When the content wasn't incredibly elementary it was offensively reductive. At one point, the author suggests that divorce and drug addiction can be boiled down to and blamed on a "hedonistic society" that is only concerned with instant gratification and pleasure. Similar statements are made throughout the book regarding people who rely on welfare to feed their families. To write a book on ethics tha I wouldn't have finished this book if it wasn't required for a graduate course I am enrolled in. When the content wasn't incredibly elementary it was offensively reductive. At one point, the author suggests that divorce and drug addiction can be boiled down to and blamed on a "hedonistic society" that is only concerned with instant gratification and pleasure. Similar statements are made throughout the book regarding people who rely on welfare to feed their families. To write a book on ethics that fails to explore the nuances of societal issues that are cited within the book is unethical. I feel that this author had a personal agenda that they didn't work very hard to conceal in this tiny poorly researched book. Also, 40% of the book is just quotes from much better authors and leaders. Go figure.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tony Rogers Jr.

    A though-provoking, practical look at the much needed subject of ethics in our society. Maxwell takes a simplistic approach(which I love) to ethical decision making by providing a one question framework through which to filter all your future decision making. Highly recommend everyone give it a read, especially anyone in leadership.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gina Herald

    Nothing new under the sun. Maxwell hits it straight on. I suspect it's no accident that the cover is black and white. I own and have read most of the books in his 101 series. They make great stocking stuffers for the business people and personal development junkies in your life. Nothing new under the sun. Maxwell hits it straight on. I suspect it's no accident that the cover is black and white. I own and have read most of the books in his 101 series. They make great stocking stuffers for the business people and personal development junkies in your life.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Beautiful brilliant little tiny book...packed with power.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Julie Baylor

    I highly recommend this book to everyone, whether in business or not. This will bring you back to the basics of integrity, empathy, and embracing the Golden Rule.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    John Maxwell once again delivers a clear and great book for us all. Ethics is not something different when we enter an organisation, it is the same ethics we have in all our lives. This book provides techniques and guides to staying true to an ethical life, and in essence "do the right thing". Having listened to this as an audiobook, I cannot provide direct quotes; but the most important "quote" I took from this great book is this, "stay true to living a life that brings love, value and support to John Maxwell once again delivers a clear and great book for us all. Ethics is not something different when we enter an organisation, it is the same ethics we have in all our lives. This book provides techniques and guides to staying true to an ethical life, and in essence "do the right thing". Having listened to this as an audiobook, I cannot provide direct quotes; but the most important "quote" I took from this great book is this, "stay true to living a life that brings love, value and support to those around you". The critical aspect to this is to not "compete" to be the best, but to be your best. I recently watched an AFL game and saw 2 players competing and one earning a free kick/pass; the ball dropping to the feet of the other player (the opposition). The opposition bent down to pick the ball up but he did not. He did it again. The other player stood waiting to receive the ball. Finally, on the third drop down the opposition player just smiled. The player awarded the free had to go and get the ball. Is that how people want to win? Is that the role model for our children? When did we get like this? The book describes a story of a Winter Olympic games bobsled event where the Italian's, not expected to win gold, performed a brilliant run down the track. They were placed first at that time with 2 competitors to go. The next competitor were the English, who were the favourites. Unfortunately in the run down the track prior, the English bobsled had lost its bolt. This meant they could not do their next and final run. Hearing this, the Italian's down the end of the track immediately went to their bobsled and removed their bolt. They asked for it to be rushed up to the English. The English were able to get the bolt installed and complete their run. The Italians ended up third. The Italian bobsledder commented having been asked why he did this, that "I would rather win knowing I had competed fairly against the best and won". Valuable lesson we should all heed. Ask yourself, would you do this?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    This book was published in the time of the collapse of Enron. A person could be forgiven for thinking that there is one standard of ethics in big business (Don't Get Caught) and another standard of ethics for the rest of humanity (The Golden Rule). The author does not agree. How would I like to be treated in this situation? This way of thinking is easy to understand and is accepted by most people. Companies that operate this way are consistently more profitable than those that don't. It also work This book was published in the time of the collapse of Enron. A person could be forgiven for thinking that there is one standard of ethics in big business (Don't Get Caught) and another standard of ethics for the rest of humanity (The Golden Rule). The author does not agree. How would I like to be treated in this situation? This way of thinking is easy to understand and is accepted by most people. Companies that operate this way are consistently more profitable than those that don't. It also works really well as a personal compass. Before a person can change their business, they need to adopt the Golden Rule as their personal integrity guideline. Make your decisions, personal and business, accordingly. Some people blame their choices on circumstances. Other people make good choices regardless of circumstances. Which are you? Doing nothing is also a decision. Consider asking others to hold you accountable for your decisions. There are many things that keep a person from adopting the Golden Rule. Most corporate ethics violations come from "cooking the books," so there can be lots of pressure to not say anything. Those in power sometimes feel that the assets of the company are their personal checking account, to be spent any way they want (who cares about ethics, I want it now). Having pride in yourself is a good thing. An excessive amount of pride, focusing only on yourself and your interests, is a bad thing. After the Great Recession, it sure seems like there are a whole new generation of business leaders who need to read this book. It's short, very easy to understand, and each chapter has in-depth discussion questions. It is very much worth the reader's time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Geoffroy

    The message is good. Follow the Golden Rule. However, it is way to simplistic to be "Ethics 101". It uses random anecdotes from business leaders who acted ethically and achieved success and of those who didn't who ended up in prison or worse. It is a pretty picture, but its not always true, we shouldn't act ethically just because we expect better success if we do (that is just being self-centered thinking being "good" will benefit us) instead we should act ethically because it is the right thing t The message is good. Follow the Golden Rule. However, it is way to simplistic to be "Ethics 101". It uses random anecdotes from business leaders who acted ethically and achieved success and of those who didn't who ended up in prison or worse. It is a pretty picture, but its not always true, we shouldn't act ethically just because we expect better success if we do (that is just being self-centered thinking being "good" will benefit us) instead we should act ethically because it is the right thing to do. Acting ethically won't necessarily lead to great business success as Maxwell claims. I think this is a dangerous claim not only because it leads to the wrong motivation to act ethically, it also gives false hope. People may constantly fail in the corrupt business world because of there ethics, they may never be business moguls. Their success will than not be in the business world, but in their personal character, knowing they still have their conscience.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Matt Leiv

    A very good, very short read. Maxwell takes what is generally a long dry subject and makes it short and sweet, basing an ethical argument on the golden rule. He talks about how ethics used to be part of a standard curriculum in the US and by the 1950s had almost completely disappeared from schools, and now completely gone to our great misfortune. He talks about how we are in the generation of situational ethics-what feels right at the time is what is right to do-which is destroying our culture. A very good, very short read. Maxwell takes what is generally a long dry subject and makes it short and sweet, basing an ethical argument on the golden rule. He talks about how ethics used to be part of a standard curriculum in the US and by the 1950s had almost completely disappeared from schools, and now completely gone to our great misfortune. He talks about how we are in the generation of situational ethics-what feels right at the time is what is right to do-which is destroying our culture. "There's no such thing as business ethics-there's only ethics...if you desire to be ethical, you live it by one standard across the board"...I could quote from every page in this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Benny Alexander

    A book that every business aspirant must read. John Maxwell clearly puts some points in the reader's mind that we do not have to find shortcuts, as sometimes the longest distance between two points are shortcuts. A book that every business aspirant must read. John Maxwell clearly puts some points in the reader's mind that we do not have to find shortcuts, as sometimes the longest distance between two points are shortcuts.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tremayne Moore

    This was outstanding. Very practical and the only reason why people may not like it is simply the decision to not implement what he is talking about. Trust me, integrity, character and ethics is everything.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Walker

    I have heard good things about Maxwell as an author. This is the first of his books I have read. I learned quite a bit from this short book. I think everyone should read it at some point in their life!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Carter

    Fantastic book! Although only about one hundred pages long John Maxwell does an incredible job at conveying the importance of living an ethical life and also giving you powerfully simple tools to get there. Chalked full of one liners, this book is highly recommended!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Leo

    Amazing book that outlined the golden rule. It's amazing how everything from this one rule comes to fruition! Are you going for gold or the golden rule? Which ever you choose determines your internal state!!! Amazing book that outlined the golden rule. It's amazing how everything from this one rule comes to fruition! Are you going for gold or the golden rule? Which ever you choose determines your internal state!!!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kapembwa Charles

    this is awesome read, if you thinking of ethics its just the right book I can recommend to anyone without thinking twice.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Greg Syers

    This is a fantastic book that everyone should read. The basis behind ethics is that everyone should live to treat others as they would like to be treated.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Serge Gautron

    Very nice quick read. The author makes some very good points and more importantly great suggestions for living an ethical and successful life by the Golden Rule.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emerson John Tiu Ng

    Mice book regarding business ethics

  23. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    This was a good read. It focused on the Golden Rule and how in order to be ethical in business and in life you should focus upon this. How there is no such thing as business ethics and if you're not ethical in your own life then how can you be ethical in business and visa versa.It also has examples of business men who were ethical in their business and those who were not. It gives you things to think about. This was a good read. It focused on the Golden Rule and how in order to be ethical in business and in life you should focus upon this. How there is no such thing as business ethics and if you're not ethical in your own life then how can you be ethical in business and visa versa.It also has examples of business men who were ethical in their business and those who were not. It gives you things to think about.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joseph McBee

    John Maxwell is nothing if not prolific. The pastor turned personal development guru sells a lot of books. I know some people that read everything the man puts out. Me, I've read five of his books including this one...I think. Personally, I've always found his work derivative. He basically takes what others have written and said and packages it around a theme. I am not saying his books aren't helpful or interesting in their own way. In fact, I found his book BEYOND TALENT pretty interesting and i John Maxwell is nothing if not prolific. The pastor turned personal development guru sells a lot of books. I know some people that read everything the man puts out. Me, I've read five of his books including this one...I think. Personally, I've always found his work derivative. He basically takes what others have written and said and packages it around a theme. I am not saying his books aren't helpful or interesting in their own way. In fact, I found his book BEYOND TALENT pretty interesting and insightful. This book on ethics had some interesting stories and...that's about it. I only picked it up from my local library because I am rewriting a business ethics course for the company I work for, and I thought I might find something helpful here. I didn't. In fact, I was a little perturbed that he reduced the "Golden Rule" down to a pithy little guideline for ethics. It is so much more than that. The words of Christ on this matter are incredibly simple, yes, but they are also richly profound. While I don't believe it was Maxwell's intent to make this ultimate ethical statement from Jesus a catchy little way to sell some books, it ultimately comes across that way. I recommend skipping this one. No offense meant to Mr. Maxwell, or his many fans.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Beigle

    This book is 100% focused on living your business life based on the Golden Rule. It was a very short, quick read. Nothing in here was groundbreaking new material, but after a pretty slow start, I enjoyed it. There are a lot of good quotes in here (some from Maxwell, many good ones from other people). - p. 7 - "'Morality is a private and costly luxury.' Ironically, in today's culture of high debt and me-first living, ethics may be the only luxury some people are choosing to live without!" - p. 7 - This book is 100% focused on living your business life based on the Golden Rule. It was a very short, quick read. Nothing in here was groundbreaking new material, but after a pretty slow start, I enjoyed it. There are a lot of good quotes in here (some from Maxwell, many good ones from other people). - p. 7 - "'Morality is a private and costly luxury.' Ironically, in today's culture of high debt and me-first living, ethics may be the only luxury some people are choosing to live without!" - p. 7 - "Few people set out with the desire to be dishonest, but nobody wants to lose." - p. 15 - "Ethics + Competence is a winning equation. In contrast, people who continually attempt to test the edge of ethics inevitably go over that edge." - p. 43 - "The only way you can make a man trustworthy is by trusting him; and the surest way to make him untrustworthy is to distrust him and show your distrust." - p. 81 - "One of the dangers of power is that those who are entrusted with it begin to make its preservation their primary concern." - p. 101 - "We make a living by what we get; we make a life by what we give."

  26. 5 out of 5

    Don

    convenience to win rationalize, longer view, behavioral interviews, man can do better, lighter vs darker, more tangible, golden rule, better return for ethical, valued appreciated trusted respected, GA character focus not on self, newspaper test, not if it feels good debt divorce, power like powerful women of beauty and grace, pride as root of all others, greatest opportunity to change who you are, responsibility is price of greatness, master moods, discipline of octopus, actions and beliefs, th convenience to win rationalize, longer view, behavioral interviews, man can do better, lighter vs darker, more tangible, golden rule, better return for ethical, valued appreciated trusted respected, GA character focus not on self, newspaper test, not if it feels good debt divorce, power like powerful women of beauty and grace, pride as root of all others, greatest opportunity to change who you are, responsibility is price of greatness, master moods, discipline of octopus, actions and beliefs, the gold or golden rule or better at platinum, no traffic jamb on extra mile. only ethics across all of life, cannot clean-up with flea dip, aspire to higher than legal, if testing edge lose to darker side, most profitable are ethical, to trust grant trust, treat others as self and do unto others, to be valued appreciated trusted respected understood, JCPenny 95, observe pressure, power pride weaknesses and self, forgiveness generosity virtues, control money or controls you, grudges get heavier, go extra mile, give with no expectation, what is your perspective priority passion, go for gold or golden rule.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hans

    Meh, no major revelation here, could have been so much better. Maxwell identifies only one underlying principle for correct human behavior towards others and that is essentially the Golden Rule. I feel like he could have gone much deeper than he did but I don't think he understands the deeper psychology of it. The Golden Rule is simple, it's EMPATHY turned into a moral principle. However most humans are born with this capacity, though how far it develops largely depends on a variety of environme Meh, no major revelation here, could have been so much better. Maxwell identifies only one underlying principle for correct human behavior towards others and that is essentially the Golden Rule. I feel like he could have gone much deeper than he did but I don't think he understands the deeper psychology of it. The Golden Rule is simple, it's EMPATHY turned into a moral principle. However most humans are born with this capacity, though how far it develops largely depends on a variety of environmental and genetic factors as well as the individual themselves and how much they cultivate it. He points out how all major religions and cultures all share some variant of the Golden rule (again not a big surprise here since Empathy is founded in physiology. But he fails to identify that the underlying conclusion of deep Empathy is feeling connected to everything. This is important because of the "WHY" in the Golden Rule. If people could feel, more than just rationally grasp, the universal connection of everything, then they would understand why the Golden Rule makes perfect and logical sense.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shavawn Berry

    This is a short primer on Ethics that I am currently using for my business writing course. Maxwell's emphasis is on the use of 'The Golden Rule' as a means to live and work with integrity. You must ask yourself, "How would I want to be treated?" when confronted with a moral dilemma. If you wouldn't want to be on the receiving end of your behavior, perhaps you need to rethink and modify that behavior. Many of the crises in business in recent years had to do with an appalling lack of empathy -- fo This is a short primer on Ethics that I am currently using for my business writing course. Maxwell's emphasis is on the use of 'The Golden Rule' as a means to live and work with integrity. You must ask yourself, "How would I want to be treated?" when confronted with a moral dilemma. If you wouldn't want to be on the receiving end of your behavior, perhaps you need to rethink and modify that behavior. Many of the crises in business in recent years had to do with an appalling lack of empathy -- for shareholders, employees, customers -- and an adherence to something called 'situational ethics.' Situational ethics foster a basic free-for-all in terms of corporate and personal behavior because they imply that we should behave according to the situation we're in, not choose our behavior first, and act from our moral center, no matter WHERE we are. Maxwell's premise that a life lived in adherence with The Golden Rule will be 'a good life' goes without saying. The book is full of excellent examples and reminders to make the right and moral choice. A quick and helpful read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dianne

    Quick read - good thing to think about in terms of the decisions you make as your 'work self' and your 'home self'. In reality, these should have the same response. The point was a bit overdone, but it had lots of real-life examples to present as examples. Some of the stories and reference are becoming dated, and will become inconsequential because they are replaced by newer scandals. The summary of action points were drawn out, nothing catchy to keep in mind, but I did pull out some useful poin Quick read - good thing to think about in terms of the decisions you make as your 'work self' and your 'home self'. In reality, these should have the same response. The point was a bit overdone, but it had lots of real-life examples to present as examples. Some of the stories and reference are becoming dated, and will become inconsequential because they are replaced by newer scandals. The summary of action points were drawn out, nothing catchy to keep in mind, but I did pull out some useful points - the 5 "P's" - that can lead to unethical actions: Pressure, Pleasure, Power, Pride, and Priorities. There were also good references to C.S. Lewis, which could lead to more reading. Not a waste, but not first priority.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ajeya

    The book discusses some quotes and some history of successful people. It talks about the "golden rule of any faith" which is roughly 'treat another person in the way you would like yourself to be treated' (with citations) Some nice quotes:- JC Penney " money is properly the byproduct of building men as partners" "Pride is at the bottom of all great mistakes " John Ruskin it says that competitive pride brings doom. Goethe "things that matter most must never be at the mercy of things that matter least" It The book discusses some quotes and some history of successful people. It talks about the "golden rule of any faith" which is roughly 'treat another person in the way you would like yourself to be treated' (with citations) Some nice quotes:- JC Penney " money is properly the byproduct of building men as partners" "Pride is at the bottom of all great mistakes " John Ruskin it says that competitive pride brings doom. Goethe "things that matter most must never be at the mercy of things that matter least" It urges one to be prepared to seize your golden opportunity And also states that people who know their weaknesses are rarely taken by surprise. -- A small book , a quick read.

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