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One Year Off: Leaving It All Behind for a Round-the-World Journey with Our Children

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A year off from work. A meandering, serendipitous journey around the globe with the people you love most. No mortgage, no car payments, no pressure. Though it sounds like an impossible dream for most people, one day David Cohen and his family decide to make it a reality. With his wife and three children, Cohen sets off on a rollicking journey, full of laugh-out-loud mishap A year off from work. A meandering, serendipitous journey around the globe with the people you love most. No mortgage, no car payments, no pressure. Though it sounds like an impossible dream for most people, one day David Cohen and his family decide to make it a reality. With his wife and three children, Cohen sets off on a rollicking journey, full of laugh-out-loud mishaps, heart-pounding adventures, and unforeseen epiphanies. Readers join the Cohen family and trek up a Costa Rican volcano, roam the Burgundy canals by houseboat, traverse the vast Australian desert, and discover Istanbul by night. Through it all, the family gets the rare opportunity to get to know each other without the mundane distractions of television and video games, discovering the world through new eyes and gaining fresh perspective on life and priorities.


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A year off from work. A meandering, serendipitous journey around the globe with the people you love most. No mortgage, no car payments, no pressure. Though it sounds like an impossible dream for most people, one day David Cohen and his family decide to make it a reality. With his wife and three children, Cohen sets off on a rollicking journey, full of laugh-out-loud mishap A year off from work. A meandering, serendipitous journey around the globe with the people you love most. No mortgage, no car payments, no pressure. Though it sounds like an impossible dream for most people, one day David Cohen and his family decide to make it a reality. With his wife and three children, Cohen sets off on a rollicking journey, full of laugh-out-loud mishaps, heart-pounding adventures, and unforeseen epiphanies. Readers join the Cohen family and trek up a Costa Rican volcano, roam the Burgundy canals by houseboat, traverse the vast Australian desert, and discover Istanbul by night. Through it all, the family gets the rare opportunity to get to know each other without the mundane distractions of television and video games, discovering the world through new eyes and gaining fresh perspective on life and priorities.

30 review for One Year Off: Leaving It All Behind for a Round-the-World Journey with Our Children

  1. 4 out of 5

    Todd N

    This is a book about a suburban family guy who hits 40 and then decides to leave his job, sell his house, and spend a year traveling the world with his wife and three kids. It's an interesting idea, but you need to know up front that he's not a regular guy -- his family was able to send him to Yale, and he became a millionaire around 30 when he sold his book publishing business. They can afford to bring a nanny along, and his wife is fluent in four languages. So while I identify with the suburban This is a book about a suburban family guy who hits 40 and then decides to leave his job, sell his house, and spend a year traveling the world with his wife and three kids. It's an interesting idea, but you need to know up front that he's not a regular guy -- his family was able to send him to Yale, and he became a millionaire around 30 when he sold his book publishing business. They can afford to bring a nanny along, and his wife is fluent in four languages. So while I identify with the suburban angst and the desire to chuck it all and hit the road, I also understand that these are pretty high-class problems to have. After reading this book I'm not entirely sure that he does. That said, this book is an interesting read. His kids are mostly bored by the cathedrals and museums of Europe, but they are completely fascinated by Africa. The parents' plan to home school their kids breaks down almost immediately, so they make it up by enrolling their kids in a school in Australia. It's also interesting to read about how some plans just go horribly wrong, which at the beginning of the trip leads to bickering, but later in the trip leads to a more fatalistic view. This book also shattered my stereotype of the overprotective parents of Marin County. They take their kids camping in Africa (albeit with a guide), and a water buffalo is killed by a pride of lions right by their camp at night. They also wind up missing an outbreak of government violence in Cambodia by less than a day. Early in the book Mr. Cohen brags that since he graduated from Yale he can never become a bum -- only an eccentric. But I was surprised at how conventional most of the locations they chose and the way they traveled were. The only book he mentions reading during the trip is On The Road, which again seems very conventional. After reading this book I am a lot warmer to the idea of traveling the world now, which is probably why my wife checked this book out of the library for me. However, I don't think I would enjoy a trip like the one described in this book. Except for the several month stay in Australia and some time on a houseboat, it just seems like a long slog of arriving at a location, seeing the sites, and then jetting off to the next location. If I were to travel for a year I would pick 12 locations and stay a month in each. It would probably be cheaper, and it would leave more time for hanging out and soaking in the culture a little more. (I also would rent my house instead of selling it. What the hell was he thinking doing that?) I would be interested to read more about the practical aspects of traveling around the world with a family -- how to access money, the bare minimum of what to pack, how to get kids to behave, how to stay in touch with people back home, etc. Bringing along a nanny so you aren't cock-blocked by the kids for a year is a very good tip. One last note: I was very distracted while reading this book because I kept wondering how Mr. Cohen was able to get a wife who is so amazingly hot and intelligent. This book doesn't exactly cast him in the best light, and his attempts at being self-deprecating aren't particularly convincing. If this were a fiction book, it would completely prevent the suspension of disbelief. (Unfortunately, I did a search for their family after finishing the book to see what they are up to. I didn't like what I found. Don't do it until after you have read this book.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    The author of this book somehow managed to extract himself entirely from his life as a coffee table book publisher and spend a year traveling around the world with his three children, ages 8, 7, and 2. This is the somewhat straightforward tale of their adventures in Costa Rica, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia. I admire the Cohens' adventurousness and their desire to give their children a taste of the wider world. The story is told from the father's point of view exclusively, and it's interes The author of this book somehow managed to extract himself entirely from his life as a coffee table book publisher and spend a year traveling around the world with his three children, ages 8, 7, and 2. This is the somewhat straightforward tale of their adventures in Costa Rica, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia. I admire the Cohens' adventurousness and their desire to give their children a taste of the wider world. The story is told from the father's point of view exclusively, and it's interesting to read what he perceives as his children's reactions to various aspects of the trip. I really liked the last chapter of the book, where the family visits a dark cave full of hundreds of carved Buddha statues. The father forgot to bring a flashlight, so he lights matches to illuminate the statues for just a few seconds at a time. He writes: "Then it struck me that life was like that, too. You light a match, and you're just a child. Light another, and you're married with children of your own. A few more brief, bright flares, and your babies have left home. A few more after that and your pack is used up. That might be why, at the end of our journey, we found ourselves standing in the Buddha caves of Pak Ou. To learn that we only have one pack of matches. To understand that we have to be in the best possible place when we light each one. To know that we must make each brief combustion a bright, shining moment that pierces the darkness and illuminates a thousand gods."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    If you're planning a trip abroad with children, this book is invaluable for research. But if you enjoy travel literature (such as Paul Theroux), this book will fall short. Originally written as a series of emails, the book contains breezy updates from the father of a family who decided to sell their house and travel around the world for a year. While the author (an editor of photography coffee table books) is funny, he is not a shrewd observer of people or places -- or if he is, lacks the writing If you're planning a trip abroad with children, this book is invaluable for research. But if you enjoy travel literature (such as Paul Theroux), this book will fall short. Originally written as a series of emails, the book contains breezy updates from the father of a family who decided to sell their house and travel around the world for a year. While the author (an editor of photography coffee table books) is funny, he is not a shrewd observer of people or places -- or if he is, lacks the writing chops to convey them. He also can't help but show off, in a middle-class way, his familiarity with foreign languages and cultures and overall his rather privileged view on life. The emails-slash-chapter lack the development of overall themes, and he rather abruptly at the end summarizes some conclusions in a "what I learned on my summer vacation" sort of way. That said, I did enjoy reading about how the parents weren't afraid to travel like locals and bring their children on adventures -- the chapters on traveling through Africa were riveting. The author may write like a dilettante, but put his philosophy into practice and it sounds like the whole family benefited from the trip. On a side note, the author commented on how the strength of his relationship with his wife, but some brief internet research shows that they've since separated. Since the book never plumbs the depths of the author's relationships with anyone, it's difficult to understand how likely that is.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lana

    A much better travel memoir than At v Home in the World by Tsh Oxenreider. While Oxenreider's book focuses more on navel-gazing and herself, Cohen's book tale gives a great look at what traveling around the world as a family is like. Oxenreider and Cohen traveled to and wrote about some of the same places, which was interesting to compare. I also appreciated Cohen's candid answer to how much their trip cost. Spoiler: it was a LOT, especially considering their trip took place in the mid-1990s. Sa A much better travel memoir than At v Home in the World by Tsh Oxenreider. While Oxenreider's book focuses more on navel-gazing and herself, Cohen's book tale gives a great look at what traveling around the world as a family is like. Oxenreider and Cohen traveled to and wrote about some of the same places, which was interesting to compare. I also appreciated Cohen's candid answer to how much their trip cost. Spoiler: it was a LOT, especially considering their trip took place in the mid-1990s. Sadly, Cohen and his wife divorced several years after the book was published, and I wish that postscript had been left out. One bone to pick: there are a lot of typos in the ebook version.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This has always been a back-of-my-mind fantasy: to take the kids out of school for a year, quit our jobs, sell our house and travel the world, letting the museums, historical sites and natural wonders be our classrooms. This author did just that, with his wife and 3 kids aged 3, 7, and 8. Reading his narrative of the year abroad makes me really want to travel the world even more, but makes me want to travel it with my kids a bit less! While it sounds great in theory, I don't think I could manage This has always been a back-of-my-mind fantasy: to take the kids out of school for a year, quit our jobs, sell our house and travel the world, letting the museums, historical sites and natural wonders be our classrooms. This author did just that, with his wife and 3 kids aged 3, 7, and 8. Reading his narrative of the year abroad makes me really want to travel the world even more, but makes me want to travel it with my kids a bit less! While it sounds great in theory, I don't think I could manage to stay cheerful with my nearest and dearest, 24/7 amidst jet-lag, strange food, navigating unknown lands,no schedules (or rather, conforming to the kids' schedules) and just letting go. I'm way too type-A. Nonetheless, it was humorous, cringe-worthy, and downright fascinating to read this book. I don't give it the full 5 stars because of the author's tendency towards pretension. I consider myself fairly educated and well-read and when there are a full 12 words I need to look up in the dictionary, it's a bit much. sybaratic? pulchritude? anyone? Saving my pennies until my around-the-world trip in 2024...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Like the author, we have abandoned our life as we knew it, for a year, with our 4 young children (one still in diapers) and moved abroad. Unlike the other, we moved to a developing country for the entire year, instead of moving constantly country to country. I think I prefer our approach. We have found a great house to live in, getting to know locals on a personal level through church and the kids' schools, struggling with language, and the transitions that kids face in a new home. At times we a Like the author, we have abandoned our life as we knew it, for a year, with our 4 young children (one still in diapers) and moved abroad. Unlike the other, we moved to a developing country for the entire year, instead of moving constantly country to country. I think I prefer our approach. We have found a great house to live in, getting to know locals on a personal level through church and the kids' schools, struggling with language, and the transitions that kids face in a new home. At times we are REALLY feeling the pains of being foreigners, but mostly we are loving our experience. I did enjoy comparing our year experiences and I appreciated the author's honesty (about the good the bad, finances, mistakes, lessons learned, etc.).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Maria Elmvang

    Really interesting book, and I loved living vicariously through the Cohen family. It's the next best thing to being there myself, and I liked how David didn't sugar coat anything. Things were the way they were - the good as well as the bad. A shame that David's emails home became less and less detailed as the time went on - their time in Costa Rica and Europe was wonderfully elaborate, but after that weeks and even months disappeared with no real mention. If it hadn't been for that, I'd have rate Really interesting book, and I loved living vicariously through the Cohen family. It's the next best thing to being there myself, and I liked how David didn't sugar coat anything. Things were the way they were - the good as well as the bad. A shame that David's emails home became less and less detailed as the time went on - their time in Costa Rica and Europe was wonderfully elaborate, but after that weeks and even months disappeared with no real mention. If it hadn't been for that, I'd have rated it a full 5 stars, but though very understandable, it was a tad frustrating. Still, he mentioned a lot of places I wanted to go (or go back!) which made for fascinating reading, and all in all I've definitely caught the travel bug!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jayanthi Venkataramani

    It starts off really well and incredible that someone actually did this. However I lost interest through the mid of the book only because it becomes more and more a personal tale and I did not find any deep insight. I think what put me off most (not at all any reflection on the book or the author and his adorable family) was that he seemed to have a lot of disposable cash to kind of get around all the things that I would've found frustrating even in a single journey, forget a round-the-world tri It starts off really well and incredible that someone actually did this. However I lost interest through the mid of the book only because it becomes more and more a personal tale and I did not find any deep insight. I think what put me off most (not at all any reflection on the book or the author and his adorable family) was that he seemed to have a lot of disposable cash to kind of get around all the things that I would've found frustrating even in a single journey, forget a round-the-world trip! He also has a baby sitter for the whole length of the trip that goes with them - isn't that nice. Overall though, the writing is interesting and we need more books like these! Maybe I'll go back and finish reading it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Thomasin Propson

    You're in your early 40's, have wife, 3 kids, successful job...what else to do but sell your house and cars, pack a bag for each family member, and head-off on a year-long adventure around the world?! I enjoyed Cohen's humorous accounts of his family's exploits (from their pre-trip jitters to the animal attack in Africa to learning the difference between Sards and Italians). Quick fun read which will make you wish you too would decide to ditch your "old" life and start afresh in foreign lands! You're in your early 40's, have wife, 3 kids, successful job...what else to do but sell your house and cars, pack a bag for each family member, and head-off on a year-long adventure around the world?! I enjoyed Cohen's humorous accounts of his family's exploits (from their pre-trip jitters to the animal attack in Africa to learning the difference between Sards and Italians). Quick fun read which will make you wish you too would decide to ditch your "old" life and start afresh in foreign lands!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Plot Summary: A midlife crisis prompts a successful San Francisco book editor to quit his job, sell his house and possessions and take a one-year trip around the world with his wife, three young children and a nanny. Thrilling and at times harrowing, Cohen’s tale, written as a series of email updates to friends, takes you along to experience the sights, sounds and tastes of more than 20 exotic locales, from Costa Rica to Laos. Appeals: humorous travel memoir; traveling with children; midlife cris Plot Summary: A midlife crisis prompts a successful San Francisco book editor to quit his job, sell his house and possessions and take a one-year trip around the world with his wife, three young children and a nanny. Thrilling and at times harrowing, Cohen’s tale, written as a series of email updates to friends, takes you along to experience the sights, sounds and tastes of more than 20 exotic locales, from Costa Rica to Laos. Appeals: humorous travel memoir; traveling with children; midlife crisis; email format; adventure around the world

  11. 5 out of 5

    Madrezenith

    I am really interested in travelling the world with my husband and 4 children, so I looked forward to this book quite a bit. It was a gift from a well-meaning friend. I was so disappointed! The author's tone was a bit arrogant, major details were omitted (like they spent 6 months in Australia!! They put their kids in schol there! Tell me more!!). Also, they took a nanny and spent a lot of time on planes and in hotels while I was hoping for some low-budget tips. I appreciate and applaud their tri I am really interested in travelling the world with my husband and 4 children, so I looked forward to this book quite a bit. It was a gift from a well-meaning friend. I was so disappointed! The author's tone was a bit arrogant, major details were omitted (like they spent 6 months in Australia!! They put their kids in schol there! Tell me more!!). Also, they took a nanny and spent a lot of time on planes and in hotels while I was hoping for some low-budget tips. I appreciate and applaud their trip but for me, I hope there are other books to address family RTW trips.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I really enjoyed reading this family's story in preparation for our sabbatical next year. I'm definitely not ready for a whole year off, just a month, but it was great to read of a family including their small children. Very brave. Well written and enjoyable. I'm just sad that 6 years after their adventure that they were divorced. I really enjoyed reading this family's story in preparation for our sabbatical next year. I'm definitely not ready for a whole year off, just a month, but it was great to read of a family including their small children. Very brave. Well written and enjoyable. I'm just sad that 6 years after their adventure that they were divorced.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I've travelled to eleven different countries, not too shabby for someone my age, but right now I'm definitely an armchair tourist. This trip-around-the-world tale was good fun - I even laughed out loud a few times at the adventures (and misadventures) of the mid-nineties Cohen family. Fun fact: they were in Hong Kong the day it was relinquished by Britain. I've travelled to eleven different countries, not too shabby for someone my age, but right now I'm definitely an armchair tourist. This trip-around-the-world tale was good fun - I even laughed out loud a few times at the adventures (and misadventures) of the mid-nineties Cohen family. Fun fact: they were in Hong Kong the day it was relinquished by Britain.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bridget

    Very interesting to think about doing this - selling your house and packing up everything to travel around the world for one year. The author and his family had a fantastic time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Morgan F

    I’m not a fan of nonfiction books so I guess this wasn’t terrible. I didn’t particularly enjoy it though I thought it was interesting. It was pretty cool that they managed to have such a great time.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Malin Friess

    Cohen had the courage (and convinced his wife and kids to join him) to quit his job, sell his houseand car and most of his possessions and travel the world for a year. It sounds impossible, but they packed their stuff into a few suitcases and with passports Some people thought they were crazy, others thought they were brilliant--everyone wanted to know how it turned out. A few tips from the Cohen family- - The cathedrals, churches, and castles in Europe all start to look the same-- the kids much p Cohen had the courage (and convinced his wife and kids to join him) to quit his job, sell his houseand car and most of his possessions and travel the world for a year. It sounds impossible, but they packed their stuff into a few suitcases and with passports Some people thought they were crazy, others thought they were brilliant--everyone wanted to know how it turned out. A few tips from the Cohen family- - The cathedrals, churches, and castles in Europe all start to look the same-- the kids much preferred going on Safari in Botwsana to the Vatican- - Find a nice beach-- indeed they did in Perth Australia- and they stayed their 3 months and schooled their kids for free in the public schools - Save you money (food and lodging is expensive)- and they didn't stay in Hostels. - Avoid expensive pre-scheduled tours-- you can work things out once you get there - There can be something like "too much family time" - find the unique--one of their favorite activities was renting a houseboat and traveling the locks and canals of Amsterdam for several days - Don't try to drive across Australia-- it's 9 straight days of nothing but desert 4 stars.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Farrah

    Just finished and absolutely devastated that he glossed over Japan, as that was the part I had been looking forward to the most. I even thought it especially serendipitous that it was towards the end of their trip/book so that it gave me something to look forward to: Westerners in Japan. One of my favorite things. My other minor issue with this is the formatting; he begins each "chapter" (written in an epistolary format of emails to family and friends) begins with the city they are HEADED to...s Just finished and absolutely devastated that he glossed over Japan, as that was the part I had been looking forward to the most. I even thought it especially serendipitous that it was towards the end of their trip/book so that it gave me something to look forward to: Westerners in Japan. One of my favorite things. My other minor issue with this is the formatting; he begins each "chapter" (written in an epistolary format of emails to family and friends) begins with the city they are HEADED to...so, like the heading of the chapter is "Luang Prabang, Laos" but he's in Cambodia for 90% of the chapter. I truly hated this aspect of the book's organization. What did I like? He's a strong writer, and the fact that he took this around-the-world vacation giving his kids this experience is fucking awesome.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bea Elwood

    Not being able to travel in the time of COVID has made me turn to books about travel, and this was a fun, easy read. I suppose I struggled a little with his level of privilege - yes, he was lucky enough to have been part of a team that put out a coffee table book that was a best seller and that launched his career. I know he worked hard to maintain that career but it's hard to relate to, and then they took their Guatemalan nanny with them! And when he's able to talk about just putting her on a f Not being able to travel in the time of COVID has made me turn to books about travel, and this was a fun, easy read. I suppose I struggled a little with his level of privilege - yes, he was lucky enough to have been part of a team that put out a coffee table book that was a best seller and that launched his career. I know he worked hard to maintain that career but it's hard to relate to, and then they took their Guatemalan nanny with them! And when he's able to talk about just putting her on a flight to Switzerland when she might not be able to come to Turkey with them it raises some issues. And then they just live in Sydney, Australia for six months, which kind of leads to my biggest issue with the book is that it was so good in the beginning and then it just bottoms out and goes no where. I'm not saying he got bored with writing about their adventures but *shrug*

  19. 5 out of 5

    Himanikashyapshreedhar

    Interesting idea, and the book is entertaining as a light read in bits. But disappointing for several reasons. Intrepid travellers though they claim to be, the Cohens (particularly the Mr whose thoughts we are privy to) don't exactly step out of their first world lens throughout. I was expecting epiphanies and insights, instead there is a crinkling of noses and ginger stepping around the "third world" in their insulated bubbles, sweeping generalizations and prejudices about lands and peoples fro Interesting idea, and the book is entertaining as a light read in bits. But disappointing for several reasons. Intrepid travellers though they claim to be, the Cohens (particularly the Mr whose thoughts we are privy to) don't exactly step out of their first world lens throughout. I was expecting epiphanies and insights, instead there is a crinkling of noses and ginger stepping around the "third world" in their insulated bubbles, sweeping generalizations and prejudices about lands and peoples from one or two impressions, a self-important tone (despite the sprinkling of self deprecating hahas) with some dutiful cliches about the 'less fortunate' which are stale, rubbery and patronising. If you are expecting travel writing, which is what I was, this is the wrong book. This is a prolonged selfie of the Cohens - the holiday email at the start should have warned me off.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Will Plunkett

    Since there were some places that aren't the typical tourist travel destinations, or at least avoided some of the areas in frequently-visited places, it was pretty good. Overall, the narration became somewhat pretentious (especially the Epilogue) and showed how different the perspective of those who've had resources and opportunities for most of life learn how "the rest of the world" really is. But travel is the greatest gift anyone can give, and learning from others' journeys is often fun, too. Since there were some places that aren't the typical tourist travel destinations, or at least avoided some of the areas in frequently-visited places, it was pretty good. Overall, the narration became somewhat pretentious (especially the Epilogue) and showed how different the perspective of those who've had resources and opportunities for most of life learn how "the rest of the world" really is. But travel is the greatest gift anyone can give, and learning from others' journeys is often fun, too.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Debra Meehan

    I think many of us fantasize about packing it all up and traveling the world but David actually does this with his family including three kids! It was interesting to hear his thought process and how they approached the trip as well as their lessons learned. They visited a variety of countries not just third world countries that many other backpacker stories seem to focus on. He does a nice job describing places and events although is not overly descriptive. A really enjoyable read, and I was sad I think many of us fantasize about packing it all up and traveling the world but David actually does this with his family including three kids! It was interesting to hear his thought process and how they approached the trip as well as their lessons learned. They visited a variety of countries not just third world countries that many other backpacker stories seem to focus on. He does a nice job describing places and events although is not overly descriptive. A really enjoyable read, and I was sad when I was done because I wanted to keep going.

  22. 4 out of 5

    April Grippo

    To cure his midlife crisis, a father takes his family - including three children under the age of 8 - around the world. Written in a series of emails that he sent to friends and family during their travels, this account is surprisingly funny. The ending is especially poignant - as the author weighed the rewards of the trip against the risks (giving up his job, spending so much "together time" with his wife and kids, plus the dangers of international travel with such young children). Was it worth To cure his midlife crisis, a father takes his family - including three children under the age of 8 - around the world. Written in a series of emails that he sent to friends and family during their travels, this account is surprisingly funny. The ending is especially poignant - as the author weighed the rewards of the trip against the risks (giving up his job, spending so much "together time" with his wife and kids, plus the dangers of international travel with such young children). Was it worthwhile? I would say a resounding yes, but my book included a thought-provoking afterward.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Trisha

    A wonderful novel about a family that decides to take their children on a year-long trek around the world. The husband/narrator shares the good, and the bad, with lots of humor and insight. I felt like the book could have been twice as long, because I would love to have read more detail about their locations, adventures, and their heart-warming experiences. I also loved the antics that their children pulled, which made traveling with children all the more relatable. A fantastic, feel good novel!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Maxfield

    Thanks Mr. Cohen for your travelogue. Reading this was like listening to stories from acquaintances at dinner parties. Interesting, humorous, encapsulated life experience distilled into narrative with a beginning, middle, end, and moral. I could tell, however, that the author was totally revolutionized by his trip around the world. And I would love to have even a fraction of the experiences that he wrote about. But since his wife, Devi, did most of the trip planning and driving, I actually wish Thanks Mr. Cohen for your travelogue. Reading this was like listening to stories from acquaintances at dinner parties. Interesting, humorous, encapsulated life experience distilled into narrative with a beginning, middle, end, and moral. I could tell, however, that the author was totally revolutionized by his trip around the world. And I would love to have even a fraction of the experiences that he wrote about. But since his wife, Devi, did most of the trip planning and driving, I actually wish she had been a contributor--or written the book herself.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy Graziano

    I read this book about 10 times in 2004. I borrowed it from the library and it set in motion our family’s greatest adventure. In 2012-2013 our middle class family (that had been saving and dreaming for years) left on a 22 country/8 month adventure. Our daughters are 21 and 17 now and “the trip” is a joy to remember. We are all forever enriched and changed in too many ways to list. My husband and I can’t wait to hit the road again someday for very long term travel. Very inspirational book. Thanks I read this book about 10 times in 2004. I borrowed it from the library and it set in motion our family’s greatest adventure. In 2012-2013 our middle class family (that had been saving and dreaming for years) left on a 22 country/8 month adventure. Our daughters are 21 and 17 now and “the trip” is a joy to remember. We are all forever enriched and changed in too many ways to list. My husband and I can’t wait to hit the road again someday for very long term travel. Very inspirational book. Thanks for writing it and planting a beautiful seed.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katia Marie

    I loved this book. I laughed quite a bit and loved hearing of the highs and lows. It was well written and I loved the updates, photos, and FAQs. I cant imagine the work booking a trip like this prior to the internet. For the people complaining - they seem to only complain about the fact that it takes money to do this... obviously. But people can continue to complain or make it happen. There is a reason this isn't commonplace, it takes hard work, debt payoff, leaving everything you know. Those pe I loved this book. I laughed quite a bit and loved hearing of the highs and lows. It was well written and I loved the updates, photos, and FAQs. I cant imagine the work booking a trip like this prior to the internet. For the people complaining - they seem to only complain about the fact that it takes money to do this... obviously. But people can continue to complain or make it happen. There is a reason this isn't commonplace, it takes hard work, debt payoff, leaving everything you know. Those people just cant get past their jealousy to see what the story was about. Overall, the book was a fun, motivational read. I hope to do it with my future kids one day.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marnie Z

    I admire that this family had the courage to sell everything and set out for such a special adventure. I'd love to do this! I enjoyed hearing about their travels since I'll likely never make it to these places myself, I think my favourite was the Burgundy canals by houseboat - that sounded so peaceful <3 I admire that this family had the courage to sell everything and set out for such a special adventure. I'd love to do this! I enjoyed hearing about their travels since I'll likely never make it to these places myself, I think my favourite was the Burgundy canals by houseboat - that sounded so peaceful <3

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alexis Nascimento

    Imagine settling on a decision to take a year off - with your entire family - and actually do it! This book follows a family of 5 who quit their day jobs, sell their home and travel the world with three kids in tow. I expected more of a “how to” vs. a memoir, but it was still a good read nonetheless.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rob Tonkinson

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book and the authors writing style. I have read several books about around the world travel with children, the best of which was 360 Degrees Longitude. That was a much more detailed account than this one. But, this was a good, light, enjoyable read that provided some sense of the challenges, costs, benefits, and risks of taking such a trip.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Ule

    I wish I'd been able to take my children on a trip like this one; though we lacked the resources to pull it off while they were still home. Amusing, easy read. I'd like to know the long term effects of this trip on the family--though it appears the couple divorced at some point since the book was published. :-( I wish I'd been able to take my children on a trip like this one; though we lacked the resources to pull it off while they were still home. Amusing, easy read. I'd like to know the long term effects of this trip on the family--though it appears the couple divorced at some point since the book was published. :-(

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