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Frostburn: Mastering the Perils of Ice and Snow

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A complete guide to playing D&D in the ice and snow. This 4-color supplement begins a new series of releases that focus on how the environment can affect D&D gameplay in every capacity. Frostburn contains rules on how to adapt to hazardous cold-weather conditions, such as navigating terrain with snow and ice and surviving in bitter cold or harsh weather. There are expanded A complete guide to playing D&D in the ice and snow. This 4-color supplement begins a new series of releases that focus on how the environment can affect D&D gameplay in every capacity. Frostburn contains rules on how to adapt to hazardous cold-weather conditions, such as navigating terrain with snow and ice and surviving in bitter cold or harsh weather. There are expanded rules for environmental hazards and manipulation of cold weather elements, as well as new spells, feats, magic items, and prestige classes. New monsters associated with icy realms are included, as well as variants on current monsters. There is enough adventure material included for months of gameplay.


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A complete guide to playing D&D in the ice and snow. This 4-color supplement begins a new series of releases that focus on how the environment can affect D&D gameplay in every capacity. Frostburn contains rules on how to adapt to hazardous cold-weather conditions, such as navigating terrain with snow and ice and surviving in bitter cold or harsh weather. There are expanded A complete guide to playing D&D in the ice and snow. This 4-color supplement begins a new series of releases that focus on how the environment can affect D&D gameplay in every capacity. Frostburn contains rules on how to adapt to hazardous cold-weather conditions, such as navigating terrain with snow and ice and surviving in bitter cold or harsh weather. There are expanded rules for environmental hazards and manipulation of cold weather elements, as well as new spells, feats, magic items, and prestige classes. New monsters associated with icy realms are included, as well as variants on current monsters. There is enough adventure material included for months of gameplay.

30 review for Frostburn: Mastering the Perils of Ice and Snow

  1. 4 out of 5

    David

    Frostburn is a sourcebook that provides a lot of details with regards to adventuring in cold places. It even coins a new term, "frostfell", for these locales, which covers high altitude, outer planes, and magically-frozen areas too. I have not yet perused the earlier Stormwrack and Sandstorm sourcebooks yet, so this is my first sourcebook with a geographical theme. Chapter 1 starts off with information regarding cold weather in general: cold terrain, cold weather, cold hazards, cold-themed traps, Frostburn is a sourcebook that provides a lot of details with regards to adventuring in cold places. It even coins a new term, "frostfell", for these locales, which covers high altitude, outer planes, and magically-frozen areas too. I have not yet perused the earlier Stormwrack and Sandstorm sourcebooks yet, so this is my first sourcebook with a geographical theme. Chapter 1 starts off with information regarding cold weather in general: cold terrain, cold weather, cold hazards, cold-themed traps, and cold architecture. I liked that it categorises "how cold it is" - cold, severe, extreme - and provides rules on being protected from the cold. What's ridiculous about this is that the rest of sourcebook mostly ignores this categorisation and describes how cold it is using °F instead (completely forgetting that most of the rest of the world use a different unit). After that it follows the typical formula, with chapter 2 showcasing races, classes, and feats. Aside from the fey uldra, the rest of the races are rather low on creativity. Dwarves, elves, gnomes, halflings, even goblins, just got slapped with a cold-variant (e.g. glacier dwarves work with "blue ice" instead of metal with "blue ice" being really nothing more than just metal doesn't made of ice - and no it won't melt). The other fully-described race is basically the cold-variant human - neanderthal. They're exactly like the word they borrowed - prehistoric humans. Why are they still prehistoric in a world of fantasy? No idea. There's a monster entry for frostfolk - human-like beings whose ancestors have possibly made some of kind demonic deal - this one had more promise to be fledged-out as a race. The class options and feats and almost all cold-themed. They're mostly ok, but I got irritated at flavour text of all things. The descriptions tend to not match the feat's actual mechanics. One metamagic feat in particular just halted my reading and I had to vent. This feat was Piercing Cold: it allows you damage creatures immune to cold. It's described as being so cold that it makes even cold-immune creatures feel it - but apparently normal creatures don't take any extra damage from oh-so-cold magic damage... Chapter 3 contains prestige classes. Nothing much to talk about here as they're mostly not going to be played by PCs (one of them is meant for frost giants, for example), without significant tweaking. Of the few that might be playable would require a campaign dedicated to staying in the cold regions. Equipment is next in chapter 4. A couple of primitive (but exotic) weapons, mostly just variants, with the exception of something called a "sugliin" - apparently it's a long staff topped with antler horns. It's so unwieldy that it takes a full round action to make an attack with it. They even added a feat specifically for you to wield it better. I'm baffled. Anyway, this chapter includes modes of transport as well, so that could be useful, although I'm not sure why an iceberg is considered a mode of transport. Of note is there's a sidebar about how freezing temperatures affect potions and scrolls. Chapter 5 contains new spells and magic items. There's quite a few fun-sounding cold-themed spells plus ice variants of known core spells. Same with the magic items - rather creative variants. For example, there are skull talismans, basically potions that won't freeze. You use them by smashing them. There's another eye-rolling error here: one of the new prestige classes require a character to craft a magical item called an iceheart as a prerequisite. The prerequisite for crafting the iceheart requires the crafter to be of that prestige class first. Such an obvious chicken and egg issue. Chapter 6 features cold-themed monsters, from animals to fey to pudding to undead to bigfoot. They're mostly just cold variants and some reprints, nothing much to talk about. Chapter 7 is why I gave this a 3-star instead of 2. It provides two very detailed adventure sites. The first is a magical laboratory with an interesting backstory hidden inside a neanderthal dwelling. The second is the fiend-populated ciry of Icerazer, situated on an iceberg. This city has a lot of detail, down to full stat blocks for its nine fiendish/evil leaders, all dedicated to the imprisoned Levistus. The plot hook is a bit tame though - it describes the iceberg city performing hit-and-run attacks on coastal cities. It ends with an appendix - about 25 pages of terrain-specific encounter tables. Really? Does anyone even use them? Meh. Overall, it's not a particularly good sourcebook, except for the first and last chapters.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gerald Lopez

    Awesome story you got here! I like how the plot is going. If you have some great stories like this one, you can publish it on NovelStar, just submit your story to [email protected] or [email protected]

  3. 5 out of 5

    'Nathan Burgoine

    Akin to “Stormwrack,” and “Sandstorm,” “Frostburn” takes your Dungeons and Dragons game to areas of extreme cold, be they frozen abyssal layers, high altitude glaciers, or just Canada in winter (I kid). Coining a new term for these places of extreme cold – Frostfell – the frostfell environments are described in detail, given a list of hazards (everything from frostbite to snow blindness to hypothermia and to magical terrors such as snowflake lichen). Each of the core races gets a quick re-hash f Akin to “Stormwrack,” and “Sandstorm,” “Frostburn” takes your Dungeons and Dragons game to areas of extreme cold, be they frozen abyssal layers, high altitude glaciers, or just Canada in winter (I kid). Coining a new term for these places of extreme cold – Frostfell – the frostfell environments are described in detail, given a list of hazards (everything from frostbite to snow blindness to hypothermia and to magical terrors such as snowflake lichen). Each of the core races gets a quick re-hash from a Frostfell point of view (Glacier Dwarves, Tundra Halflings, for example), and two new core races are introduced: the high-climate Neanderthals, and the mystic Uldras, who have a strong connection to a broken goddess who survives frozen in the frostfell regions. The gods and goddesses of the Frostfell are also discussed, some from the various worlds of Dungeons and Dragons (including Greyhawk!) New feats are listed (including mundane ones such as ‘Altitude Adaption’ and magical feats such as ‘Snowcasting’), as are ten prestige classes, including a psionic cryokineticist, the stormsinger, and – my favourite – the Frost Mage. Equipment and gear gains a brief chapter, and then magic has a chapter of its own, all, of course, with a frosty flair. Monsters round out the book, many of them interesting and well put together, and two adventure sites, including the demon-inhabited floating iceberg city of Icerazor, give an easy in for Dungeon Master’s wanting to add the book’s information to their campaign. This book gets a lot of use in my group – definitely worth it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I haven't been in the situation to really use this book yet. But it looks useful and interesting. Rating has potiential of going up or down at this point. I haven't been in the situation to really use this book yet. But it looks useful and interesting. Rating has potiential of going up or down at this point.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chip

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brendan Coster

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Nickolls

  8. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  9. 4 out of 5

    Julian Meynell

  10. 5 out of 5

    Hugh Melrose

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ronald

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gregory Adams

  13. 5 out of 5

    Peat

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ash

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jeramy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jake

  17. 5 out of 5

    Karl Ligman

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kei

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Scott wachter

  21. 5 out of 5

    Phil

  22. 5 out of 5

    Johannes Löfgren

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jorge

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  26. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  27. 5 out of 5

    Theodoros Theodoridis

  28. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gary

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rich

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