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We Can Fix It: A Time Travel Memoir

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What would you do if you had a time machine? Bet on sporting events? Assassinate all the evildoers of history? Or maybe try to fix all the mistakes and regrets that have haunted you all these years? Join Jess as she travels back in time to share her wisdom with her naive younger self, stand up to bullies who terrorized her child self, and teach her horny teenage self a thi What would you do if you had a time machine? Bet on sporting events? Assassinate all the evildoers of history? Or maybe try to fix all the mistakes and regrets that have haunted you all these years? Join Jess as she travels back in time to share her wisdom with her naive younger self, stand up to bullies who terrorized her child self, and teach her horny teenage self a thing or two! What begins as a raunchy adventure in teen wish fulfillment grows into a thoughtful story about memory, regret, and growing up. One time machine, one frustrated girl, one sexy futuristic jumpsuit... infinite possibilities!


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What would you do if you had a time machine? Bet on sporting events? Assassinate all the evildoers of history? Or maybe try to fix all the mistakes and regrets that have haunted you all these years? Join Jess as she travels back in time to share her wisdom with her naive younger self, stand up to bullies who terrorized her child self, and teach her horny teenage self a thi What would you do if you had a time machine? Bet on sporting events? Assassinate all the evildoers of history? Or maybe try to fix all the mistakes and regrets that have haunted you all these years? Join Jess as she travels back in time to share her wisdom with her naive younger self, stand up to bullies who terrorized her child self, and teach her horny teenage self a thing or two! What begins as a raunchy adventure in teen wish fulfillment grows into a thoughtful story about memory, regret, and growing up. One time machine, one frustrated girl, one sexy futuristic jumpsuit... infinite possibilities!

30 review for We Can Fix It: A Time Travel Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Jess Fink takes a novel approach to the comics memoir by framing hers as a time-travel adventure where her present self goes back to revisit her youth. Except she decides to use what she knows now to make her life better back then. Mistakes, it seems, are not solely the reserve of youth… said no one sober ever... We Can Fix It! is a pretty shallow and uninteresting book. Often the best memoirs relate a unique experience or perspective but Fink’s young life was like anyone else’s: mundane and sma Jess Fink takes a novel approach to the comics memoir by framing hers as a time-travel adventure where her present self goes back to revisit her youth. Except she decides to use what she knows now to make her life better back then. Mistakes, it seems, are not solely the reserve of youth… said no one sober ever... We Can Fix It! is a pretty shallow and uninteresting book. Often the best memoirs relate a unique experience or perspective but Fink’s young life was like anyone else’s: mundane and small. While she does relate her story well in the format, there’s little substance here to compel the reader, with Fink focusing mostly on awkward sexual encounters and ill-advised dalliances with drugs. She attempts some unfunny humour by having her future self make out with her younger self and relates some “hysterical” encounters that could only be funny to her and maybe one other friend; the end result each time for me was silent boredom. The ending too is uninspired as Future Jess learns a banal and predictable life lesson in after-school special fashion. Some young people have led remarkable lives which warrant an early memoir – Jess Fink’s life doesn’t. We Can Fix it! is self-obsessed narcissism from start to finish.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Oriana

    Well within the first five pages Jess from the future is making out with Jess from the past, so assuming you think that is awesome, you will probably like this book. It's really short, though, and mostly surface-y, with a couple of maddening glimpses at some really heavy shit that is never returned to. So IDK, fun and light but without a lot of lasting power or really all that much to say, except: life is hard, you always think you're the asshole although you're usually not, and also it takes a Well within the first five pages Jess from the future is making out with Jess from the past, so assuming you think that is awesome, you will probably like this book. It's really short, though, and mostly surface-y, with a couple of maddening glimpses at some really heavy shit that is never returned to. So IDK, fun and light but without a lot of lasting power or really all that much to say, except: life is hard, you always think you're the asshole although you're usually not, and also it takes a really really long time to get good at sexing.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Hassaan

    Things I learned today: 1. I'm not the only one who thinks self making out would be hot. 2. Poop jokes go surprisingly well with introspection. Surprisingly well. This learning experience brought to you by one Jessica Fink in her fabulous book We can Fix It: A Time Travel Memoir. It really brought validation to my beliefs that no, I would not use a time machine to kill notorious dictators, but to make out with my younger self. Jess builds upon the initial silliness/sheer brilliance of presenting ma Things I learned today: 1. I'm not the only one who thinks self making out would be hot. 2. Poop jokes go surprisingly well with introspection. Surprisingly well. This learning experience brought to you by one Jessica Fink in her fabulous book We can Fix It: A Time Travel Memoir. It really brought validation to my beliefs that no, I would not use a time machine to kill notorious dictators, but to make out with my younger self. Jess builds upon the initial silliness/sheer brilliance of presenting masturbation in a whole new light by taking some remarkably deep looks into coping with regrets and traumas from your past, as she revisits scenes from her life that have troubled her all her life. Armed with nothing but her outrageously sexy jumpsuit (none of her alternate selves can seem to resist it) and a kick ass time machine, Jess goes about trying to fix things in her past, with the "perspective" and "wisdom" she has gained from the experience of age. Hilarious hijinks ensue, amidst flashes of profound insight that left me quite introspective myself. It's wickedly funny, rife with Fink's trademark irreverence and remarkable breadth. The obsession with our past, particularly embarrassing events, or little mistakes we wish we hadn't made, is wonderfully tackled; Often I found myself nodding my head, "Yes, this is exactly how my stubborn younger self would behave were he to be confronted with this 'foresight' ". I'd enjoyed Fink's previous work (Chester 5000 XYV). We can Fix It, however, is now, by far, my favourite work from her. If only because of that stunning poop joke.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    I guess this will count as speculative creative nonfiction, as it involves Jess time traveling back to the past of earlier selves to see if she could teach her not to make the mistakes she made, make out with herself to show herself some tricks she has since learned, etc… Pretty funny stuff!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Garden

    I liked this. I like her drawing style and her spunky attitude. I feel like this could have benefitted from a more thoughtful ending, but whatever. Sometimes you just learn a lesson, what're you gonna do. Surprisingly I was in the bookclub minority (the one-person minority) in thinking self makeouts sounds super gross. Here's something about me I am a prude. Anyway I am reading all her online stuff now. I liked this. I like her drawing style and her spunky attitude. I feel like this could have benefitted from a more thoughtful ending, but whatever. Sometimes you just learn a lesson, what're you gonna do. Surprisingly I was in the bookclub minority (the one-person minority) in thinking self makeouts sounds super gross. Here's something about me I am a prude. Anyway I am reading all her online stuff now.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Reminds me in tone of Alison Bechdel's Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic. It hits home and has time travel. You can't go wrong with that. Reminds me in tone of Alison Bechdel's Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic. It hits home and has time travel. You can't go wrong with that.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kate Atherton

    I thought this book was truly original and engrossing. Full of humor but hitting serious notes when needed (and to ground the cruder or more flighty anecdotes) this graphic novel had a lot more heart and a lot more plot twists than I anticipated. The heroine travels back in time at first to teach her last self about sex and love (so she doesn’t mess up so badly) but then realizes she can teach her potentially to avoid EVERY bad thing at every age that she can remember. Then the heroine realizes I thought this book was truly original and engrossing. Full of humor but hitting serious notes when needed (and to ground the cruder or more flighty anecdotes) this graphic novel had a lot more heart and a lot more plot twists than I anticipated. The heroine travels back in time at first to teach her last self about sex and love (so she doesn’t mess up so badly) but then realizes she can teach her potentially to avoid EVERY bad thing at every age that she can remember. Then the heroine realizes all of this, even the bad experiences, shaped her as a person and ultimately uses her time machine to visit happy memories she couldn’t remember all the way. This book is easy to read and follow and so so sweet and quirky. I would recommend it and I want to read more of Jess Dink’s work now.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Peter Derk

    Let's separate this into two categories. 1. Digital Comics I bought this digitally and read it on my phone. Which was a horrible idea and a horrible experience. Also, the download I bought gives you 24 hours to download 6 copies. Which is crazy. Why the hell would I need 6 copies in 24 hours? SIX? And on the flipside, it's crazy because it would have been nice to access it through a purchase code for more than 24 hours. How about we meet in the middle? Two codes, forever. It's one of my first exper Let's separate this into two categories. 1. Digital Comics I bought this digitally and read it on my phone. Which was a horrible idea and a horrible experience. Also, the download I bought gives you 24 hours to download 6 copies. Which is crazy. Why the hell would I need 6 copies in 24 hours? SIX? And on the flipside, it's crazy because it would have been nice to access it through a purchase code for more than 24 hours. How about we meet in the middle? Two codes, forever. It's one of my first experiences with digital comics, and I have to say, I'm not sold. Never have I purchased a physical copy of something and then had restrictions placed on where I could read it and how. It's not like you buy a print book and if you don't shelve it in your home within 24 hours, poof, it's gone. That part sucked. Sucks still. But the above star rating doesn't have much to do with that because that would be unfair. That would be like someone who gets on Amazon and rates a product badly because of a shipping issue. These people exist, and they are legion, and they are real dum-dums. Legion of Dumb! 2. This Comic A lady makes or gets a time machine. There's a time machine. And she's gonna go back in time and fix all the mistakes she made as a young'un, which mostly have to do with awkward moments of growing up. I didn't finish the book because, like I said, I lost access to it. Is this theft? What's old web(ster)-head say? "the felonious taking and removing of personal property with intent to deprive the rightful owner of it" Huh. So in a way, Top Shelf comics kinda committed theft, did they not? Because I had personal digital property that I rightfully owned, and I was deprived! Anyway, sorry. Back to the comic. Here's the thing. This lady goes back in time and seems to spend a lot of time making out with herself. Future lady makes out with past lady. I don't even know what to call that sexual act. It's not the same as kissing, say, your hand for practice, but it's also not the same as kissing a completely different person. I don't really know why she makes out with herself, and call me judgmental, but it's weird. In fact, fuck you if you think I'm being judgmental. I'm judging a sexual act that is IMPOSSIBLE to perform. You can't make out with yourself. So I'm going to go ahead and judge and say it's weird and also that it didn't make a whole lot of sense. In a world of all the people you could make out with, a world that's even larger because you can now skip along the 4th dimension, you decide to make out with YOURSELF!? Of course, the question is, would you be curious? Would you make out with yourself? Just to see? Because it might provide some insight into your technique, or lack thereof. Maybe this would be an important educational experience. My answer is no. Not just because it's gross. My answer is no because, if I did that, then when I made out with other people I'd just be thinking about what they were experiencing while making out with me. And the last thing I need in my head when I'm making out is, erm, ANYTHING, really. Kill the mind, use a little tongue. That's what my grandfather always said. It's entirely possible that this book ramps up where I left off, maybe gets funnier or crazier or just generally more fun. But alas, I'll never know.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Raina

    Silly, fun, escapist, horny. Fairly predictable time-travel moral. But breezily entertaining, for sure. Yay normalization of the ladies libido. While you hear Fink's name tossed with the word "erotica," don't expect the illustrations to be particularly sexy. This is relatively self-deprecating work, with a nice dose of awkward. A professional review I wrote after a database of "children's literature" sent me this (hence all the THIS-IS-NOT-FOR-KIDS-ESE): What is the first thing you would do if you Silly, fun, escapist, horny. Fairly predictable time-travel moral. But breezily entertaining, for sure. Yay normalization of the ladies libido. While you hear Fink's name tossed with the word "erotica," don't expect the illustrations to be particularly sexy. This is relatively self-deprecating work, with a nice dose of awkward. A professional review I wrote after a database of "children's literature" sent me this (hence all the THIS-IS-NOT-FOR-KIDS-ESE): What is the first thing you would do if you had a time machine? Stop yourself from doing dumb things? Make out with yourself? Revisit pleasurable moments? Jess goes immediately for the sexy parts of her past, both bad memories and good. It’s an unusual twist on the memoir genre. The fictionalized Fink interacts with her former selves freely, even transporting multiple versions of herself to various points in her timeline. The content, while not graphically explicit, is overt in its sexuality – the author is acclaimed for this kind of work and known for contributions to comic anthologies such as Erotic Comics and Smut Peddler. As such this work is best suited to libraries serving all ages or adults only. A typical page contains between four and six relatively free-floating panels containing Fink’s accessible grayscale drawings. The Fink character runs into many of the downsides of time travel into one’s own past – memories not living up to your recollection, the inability to influence a more positive outcome, and more. This is a diverting read, and a unique example of memoir storytelling, but best suited to libraries serving the public.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Clearwater Public Library System

    I was unimpressed by this graphic novel and was ultimately confused by it's purpose. The majority of the novel, Jess is going back in time to "fix" the various mistakes she had made - everything ranging from being snippy to her mom to fooling around with the wrong guy. Eventually she realizes this is wrong and that she should live her own mistakes and instead visits different points in her past to creep on herself and remember all the old inside jokes between her and her friends. This is all well I was unimpressed by this graphic novel and was ultimately confused by it's purpose. The majority of the novel, Jess is going back in time to "fix" the various mistakes she had made - everything ranging from being snippy to her mom to fooling around with the wrong guy. Eventually she realizes this is wrong and that she should live her own mistakes and instead visits different points in her past to creep on herself and remember all the old inside jokes between her and her friends. This is all well and good, but for me was dull and confusing. In a nutshell, this is a graphic novel account of the author's teen and college years with a time travel element thrown in for "interest". I felt extremely lost with all of the inside you-had-to-have-been-there jokes, and the popping around from weird flirtatious moment to weird flirtatious moment got really repetitive. It wraps up with some strange talk about how we should focus on the good in our lifetimes instead of only remembering the bad. Which is a great message, but felt overshadowed by the insides jokes that just fell flat and left me feeling like I wasn't a part of this experience and was instead just watching the author gratuitously relive her glory days. I would not recommend this. -Miss Jenn This title is available from PPLC in print format HERE

  11. 4 out of 5

    Callie *Fights Censorship*

    Major disappointment. If you love time travel, this is NOT the story for you. This is one of the most self-indulgent and self absorbed books I have ever read, did she even consider her audience? This book is comprised of seemingly random vignettes stringed together, many of which are neither unique nor interesting. This book is crude to say the least, you have a time travel machine and all you want to do is stalk yourself and have orgies with several versions of yourself? It is not that I was offe Major disappointment. If you love time travel, this is NOT the story for you. This is one of the most self-indulgent and self absorbed books I have ever read, did she even consider her audience? This book is comprised of seemingly random vignettes stringed together, many of which are neither unique nor interesting. This book is crude to say the least, you have a time travel machine and all you want to do is stalk yourself and have orgies with several versions of yourself? It is not that I was offended by the content but rather I was offended by the idea that this content would be considered humorous or amusing, it was just stupid and a bit sad. I would not recommend this book to anyone, and I give a warning to any fellow sci-fi or time travel fan, this book really contains neither. It tried to do the whole 'moral of the story' thing but it fell flat since there were no consequences to her disruptions of the timeline. You want a great graphic memoir? Try Getting Married and Other Mistakes

  12. 4 out of 5

    Romane

    If I have a time machine I'd do the same thing too. I'll try to straighten the things I've done wrong, and maybe make out with my past self too. Wait... what? Anyway, this book is fantastic. There's also something that I really liked about what she said; "Above all, I guess I learned that I am the person I am today because of my mistakes and experiences. Most of my decisions weren't right or wrong, they were part of who I was when I made them. Changing my past would only make me different, not If I have a time machine I'd do the same thing too. I'll try to straighten the things I've done wrong, and maybe make out with my past self too. Wait... what? Anyway, this book is fantastic. There's also something that I really liked about what she said; "Above all, I guess I learned that I am the person I am today because of my mistakes and experiences. Most of my decisions weren't right or wrong, they were part of who I was when I made them. Changing my past would only make me different, not better. And anyway, changing the bad stuff won't help me deal with the future." Oh, and that "we made out so hard I broke my nose ring" part is really cute.

  13. 5 out of 5

    April

    I really like Jess Fink. I love her work, so this was more of a 'fun' dabble for me and I wasn't expecting anything spectacular, therefore I wasn't disappointed. I adored the art, and chuckled a lot at the humorous strips involving her failing to repair a mistake and ending up making out with herself instead. It feels as though it is an expressive piece intended for both Fink herself and her readers, that we should not feel compelled to undo our mistakes no matter how big or small, as they have I really like Jess Fink. I love her work, so this was more of a 'fun' dabble for me and I wasn't expecting anything spectacular, therefore I wasn't disappointed. I adored the art, and chuckled a lot at the humorous strips involving her failing to repair a mistake and ending up making out with herself instead. It feels as though it is an expressive piece intended for both Fink herself and her readers, that we should not feel compelled to undo our mistakes no matter how big or small, as they have made us the person we are today. I mean really, had I not experienced the embarrassing slap of a boy's lips on mine in high school, I would never have anticipated my lesbianism so early.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Allie

    For some reason I thought this would be queerer? Maybe it's because the first thing that happens is she makes out with her past self, but aside from making out with herself it's really super duper straight (which to me is hella boring). That makes it sound like a deal breaker. I still really liked this! But the part that I liked the most that was so interesting was when she tried to intervene when her abusive father kidnapped young Jess. That was the one part that was truly heartrending. The res For some reason I thought this would be queerer? Maybe it's because the first thing that happens is she makes out with her past self, but aside from making out with herself it's really super duper straight (which to me is hella boring). That makes it sound like a deal breaker. I still really liked this! But the part that I liked the most that was so interesting was when she tried to intervene when her abusive father kidnapped young Jess. That was the one part that was truly heartrending. The rest was just like goofy teenage makeouts and screwing around at work. I would definitely read an entire full length memoir about that one single incident with her dad and cry my damn eyes out.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Thom

    Read by a friend + "time travel" in the title = add to reading list. This approach can result in mishaps. Pros were the illustrations, the length and time travel. Cons include inside jokes and lack of plot or direction. See also Audrey Niffenegger. Read by a friend + "time travel" in the title = add to reading list. This approach can result in mishaps. Pros were the illustrations, the length and time travel. Cons include inside jokes and lack of plot or direction. See also Audrey Niffenegger.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Pretty funny, fairly insightful memoir written in a way as a time travelogue. She tries to correct her old self, comes to the realization that's not necessary and that one must think of the good times and not of the bad. Very quick read. It was entertaining enough that I'd read more of Jess Fink's other books if I came across them. Pretty funny, fairly insightful memoir written in a way as a time travelogue. She tries to correct her old self, comes to the realization that's not necessary and that one must think of the good times and not of the bad. Very quick read. It was entertaining enough that I'd read more of Jess Fink's other books if I came across them.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Liz Neering

    Jess Fink has a truly unique art and storytelling style, and her talent shines through in this. You're laughing right up until the moment your heart sinks in your chest. Her memoir is so earnest and moving and real, I encourage you to get off your duff and order it right now. Jess Fink has a truly unique art and storytelling style, and her talent shines through in this. You're laughing right up until the moment your heart sinks in your chest. Her memoir is so earnest and moving and real, I encourage you to get off your duff and order it right now.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Xunker

    NOT FOR KIDS. But for curious adults who like off-kilter situations, it's a hoot! NOT FOR KIDS. But for curious adults who like off-kilter situations, it's a hoot!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Spencer

    I'm sure some folks would really love this. I did laugh at some parts. I mostly found this book annoying. I'm sure some folks would really love this. I did laugh at some parts. I mostly found this book annoying.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joey Alison Sayers

    I read most of these online (LiveJournal?) some years back and hadn't realized they'd been collected. Funny + sexy + time travel = yes please! I read most of these online (LiveJournal?) some years back and hadn't realized they'd been collected. Funny + sexy + time travel = yes please!

  21. 4 out of 5

    MechaComicReviews

    Our memories of our lives from years or even decades ago can change, reformulate, modify, or forget how things played out at the time that they were happening. If we were given a time machine to visit our past selves and right the wrongs of our lives, would we do it? That’s what We Can Fix It! by Jess Fink asks throughout the entire time travel memoir. The reader is transported through the highs and miserable lows of Jess’ life, and she uses that to reflect back on ourselves. Jess’ exploration of Our memories of our lives from years or even decades ago can change, reformulate, modify, or forget how things played out at the time that they were happening. If we were given a time machine to visit our past selves and right the wrongs of our lives, would we do it? That’s what We Can Fix It! by Jess Fink asks throughout the entire time travel memoir. The reader is transported through the highs and miserable lows of Jess’ life, and she uses that to reflect back on ourselves. Jess’ exploration of her memories and visiting her past starts out as a recollection of all of the sexy times she’s had. Whether that’s rooting for a kiss or being dismayed at her former self’s blowjob technique. It’s also an excuse to make out with herself. This seems kind of juvenile but we’ve all relived our past loves while trying to fall asleep at night and wondered how good of a kisser we were and still are. After the initial premise, Jess visits the lows of her life and tries to give herself very quick but forceful advice (“Don’t even call him!” or “Don’t buy those pants!”) in the hopes of improving her past self’s life. Eventually she realizes that, by concentrating on all of the bad, it made her forget a lot of the good times she had growing up. And that’s the big lesson delivered in a fairly humorous way: we should think about the sexy stuff and also focus on what made us giggle or smile or fill us with joy. The lesson is great, and I highly recommend reading the comic because the trip it takes to get there is just as good.

  22. 4 out of 5

    A.y.

    I liked it. It was definitely charming, but not a particularly profound or novel take on “future self tries to prevent past self from making embarrassing mistakes” time travel genre. Basically every element of the narrative was underdeveloped- the time machine origins were funny but not explored; the story of her abusive father was jarring but then dropped almost immediately after it was introduced; the narrative arc of her realising she needed to be kinder to her mother as their family was adju I liked it. It was definitely charming, but not a particularly profound or novel take on “future self tries to prevent past self from making embarrassing mistakes” time travel genre. Basically every element of the narrative was underdeveloped- the time machine origins were funny but not explored; the story of her abusive father was jarring but then dropped almost immediately after it was introduced; the narrative arc of her realising she needed to be kinder to her mother as their family was adjusting after a recent (it seemed) divorce was touching but never resolved. I thought there could have been a lot more time spent narratively connecting the different scenes together and telling the story of Fink’s life. There was some pretty dramatic, traumatic, but also hilarious life events that were just presented as a series of vignettes. This leads me to wonder why these were collected together and what story it was meant to tell beyond “don’t forget you b life has good in addition to bad” which is so facile an insight I feel patronized as a reader. I got this for 25% off at a closing sale for a comic book shop, and I wouldn’t recommend paying full price for it, but I would recommend getting it from a public library. Worth a read, not worth the list price. Read it cover to cover in under 30 minutes and my thought at the end was “aww that was cute”.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

    I’ve always and still am fascinated with the concept of time travel. I’ll checkout pretty much all fiction that includes it. So I was delighted when Kate Leth recommended this memoir on a podcast I was listening to. I thought time travel and memoir seemed like an interesting take on both genres. I was hooked from the initial encounter. What happens is so outrageous that I just loved it. This was an enjoyable read and was done in one sitting (the book is short but its length I feel is perfect) eve I’ve always and still am fascinated with the concept of time travel. I’ll checkout pretty much all fiction that includes it. So I was delighted when Kate Leth recommended this memoir on a podcast I was listening to. I thought time travel and memoir seemed like an interesting take on both genres. I was hooked from the initial encounter. What happens is so outrageous that I just loved it. This was an enjoyable read and was done in one sitting (the book is short but its length I feel is perfect) even with taking time to stop and re read certain areas. The events lean definitely on the humorous side but there were several times my eyes welled up. I also want to comment (like her younger versions do) about how awesome that jumpsuit is especially if its that 60’s sci-fi green color. Her style of cartooning is very adorable. I’m very bias to this style as I love cutesy cartoons. Loved all the little lightning bolts drawn throughout. This was my introduction to Jess Fink’s work and was extremely pleased. Very excited to search out and read her other material. Thank you Jess Fink (cool name) for making such an enjoyable book!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Eli

    I'm not giving this any stars, because any faults I perceive in it are definitely more about me than about the book. Gentle review-reader of the future, you may note that I read this book in the tumultuous and contentious days following the 2020 election in the United (?) States. I thought I needed something light, frivolous, and optimistic to give me a brief break from the waking nightmare I was living in at the time. And then I got super pissed that light, frivolous, and optimistic is exactly w I'm not giving this any stars, because any faults I perceive in it are definitely more about me than about the book. Gentle review-reader of the future, you may note that I read this book in the tumultuous and contentious days following the 2020 election in the United (?) States. I thought I needed something light, frivolous, and optimistic to give me a brief break from the waking nightmare I was living in at the time. And then I got super pissed that light, frivolous, and optimistic is exactly what I got, because it turns out that wasn't what I needed after all. So if you're looking for a fun, quick read, this is for you. If you're not, it's not - and that's certainly not the book's (or Jess Fink's) fault.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Soobie's scared

    I sooo didn't like this graphic novel. I read other works by Jess Fink and I really liked them. I'm referring to the Chester's series, for example. For this reason, I decided to read this one as well. This was a mistake. I kind of like the concept of time-travel but in this work it's extremely poor executed. The protagonist is very annoying because she kept going back trying to change things trying to make her life better. OK, I can understand that but she was so annoying. I like Fink's art and t I sooo didn't like this graphic novel. I read other works by Jess Fink and I really liked them. I'm referring to the Chester's series, for example. For this reason, I decided to read this one as well. This was a mistake. I kind of like the concept of time-travel but in this work it's extremely poor executed. The protagonist is very annoying because she kept going back trying to change things trying to make her life better. OK, I can understand that but she was so annoying. I like Fink's art and the way she puts her panels on the page and I will definitely read something else by her. Unfortunately this was a miss for me.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Artguy

    It is great to have a female voice in the world of graphic novels. Not that it is non-existant (Alison Bechdel, Marjane Satrapi for example), but you don't see it often enough in light-hearted books in this genre. Jess Fink is unapologetic, too, diving right in to all manners of humor. It starts with her future self traveling back in time to help her younger self to avoid bad decisions and awkward situations. Immediately she has sex with herself. And this sets the tone. This is by no means high l It is great to have a female voice in the world of graphic novels. Not that it is non-existant (Alison Bechdel, Marjane Satrapi for example), but you don't see it often enough in light-hearted books in this genre. Jess Fink is unapologetic, too, diving right in to all manners of humor. It starts with her future self traveling back in time to help her younger self to avoid bad decisions and awkward situations. Immediately she has sex with herself. And this sets the tone. This is by no means high literature, and the moral ends up to be rather bland, but it is an imaginative story with very funny moments that make this quick read worthwhile.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amy Qualls

    Standard trope: the first thing any time traveler does is make out with him/herself. After that: in this case, a small, sweet story about what we choose to remember and how that affects who we are as people.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dana Giusti

    Meh. I didn't understand why she was making out with former versions of herself; it seemed super creepy. And of course, she discovers that her past mistakes made her who she is today. Yawn. Meh. I didn't understand why she was making out with former versions of herself; it seemed super creepy. And of course, she discovers that her past mistakes made her who she is today. Yawn.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Keith Knudsen

    Pretty funny read and a nice moral tucked in there.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Driscoll

    Clever idea, but the execution leaves a lot to be desired. Still, a few moments made me kind of grin.

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