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From the bestselling author and acclaimed historian, a powerful portrayal of the life of Jesus Is Jesus relevant to us today? Few figures have had such an influ­ence on history as Jesus of Nazareth. His teachings have inspired discussion, arguments, even war, and yet few have ever held forth as movingly on the need for peace, forgiveness, and mercy. Paul Johnson's brilli From the bestselling author and acclaimed historian, a powerful portrayal of the life of Jesus Is Jesus relevant to us today? Few figures have had such an influ­ence on history as Jesus of Nazareth. His teachings have inspired discussion, arguments, even war, and yet few have ever held forth as movingly on the need for peace, forgiveness, and mercy. Paul Johnson's brilliant reading offers readers a lively biography of the man who inspired one of the world's great religions and whose les­sons still guide us in current times. Johnson's magisterial and revered book A History of Christianity is a masterpiece of historical writing on religion; and in his new book he returns to focus on a central figure in one of the world's dominant religions. Johnson's intelligent and conver­sational style, as well as his ability to distill complex subjects into succinct, highly readable works, make this book the ideal match of a major historian with a major subject. The result is an accessible biography and an insightful analysis of how Jesus is important in the present era.


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From the bestselling author and acclaimed historian, a powerful portrayal of the life of Jesus Is Jesus relevant to us today? Few figures have had such an influ­ence on history as Jesus of Nazareth. His teachings have inspired discussion, arguments, even war, and yet few have ever held forth as movingly on the need for peace, forgiveness, and mercy. Paul Johnson's brilli From the bestselling author and acclaimed historian, a powerful portrayal of the life of Jesus Is Jesus relevant to us today? Few figures have had such an influ­ence on history as Jesus of Nazareth. His teachings have inspired discussion, arguments, even war, and yet few have ever held forth as movingly on the need for peace, forgiveness, and mercy. Paul Johnson's brilliant reading offers readers a lively biography of the man who inspired one of the world's great religions and whose les­sons still guide us in current times. Johnson's magisterial and revered book A History of Christianity is a masterpiece of historical writing on religion; and in his new book he returns to focus on a central figure in one of the world's dominant religions. Johnson's intelligent and conver­sational style, as well as his ability to distill complex subjects into succinct, highly readable works, make this book the ideal match of a major historian with a major subject. The result is an accessible biography and an insightful analysis of how Jesus is important in the present era.

30 review for Jesus: A Biography, from a Believer

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Zygmont

    This may be a difficult book for some readers who are not Christians, because author Paul Johnson accepts the divinity of Christ (as he states unambiguously in the subtitle, A Biography From a Believer). But I recommend the book to any and all readers, because it gives a perspective of Christ that you don't find elsewhere, presenting him as a walking, talking, living and breathing historical figure -- and, let's face it, considering his impact, Jesus was one of the most significant figures in al This may be a difficult book for some readers who are not Christians, because author Paul Johnson accepts the divinity of Christ (as he states unambiguously in the subtitle, A Biography From a Believer). But I recommend the book to any and all readers, because it gives a perspective of Christ that you don't find elsewhere, presenting him as a walking, talking, living and breathing historical figure -- and, let's face it, considering his impact, Jesus was one of the most significant figures in all of history. Johnson is a very careful and refreshingly lucid historian and biographer. He uses the four gospels as source material (they are contemporaneously written historical documents, after all, written by Christ's companions and meant to record and memorialize his life), along with information he gleans from other historical records, to present Christ as compassionate, gregarious, charismatic, well respected, and overall a nice guy. When setting up his tale in the book's introduction, Johnson tells us that within 20 after Christ's death, in about 50 AD (in an era when writing was rare and difficult), ". . . biographies of him written in the Aramaic tongue he normally spoke were circulating, but these have disappeared. Within half a century of his death, however, four biographies, written in Greek, had been published, and all have come down to us. By the end of century, forty-five authentic documents about him had appeared, and these have also survived. . . . The problem of writing the life of Jesus the man is not so much the paucity of sources as their abundance. . . . There is the further problem of presenting to readers, two millennia later, the personality of a man so extraordinary and protean, passionate yet deliberative, straightforward and subtle, full of authority and even, at times, stern, yet also infinitely kind, understanding, forgiving, and loving, so dazzling in his excellences that those close to him had no hesitation in accepting his divinity." It is a problem that Paul Johnson overcomes splendidly, writing a very interesting, illuminating and inspiring biography of Jesus Christ. I recommended it to all.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rick Elliott

    More than any other book - other than the Bible - Paul Johnson's "Jesus - A Biography From A Believer" helped me to understand the life, character, teachings, and context of the man whose life changed the course of human history. After reading this wonderfully precise and and moving work, my praise and worship for Jesus has been elevated to a whole new level. I highly recommend this book! More than any other book - other than the Bible - Paul Johnson's "Jesus - A Biography From A Believer" helped me to understand the life, character, teachings, and context of the man whose life changed the course of human history. After reading this wonderfully precise and and moving work, my praise and worship for Jesus has been elevated to a whole new level. I highly recommend this book!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Karl Rove

    Within just a few months, two slim, brillant volumes from a great writer. "What did Jesus teach?...The only way to grasp his teaching is to read all the Gospels repeatedly, until permeates the mind." "The Christianity he bequeathed has not been tried and failed. As G.K. Chesterton once wrote, it has been found difficult and left untried." Within just a few months, two slim, brillant volumes from a great writer. "What did Jesus teach?...The only way to grasp his teaching is to read all the Gospels repeatedly, until permeates the mind." "The Christianity he bequeathed has not been tried and failed. As G.K. Chesterton once wrote, it has been found difficult and left untried."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Edoardo Albert

    Here's an impious thought for the impious: surely there's something deeply wonderful that the most important man in human history was a carpenter, a poor man living in the first century equivalent of Walsall, rather than a conqueror or a king. Think of those other candidates for most important man in history, generally surnamed 'the great', such as Alexander or Cyrus or Napoleon: they arrived at their greatness by swimming across rivers of blood. What Paul Johnson does in this little book, and d Here's an impious thought for the impious: surely there's something deeply wonderful that the most important man in human history was a carpenter, a poor man living in the first century equivalent of Walsall, rather than a conqueror or a king. Think of those other candidates for most important man in history, generally surnamed 'the great', such as Alexander or Cyrus or Napoleon: they arrived at their greatness by swimming across rivers of blood. What Paul Johnson does in this little book, and does marvellously, is show why that carpenter from Nazareth was: so extraordinary and protean, passionate yet deliberative, straightforward and subtle, full of authority and even, at times, stern, yet also infinitely kind, understanding, forgiving, and loving, so dazzling in his excellences that those close to him had no hesitation in accepting his divinity. There is a question that Jesus is related to have asked his disciples. "Who do people say I am?" And they answered, giving the speculations of the people as to who this extraordinary preacher and miracle worker might be. Then Jesus said, "But you, who do you say I am?" The question is asked of each of us. It may be the most important question ever posed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Phillip

    This was more or less a prose summary of the New Testament gospels. It was if someone was given a book review of the four gospels -- I didn't really learn anything I couldn't have known if I read them myself. This was basically the Cliff's Notes version on the NT. I was a bit put off when he began the book by saying "I do not cite my authorities, though I am prepared to defend all my assertions, if challenged, by documentation." This was very Jesus 101 ... there was a lack of critical reading of This was more or less a prose summary of the New Testament gospels. It was if someone was given a book review of the four gospels -- I didn't really learn anything I couldn't have known if I read them myself. This was basically the Cliff's Notes version on the NT. I was a bit put off when he began the book by saying "I do not cite my authorities, though I am prepared to defend all my assertions, if challenged, by documentation." This was very Jesus 101 ... there was a lack of critical reading of the gospels. I don't agree that you can combine all four gospels together to create one story because, in some ways, they are mutually exclusive. He takes for granted that John was written by one of the actual apostles, but that's just not historically correct. So, if you just want a basic restatement of the Gospels, this is for you. But if you are looking for anything deep and critical, find something else.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ali M

    Paul Johnson writes in his slim but thorough biography of Jesus “that all the genuine improvements in the way human beings live and behave toward one another spring from following the teaching and, above all, the example of Jesus.” Johnson gives us the details of the teaching and example of Christ in simple but eloquent prose. Johnson makes clear early in the book that he does not cite his authorities, which helps with the flow of the story. And while this assertion gave me pause at first, I hav Paul Johnson writes in his slim but thorough biography of Jesus “that all the genuine improvements in the way human beings live and behave toward one another spring from following the teaching and, above all, the example of Jesus.” Johnson gives us the details of the teaching and example of Christ in simple but eloquent prose. Johnson makes clear early in the book that he does not cite his authorities, which helps with the flow of the story. And while this assertion gave me pause at first, I have such tremendous respect for Johnson as an historian and knowing that he wrote “A History of the Jews,” I was quite content to rely on his statement that he could defend all his assertions with documentation if necessary. This is a straightforward narrative of the life and beliefs of Jesus Christ, but Johnson makes it compelling with the passion of his belief and his synthesis of those beliefs such that they are relevant to the modern reader. A few things stood out to me in Johnson’s book. The first was that it had never really occurred to me that the people we read about in the New Testament were literate. But Mary, Joseph and Jesus were all very well educated and as practicing Jews read and prayed with great reliance on the scriptures, and indeed were guided in their daily lives by written laws. The second thing was that the coming of Christ was of particular importance for women. Johnson devotes an entire chapter to Jesus’s encounters with his people with a particular emphasis on women, the aged and children. Johnson writes, “Jesus’s encounters with women had a particular significance. Women were almost invisible in the ancient Near East. They had little or no status unless they married rulers, and then their place was precarious… If they were poor and old, they were nothing. But not to Jesus.” The protection that Christianity gave to women was an entirely new thing and it makes me sad to think we are eschewing this protection today in favor of choice and all the temptations that modernity offers us. Human nature is constant and to deny that women need certain protections in society is to deny reality. Finally, the time of Jesus seems so long ago to modern readers and it is easy to think of the people and their problems as primitive and to distance ourselves in our wealth, comfort and knowledge. For me, this book really brought home to me how little has changed in over two millennia. The faults of man are just as they were then; common, knowable and awful. It is against this fabric that Johnson describes the teachings of Christ and enables the reader to see more clearly what a gift to humanity his life and message are. This book was first published in 2010, but Johnson could have been writing at any time in history. His closing remarks are both chilling and comforting in that they make clear that some things never change, that we never learn, but that there is a way forward. Johnson writes, “Palestine in the first century AD was a land crowded (just as our earth is crowded) with a multiracial, multi-religious population. The people believed themselves to be civilized, with ancient traditions of law, spiritual life, and government. But their tranquility was constantly disturbed by barbarous events and acts of savagery. There was a sense of impending catastrophe. Wild visions of a terrifying future were discussed. There were prophets of both doom and utopias. Government, both spiritual and temporal, was supposedly a blessing, being based, on the one hand, on the law of Moses and, on the other, on Roman law. There were codes, precedents, courts, parchments – and plenty of lawyers. In practice it was corrupt, mendacious, grossly inefficient, and spasmodically cruel. It did not dispense justice so much as whim. It was run by men who were plainly inadequate and sometimes monsters. Herod the Great was an evil man who murdered innocent children to protect his throne. Herod’s son Antipas was a spendthrift hedonist, not unlike some Arabian princes today, but he was also a man who mingled his frivolities with an occasional murder. Caiaphas, the high priest, was an evil man like Herod, with an added dimension of hypocrisy, spiritual pride, and a peculiar malice toward good men. Pontius Pilate was an archetype of the weaknesses with which we are daily familiar in our own political world: a pretense to uphold truth and justice and to heed public opinion, combined with indecision, cowardice and a final tendency to bow to pressure groups, even when knowing them to be wrong. Every aspect of bad government we experience toady finds its counterpart in first century Palestine, not least the listless mediocrity which was its usual characteristic.” The truth of our world is sometimes hard to bear, but Johnson leaves us on a hopeful note, concluding, “The Christianity he bequeathed has not been tried and failed. As G.K. Chesterton once wrote, it has been found difficult and left untried. But it remains at our disposal. Its message, at its simplest, is: do as Jesus did. That is why his biography, in our terrifying twenty-first century, is so important. We must study it, and learn.” It is my fervent prayer that we do. This book is a good place to start.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Willis

    I'm a Paul Johnson fan. I love his insight and opinions in his books, but this one was lacking in both. Maybe he was timid of saying anything blasphemous, or maybe he realized he did not have the expertise to say anything beyond what was in the Gospels. It's a nice and well-written biography but one might as well read the Gospels of Matthew and John. I'm a Paul Johnson fan. I love his insight and opinions in his books, but this one was lacking in both. Maybe he was timid of saying anything blasphemous, or maybe he realized he did not have the expertise to say anything beyond what was in the Gospels. It's a nice and well-written biography but one might as well read the Gospels of Matthew and John.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    I liked this book. I mean it was okay. It was basically a refresher of the Gospels and the life of Jesus from the time God told Mary she was pregnant until the time Jesus ascended. I liked Yancey's "The Jesus I Never Knew" better because when he gave personal opinion, it was from his personal experiences. This author (Johnson) would say some things and it really made me think okay I need to read the Bible again for myself. He did some paraphrasing without citing scriptures. I did not like his "N I liked this book. I mean it was okay. It was basically a refresher of the Gospels and the life of Jesus from the time God told Mary she was pregnant until the time Jesus ascended. I liked Yancey's "The Jesus I Never Knew" better because when he gave personal opinion, it was from his personal experiences. This author (Johnson) would say some things and it really made me think okay I need to read the Bible again for myself. He did some paraphrasing without citing scriptures. I did not like his "New 10 commandments." How do you say Jesus left us with 1 commandment to love God and love our neighbor, then come up with 10 new commandments that are basicaly the same things? So ehh this book was good as a refresher for someone who already knows the life of Jesus or may haven't read about it since they were a kid but I would not recommend this to someone interested in becoming a christian. It can be complicated since the gospels give different accounts of some of the same stories and Johnson does not say much to address that.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sally Ewan

    I picked this book up (actually BOUGHT it, rather than got it from the library!) because I love Paul Johnson's history books. I was intrigued by the subtitle "A Biography, from a Believer". Nothing new or exciting in the first few chapters, but he did present the setting of Christ's birth and life in a helpful factual way. But when I got to the chapter about Jesus's "new" commandments, I became distressed. Johnson talks about how we are to be like Jesus and if we come close enough to his example I picked this book up (actually BOUGHT it, rather than got it from the library!) because I love Paul Johnson's history books. I was intrigued by the subtitle "A Biography, from a Believer". Nothing new or exciting in the first few chapters, but he did present the setting of Christ's birth and life in a helpful factual way. But when I got to the chapter about Jesus's "new" commandments, I became distressed. Johnson talks about how we are to be like Jesus and if we come close enough to his example of goodness, honesty, morality, etc, then we can go to heaven. There was no mention of our indwelling sin nature or our utter inability to be like Christ without the Holy Spirit. No mention of the Atonement. It was good works all the way. So sad.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    This was a great review of the life of Christ with several great observations I've never considered. It seems that most books on Christ in the last few years have been angry rants trying to disprove His existence, so this was definitely refreshing This was a great review of the life of Christ with several great observations I've never considered. It seems that most books on Christ in the last few years have been angry rants trying to disprove His existence, so this was definitely refreshing

  11. 5 out of 5

    Laurel Hicks

    Excellent biography by an historian. There are a few things I don't agree with, but I can recommend this book. Excellent biography by an historian. There are a few things I don't agree with, but I can recommend this book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jerrodm

    I did not love this book, and I don't consider it to be serious biography; rather, it's a condensation of stories from the four gospels, with some of the author's surmises (and biases) thrown in for good measure. I have to say that I started reading this book somewhat under false pretenses - I was looking for a historical take on the life of Jesus, not focusing on the claims of divinity or miracle-working. The book I wanted to read wasn't available from Overdrive, but this one, entitled Jesus: A I did not love this book, and I don't consider it to be serious biography; rather, it's a condensation of stories from the four gospels, with some of the author's surmises (and biases) thrown in for good measure. I have to say that I started reading this book somewhat under false pretenses - I was looking for a historical take on the life of Jesus, not focusing on the claims of divinity or miracle-working. The book I wanted to read wasn't available from Overdrive, but this one, entitled Jesus: A 21st Century Biography, was. Only after I'd checked it out did I find that the alternate sub-title was A Biography, from a Believer. So this wasn't exactly the book I'd been planning on reading. And the book is definitely from the perspective of the author, Paul Johnson, with no attempt to weigh the contrasting claims (even among believers) around Jesus's life and personality. In fact, he states at the beginning that the Bible, and specifically the gospels, provide the basis for all his writing - no external sources or analysis brought to bear here. Further, he uses what I can only think of as the "Scrabble Rule" of scholarly citation, stating in the introduction that "I do not cite my authorities, though I am prepared to defend all my assertions, if challenged, by documentation." So what the reader ends up with is a prose explanation of what Paul Johnson imagines Jesus was like, from his repeated close readings of the four gospels. Not useless, perhaps, but not what most people would think of as serious scholarship. Johnson's decision not to seriously engage with the millennia of writing about the person of Jesus shows in many ways. He asserts among other things, the following: - Jesus didn't have any schooling - Judaism was "popular among serious, civilized people everywhere" (The ethnocentrism here is super-yucky, for the record.) - That all early Christians probably "knew the names of the apostles, in order, by heart" (What basis is there for this conclusion?) - The miracle at the Wedding in Cana is a reliable account because "where alcohol is concerned men rarely make statistical mistakes" (Tell that to all the drunk people who've ever tried to split a bar tab at the end of the night!) - Regarding care for orphans, widows and other unfortunates, that Jews were "more conscientious in this respect than any other people (On what basis does he make this claim?) - The religious leaders of the Jews "got on very well with Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor of Judaea, and Herod Antipas" (Tell that to the Romans, who put down literally dozens of riots, protests and other movements led by religious leaders during the hundred or so years around the life of Jesus! Seriously, Paul, try reading an actual history book about this!) On top of that, several of his less-than-savory views seriously tarnished the book for me, including his Milton-esque fear of knowledge as sinful, portraying knowledge and science as a temptation to evil; his claim that pre-modern societies "were just emerging from savagery", that the West is the standard for civilization, and that the Judaic (and, by extension, Christian) tradition is somehow so much deeper, richer and more meaningful than other religious traditions; that "masculine characteristics" include reason and logical argumentation, while an appeal to emotions to make a point is feminine; that divorce is inevitably a bad thing for women and that prohibitions on divorce are there to protect women from being left alone in this hard, cruel world by their protector husbands; that sex not under the control of the church is "licentiousness"...the list goes on. On top of that, Johnson would like to arrogate all, literally all of the good things that have happened in history since Jesus was born to the influence of Christianity, as the following quotation makes clear: But if we sort out the salutary aspects from the deplorable, if we look at what is decent and valuable in our modern sensibilities—now, in the second decade of the twenty-first century—we see that all the genuine improvements in the way human beings live and behave toward one another spring from following the teaching and, above all, the example of Jesus.It's just so absurdly parochial it's hard to know how to respond. So anyway, I can't really recommend this book to anyone. If you're not a believer, you're likely to be confounded by an author who so obviously makes no effort to consider other viewpoints that he doesn't even really cohabit the same universe as you. I get that not every book, not even every historical book, needs to take an all-sides approach. But I think there's so little common ground here for non-believers that they're not likely to take much away. For believers, there really isn't much new ground either, apart from a look into Johnson's personal views on the nature of Jesus's political and spiritual program. Maybe that's something you're interested in, but I didn't find it so much more enlightening than just going and listening to any random preacher talk about a story from the gospels on any given Sunday. There's no new material brought to light to expand your understanding of what's already in the Bible. Instead, it's just "what Paul Johnson" thinks about the stories contained therein. Not my cup of tea.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Reader Variety

    Go-to book for a compact examination of the life of Jesus on earth. Johnson examines each phase of the life of Jesus, and though as a believer he admits his bias, he still does a fair job of outlining the major driving events that brought Jesus into being and into such importance during his life and after. Johnson explores the remarkable of story not only of how Mary receives the news about being pregnant Jesus, but also how Joseph (though not married to Mary and suspicious at first) took her for Go-to book for a compact examination of the life of Jesus on earth. Johnson examines each phase of the life of Jesus, and though as a believer he admits his bias, he still does a fair job of outlining the major driving events that brought Jesus into being and into such importance during his life and after. Johnson explores the remarkable of story not only of how Mary receives the news about being pregnant Jesus, but also how Joseph (though not married to Mary and suspicious at first) took her for his wife and remained a devoted husband. He also explores how Jesus valued those who had faith inspired by belief vs. by miracle, notably the Roman centurion who asked Jesus to heal his servant, but said he was not worthy to have Jesus come under his roof and believed that just a word spoken by Jesus would be enough to heal the servant. Johnson describes Jesus as being "true for all time" and "transfiguring history and geography, spreading everywhere and bridging the gulf between the universe God created and the infinite in which he had his being." Johnson outlines Jesus's "New Ten Commandments": - We all must develop a new personality based on his teachings - Accept and abide by universality - the human race must be seen as a whole - Respect that we are all equal in God's eyes - Need for love in all human relationships - Show mercy just as God shows it to us - Show balance and control - Cultivate an open mind - Pursue the truth unstained by sectarian usage - Exercise judicious use of power - Show courage

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Giddens

    I was turned onto this by Ryan Holiday, though I had read a bunch of Paul Johnson stuff before. While the four gospels are the authoritative (and only real necessary) story of Jesus, Johnson's approach is surprisingly novel. Approaching the heart of the best selling book of all time as a biographer, he stitches the gospels together into one story (KJV references, of course), producing a character study. You know, like a biography. It's hard to articulate why this new approach works, but it was r I was turned onto this by Ryan Holiday, though I had read a bunch of Paul Johnson stuff before. While the four gospels are the authoritative (and only real necessary) story of Jesus, Johnson's approach is surprisingly novel. Approaching the heart of the best selling book of all time as a biographer, he stitches the gospels together into one story (KJV references, of course), producing a character study. You know, like a biography. It's hard to articulate why this new approach works, but it was refreshing for me. He digs into historical context and asks a lot of questions, like "what was Jesus doing between ages 12 and 30?", attempting to answer them as best he can. This is really good, if for no other reason than it makes an old, old, story new again.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Samuel

    As a fellow believer this was a case of preaching to the choir, but don't stop reading because of that. Paul Johnson's biography of Jesus doesn't add a lot that isn't already found in the four gospels, but he does do the reader the favour of organizing these stories giving an overview of what is found in each and what each is trying to tell us. He is light on analysis, but does include some, gives some speculation on motives of those who tried Jesus, they don't come off well, as well as Judas, wh As a fellow believer this was a case of preaching to the choir, but don't stop reading because of that. Paul Johnson's biography of Jesus doesn't add a lot that isn't already found in the four gospels, but he does do the reader the favour of organizing these stories giving an overview of what is found in each and what each is trying to tell us. He is light on analysis, but does include some, gives some speculation on motives of those who tried Jesus, they don't come off well, as well as Judas, who Johnson leaves judgement of to the readers. All together this is a good companion to the gospels not a replacement for them. I don't think it will convince those who are not believers, but that is not what it was designed for.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Trent

    I would say 20% 5 star book, otherwise 3 stars because he's just summarizing what the gospels already say. Paul Johnson is a tremendous author, and I would recommend his other books above this one. Especially Modern Times, which I thought was a Phenomenal history book! Basically this book is good when he's talking about the times in which Jesus lived rather than Jesus himself, because Paul Johnson is an outstanding historian. I would say 20% 5 star book, otherwise 3 stars because he's just summarizing what the gospels already say. Paul Johnson is a tremendous author, and I would recommend his other books above this one. Especially Modern Times, which I thought was a Phenomenal history book! Basically this book is good when he's talking about the times in which Jesus lived rather than Jesus himself, because Paul Johnson is an outstanding historian.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I would recommend the book to Christians and others interested in Biblical writings. Even though the stories from Jesus' life were familiar to me, the way they were presented and paired together was in such a way that I still found myself learning more, especially with the provided historical context. I would recommend the book to Christians and others interested in Biblical writings. Even though the stories from Jesus' life were familiar to me, the way they were presented and paired together was in such a way that I still found myself learning more, especially with the provided historical context.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Kang

    My reading experience of this book wasn't great. It took me some months to plod through it and even that with generous skipping of pages. Much of the book is basically a retelling of the life of Jesus as found in the Gospels. My reading experience of this book wasn't great. It took me some months to plod through it and even that with generous skipping of pages. Much of the book is basically a retelling of the life of Jesus as found in the Gospels.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lydia G

    This was a 2014 United Methodist Women's Reading Program book. I guess being a Christian and a Believer for many years, I just wasn't as impacted in reading this book. For a new believer, I think it would be good. This was a 2014 United Methodist Women's Reading Program book. I guess being a Christian and a Believer for many years, I just wasn't as impacted in reading this book. For a new believer, I think it would be good.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kico Meirelles

    By an amazing coincidence, I finished this beautiful book on a Good Friday. This book is a must read to remember His great journey among us and His relevance to our lives. In addition, it was written by Paul Johnson, my favorite biographer writer.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Clint Davison

    Good book - little too much opinion, but it's at least billed that way going in. Good book - little too much opinion, but it's at least billed that way going in.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Eclaghorn

    Enjoyed a historian's perpective on the greatest man in history. Great read. Enjoyed a historian's perpective on the greatest man in history. Great read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Noah

    I got to understand Jesus better. Who could ask for anything more?

  24. 4 out of 5

    Justin Arnest

    Insightful perspectives. This book was a very practical look at the four Gospels and laid out the biography of Jesus in a very chronological and factual presentation.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Radu Andrei Deme

    A journalist who know how to tell the story of one of the most controversial subjects of mankind..

  26. 5 out of 5

    LaDon

    A reasonably good overview of Jesus' life. A reasonably good overview of Jesus' life.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Frances

    Little is said here is new.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    I learned a lot from this book. I found the King James version of the Bible that was sited a little hard to understand.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ray

    I liked it, and am glad I read it during the Lenten season.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Matt Kuntz

    This is a beautiful little biography of Jesus. It doesn't have a lot of non- Biblical sources, but the author manages to tease out interesting and valuable information that from the context, types of images described, etc This is a beautiful little biography of Jesus. It doesn't have a lot of non- Biblical sources, but the author manages to tease out interesting and valuable information that from the context, types of images described, etc

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