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The Mystery of Cabin Island

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A series of adventures begins for the Hardy boys after they sail their ice boat to the desolate and inhospitable Cabin Island.


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A series of adventures begins for the Hardy boys after they sail their ice boat to the desolate and inhospitable Cabin Island.

30 review for The Mystery of Cabin Island

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sheri

    This is my first Hardy Boys re-read since elementary school. The stories follow the same format as the Nancy Drew mysteries, and I can see how both series appeal to kids and parents. Comparing the two series, the Hardy Boys seem more action oriented; the boys are always exploring, pursuing, navigating land and water, and just plain detecting in some way. Apparently, this story is regarded as one of the best among Hardy Boys fans, and I can see why mystery devotees like this one so much. You get This is my first Hardy Boys re-read since elementary school. The stories follow the same format as the Nancy Drew mysteries, and I can see how both series appeal to kids and parents. Comparing the two series, the Hardy Boys seem more action oriented; the boys are always exploring, pursuing, navigating land and water, and just plain detecting in some way. Apparently, this story is regarded as one of the best among Hardy Boys fans, and I can see why mystery devotees like this one so much. You get a lot of bang for the buck in this mystery with its unique setting and uncommon accessory of an iceboat, as well as a ghostly and exotic character, a coded message, and hidden valuables. There are enough suspicious characters and questionable events to build intrigue and suspense and those elements paired with the remarkable and enviable adventures of the Hardy brothers make this an exciting escape from a humdrum everyday life. Recommended to kids who like mystery, action, and adventure.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    Another thrilling adventure for Frank and Joe with the friends Biff and Chet! This time they are using an iceboat (being a Southerner, I didn't even know they existed) and camping in a cabin on Cabin Island with two mysteries to solve. They have to fight off some rowdy no-gooders in Ike and Nash and a pretty insistent bad guy Hanleigh as well as ghosts and ferocious snowstorms! So far, one of my son and I'd favorite Hardy Boy stories full of twists and excitement and Chet's pancakes! Loved it :)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessaka

    This was the first Hardy Boy that I read, and I am glad I did because years ago when I tried to read one of these Hardy Boy books there was just too much action for me to believe what was happening, that is, every time they turned around something bad was happening to one of them. So far, I have not found that to be true of the ones that McFarlane wrote, but I have not read them all. "The long cold snap had caused rejoicing in the hearts of the young folk of Bayport. Although the ice in mid-bay w This was the first Hardy Boy that I read, and I am glad I did because years ago when I tried to read one of these Hardy Boy books there was just too much action for me to believe what was happening, that is, every time they turned around something bad was happening to one of them. So far, I have not found that to be true of the ones that McFarlane wrote, but I have not read them all. "The long cold snap had caused rejoicing in the hearts of the young folk of Bayport. Although the ice in mid-bay was not solid, along the shore and in the numerous covers of the indented bay it was frozen to a safe depth. The dark figures of skaters sped like swallows in flight on the miniature natural rinks close to shore, and father out the speeding ice-boats with their billowing sails resembled huge sea gulls as they raced before the wind." Joe and Frank Hardy are on one such ice-boat, along with their friend Chet. It is almost the Christmas holidays, and they are looking forward to camping out. As they are sailing along they find Cabin Island and decide to stop and see the place. It is supposed to be deserted, but when they get off the boat they find foot prints in the snow, and as they begin to explore the island a stranger tells them to leave. The mystery begins. Note: You know what those boys need to have? Roasted hot dogs, hot chocolate, and roasted marshmallows. And now I will tell you how to make them: P.S. if you need chili, mayo or mustard, or even onions, bring them with you. Make a campfire in a safe place. Cut a branch off a tree and trim it; then sharpen to a point. Place a hot dog on it and roast it over the fire, turning it when needed. Do the same for a mashmallow, but when the marshmallow catches fire, blow the fire out. You just want to marshmallow to be mostly black all over. As for hot chocolate: Boil water on a campfire, and then pour a packet of cocoa powder in each cup. Note: Copyright: 1929

  4. 5 out of 5

    C.

    I enjoyed “The Mystery Of Cabin Island”, 1929, very much but gave three stars because, as a voracious reader, I'm conscious of contrived action. The Stratemeyer Syndicate planned these stories and assigned authors; largely Canadian, Leslie McFarlane. After you read a few, it is clear that too much of the action is artificial. One asks why the Hardy Boys didn't travel with the police in their pocket, for the number of guilty characters and burglaries they confronted and near vehicular misses: on I enjoyed “The Mystery Of Cabin Island”, 1929, very much but gave three stars because, as a voracious reader, I'm conscious of contrived action. The Stratemeyer Syndicate planned these stories and assigned authors; largely Canadian, Leslie McFarlane. After you read a few, it is clear that too much of the action is artificial. One asks why the Hardy Boys didn't travel with the police in their pocket, for the number of guilty characters and burglaries they confronted and near vehicular misses: on the road, in the water, and now on the ice. What financially well-set parents! It's a missing element that the sleuths never needed to be inventive, like “MacGyver”. They always had professional equipment at their fingertips. This is one of the special stories, with substance in the details of the mystery, of a personal nature. An antique collector is tracking his Grandson. Unfortunately the substance was in the background. I asked myself: what is going on in most of this novel? As worthy as the storyline is, the action is mainly that infamously artificial filler. There is too much running around. Every time the foursome of Frank, Joe, Chet, or Biff left Cabin Island, a rival iceboat bugged them. Whenever they returned to Cabin Island, the known villain had trespassed; an undeniably unintelligent villain. They should have had the foresight to park police at either end of the ice, or they could have gone to the homes of the iceboat drivers. None of their identities were mysteries. A reader too young to ponder intellectual questions, or content with action, however overtly-fabricated it is, would delight in this story. I look for the gems among the Hardys and Nancy Drew, where I imagine their authors were given carte blanche to shine. There are four- and five-star books among them.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kristine Hansen

    I loved this book - and a lot of the reason was that I was lucky enough to read the 1929 version. Lots of differences - the first being that Frank and Joe are age 16 and 15 respectively in the older books, instead of the 18 / 17 age they are in newer reprints. The mystery is simple and honestly this book is more a wintertime camping adventure, which I enjoyed too. The clues kept one guessing, and ok some of it was a bit obvious, but the pacing was swift and we still got to spend a considerable am I loved this book - and a lot of the reason was that I was lucky enough to read the 1929 version. Lots of differences - the first being that Frank and Joe are age 16 and 15 respectively in the older books, instead of the 18 / 17 age they are in newer reprints. The mystery is simple and honestly this book is more a wintertime camping adventure, which I enjoyed too. The clues kept one guessing, and ok some of it was a bit obvious, but the pacing was swift and we still got to spend a considerable amount of time with Chet and Biff, so it's all good. Overall, I'd really like to track down more of the original books. If you're a Hardy Boys fan, do try them in the older versions. It's an amazing glimpse of life in the 1920s. and a fun mystery besides!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    I've been reading a bunch of these early Hardy Boys books lately. I've got to say, this was the first one where I wanted to call Child Protective Services on their parents. "Sure, go camping on a secluded island in the middle of winter where one child has already gone missing. What could go wrong?" No fun names in this one but there are: - Ghosts! - Fat Shaming! - Casual racism! - Code breaking! - Ice boats! Ice Boats! ICE BOATS!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    1929 version: ★★★★✰ (3.5 rounded up) 1966 version: ★★★✰✰ Update, 11/25/18 (1966 version): This was just altered from the original, meaning the bones of the story are the same. But just like with the others I've read, the revisers took the story and added a healthy heap of stupidity and utter nonsense. So much of what goes on in this makes absolutely no sense, and it's impossible to take any of the characters seriously. Why do they behave the way they do? I just don't get it. I don't recall seeing t 1929 version: ★★★★✰ (3.5 rounded up) 1966 version: ★★★✰✰ Update, 11/25/18 (1966 version): This was just altered from the original, meaning the bones of the story are the same. But just like with the others I've read, the revisers took the story and added a healthy heap of stupidity and utter nonsense. So much of what goes on in this makes absolutely no sense, and it's impossible to take any of the characters seriously. Why do they behave the way they do? I just don't get it. I don't recall seeing that problem with the original, though it's been two years since I've read it, and my memory is a little fuzzy on the details. But the revision improves in one area: Action. There was a lack of action and mystery in the original, but they made up for it here even if the action is ridiculous and the mystery is retarded. The Hardy boys and their friends are as dumb as a box of rocks, but they solve the mystery anyway because the bad guys are also as dumb as a box of rocks. And the added plot of the missing grandson... And the guy from the middle east... Why do they... You know, I just can't go on. Oh, the inanity... In spite of all that, I did enjoy reading this, but that's probably because I was just excited to be kicking off my Christmas reading. And partly because some of the plot twists are so ridiculous I just couldn't help but laugh at them. The writing is also subpar, but it's not so bad that it can damage impressionable young minds trying to learn grammar. I'd suggest it to kids who like this kind of thing, but I don't suggest it to anyone who has experience with reality. It doesn't deserve three stars, but it's getting them anyway because, like I said, I did enjoy reading it. Original review, 11/29/16 (1929 version and a bunch of other BS): This was my first adventure with the Hardy Boys, but first a side story. (Review for this book marked below in bold if you want to skip to it.) Mama was thinning out her books, so I snatched up the first two Hardy Boys mysteries because I had always wanted to try them again. (The Tower Treasure and The House on the Cliff). I gave the first one a whirl when I was a kid, but it just didn't take for some reason. Then I embarked on my own mystery adventure before I started reading them now. I wondered how many of these things there were, so I looked it up. There are, to date, 190. And it looked like all of them are attributed to F. W. Dixon, so I started digging to see how many were actually his before someone else took over as a ghostwriter and kept using his name. And down the rabbit hole I went. Turns out there is no F. W. Dixon; the whole thing was a community effort using that pseudonym. It all started in 1927, and the two books I had were put out in 1959. Come to find out they were revisions! The first 38 were redone between 1959 and 1973 to modernize them a bit and to make them more politically correct. I want the original 1920's stories, and I definitely don't wanna read no PC crap! Give it to me raw! I'm a big boy. I can take it. Also, I'm philosophically opposed to rewriting another author's work, and this just wasn't going to fly, but then I had an idea. It would be kind of neat to do a comparison if I could find the original versions. An extensive search yielded some affordable results, and I hope to give both versions of The Tower Treasure and The House on the Cliff a read next year. (11/25/18 update: Mission accomplished.) Personally I hope to find enough namby-pamby fiddle-faddle to thoroughly excoriate the revisions, but we'll see. (11/25/18 update: Hope fulfilled.) This website gives details about the revision project if you're interested. It also tells us that "the quality of the revised stories is generally so far below that of the originals that it can only be considered as an act of literary vandalism." Oooh, I can't wait. It's kind of like this: (This is one of the many quotes often misattributed to Dorothy Parker thanks to the internet. I wonder if the poor woman ever said anything at all?) Quite right, quite right. Thank you, sir. Review of this book starts here: The Mystery of Cabin Island also showed up on several "best of the Hardy Boys" lists, and it took place at Christmastime, so that was good enough for me to kick off my annual Christmas reading. Oddly enough the newer reprint was really expensive, but then I found an original copy printed right before the revision project for $3 or $4. SCORE! I don't have the revision of this one, nor do I plan to get it, (11/25/18 update: found it at my boss's house while house-sitting and here we are.) but after reading it I could take a pretty good guess at one scene that might have been deleted, and I was right. (If the internet can be believed, that is. (11/25/18 update: It can in this instance, but let's not get carried away.).) The Hardy Boys (Frank and Joe) have rifles of their own which they just happen to have in their boat. This kind of thing was normal in the 1920's when kids were camping, and also not unusual in the 50's and 60's, but I guess grown-ups who were ahead of the trend didn't want guns in kids books? I don't know. Chet and Biff, two friends of the Hardy Boys, were given rifles so all four could go out and get a pair of foxes (why isn't that foxen like ox and oxen?) that were stealing and killing chickens. They manage to do this. Now, Chet is a bonehead, and has proven it about 43 times before this incident, so why anyone would ever give him a rifle is beyond me. The boys get on him for pointing it at them accidentally, and when they find the foxes, Chet goes to take the first shot, but he had forgotten to load the thing. In this case, that's probably a good thing because I can't imagine him hitting anything he aimed at. Why this scene was deleted is anyone's guess, but I'd lay down money that it was because there were boys with guns in it. I think we do children a disservice by trying to shield them from such things. I maintain that if one is taught gun safety and has shown that he can safely handle a firearm, then there's no problem with him using one. I had been taught about gun safety since I was probably four or five years old, and have been firing them since I was elementary school age. Some things are ingrained in me because I was properly taught. Always treat it as if it were loaded. If you don't know how to check whether or not it's loaded, then you don't handle it until you're shown how. Never aim it at anything unless you plan on pulling the trigger (unless you're sighting it while unloaded, of course). Never put your finger on the trigger unless you're ready to pull it. Never point it at a person unless you're prepared to kill him, because that could happen when you pull the trigger even if you're shooting to maim. To me these things are common sense. If I ever broke any of these rules, or a few others, the spirit of my grandfather's hand would descend from on high and clonk me a good one on the back of the head. That would be followed up by the spirit of my uncle's hand, and then my dad would knock me for real when he found out. False start, lane three. Woops. Sorry. Review resumes below if you want to bypass this next batch of... whatever this is. I asked a friend once if he wanted to go to a local gun show, and he was aghast. This twenty-something year old man was terrified of the things, but had no experience in his history to warrant such a reaction. He'd just never handled one, never been taught anything about them, had been indoctrinated since birth that they were bad, and being around them threatened to unglue him. I couldn't relate. (Needless to say we didn't attend that show.) Another friend who had similar feelings about them went with me to the shooting range once and found she enjoyed the experience. This doesn't mean everyone should be using one, though. I went rabbit hunting with some friends in college once, and one walking beside me draped his shotgun over his shoulders and across the back of his neck with the barrel pointed right at my head. I mentioned it, and he didn't seem too concerned since his hand wasn't on the trigger. I made sure I was walking behind him from that point on. He must not have known that those things have been known to go off for no reason. Notice I said I went hunting with them "once." Just like with everything else, proper safety is key, but I guess we all have different definitions of "proper." And, you know, I really didn't mean to get started on a gun control diatribe, and I think I'm rapidly approaching that point. Best to quit it here. Review resumes here: I think we do kids a disservice by removing scenes like this from books. We mollycoddle them into ineptitude nowadays, and now you have millions of millennials who can't even be on the losing side of an election without having to cancel classes/work, and retreat to safe spaces for a cry-in with therapy dogs, coloring books, bubbles, Legos, and Play-Doh... I'm all for people doing whatever they need to do to cope with trauma; I build Legos myself and find it quite therapeutic. But I do it on my own time. (And my deepest respect to the Dems who went to work the day after Trump was elected. Sincerely, thank you for showing the rest how it's supposed to be done. If I can make it to work the day after Obama was elected twice, anyone can do it). False start, lane three. One more, and you're DQ'd. OK, OK. Fine. I'll be good. I'll stick to the book from now on. There's a little bit of shameless promotion for the other books in the series going on. Stuff like this is peppered throughout the text: "The incident to which Joe referred was the climax of one of the numerous mysteries solved by the Hardy boys. The brothers, who were introduced to our readers in the first volume of this series, entitled: "The Hardy Boys: The Tower Treasure," were the sons of..." That was distracting, yet also amusing. I reckon advertising had to be done a little differently back then. From what I understand the mystery plot of this book took a backseat to the camaraderie plot, which is encouraging because there wasn't a lot of mystery to this mystery book. There were a couple of clues and some follow-up, but it seemed a bit lacking. I don't read a lot of mysteries, though, so I'm not the best judge of that kind of thing. For a kids' book, I think it probably works just fine. (2-23-17 update: Mama read this after me and told me this had nowhere near as much mystery as the others she read in her youth. I consider her to be a competent judge since she's an avid Nancy Drew fan, and they're pretty much the same thing with a different leading protagonist.) The characters are one-dimensional, but like I just said, this is a kids' book. I think I'd be judging it too harshly if I don't view it through the lens of the intended audience. The villains are especially flat, but I enjoyed it anyway. Chet, the bonehead I mentioned earlier, is just as 1-D as the rest, but he was my favorite because he was the most amusing. One thing I thought of as I read was that this was published in September, 1929, right before the stock market crash changed everything for everyone. The country in November 1929 was a very different place than it was in October 1929. The cabin mystery events take place at Christmas 1929, but I'm pretty sure some things happening in this book wouldn't have happened in the real world in December 1929, such as kids getting an ice boat and some other fancy gifts for Christmas, the proprietor of a store selling his wares to the boys at cost as a reward for getting the foxes, (view spoiler)[the owner of the island giving each of the boys $100 for finding his missing stamp collection (hide spoiler)] , etc. I wonder if the ones written in the ensuing decade have a different flavor and reflect life during the Depression? I don't know that I'll be interested enough to find out, but that was on my mind. I consider this a Christmas book mostly because I can. It takes place at Christmastime, but there's very little Christmas spirit involved. What's really unusual is that the boys and their friends are allowed to go camping for a week or so on an island over the Christmas holiday. Being allowed away from home for a week wasn't odd for teenagers in the 1920's, but over Christmas? Yeah, right. This book also shows how much times have changed in the past century. The boys know how to take care of themselves, how to cook, clean up, etc. and I have no doubt that was probably common back then. Well, the knowledge of how to do such things was; teenagers actually doing some of it? Not so much. I expect the writer was trying to make the Hardy boys into role models who mind their p's and q's. My friends knew how to do things that are lost on this current generation, and I expect the members of my parents' generation were even better at fending for themselves. I look at my nephew and his friends (who are currently of an age with the Hardy Boys), and I am amazed at how little they know even though they could work rings around me with technological geegaws. I imagine putting them in this cabin island situation, and with the exception of one of them who knows how to do manual labor and rough it (so there is hope for parts of the generation), I expect they'd all be dead in about three minutes. Ok, well not that quick, but I sure don't see them lasting a week before throwing in the towel. One night, tops. Alright, that's it. Out of the pool. Damn!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Minks

    3.5 stars

  9. 4 out of 5

    ✨ Gramy ✨

    Frank and Joe Hardy and their chums are given permission to spend a week of the winter break after Christmas in a cabin on Cabin Island as a reward for the owner's car being recovered in a previous book. The owner, Elroy Jefferson, asks them to look for clues regarding the owner's missing grandson and some missing medals that he owns. The have two near accidents in the iceboat because of two delinquent teenagers, who have been helping a bad guy try to steal something from the island. The boys ha Frank and Joe Hardy and their chums are given permission to spend a week of the winter break after Christmas in a cabin on Cabin Island as a reward for the owner's car being recovered in a previous book. The owner, Elroy Jefferson, asks them to look for clues regarding the owner's missing grandson and some missing medals that he owns. The have two near accidents in the iceboat because of two delinquent teenagers, who have been helping a bad guy try to steal something from the island. The boys have also experienced sightings of ghosts, eerie sounds in the night, and break-ins. Can the boys and their chums solve these mysteries? I am currently reading this series to my grandsons and they have remained interested through the first eight books already!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Didn't like this one as much as the other Hardy Boys mystery I read. It was just really hard to follow the story and I don't know why. :/ I did love the one character's obsession with food and eating...and his hiding those sandwiches for a "midnight snack" (but then he ended up sharing when the rest of their food was stolen) -- hilarious!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    This one was great fun-and now I have a strange desire to go ice sailing!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Josiah

    One of the best Hardy Boys Books! Great book for Christmas! Lots of adventure for all mystery lovers.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Emily V

    I think this is a fun wintery book for everyone and anyone to read!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Angela Watson

    The Mystery of Cabin Island by Franklin W. Dixon is about two brothers Joe Hardy and Frank Hardy and their friends Chet and Biff. It is Christmas time, and the boys are out for Christmas break and have been given permission to stay at a private island owned by Mr. Jefferson. While the boys and their friends head out to Cabin Island for the break they are looking for a lost medal collection of Mr. Jefferson's, as well as for his missing grandson Johnny Jefferson. But as they soon come to realize, The Mystery of Cabin Island by Franklin W. Dixon is about two brothers Joe Hardy and Frank Hardy and their friends Chet and Biff. It is Christmas time, and the boys are out for Christmas break and have been given permission to stay at a private island owned by Mr. Jefferson. While the boys and their friends head out to Cabin Island for the break they are looking for a lost medal collection of Mr. Jefferson's, as well as for his missing grandson Johnny Jefferson. But as they soon come to realize, Hanleigh a stranger, and Johnny Jefferson are all searching for the same things.But why? And from there these boys try their hardest to resolve this mystery for Mr. Jefferson. The Mystery of Cabin Island was a great book, that I really enjoyed. It was an easy read as well as very interesting. I would definitely recommend this book, or any other mystery books by Franklin Dixon, because they are very suspensful and will keep the reader's attention. I feel that young adults would enjoy these books, in that they keep you on your toes and you get so in to it that you are almost trying to solve the mystery with them. Excellent book!

  15. 4 out of 5

    David Hines

    I first read The Mystery of Cabin Island on a cold winter night about 35 years ago and on this cold winter night decided to relive my childhood re-reading it! The Hardy Boys are a little dated in dialouge and technology and vary considerably in quality from book to book, but this is one of the better ones and I daresay even a modern kid might still enjoy reading the Hardy's winter adventure in a cabin on an isolated island. If you like the Hardy Boys you will enjoy this book. I even plan to trac I first read The Mystery of Cabin Island on a cold winter night about 35 years ago and on this cold winter night decided to relive my childhood re-reading it! The Hardy Boys are a little dated in dialouge and technology and vary considerably in quality from book to book, but this is one of the better ones and I daresay even a modern kid might still enjoy reading the Hardy's winter adventure in a cabin on an isolated island. If you like the Hardy Boys you will enjoy this book. I even plan to track down the original 1929 edition to see the difference between that one and this "updated" version from decades later!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Maddie

    I have no idea what I just listened to XD Honestly, I don't know. Only read this (well listened on audio) for the Hunger Games challenge, so yeah no clue :p I liked that (view spoiler)[they always wanted to do the right thing, and that they weren't all perfect. They weren't scared of nothing. (hide spoiler)] One thing I didn't like was how (view spoiler)[they acted a little uppity at times. (hide spoiler)] I like how even though this one's #8 it still made sense. I didn't know much about the cha I have no idea what I just listened to XD Honestly, I don't know. Only read this (well listened on audio) for the Hunger Games challenge, so yeah no clue :p I liked that (view spoiler)[they always wanted to do the right thing, and that they weren't all perfect. They weren't scared of nothing. (hide spoiler)] One thing I didn't like was how (view spoiler)[they acted a little uppity at times. (hide spoiler)] I like how even though this one's #8 it still made sense. I didn't know much about the characters, but I still didn't feel too out of my depth.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Parker

    I have been reading through the entire Hardy Boys mystery series, some which I have read in the past, others are first-time reads. Mystery on Cabin Island is one of my favorites in the series. A Christmas vacation to Cabin Island turns into solving multiple mysteries involving missing metals and a missing grandson, all with twists and turns from a ghost to a trespasser to run-ins with a couple of high school dropouts. The book will leave one on the edge of one's seat until each of the mysteries I have been reading through the entire Hardy Boys mystery series, some which I have read in the past, others are first-time reads. Mystery on Cabin Island is one of my favorites in the series. A Christmas vacation to Cabin Island turns into solving multiple mysteries involving missing metals and a missing grandson, all with twists and turns from a ghost to a trespasser to run-ins with a couple of high school dropouts. The book will leave one on the edge of one's seat until each of the mysteries are solved.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Belyea

    When an elderly man hires Frank and Joe to find his missing grandson and locate stolen medals from his past, they take Biff and Chet along for an investigation on Cabin Island, where constant run-ins with some familiar punks are keeping the boys on their toes! Dixon is sure to please fans with more mystery and thrills in this daring adventure. Where could the missing grandson be, and will the Hardy brothers find him before the dasterdly weather gets to them?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ruthie Jones

    I read the Hardy Boys books (and Nancy Drew) when I was a child. The stories are old fashioned, but that's why I like them so much.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Daisy

    Having a moment of nostalgia. The Hardy Boys are just as good as I remember them from childhood.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    Really intense and was really a mystery I'm gonna stick with this series Really good my name is bunn Bob hook look noon diem dude many. good have toot root foot are is

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cyd

    Frank and Joe solve a double mystery, and do some daring ice-sailing along the way!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    Normally I wouldn’t include books I read to my kids on my goodreads, but a) technically we listened to it on audible instead of me reading, and b) I don’t think I had ever actually read a Hardy Boys. More of a Bobsey Twins and Boxcar children girl. It’s funny flipping through some of the reviews here. Yes, it is ridiculous. I would certainly not encourage my children to bide their time while a criminal tried to kidnap them. I wouldn’t be like “have fun camping and just don’t get killed!” BUT kid Normally I wouldn’t include books I read to my kids on my goodreads, but a) technically we listened to it on audible instead of me reading, and b) I don’t think I had ever actually read a Hardy Boys. More of a Bobsey Twins and Boxcar children girl. It’s funny flipping through some of the reviews here. Yes, it is ridiculous. I would certainly not encourage my children to bide their time while a criminal tried to kidnap them. I wouldn’t be like “have fun camping and just don’t get killed!” BUT kids need a world where they are in charge. Whether it’s through unsupervised imaginary play, or literature. The amount of the first they get is drastically diminishing, so the last must remain. I haven’t read much modern middle grade books. Most of what I read as a kid was from the 50s, when kids still roamed free. I wonder if it reflects the modern world - all scheduled activities and organized play dates. Or if there is still an imagined world where kids are in charge, even doing ridiculous things like capturing criminals. I liked this one better than the other Hardy Boys we listened too. A simpler plot (my boys are 4&5 and while it was still largely over their heads, the single setting and single criminal helped them get the story much more.) They are now huge fans, and while they’re a bit young, I am enjoying them seeing brothers work together and also a less violent adventure than most superhero stuff they’re in to.

  24. 4 out of 5

    June Jacobs

    I thoroughly enjoyed this mystery/adventure story from the Hardy Boys collection. It was the first story I have read from the series. Since this story was originally published in 1929, please be aware that some of the language and culturally-accepted stereotypes now considered inappropriate and unacceptable are included in the text. Toward the end of the book the boys 'hitchhike' back to town. **If you are reading this with a middle-grader or tween, this would be a good opportunity to discuss how I thoroughly enjoyed this mystery/adventure story from the Hardy Boys collection. It was the first story I have read from the series. Since this story was originally published in 1929, please be aware that some of the language and culturally-accepted stereotypes now considered inappropriate and unacceptable are included in the text. Toward the end of the book the boys 'hitchhike' back to town. **If you are reading this with a middle-grader or tween, this would be a good opportunity to discuss how things have changed over the past ninety years. The main characters are teenagers. Joe is eighteen and Frank is a year younger, so their level of independence is quite a bit higher than I would expect for a middle-grader or tween who may be reading the story. The vocabulary is high-level, and the action scenes are fast-paced. The characters and settings are strong and well-developed. The book is completely clean in language and content, although there is some fighting in some of the scenes. I borrowed this book from the children's collection in the local public library. #############

  25. 4 out of 5

    Book collector

    Ok this isn't a specific review of the books. There are quite a few hardy boys books and I read them over a period of several years but that was around 30-35 years ago now. Some I remember clearly and I will be specific about those at the end of this part of the review. This section is really an overview of the series. Franklin w. Dixon was of course a syndicate name. A name used over many years on the hardy boys books. My father read them during the fifties, they started during the forties and Ok this isn't a specific review of the books. There are quite a few hardy boys books and I read them over a period of several years but that was around 30-35 years ago now. Some I remember clearly and I will be specific about those at the end of this part of the review. This section is really an overview of the series. Franklin w. Dixon was of course a syndicate name. A name used over many years on the hardy boys books. My father read them during the fifties, they started during the forties and by the end of the the 1980's I'd collected a full set up to around number 90 along with the first 25 or so casefiles books. They were enjoyable books. Fairly simple, but generally well written mysteries. They followed a basic pattern. The hardy boys father would either disappear working on a case or go off to work a case, the boys would get involved in a curious but not terribly threatening mystery in which they and their friends would regularly be captured, escape, repeat as needed. They would end with the boys in danger and then their father would turn up, save them and reveal they had both been working the same case. There are variations on the pattern of course and don't get me wrong I'm not knocking the familiar tropes of the series, that's what made these books fun to read. Some books were brilliant, some weaker but I rarely read one that was poor. All were well written by the various authors behind the dixon name. Now I'm going to digress for a moment. I had a problem with kids books when I was a kid. They weren't very exciting. But there was a reason that I felt this. In the 1970's through really up until the Harry Potter phenomenon in the late 1990's (be thankful for Rowling, as her success has paved the way for the brilliant children's book landscape we now have) children's books were fairly tame. I was spoiled when I was young. I love a TV show called doctor who. It began in the UK in 1963 and from 1973 fans of the show had the target doctor who books. These were adaptations of the TV stories. I started reading them at the age of 7. They spoiled kids books for me. Why? Because they were full of death. Characters actually died there was genuine threat with those books. Most kids literature at this period didn't do that. So I found myself reading adult books from the age of 12. Jack Higgins, Ian Fleming, Alistair maclean, Agatha Christie and more. I still read kids books, the hardy boys were a favourite of my father's so I happily read them. It's odd but I probably read more kids books now than i did as a kid! The kids books then were tame. They could be fun, but tame. The hardy boys series was the same. Fun but tame. Exciting but not threatening. Not really. The books tried to address this with the hardy boys casefiles. Slightly more adult, with greater threat. But by then I drifted away from new hardy boys books onto other things but I have a great affection for the series. And that's what this review is about. It's to give those wanting to try these books a idea of what to expect. The stories are fast paced. Normally featuring an intriguing mystery. Female characters can be a bit weak, especially in the early books but that's a sign of when they were written. There's action, humour and ghosts, smugglers, and lots of intriguing mystery all resolved well. The ghosts are always explained and the bad guys always caught. The hardy boys books are nostalgic fun. I spent many years enjoying them and have very fond memories of them.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rex Libris

    Frank and Joe, along with Chet and Biff, spend Christmas vacation on an island with a cabin on it. The island, known as Cabin Island, is owned by a Mr. Jefferson. Two years earlier Mr Jefferson had a collection of rare medals stolen and they were never recovered. Now Mr. Jefferson's grandson has disappeared. I bet you are thinking Cabin Island probably figures into this somehow. If that is what you were thinking, you were right! It looked like it was going to be a concussion-free adventure for th Frank and Joe, along with Chet and Biff, spend Christmas vacation on an island with a cabin on it. The island, known as Cabin Island, is owned by a Mr. Jefferson. Two years earlier Mr Jefferson had a collection of rare medals stolen and they were never recovered. Now Mr. Jefferson's grandson has disappeared. I bet you are thinking Cabin Island probably figures into this somehow. If that is what you were thinking, you were right! It looked like it was going to be a concussion-free adventure for the Hardy's, but then at the last minute Joe got whack on the noggin from behind. On a side note, Mr. Jefferson get a concussion when the Hardy's ice boat gets flipped as the result of an attack by the bad guy. Book: 1 Series: 5

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    I read a first-edition version of this book, and the cover is slightly different from what appears here, but this was the closest I could find on Goodreads. The Mystery of Cabin Island is much like the previous seven Hardy Boys volumes, with some cool adventures, but this is the first one set in winter, which I, being from Maine, really appreciate (Maine is even mentioned once, toward the end, and that always excites me). I especially liked the scenes set in the cabin at night during a snowstorm— I read a first-edition version of this book, and the cover is slightly different from what appears here, but this was the closest I could find on Goodreads. The Mystery of Cabin Island is much like the previous seven Hardy Boys volumes, with some cool adventures, but this is the first one set in winter, which I, being from Maine, really appreciate (Maine is even mentioned once, toward the end, and that always excites me). I especially liked the scenes set in the cabin at night during a snowstorm—kinda gave me a sense of suspenseful coziness I really enjoy.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Another fun mystery, with lots of inclement weather, ice boat attacks and Chet’s excellent cooking! The boys encounter a trespasser on Mr. Jefferson’s island and they get all fist-a-cuffs, but never use unnecessary force. An Arab named Yussef is running around in the snow, a con-man is running an international scam, and the Hardys crack the case again!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joe Stevens

    No essay length review here. Good solid fun with boys who played a very long time ago. The mystery is decent, but the fun is in the four pals well palling around in the snow and on the ice at Christmas time. They enjoyed their lives in this fictional world and you might enjoy reading about that enjoyment.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dan Kelly

    Frank and Joe pull off another "caper" with The Mystery of Cabin Island, a not-bad if meandering addition to the Hardy oeuvre. If you're a fan of claustrophobic winter thrillers where no one gets murdered, but where ice boats are slightly damaged and groceries are scattered, you will enjoy this book. This installment in the Hardy saga spends most of its time describing Frank, Joe, Chet, their other friend (not the Italian with the boat, the other guy—Biff? Tyrion?), a "ghost," a lost rich teenage Frank and Joe pull off another "caper" with The Mystery of Cabin Island, a not-bad if meandering addition to the Hardy oeuvre. If you're a fan of claustrophobic winter thrillers where no one gets murdered, but where ice boats are slightly damaged and groceries are scattered, you will enjoy this book. This installment in the Hardy saga spends most of its time describing Frank, Joe, Chet, their other friend (not the Italian with the boat, the other guy—Biff? Tyrion?), a "ghost," a lost rich teenager, and the obligatory money-hungry asshole (MHA) watching each other going in and out of the aforementioned cabin. I'm not kidding about that. The cover art perfectly illustrates the plot. Frank and Joe are rendered watching Mr. MHA walking up to the cabin. Once there, MHA looks up at the chimney. Sometimes MHA goes INSIDE the cabin to look at the fireplace connected to the chimney. All of this odd behavior activates the Hardys' flawless detective instincts, leading them to to suspect that there's something in the chimney...or the fireplace. Often, MHA catches the boys watching HIM. Unlike the gangsters and terrorists from previous books, MHA doesn't draw a gun, hurl a grenade, or swing a baling hook at the boy detectives. Instead, he tries to chase them off by yelling at them, or even shaking his fist. During the course of the story, he hires two rotten high school drop outs to intimidate the brothers by busting up their ice boat and messing with their groceries. Excepting the time when their ice boat is overturned, this is as violent as it gets this installment. Reading to my son, I couldn't help but enjoy the Schadenfreude of imagining the Hardys and friends wondering who the hell is fucking with their food. Chet, characteristically, is painfully overwrought at the carnage of overturned produce, cans, and bacon. Though I might be inventing that for my own amusement. MHA is an anomaly as a Hardy Boys heavy. Aside from the dropouts—who he eventually betrays by cunningly locking them in a shed, he's working on his own and without a budget. Even when he gets the upperhand on Joe, he passive-aggressively sticks to the Hardy trope of just tying him up and walking away, rather than popping a slug into his head. Maybe he intended to let him die of exposure, but it seems unlikely. MHA is a dick, but he doesn't appear to be a sociopath. In fact, you wonder why, after MHA busts into the cabin one night, the Hardys and their pals don't secretly pummel and stomp the jerk and toss his corpse into one of Bayport's many convenient caverns. It should be noted that the Hardys and their friends are at the cabin at the behest of a local rich old philanthropist—a common species in Bayport. Presumably he hired them because their dad couldn't be bothered. On the other hand, I suspect most of the local rich folks know by now that while Fenton Hardy will charge them X thousand dollars a day, plus expenses, the Hardys can be plied with a free hostelry, and will even provide their own food and transportation. Ha ha. Suckers. Either/or, rich guy is looking for his teenage nephew and a box of rare medals he's collected over the years, but which were stolen by some shifty dude who can barely be considered a character. All three have since disappeared, but since this is a Hardy Boys mystery, you can guess (spoilers) which one is bricked up in the chimney. As usual, Chet reveals his comedic value as a food-loving dumbass who believes spooks are real, based on sights and sounds anyone with half a brain could identify as non-supernatural (the wind blowing over the top of a soda-bottle fills him with pants-loading terror). The "Is it a g-g-g-ghost?" trope turns up repeatedly in The Mystery of Cabin Island, to the point where you wonder why the Hardys won't stop kidding their tubby friend about his gullibility, and ask him WTF is his problem? Later on, we are led to suspect that (spoilers ahead, though I can't believe I'm writing that where a Hardy boys book is concerned), Chet is not only mentally impaired enough to believe in ghosts, he's either too provincial or too racist, to realize an Iranian fellow in a thawb and keffiyeh is not a vengeful specter. He can't be blamed later though when the rich old man's nephew decides to dress up in his own robe for...some reason, and hangs outside the cabin, watching the chimney...while the Hardys watch him. Yep, we're back to watching people watching the damn chimney again. The nephew's behavior is generally bizarre, incidentally, and you wonder why the old man wants the little trust fund freak back. For example, he accidentally leaves a carved wooden boat in the mystery cabin, tipping off the boys and their patron to his presence. Naturally, this suggests he's in the habit of carving, carrying around, and misplacing little wooden boats. I'm intrigued by the potential future adventures of the rich guy and his weird nephew. I picture the young man suddenly telling the old man in a few years that he wants to live off the land in Alaska, and ends up either starving to death, eaten by a bear on day three, or falling into a glacial crevasse. This we must leave to the fanfic writers.

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