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The Sleuth of St. James's Square by Melville Davisson Post, Fiction, Historical, Mystery & Detective, Action & Adventure

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The tales included in this volume are: "The Thing on the Hearth," "The Reward," "The Lost Lady," "The Cambered Foot," "The Man in the Green Hat," "The Wrong Sign," "The Fortune Teller," "The Hole in the Mahogany Panel," "The End of the Road," "The Last Adventure," "American Horses," "The Spread Rails," "The Pumpkin Coast," "The Yellow Flower," "A Satire of the Sea," and Th The tales included in this volume are: "The Thing on the Hearth," "The Reward," "The Lost Lady," "The Cambered Foot," "The Man in the Green Hat," "The Wrong Sign," "The Fortune Teller," "The Hole in the Mahogany Panel," "The End of the Road," "The Last Adventure," "American Horses," "The Spread Rails," "The Pumpkin Coast," "The Yellow Flower," "A Satire of the Sea," and The House by the Loch."


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The tales included in this volume are: "The Thing on the Hearth," "The Reward," "The Lost Lady," "The Cambered Foot," "The Man in the Green Hat," "The Wrong Sign," "The Fortune Teller," "The Hole in the Mahogany Panel," "The End of the Road," "The Last Adventure," "American Horses," "The Spread Rails," "The Pumpkin Coast," "The Yellow Flower," "A Satire of the Sea," and Th The tales included in this volume are: "The Thing on the Hearth," "The Reward," "The Lost Lady," "The Cambered Foot," "The Man in the Green Hat," "The Wrong Sign," "The Fortune Teller," "The Hole in the Mahogany Panel," "The End of the Road," "The Last Adventure," "American Horses," "The Spread Rails," "The Pumpkin Coast," "The Yellow Flower," "A Satire of the Sea," and The House by the Loch."

30 review for The Sleuth of St. James's Square by Melville Davisson Post, Fiction, Historical, Mystery & Detective, Action & Adventure

  1. 4 out of 5

    Les Wilson

    The sleuth who lives in a large house in St. James's Square, London, is Sir Henry Marquis, head of the Criminal Investigation Department of Scotland Yard. He also owns a country mansion and a villa on the French Riviera and internal evidence suggests he was educated at Rugby’s famous public school and Oxford University. He previously ran the English secret service in the India-Burma border area and had also been busy in unspecified places in Asia, although there is reason to suppose he is famil The sleuth who lives in a large house in St. James's Square, London, is Sir Henry Marquis, head of the Criminal Investigation Department of Scotland Yard. He also owns a country mansion and a villa on the French Riviera and internal evidence suggests he was educated at Rugby’s famous public school and Oxford University. He previously ran the English secret service in the India-Burma border area and had also been busy in unspecified places in Asia, although there is reason to suppose he is familiar with Mongolia. Sir Henry belongs to the Empire Club in Piccadilly and apparently goes to the opera now and then. He is enthusiastic about scientific methods for solving crimes, mentioning dactyloscopic (fingerprint) bureaus and photographie mitrique in particular, but also laments lack of “intuitive impulse” in the men under his command. However, not all the cases in this collection of short stories are solved by deduction or even intuitive impulse, and indeed one or two end in triumph for those on the wrong side of the law. Oddly enough, although Sir Henry is the titular sleuth, in some stories he is not directly involved and in a couple he is referred to only in passing.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Barrow Wilfong

    The Sleuth of St. James's Square is a collection of short mystery stories, each with a different protagonist and not related to each other in any way except that each are about some sort of mystery, rarely dealing with murder. I believe that the Sleuth is Sir Henry Marquis. I didn't see his involvement playing much of a role in the book. A rather odd way to present stories, in my opinion. The writing is very Victorian so somewhat archaic in style. The stories start off rather vague and lacking in The Sleuth of St. James's Square is a collection of short mystery stories, each with a different protagonist and not related to each other in any way except that each are about some sort of mystery, rarely dealing with murder. I believe that the Sleuth is Sir Henry Marquis. I didn't see his involvement playing much of a role in the book. A rather odd way to present stories, in my opinion. The writing is very Victorian so somewhat archaic in style. The stories start off rather vague and lacking in direction which I suppose is the writer, Post's, style. It takes a few pages to come to realize what the actual mystery is. For most of the tale one is wondering what is going on or about to happen. However they all quickly converge into a crystal clear and profound, if abrupt conclusion at the very end. All in all, a quick, and, if not Holmes or Lord Wimsey or Father Brown, still an enjoyable read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Yibbie

    A group of short mysteries. One of them is very odd and puzzling.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kat Steinke

    1.5 stars. I'll start this by saying I did enjoy the blunt subversion in The Thing on the Hearth, and the twist of The Last Adventure. But on the other hand, when the theme of the former showed up in three stories in succession, it was getting a bit much, and all in all I felt like most of the stories erred on the side of predictability. The fact that the book shows its age heavily and not very favorably, clichés and all, doesn't help either. (Though maybe it's sleep deprivation making me this cr 1.5 stars. I'll start this by saying I did enjoy the blunt subversion in The Thing on the Hearth, and the twist of The Last Adventure. But on the other hand, when the theme of the former showed up in three stories in succession, it was getting a bit much, and all in all I felt like most of the stories erred on the side of predictability. The fact that the book shows its age heavily and not very favorably, clichés and all, doesn't help either. (Though maybe it's sleep deprivation making me this cranky, I don't know.)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Hobbs

    Read so far: *The Thing on the Hearth-- *The Reward-- The Lost Lady-- *The Cambered Foot-- The Man in the Green Hat-- *The Wrong Sign-- *The Fortune Teller-- *The Hole in the Mahogany Panel-- The End of the Road-- The Last Adventure-- American Horses-- *The Spread Rails-- The Pumpkin Coach-- The Yellow Flower-- Satire of the Sea-- The House by the Loch --

  6. 5 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    The title of this collection is a little misleading, since the sleuth in question, Sir Henry Marquis, is not really the focus of the book—he's more like a slight connecting element between the varied stories. In only a few is he the active investigator; in some he's listening to other people tell a story and in some cases he is only briefly mentioned in the narrative. He never really emerges as a fully formed character. The stories themselves are pretty unique—they're not all formal whodunits. A The title of this collection is a little misleading, since the sleuth in question, Sir Henry Marquis, is not really the focus of the book—he's more like a slight connecting element between the varied stories. In only a few is he the active investigator; in some he's listening to other people tell a story and in some cases he is only briefly mentioned in the narrative. He never really emerges as a fully formed character. The stories themselves are pretty unique—they're not all formal whodunits. A lot of them are winding narratives about some unusual incident, with a twist at the end that explains what was the actual crime or mystery. There's a recurring theme in several of explorers or scientists in search of some mythical treasure or discovery, while a few of the stories are connected with World War I. Three of the stories, supposed to be read from an old diary, feature a setting and detective extremely similar to Post's Uncle Abner mysteries. "The House by the Loch" has a flavor that again reminds me of Chesterton's Father Brown stories, though this time it's more in the setting and atmosphere. A couple of the tales ("The Thing On the Hearth" and "The Spread Rails," particularly) are a little long-winded, taking quite a bit of time to get to a pretty simple point. But while these stories may not exactly come up to the superb Uncle Abner, Master of Mysteries, they're still very good reading, and Post's writing is beautiful—I'd give it a fourth star for that alone.

  7. 5 out of 5

    R.

    My feelings are very mixed on this book. The plot ideas were good, but I kept getting lost. “Who’s saying this, again?” Also, after a while his characters seem to stereotype. His most common criminal is an “obese” “oriental creature” or someone with elements of that. I prefer mystery books where I can deduce the ending yet the ending not be OBVIOUS (Red House Mystery, Mystery at No. 39 New Pine, Secret Adversary, etc.), so I was disappointed when this book didn’t reveal the “Clue”(yes, I understand My feelings are very mixed on this book. The plot ideas were good, but I kept getting lost. “Who’s saying this, again?” Also, after a while his characters seem to stereotype. His most common criminal is an “obese” “oriental creature” or someone with elements of that. I prefer mystery books where I can deduce the ending yet the ending not be OBVIOUS (Red House Mystery, Mystery at No. 39 New Pine, Secret Adversary, etc.), so I was disappointed when this book didn’t reveal the “Clue”(yes, I understand that stuff is really hard to get just right because I’m writing my own precious (“my preciousss” as Gollum would say. :D) mystery book ). The stories did have pieces of info which I will probably never use but are still interesting. Also, there’s quite a bit of unwanted words (mostly d_ but also some taking God’s name in vain). This book took me long time to finish mostly because I only got into it half-way through (the first story was just WEIRD). I might read more by MDP because I know he can write better than this. I’m just not sure. . . Agatha Christy's and Thorndyke are much better.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Short stories in early twentieth century style with Sir Henry of the CID.

  9. 5 out of 5

    LRK

    Charming little mystery adventure. Each of the chapters has its own neat little puzzle.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Danny Neal

    Different These were some pretty good stories by an author I had never heard of. I feel sure that more of his books will be on my reading list.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    Short stories which are really little puzzles rather than mysteries

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kim

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

  14. 4 out of 5

    Miranda47

  15. 5 out of 5

    Todd Sorensen

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn T. Nixon

  17. 4 out of 5

    E Alexander

  18. 4 out of 5

    Becky Mackey

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Colwell

  20. 5 out of 5

    Becca

  21. 5 out of 5

    Susan Stouffer

  22. 4 out of 5

    Diane G. Bean

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bruno Di Giandomenico

  25. 5 out of 5

    Megan Taylor

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tania Monhollan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Naomi

  28. 5 out of 5

    Srivalli

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jan

  30. 5 out of 5

    Frank J. Ward

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