counter Happiness and Education - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Happiness and Education

Availability: Ready to download

When parents are asked what they want for their children, they usually answer that they want their children to be happy. Why, then, is happiness rarely mentioned as a goal of education? This book explores what we might teach if we were to take happiness seriously as a goal of education. It asks, first, what it means to be happy and, second, how we can help children to unde When parents are asked what they want for their children, they usually answer that they want their children to be happy. Why, then, is happiness rarely mentioned as a goal of education? This book explores what we might teach if we were to take happiness seriously as a goal of education. It asks, first, what it means to be happy and, second, how we can help children to understand it. It notes that we have to develop a capacity for unhappiness and a willingness to alleviate the suffering of others to be truly happy. Criticizing our current almost exclusive emphasis on economic well-being and pleasure, Nel Noddings discusses the contributions of making a home, parenting, cherishing a place, the development of character, interpersonal growth, finding work that one loves, and participating in a democratic way of life. Finally, she explores ways in which to make schools and classrooms cheerful places. Nell Noddings is Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education, Emerita, at Stanford University. She is past president of the Philosophy of Education Society and of the John Dewey Society. In addition to twelve books, she is the author of more than 170 articles and chapters on various topics ranging from the ethics of care to mathematical problem solving. Her latest books are Starting at Home: Caring and Social Policy (University of California Press) and Educating Moral People: A Caring Alternative to Character Education (Teachers College Press), both published in 2002.


Compare

When parents are asked what they want for their children, they usually answer that they want their children to be happy. Why, then, is happiness rarely mentioned as a goal of education? This book explores what we might teach if we were to take happiness seriously as a goal of education. It asks, first, what it means to be happy and, second, how we can help children to unde When parents are asked what they want for their children, they usually answer that they want their children to be happy. Why, then, is happiness rarely mentioned as a goal of education? This book explores what we might teach if we were to take happiness seriously as a goal of education. It asks, first, what it means to be happy and, second, how we can help children to understand it. It notes that we have to develop a capacity for unhappiness and a willingness to alleviate the suffering of others to be truly happy. Criticizing our current almost exclusive emphasis on economic well-being and pleasure, Nel Noddings discusses the contributions of making a home, parenting, cherishing a place, the development of character, interpersonal growth, finding work that one loves, and participating in a democratic way of life. Finally, she explores ways in which to make schools and classrooms cheerful places. Nell Noddings is Lee L. Jacks Professor of Education, Emerita, at Stanford University. She is past president of the Philosophy of Education Society and of the John Dewey Society. In addition to twelve books, she is the author of more than 170 articles and chapters on various topics ranging from the ethics of care to mathematical problem solving. Her latest books are Starting at Home: Caring and Social Policy (University of California Press) and Educating Moral People: A Caring Alternative to Character Education (Teachers College Press), both published in 2002.

29 review for Happiness and Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ietrio

    I was raised with this sort of stupidity and overall shallow appraisal of the reality. As I wasn't aware of the existence of one Noddings and probably Noddings wasn't THAT influent when I was in school, I assume Noddings just rehashes old wives tales and popular "common sense" as his own thoughts. > Because educational programs were designed by men, they were directed at preparation for public life – male life. Homemaking was taught at home and in some schools exclusively for women. Actually, from I was raised with this sort of stupidity and overall shallow appraisal of the reality. As I wasn't aware of the existence of one Noddings and probably Noddings wasn't THAT influent when I was in school, I assume Noddings just rehashes old wives tales and popular "common sense" as his own thoughts. > Because educational programs were designed by men, they were directed at preparation for public life – male life. Homemaking was taught at home and in some schools exclusively for women. Actually, from Medieval times there were two general directions in education: superior and inferior. The superior path was worthy of the elite, abstract, university-related. The inferior path was practical and it means apprenticeship. The women were defaulting to apprenticeship, yet there were cases when women got the best education available. More, although all sort of political activists dramatize, the act has a lot more to do with birth control than what Noddings pompously calls "public life". To make things worse, the simplistic thoughts generated by Noddings ignore the aspect of women imposing the position to other women and push for a new sentient god, the Society, which, like the father-god from the Christian trinity, is somehow male. Another remark would be that although the title and the self important remarks imply a general book, Noddings is limited to only the White European World, the others not worthy of the examination.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alexis

    How would we have to change schools if student happiness was one of our aims? Noddings gives us the philosophical background of happiness and then moved forward to talk about different realms in which happiness can occur. Her recommendations in the final chapter about how to aim for happiness in schools calls for radical change, but ones that are generally feasible. I loved this book from the very moment I started reading it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Pashew Majeed

    Knowing if there is a sense of need in education makes us as parents and educators try to maintain those needs of our kids but, prior and for this to happen, is the realization of those needs. Knowing what we need might reduce the guilt we have; the guilt that is the product of the conflict between civilization and instinct and this is the price we pay for our happiness (Noddings, 2003, p.69). So, to realize those needs is the very first step towards doing what takes us to happiness. As Noddings Knowing if there is a sense of need in education makes us as parents and educators try to maintain those needs of our kids but, prior and for this to happen, is the realization of those needs. Knowing what we need might reduce the guilt we have; the guilt that is the product of the conflict between civilization and instinct and this is the price we pay for our happiness (Noddings, 2003, p.69). So, to realize those needs is the very first step towards doing what takes us to happiness. As Noddings suggests, with kids there are times when they do not know what they need, and that is when parents or educator impose on them those needs (p.69). Read all the article here http://kurdistantribune.com/2014/be-h...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    What is your definition of happiness? I think mine differs from Nel Noddings. I learned that at no time should a teacher intentionally make a student unhappy for any reason in class. I did get a few motivating thoughts from this book. But generally it did not correlate with the realities of public school at this time. Maybe in the future when the world is different...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sue Lyle

    Loved it! All teachers should read it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Spencer Smith

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stacy

  8. 4 out of 5

    Wgrosse

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

  10. 4 out of 5

    Susie

  11. 5 out of 5

    Robin Gal

  12. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Granelli

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lakrisa Walker

  14. 5 out of 5

    Aynur Aslanova

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mohamed Ateaa

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hazem Reda

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kellie Marquet

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carri Naumann-Monti

  19. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  20. 5 out of 5

    Erik Erickson

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rae-Anne

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jude Brigley

  24. 5 out of 5

    Beththena Johnson

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

  26. 5 out of 5

    Anamika Gupta

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kazusa Yamashita

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lauren West

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brianna Keating

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.