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Warren Ellis and Juan Jose Ryp, the team behind the fan-favorite Black Summer, are revolutionizing masked heroes yet again in this blockbuster epic! Dead heroes in the dirt. A killer capable of almost supernatural tortures. Five generations of the world's only superhuman group. A forty-year legacy of standing for the rights of freedom and safety. A young man obsessed with Warren Ellis and Juan Jose Ryp, the team behind the fan-favorite Black Summer, are revolutionizing masked heroes yet again in this blockbuster epic! Dead heroes in the dirt. A killer capable of almost supernatural tortures. Five generations of the world's only superhuman group. A forty-year legacy of standing for the rights of freedom and safety. A young man obsessed with the need for street justice. How much do you want to be a superhuman? How badly does he want it? Bad enough to bring on the last days of an American legend? If he even gets to survive that long? Forty years ago, a group of superhumans emerged in San Francisco, guided by the man whose unique new drugs gave them their incredible powers. But the team is not the only thing that's advanced over the years, and there are no easy victories when their luck finally begins to run out... This huge collection features all eight issues of the series, complete with a cover gallery under an all-new cover by Juan Jose Ryp.


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Warren Ellis and Juan Jose Ryp, the team behind the fan-favorite Black Summer, are revolutionizing masked heroes yet again in this blockbuster epic! Dead heroes in the dirt. A killer capable of almost supernatural tortures. Five generations of the world's only superhuman group. A forty-year legacy of standing for the rights of freedom and safety. A young man obsessed with Warren Ellis and Juan Jose Ryp, the team behind the fan-favorite Black Summer, are revolutionizing masked heroes yet again in this blockbuster epic! Dead heroes in the dirt. A killer capable of almost supernatural tortures. Five generations of the world's only superhuman group. A forty-year legacy of standing for the rights of freedom and safety. A young man obsessed with the need for street justice. How much do you want to be a superhuman? How badly does he want it? Bad enough to bring on the last days of an American legend? If he even gets to survive that long? Forty years ago, a group of superhumans emerged in San Francisco, guided by the man whose unique new drugs gave them their incredible powers. But the team is not the only thing that's advanced over the years, and there are no easy victories when their luck finally begins to run out... This huge collection features all eight issues of the series, complete with a cover gallery under an all-new cover by Juan Jose Ryp.

30 review for No Hero Limited Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    Warren Ellis could be one of the greatest writers of super hero comics, if it weren't for that nagging fear that someone might notice he's writing 'just super hero comics' and it would destroy his 'I'm an edgy bastard!' personae. Like with Black Summer, he creates great code names, clever takes on super powers and the cliches/archetypes of the genre and even does some really smart stuff that hits a nice balance between larger than life and the 'real world'. Then he panics, throws in a bunch of plo Warren Ellis could be one of the greatest writers of super hero comics, if it weren't for that nagging fear that someone might notice he's writing 'just super hero comics' and it would destroy his 'I'm an edgy bastard!' personae. Like with Black Summer, he creates great code names, clever takes on super powers and the cliches/archetypes of the genre and even does some really smart stuff that hits a nice balance between larger than life and the 'real world'. Then he panics, throws in a bunch of plot twist, shock moments, works really hard to remind you everyone on the planet is a selfish, screwed up jerk and then tries to shock you some more, while hitting you over the head with a moral. Which, in this story seems to undermine the catch phrase Warren used as the (supposed) theme of the story. At about the half way part of this story, I could see that a great premise, a text book 'how to do an introduction to the super team' story arc was about to go off the rails and Warren was going to do his usual dodge of being labeled a super hero writer, and I stayed around anyway. Shame. As soon as the 'smartest man in the room' started acting really stupid and instead just became mister exposition I should have walked away. I know this is part of a collection of mini-series where Warren comments on super heroes, but they are all the same comment and tell the same story. You want to shock me, Warren? Do it by not trying to shock me everytime you do one of these. The other shame is the artist on this and Black Summer is amazing and able to create super heroes that look like super heroes, while making the world around them look real and the two things mesh perfectly. Somebody that wants to do super heroes is going to get ahold of this guy and they are going knock people's socks off. But, as long as he stays with Warren it'll be 'Oh, that's a cool looking costume!' followed on the next page by 'So, that's what the human spleen looks like when you rip it loose from the human body with your bear hands.'

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ill D

    I noticed I’ve been discussing Watchmen a lot in my reviews as of late. And it makes sense. Ever since the late 80’s, everything that has become manifest in this industry henceforth is some type of response in one way or another. Some swish. Some sip. No Hero, not content with a mere gulp, plunges itself headfirst into the stream of creative thought opened by Moore/Gibbons. More facsimile and pastiche than a properly laden homage, Ellis’ offering takes a thoroughly irreverent ‘bread and circus’ I noticed I’ve been discussing Watchmen a lot in my reviews as of late. And it makes sense. Ever since the late 80’s, everything that has become manifest in this industry henceforth is some type of response in one way or another. Some swish. Some sip. No Hero, not content with a mere gulp, plunges itself headfirst into the stream of creative thought opened by Moore/Gibbons. More facsimile and pastiche than a properly laden homage, Ellis’ offering takes a thoroughly irreverent ‘bread and circus’ approach here to detrimental effect. Moore’s critical barbs against the nostalgic roots of the industry have broadcast themselves and a good chunk of their seeds ended up here. Superheroes are depicted (as first seen in Watchmen) as the distorted, neurotic, far-from-perfect individuals (they most likely would actually be) seen within all seven issues. Presented with extra doses of intrigue and a stunning indifference to the plight of others they’re all despicable without an iota of goodness. Given just how unlikeable a great catalogue of these characters are, it’s truly a miracle that Ellis’ work from 2006 is able to earn itself a three star rating (from yours truly). A hurriedly detailed style that inhales and exhales with no respect for a more normal pulsation, gives us just enough air to breath before crushing us against with a bajillion lines of form and function. Similar to Frank Miller’s HardBoiled, crunchiness is the style du jour with an overpowering emphasis on the micro. Fitting the philosophical urgency within, the choices in regards to illustration were well done here. Bone crunching brutality and the streams of blood and guts that follow are all colored to bursting effect. Crafty applications of eye candy pepper nigh ever other page leaving a memorable veneer with an unabashed preference for the seen. The macro level of narrative is of its own concern but, the micro level of visuals (for the most part) stand up well on their own here. On the other hand however, the story itself is up for debate across all rungs of its character. Grafting its main thread of narrative from Watchmen itself, Ellis first germinates his anti-hero tale and then allows himself further artistic license - lifting from various other sources most notably here, The Matrix. The other references twill between ineffective and mediocre yet, it’s the repossessions of the green-code-tinted computer world that find themselves expertly planted. These hit and misses are thankfully brushed over well with a solid spate of writing until things mature just a tad more. With the super-hero cadre acting within a more esoteric formulation here, one must be seen in heroic capacity to join the guild. Shortly after our super-hero idolizer/protagonist is taken in by the group he’s given a curiously unitary choice. Jacking directly from The Matrix, a Kali-influenced individual offers the hero to be a simple choice – just one pill to begin the transformation. This thoughtful decision which rejects Morpheus’ dual pill proposition, seemingly digs another bard into the inherent teleology of the Comic Book world. With no choice, all super heroes must follow along their predetermined tracks with no ability to decide otherwise. Trapped within their invisible casks of amontillados, superheroes are damned by their ever-escalating duties. Seemingly exposing the internalized damnation of our cape clothed friend(s), the transformative mcguffin that turns the scrawny into the brawny, has horribly backfired, leaving the protagonist mutilated before belief. Implicitly, Ellis’ is seeming to tell us that we don’t need to follow Icarus very far to be burned by heavenly delusions. Nor do we need to construct a fabulous building stretching to the sky (Babel) to bring it all crashing down. Without a scintilla of doubt the lesson is simple here: all the seeds of our destruction are found within. In either case, the plot flips polarity and a whole host of plot-twists-and turns ramp up toward the last two issues. Sparing the details worth reading, I will however state that yet another harsh barb in Watchmen fashion is formulated and thrust here to nasty effect. Just as Morpheus’ duality is rejected, so too does No Hero rejects Watchmen’s closed loop of narrative. Seemingly staving off the intrinsic nihilism of life with a (perhaps) more Eastern response, Moore’s Dr. Manhattan simply states, “Nothing ever ends…” Beginning with a bloody smiley face pin and ending with the same image, it could be said that, “ain’t a damn thang [sic] changed.” For No Hero on the contrary, something far more bleak is the uncompromising response. Ultimately, anything riffing off of Watchmen will be held to an impossibly high standard. Which is fine when other comics incorporate elements from it’s stylistic bequeathments, yet to swim in the same vein of hyper-self-awareness and personal criticism, No Hero is certainly no hero. Moore and Gibbon’s challenged us with great themes and powerful symbolism to deconstruct the internal contradictions of comics while telling a great story. Ellis on the other hand, has reappropiated what he likes but, was unable to develop anything seminal, merely mildly enjoyable. Filching what works and filling in where needed, we get a well-illustrated grittiness that only finds itself suffused with a mediocre story that, while can be enjoyable on its own, a further reading into the manifestations of anti-comic ethos pales in comparison to its spiritual predecessor. With only a tiny handful of barbs to add, No Hero is a splinter in the minds eye compared to the RedWood built by Moore and Gibbons.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    I like these new comic books coming out about "the other side" of superheroes - Garth Ennis' "The Boys" is a good example of the popularity of these kinds of stories. In that book "supes" are policed by a CIA type organisation called "The Boys" who are ordinary people (albeit a bit psycho). But how? They are injected with something that gives them incredible strength so they are a match for the supes. It's a very quick scene where the new guy "Huey" gets injected and then takes on the supes. In I like these new comic books coming out about "the other side" of superheroes - Garth Ennis' "The Boys" is a good example of the popularity of these kinds of stories. In that book "supes" are policed by a CIA type organisation called "The Boys" who are ordinary people (albeit a bit psycho). But how? They are injected with something that gives them incredible strength so they are a match for the supes. It's a very quick scene where the new guy "Huey" gets injected and then takes on the supes. In Warren Ellis' "No Hero" this transition from ordinary person to superhero is looked at more closely. When the new guy gets recruited to this superhero organisation who help police the world, he is given a pill that will give him incredible powers. What happens next is detailed in superbly horrific and gory detail by the excellent Juan Jose Ryp. It's a wordless nightmare, a 21st version of Hieronymous Bosch or Dante, but in far more horrifying imagery. What happens next is the dismantling of the superhero organisation, piece by piece, in deliciously psychotic scenes. Great fun to read, even better to see with Ryp's astonishingly detailed art, with an original take on these new anti-superhero comics. Warren Ellis back on form with this great book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    47Time

    The Levellers, led by scientist Carrick Masterson, reveal themselves to the public as a drug-enhanced team working for the betterment of the common man. A decade later they call themselves the Front Line. Later still a former member comes out with revelations about the drug they used and its side-effects. In 2011 two of the team members are killed in an explosion, so replacements are sought. Joshua Carver is a vigilante who draws Carrick's attention. He wants to join the Front Liners and to be in The Levellers, led by scientist Carrick Masterson, reveal themselves to the public as a drug-enhanced team working for the betterment of the common man. A decade later they call themselves the Front Line. Later still a former member comes out with revelations about the drug they used and its side-effects. In 2011 two of the team members are killed in an explosion, so replacements are sought. Joshua Carver is a vigilante who draws Carrick's attention. He wants to join the Front Liners and to be involved in the investigation of the explosion that claimed two of his teammates. First he needs to be given the drug called FX7, the one that turns him into a superhuman, and the trip nearly kills him. (view spoiler)[Meanwhile another member of the team is killed by a party who knows the psysiology of an individual who has taken FX7. After his trasformation is complete, Joshua is visited by dr. Benjamin Chisolm, codename Redglare. Joshua's skin is flaking horribly, so Carrick decides on a full-body suit for him. An attempt on his life during the press release destroys a part of his suit, revealing his deformed skin. He is still part of the team, so Chisolm takes him among the people right when a plane is seen flying toward a crash landing in the city. Joshua brings it to the river, but the finds that the plane was brought down by Carrick with Smoke and Fasthawk's help, the last two members of the Front Liners. The true purpose of the Front Liners is revealed: to control the world. As a result, Joshua, an individual raised by a serial killer and working for the FBI, kills the whole Front Liners team. Joshua attacks Carrick and confirms everyone's befief that he took FX7 too. Carrick became immortal after taking the drug and has gained limitless riches from his control of the world. Joshua works for all of Carrick's enemies, so he refuses anything Carrick offers, then throws him into space. The whole world suffers without the Front Liners' positive influence, probably degenerating into a world war. (hide spoiler)]

  5. 4 out of 5

    Peter Tupper

    As a follow-up to Ellis' "Black Summer", "No Hero" isn't as satisfying a work. The Seven Guns in "Black Summer" had a believable and interesting range of political ideas, and an interesting implied backstory. The Front Line in "No Hero" seem to have been corrupt, vicious bastards since the beginning, which makes the action as a whole less interesting. Whereas the violence and horror in "Black Summer" was used judiciously, "No Hero" is Ellis in shock mode, having run out of things to say part way As a follow-up to Ellis' "Black Summer", "No Hero" isn't as satisfying a work. The Seven Guns in "Black Summer" had a believable and interesting range of political ideas, and an interesting implied backstory. The Front Line in "No Hero" seem to have been corrupt, vicious bastards since the beginning, which makes the action as a whole less interesting. Whereas the violence and horror in "Black Summer" was used judiciously, "No Hero" is Ellis in shock mode, having run out of things to say part way through the story. I get what Ellis' is trying to do here, which is play with the reader's preconceptions about hero's journey narratives in general and superhero comics in particular. Instead of a battle of good and evil, what we end up with is two violent monsters trying to kill each other. Good luck whoever happens to be in between them.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Downgraded from three stars. This is a cynical book, even by Ellis's standards, filled with horrible people. The twist on the protagonist managed to be predictable and to come out of nowhere simultaneously, which is a feat in itself. The climatic battle ends with the unkillable villain (villains, really) flung into space, as if the author just threw his hands up in frustration. Ryp's art is detailed to a fault, yet the bloodiest scenes are strangely imprecise. I was never quite clear on what was Downgraded from three stars. This is a cynical book, even by Ellis's standards, filled with horrible people. The twist on the protagonist managed to be predictable and to come out of nowhere simultaneously, which is a feat in itself. The climatic battle ends with the unkillable villain (villains, really) flung into space, as if the author just threw his hands up in frustration. Ryp's art is detailed to a fault, yet the bloodiest scenes are strangely imprecise. I was never quite clear on what was going on when the gore started flying. And I don't think he ever settled on one look for Redglare or the post-transformation Revere. A hot mess, as the kids say. Unsatisfying on all levels: plot, character, presentation. A nihilistic misfire.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Thor

    This book hooked me in immediately. I actually read it in one sitting which is unusual for me. This showcases both the best and the worst of Warren Ellis. The concept and writing are excellent, and I really enjoyed the idea. However, the twists in this book completely rip it apart and there is nothing to hold onto in the end. The initial premise was much more interesting than the "surprising" twists. Unfortunately, 3/4s of this is a great read, and the last 1/4 of it quickly destroys it. This book hooked me in immediately. I actually read it in one sitting which is unusual for me. This showcases both the best and the worst of Warren Ellis. The concept and writing are excellent, and I really enjoyed the idea. However, the twists in this book completely rip it apart and there is nothing to hold onto in the end. The initial premise was much more interesting than the "surprising" twists. Unfortunately, 3/4s of this is a great read, and the last 1/4 of it quickly destroys it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    Nobody does the "cynical superhero comic" like Warren Ellis. First Black Summer, now this. So a chemist develops a drug in the 60s to create superhumans. He then creates a team of superheroes to make the world better, carefully regulating the drug and only allowing one superhero team to exist. Then in modern times, some members and killed and must be replaced. He finds the perfect replacement. And nothing is what it seems. Just a very well done comic showing that absolute power may not corrupt abs Nobody does the "cynical superhero comic" like Warren Ellis. First Black Summer, now this. So a chemist develops a drug in the 60s to create superhumans. He then creates a team of superheroes to make the world better, carefully regulating the drug and only allowing one superhero team to exist. Then in modern times, some members and killed and must be replaced. He finds the perfect replacement. And nothing is what it seems. Just a very well done comic showing that absolute power may not corrupt absolutely but it comes damn close. The art by Juan Jose Ryp didn't seem to be quite as hyperdetailed as Black Summer but still very good. Ellis always throws some sickness in and some of his stuff crosses the line for some readers, but overall this is another great work from him and the underrated Avatar Publishing. If you like your superheroes flawed and your stories dark, this is for you.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Logan Young

    Cool art, meh unoriginal story. Ellis clearly phoned this one in.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mark Desrosiers

    In 1966, a group of idealistic vigilantes, "the Levellers", shows up in San Francisco. Their leader is this irritating Paul Kantner lookalike named Carrick Masterson, and it is he who cooked up the drug that granted superpowers unto him and his friends. Flash forward 45 years, and the "Levellers" are now a sinister and powerful bunch called the Front Line, still protecting the Earth, but Carrick is now infused with misanthropy, cynicism, and greed -- all of which of course still looks like princ In 1966, a group of idealistic vigilantes, "the Levellers", shows up in San Francisco. Their leader is this irritating Paul Kantner lookalike named Carrick Masterson, and it is he who cooked up the drug that granted superpowers unto him and his friends. Flash forward 45 years, and the "Levellers" are now a sinister and powerful bunch called the Front Line, still protecting the Earth, but Carrick is now infused with misanthropy, cynicism, and greed -- all of which of course still looks like principled idealism in 2011 (Warren Ellis is a master at this sort of shifty theme). Enter this straight-edge kid who wants to join the Front Line, and things get very unpredictable, plus disgusting. Once again -- despite some hasty character development and preposterous setups -- Ellis pours lime on the corpse of idealism and "purity" to excellent effect. Though Ellis's plotting is wacky and gripping as usual, what puts this into four-star range is artist Juan Jose Ryp, whose dense, precise renderings (pun intended) of gore and violence are bright, creepy, hilarious -- think Peter Jackson's Dead Alive, or the paintings of Ivan Albright. Perfection recapitating disgustication, something like that.

  11. 5 out of 5

    arjuna

    As much as I like Warren Ellis, and while I agree with a lot of what this reviewer has to say, I'm going to concur with this one... while the story works, it ultimately falters by going just that little bit too broad-brush. I'm also not a great fan of the artwork - while it is nicely nasty I can't help feeling the overall book may have been served by a little more breathing space, if it were. Overall: feels like a great idea that didn't quite get enough time to develop as well as it might have. As much as I like Warren Ellis, and while I agree with a lot of what this reviewer has to say, I'm going to concur with this one... while the story works, it ultimately falters by going just that little bit too broad-brush. I'm also not a great fan of the artwork - while it is nicely nasty I can't help feeling the overall book may have been served by a little more breathing space, if it were. Overall: feels like a great idea that didn't quite get enough time to develop as well as it might have.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Excellent premise and thoughtful writing - of *course* having the power to fly should have a physical cost. Why has no one thought this super-powers stuff through like Ellis before? Ellis does these themes well: coping with disfigurement, newfound/not-understood powers, control of the masses, hypocritical hero complex. I'm always game for a good run with messed up "heroes". Excellent premise and thoughtful writing - of *course* having the power to fly should have a physical cost. Why has no one thought this super-powers stuff through like Ellis before? Ellis does these themes well: coping with disfigurement, newfound/not-understood powers, control of the masses, hypocritical hero complex. I'm always game for a good run with messed up "heroes".

  13. 5 out of 5

    Constance

    An interesting and pretty horrifying take on the superhero genre, this is an alternate history - with superpowered humans - spanning 1966 through 2011. The artwork and story are not for the faint of heart, but it's certainly worth reading for a look at the darker parts of humanity. An interesting and pretty horrifying take on the superhero genre, this is an alternate history - with superpowered humans - spanning 1966 through 2011. The artwork and story are not for the faint of heart, but it's certainly worth reading for a look at the darker parts of humanity.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Skjam!

    Forty-five years ago, the Levellers appeared in San Francisco, superhuman beings created by psychoactive chemicals. Led by maverick scientist Carrick Masterson, they were the world’s first superheroes. Decades later, the membership has changed, except the still-youthful Masterson, and they’re known as the Front Line. They’re still the only superheroes in the world, due to their proprietary empowerment process. And now two of them have died in as many days. It’s time to go recruiting! But is Josh Forty-five years ago, the Levellers appeared in San Francisco, superhuman beings created by psychoactive chemicals. Led by maverick scientist Carrick Masterson, they were the world’s first superheroes. Decades later, the membership has changed, except the still-youthful Masterson, and they’re known as the Front Line. They’re still the only superheroes in the world, due to their proprietary empowerment process. And now two of them have died in as many days. It’s time to go recruiting! But is Josh Carver the perfect candidate, or is he, as he says himself, “no hero”? This is one of Warren Ellis’ “big idea” limited series. In this case, the central idea is superhumans who start with the motive of changing the world for the better. Not to rule the world as such, but making it a nicer place to live in. Some of it is done openly, by being superheroes, but they’re not afraid to do dirty work behind the scenes to remove people who they feel are making the world worse. We don’t see too much of how the world has changed as a result, only hearing about events in the background. But one of the side effects is that the Front Line have made a lot of powerful enemies. The story primarily follows Josh Carver as he is recruited into the Front Line. He’s figured out how to get their attention as a candidate, because he really wants to be superhuman. It’s not quite that simple, however, since the empowerment process is somewhat random in its effects, and there are a fair number of people who didn’t survive. (This has been kept from the public.) The process itself makes for some trippy art, and Josh undergoes significant change. Meanwhile, the Front Line’s enemies pound them hard. As soon as they think they know who’s behind it, contradictory evidence shows up. Years of being the only superhumans have made the Front Line, and Masterson in particular, arrogant and unable to adapt to a foe that can truly fight back. Content notes: Lots of gore, and discussion of rape. I would have liked to have seen more of the early days of the Levellers, and information on whether they started more idealistic or were arrogant from the start. Still, there’s some intriguing ideas here. The ending is bleak. Recommended for superhero fans who prefer the gloomier and gorier side of the field.

  15. 4 out of 5

    eleanor

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I usually really enjoy Warren Ellis, but this book is definitely a miss. As many other people have said, it’s clearly a child of Watchmen, but without any of the emotion & subtlety. No Hero starts off with an interesting premise (idealistic youth recruited as part of a superhero team by a Lex Luthor-ish Fabio) that unfortunately quickly turns into a bloody, ham-fisted story based on not much more than gore & “in your face” nihilism. I will give it credit; it did genuinely disturb me while readin I usually really enjoy Warren Ellis, but this book is definitely a miss. As many other people have said, it’s clearly a child of Watchmen, but without any of the emotion & subtlety. No Hero starts off with an interesting premise (idealistic youth recruited as part of a superhero team by a Lex Luthor-ish Fabio) that unfortunately quickly turns into a bloody, ham-fisted story based on not much more than gore & “in your face” nihilism. I will give it credit; it did genuinely disturb me while reading, despite the ridiculous violence that is especially groan-worthy in the second half of the book. Fascists are always scary, & that would have been true enough without spinal cords & kidneys flying everywhere. I actually found the “hero”’s initial transformation a la The Fly to be most dreadful, as it became increasingly obvious that he would not recover from his grotesque physical changes. However, regardless of how they look, everyone in this bleak story is a monster, & finishing it will almost certainly leave a bad taste in your mouth.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    This was grimdark super-hero comics with no clear moral other than 'people are terrible'. Edgy. I know that Ellis has a tendency towards 'edgy' stories, but it at least feels coherent when its within a bigger storyline (re: Extremis Arc). It felt like Warren Ellis wanted this to be Watchman, but in trying to replicate a classic story, got very lost and just went for shock value over any substantial moral or even a story that made sense. Boring. This was grimdark super-hero comics with no clear moral other than 'people are terrible'. Edgy. I know that Ellis has a tendency towards 'edgy' stories, but it at least feels coherent when its within a bigger storyline (re: Extremis Arc). It felt like Warren Ellis wanted this to be Watchman, but in trying to replicate a classic story, got very lost and just went for shock value over any substantial moral or even a story that made sense. Boring.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Baba

    In 1966 a chemist called Carrick Masterton, managed to create a compound, FX7, that could create meta-humans. 45 years later… after essentially quasi-world domination, members of his Frontline team begin to get assassinated. Josh Carver wants to be a hero, more than anything and is recruited... thing is, Josh Carver is definitely... no hero. Interesting premise and concept by Ellis. 7 out of 12. In 1966 a chemist called Carrick Masterton, managed to create a compound, FX7, that could create meta-humans. 45 years later… after essentially quasi-world domination, members of his Frontline team begin to get assassinated. Josh Carver wants to be a hero, more than anything and is recruited... thing is, Josh Carver is definitely... no hero. Interesting premise and concept by Ellis. 7 out of 12.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Dark ass twist is all I’ll say. Interesting read, don’t know if I’d read it again though. I like how much he deals with who has powers vs who wants powers vs who takes power back and what they do with it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mario Mikon

    Weakest of the trilogy, but still great fun. I loved the gore!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

    One of my favorite takes on the superhero comics. Ryp’s artwork is the perfect compliment to Ellis’ absolutely brutal script; the word “ultraviolence” doesn’t even come close to describing it all.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Will Cooper

    A slow start, but I love the last couple issues. Crafting heroes and how much control is a good thing. A classic Ellis tale.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sean Goh

    Ellis taking a page out of Ennis's book with the hyperdetailed gore and violence. The plot twist at the end of the book though, with all the speech bubbles. Ellis taking a page out of Ennis's book with the hyperdetailed gore and violence. The plot twist at the end of the book though, with all the speech bubbles.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Greg Trosclair

    Interesting read from Ellis. I for the most part enjoyed all of Ellis' work for Avatar. I also enjoyed Juan Jose Ryp's artwork. It reminds me a bit of Geoff Darrow yet is still his own style. Interesting read from Ellis. I for the most part enjoyed all of Ellis' work for Avatar. I also enjoyed Juan Jose Ryp's artwork. It reminds me a bit of Geoff Darrow yet is still his own style.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jukka Kuva

    Only an introductory issue has come out when I'm writing this but I wanted to write a review to let people know about it. No Hero is, as could be deduced from the name, a superhero comic. This time there are no natural superheroes though. A drug has been developed that can make you into a superhero but has severe side effects. The comic asks a question in it's tagline: How much do you want to be a superhuman? The premise seems very promising in the skilled hands of Warren Ellis and I got some Pla Only an introductory issue has come out when I'm writing this but I wanted to write a review to let people know about it. No Hero is, as could be deduced from the name, a superhero comic. This time there are no natural superheroes though. A drug has been developed that can make you into a superhero but has severe side effects. The comic asks a question in it's tagline: How much do you want to be a superhuman? The premise seems very promising in the skilled hands of Warren Ellis and I got some Planetary-like vibes from the leader of the superheroes. Juan Jose Ryp has improved a bit from Black Summer and there's no complaints about his artwork. I'll definitely read the first issue when it comes out. You should check it out too. If you want to know whether I recommend you read it, see every other Warren Ellis review I've written here. (070709) Five more episodes out now. Really good stuff.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cale

    Like all of Ellis' Avatar works, this book is brutal in some of its imagery, with excessive gore appearing throughout the work. It's over-the-top, but it's in service to an interesting story, as a young man jumps through every hoop to earn the right to super powers, to his own ends. It's got a lot of the trademark Ellis snark and it is pretty dark, especially as the story twists near the end. Expectations get subverted, and the last page is pretty harsh. The characters don't stand out as any of Like all of Ellis' Avatar works, this book is brutal in some of its imagery, with excessive gore appearing throughout the work. It's over-the-top, but it's in service to an interesting story, as a young man jumps through every hoop to earn the right to super powers, to his own ends. It's got a lot of the trademark Ellis snark and it is pretty dark, especially as the story twists near the end. Expectations get subverted, and the last page is pretty harsh. The characters don't stand out as any of Ellis' best, but I think the story will stick with me for a while. And there is some amazingly detailed artwork in here - I wouldn't call it beautiful due to subject matter, but very well done nonetheless. Some of it possibly even nightmare-inducing. So be warned, but if you like Warren Ellis' work, this is definitely the same vein (it feels a lot like Black Summer, and a bit like Gravel, but a long way from Transmetropolitan, if that helps).

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Remember that time you were dating that person and you thought they were so great at first? You thought they might be the "one", the answer to your prayers... But eventually, you realized they weren't great at all- they were in fact, the worst thing that ever happened to you. That sucked didn't it? But then, you had a secret too. You weren't very great either. You were never going to be anyone else's the "one" because you are a TERRIFYING SUPER FREAK. That's why you're wearing your ex's spinal c Remember that time you were dating that person and you thought they were so great at first? You thought they might be the "one", the answer to your prayers... But eventually, you realized they weren't great at all- they were in fact, the worst thing that ever happened to you. That sucked didn't it? But then, you had a secret too. You weren't very great either. You were never going to be anyone else's the "one" because you are a TERRIFYING SUPER FREAK. That's why you're wearing your ex's spinal cord wrapped around your waist and have fashioned it so it resembles an enormous bloody phallus. This is what Warren Ellis' 7 issue comic series, No Hero, is like. It's so great it just might be the "one".

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    This is part two of Warren Ellis' three part thematically linked group of stories on the super hero in society. Black Summer showed us both the good and the bad that could come of those with powers trying to right the world to the way they thought it would be. Again, here as in Black Summer the road to Hell is paved with Good Intentions. Arguably there is no good or evil, but layers of people, governments, and possibly corporations all seeking control, power and wealth. In some ways the story do This is part two of Warren Ellis' three part thematically linked group of stories on the super hero in society. Black Summer showed us both the good and the bad that could come of those with powers trying to right the world to the way they thought it would be. Again, here as in Black Summer the road to Hell is paved with Good Intentions. Arguably there is no good or evil, but layers of people, governments, and possibly corporations all seeking control, power and wealth. In some ways the story does have a tragic ending.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Definitely a bit more reliant on plot twists and turns than a lot of Warren Ellis' work, but quite good. The title completely gives away the plot, which completely diverges from the hero's journey. There isn't much weird science or useful political commentary (though the final text box is a nice touch), but it's a great story. The art, not quite so great. Definitely a bit more reliant on plot twists and turns than a lot of Warren Ellis' work, but quite good. The title completely gives away the plot, which completely diverges from the hero's journey. There isn't much weird science or useful political commentary (though the final text box is a nice touch), but it's a great story. The art, not quite so great.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    After I read Black Summer, I jumped over to No Hero. Quite disappointed with [spoiler] the fact that the protagonist is not seriously vetted. Psychopaths are supposedly rather easy to spot when you know what to look for, and I just don't buy that this superhero group would miss that, no matter how pressing recruitment needs are. After I read Black Summer, I jumped over to No Hero. Quite disappointed with [spoiler] the fact that the protagonist is not seriously vetted. Psychopaths are supposedly rather easy to spot when you know what to look for, and I just don't buy that this superhero group would miss that, no matter how pressing recruitment needs are.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tess van Brummelen

    "Law is not justice and a trial is not a scientific inquiry into truth. A trial is the resolution of a dispute." -Edison Haines "There's nothing wrong with me. Nothing wrong with me. I'm a superhuman now." "Well, I'll take my silver linings wherever I can find them. Even if they look a little like duct tape gleaming around the wrists of a forcibly restrained patient." "Law is not justice and a trial is not a scientific inquiry into truth. A trial is the resolution of a dispute." -Edison Haines "There's nothing wrong with me. Nothing wrong with me. I'm a superhuman now." "Well, I'll take my silver linings wherever I can find them. Even if they look a little like duct tape gleaming around the wrists of a forcibly restrained patient."

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