counter Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein's Letters to and from Children - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein's Letters to and from Children

Availability: Ready to download

This enchanting book displays a small sampling of the amusing, touching, and sometimes precocious letters sent to Albert Einstein by children from around around the world, and his often witty and very considerate responses. Illustrations.


Compare

This enchanting book displays a small sampling of the amusing, touching, and sometimes precocious letters sent to Albert Einstein by children from around around the world, and his often witty and very considerate responses. Illustrations.

30 review for Dear Professor Einstein: Albert Einstein's Letters to and from Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    أنس

    A really nice book. A good introduction I think to the man himself for those, like me, who aren't really familiar with the course of his life. The children's letters section is adorable, amusing and inspiring. For me the most touching letters were his responses to questions on scientists & prayer, his correspondence with the girl Tyfanny, the way he simply explained the concept of what an animal is. One Prayer: "January 24, 1936 Dear Phyllis, I will attempt to reply to your question as simply as I A really nice book. A good introduction I think to the man himself for those, like me, who aren't really familiar with the course of his life. The children's letters section is adorable, amusing and inspiring. For me the most touching letters were his responses to questions on scientists & prayer, his correspondence with the girl Tyfanny, the way he simply explained the concept of what an animal is. One Prayer: "January 24, 1936 Dear Phyllis, I will attempt to reply to your question as simply as I can. Here is my answer: Scientists believe that every occurrence, including the affairs of human beings, is due to the laws of nature. Therefore a scientist cannot be inclined to believe that the course of events can be influenced by prayer, that is, by a supernaturally manifested wish. However, we must concede that our actual knowledge of these forces is imperfect, so that in the end the belief in the existence of a final, ultimate spirit rests on a kind of faith. Such belief remains widespread even with the current achievements in science. But also, everyone who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science becomes convinced that some spirit is manifest in the laws of the universe, one that is vastly superior to that of man. In this way the pursuit of science leads to a religious feeling of a special sort, which is surely quite different from the religiosity of someone more naive. With cordial greetings, your A. Einstein " He's a witty man as evident from this letter to a girl who told him she loved science but dreaded mathematics 'Dear Barbara: I was very pleased with your kind letter. Until now I never dreamed to be something like a hero. But since you have given me the nomination, I feel that I am one. It's like a man must feel who has been elected by the people as President of the United States. Do not worry about your difficulties in mathematics; I can assure you that mine are still greater.'

  2. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    Enjoyed it much! Quick and easy read. That Einstein is a lovable fellow. "Elsa tells me that you are unhappy because you didn't get to see your Uncle Einstein. Therefore I will tell you what I look like: pale face, long hair, and a modest paunch. In addition an awkward gait, a cigar - if I happen to have one - in the mouth, and a pen in the pocket or hand. But this uncle doesn't have bowed legs or warts, and is therefore quite handsome; and neither does he have hair on his hands, as ugly men ofte Enjoyed it much! Quick and easy read. That Einstein is a lovable fellow. "Elsa tells me that you are unhappy because you didn't get to see your Uncle Einstein. Therefore I will tell you what I look like: pale face, long hair, and a modest paunch. In addition an awkward gait, a cigar - if I happen to have one - in the mouth, and a pen in the pocket or hand. But this uncle doesn't have bowed legs or warts, and is therefore quite handsome; and neither does he have hair on his hands, as ugly men often do. So indeed it is a pity that you didn't get to see me. With warm greetings from your Uncle Einstein" (113)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Donald Grant

    It is common in marketing, or at least in marketing surveys, to ask if a product or service exceeded expectations. This means the product or service went above and beyond what the customer was anticipating. When you get the service you expect that just means the company is doing okay but is not outstanding. When you get less than you expect you complain or at least do not return to that company. This book is one that I should return. Promoted as letters from children to Einstein and his responses It is common in marketing, or at least in marketing surveys, to ask if a product or service exceeded expectations. This means the product or service went above and beyond what the customer was anticipating. When you get the service you expect that just means the company is doing okay but is not outstanding. When you get less than you expect you complain or at least do not return to that company. This book is one that I should return. Promoted as letters from children to Einstein and his responses gets it only half right. There are letters from children, but only thirteen responses. Some of the responses do not have a letter, but at least one can guess the content. The first one hundred ten pages of two hundred thirty two, consists of a quick biography and photos of Einstein’s life. Subtracting the afterword, suggested further reading, and index, the book has one hundred pages of letters. Even scarier is the suggested retail price is $25.99. at least Amazon sells it for $19.37. A better price would be $9.67, half of Amazon’s price, fitting for the half of the book that is actually correspondence. I have two heroes in my life, Mickey Mouse and Albert Einstein. Mickey reminds me to not take things to seriously and Albert reminds me to question everything. With that in mind, I question why I bought this book, but have to laugh at myself for wasting the money. This one gets one star.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This book is almost half devoted to a biography of Einstein which I didn't mind but didn't expect. The letters I enjoyed most were the ones in pairs but even the letters which don't have an answer were fun to read. The children's voices are sincere and sometimes extremely formal, other times remarkably casual (one opens "Dear Albert"). There are some gems in Einstein's responses, of course, and he is quite witty too. This book is almost half devoted to a biography of Einstein which I didn't mind but didn't expect. The letters I enjoyed most were the ones in pairs but even the letters which don't have an answer were fun to read. The children's voices are sincere and sometimes extremely formal, other times remarkably casual (one opens "Dear Albert"). There are some gems in Einstein's responses, of course, and he is quite witty too.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Delaney

    Very quick read with some interersting facts about Einstein. The actually letters are cute but nothing particularly insightful. Worth a flip through.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    cool to know this happened

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dianna

    Wish there had been more letters FROM Einstein instead of so many from the children. Still, an interesting read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amina Daoud

    A quick and amusing read, some letters remained unanswered, i enjoyed the less.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Makayla

    Knowing the legend of Albert Einstein made everyone and personally myself a different aspect on Albert. Albert Einstein was a genius like everybody knew of him. By reading this book it was easy to understand and actually got to know a different side of him. They showed how he was a normal guy whom loved children, a little corny at times and explained how he was different from others because of his mind. At birth, his parents thought he was retarded because of his deformed head and he didn't star Knowing the legend of Albert Einstein made everyone and personally myself a different aspect on Albert. Albert Einstein was a genius like everybody knew of him. By reading this book it was easy to understand and actually got to know a different side of him. They showed how he was a normal guy whom loved children, a little corny at times and explained how he was different from others because of his mind. At birth, his parents thought he was retarded because of his deformed head and he didn't start talking until he was three. He eventually started to speak and repeated every sentence until he was eight. When his father got off of work he would bring library books. When he got older he enjoyed reading math and science books every minute of the day. He didn't think his teachers weren't advance enough to teach him anything. Being by himself and learning different methods helped him become a genius.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Difficult to rate this book. The letters were very witty, and I found it enjoyable reading both Einstein's replies, and the original letters the children wrote. The only let down of the book is that it contained three separate accounts of the professor's life, all detailing the same events, which took up nearly half the book. I was not particularly interested in the first place, but to find that I had to repeat his whole history again, from a different academic perspective but which managed to i Difficult to rate this book. The letters were very witty, and I found it enjoyable reading both Einstein's replies, and the original letters the children wrote. The only let down of the book is that it contained three separate accounts of the professor's life, all detailing the same events, which took up nearly half the book. I was not particularly interested in the first place, but to find that I had to repeat his whole history again, from a different academic perspective but which managed to include all the same information was nothing short of disappointing. The timeline was equally dull. That being said, the book was very entertaining once the biographical stage was over, and I very much enjoyed reading his letters.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    If you were playing the word association game and said, "genius" the first person to come to mind for most people would be Albert Einstein. However, Professor Einstein himself would be the first one to deny that he was a genius. Why? Einstein was quite humble. Despite his smarts, he "thought he was only more curious about the world than others, and that curiosity is a childlike quality that most adults seem to lose." Einstein also had the ability not to take himself too seriously, as evidenced b If you were playing the word association game and said, "genius" the first person to come to mind for most people would be Albert Einstein. However, Professor Einstein himself would be the first one to deny that he was a genius. Why? Einstein was quite humble. Despite his smarts, he "thought he was only more curious about the world than others, and that curiosity is a childlike quality that most adults seem to lose." Einstein also had the ability not to take himself too seriously, as evidenced by his responses to the letters he received from children around the world. This book is an endearing collection of letters, to and from this great scientist.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Eva Nickelson

    The book was a mixture of biographical information about Einstein (focused on his education) and letters to and from children. The biographical information was interesting, although I wished it had focused more on Einstein's interaction with children instead of just on his own educational experiences. The letters from the children were sometimes cute, usually hilarious, but most of them lacked context. There did not seem to be any order to the letters, and while some of them showed a corresponde The book was a mixture of biographical information about Einstein (focused on his education) and letters to and from children. The biographical information was interesting, although I wished it had focused more on Einstein's interaction with children instead of just on his own educational experiences. The letters from the children were sometimes cute, usually hilarious, but most of them lacked context. There did not seem to be any order to the letters, and while some of them showed a correspondence, others did not. It would have been nice to have more context for the letters, especially the ones without a response from Einstein, instead of them just being disjointed snippets.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bev

    Fun, short read which included two brief biography of Einstein, by different authors, with different emphasis, but repeating the same information. Who knew that he had problems with math and had to ask famous mathematicians to help create the formulas for his relativity theory, or that E=mc2 was originally L=mc2 (though that is never explained). The fun part, though, is the letters to and from children, for whom the scientist obviously had a particular fondness. Again, in the comments on the let Fun, short read which included two brief biography of Einstein, by different authors, with different emphasis, but repeating the same information. Who knew that he had problems with math and had to ask famous mathematicians to help create the formulas for his relativity theory, or that E=mc2 was originally L=mc2 (though that is never explained). The fun part, though, is the letters to and from children, for whom the scientist obviously had a particular fondness. Again, in the comments on the letters, Calaprice repeats, again, information. This book could have used an editor, but for what it was, I enjoyed it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    This is a sweet and poignant little book. If you're looking for something to uplift, this will do it for you. The book is a series of letters that children wrote to Albert Einstein during his life. Some he responded to - always with respect, kindness and encouragement - and others not. But the letters are by turns sweet, silly, and earnest but always show that wisdom that only children can somehow manage. The book also contains a brief biography of Einstein and a number of photos of him during his This is a sweet and poignant little book. If you're looking for something to uplift, this will do it for you. The book is a series of letters that children wrote to Albert Einstein during his life. Some he responded to - always with respect, kindness and encouragement - and others not. But the letters are by turns sweet, silly, and earnest but always show that wisdom that only children can somehow manage. The book also contains a brief biography of Einstein and a number of photos of him during his life. Overall a fun way to pass a couple of hours - it is a short easy to read book - in a fun way.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dorian

    This half-biography-half-archival book appealed to me because of its focus on youth. I was not disappointed in the least with it. I enjoyed it as an adult reading cover to cover, but its presentation is such that my ten year old daughter could turn to any page, read, understand and enjoy. That this book is attractive to young readers makes me incredibly giddy, as it demonstrates the celebrity appeal of an intellectual.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Roger Royer

    I loved this book. I found out some amazing facts about Professor Einstein that I did not know and I also found out that he was more than I ever could have wished for when it came to children and adults. The letters and pictures portray a man that was not only brilliant but was also kind and caring. He seems to have never talked down to children in the letters he replied to in the book but talked to them like little adults with more curious minds than most adults.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kelly (miss_kellysbookishcorner)

    This is definitely a quick and easy read. It's a great introduction to Einstein and his life. I absolutely loved how this book was set up, with a preface, followed by a biography, pictures and then the letters. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the letters, because I really got a sense of Einstein's personality. The letters also show the impact of Einstein's life on million of children. This is definitely a quick and easy read. It's a great introduction to Einstein and his life. I absolutely loved how this book was set up, with a preface, followed by a biography, pictures and then the letters. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the letters, because I really got a sense of Einstein's personality. The letters also show the impact of Einstein's life on million of children.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dgg32

    Well, Einstein's communications were very fascinating and diverse. I think putting them together as a book is somehow difficult. The subject is constantly changing and you never remember what you read before. I prefer quotes than a big book of letters. Well, Einstein's communications were very fascinating and diverse. I think putting them together as a book is somehow difficult. The subject is constantly changing and you never remember what you read before. I prefer quotes than a big book of letters.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Cranney

    Hardly any of the letters from Einstein; in the end I just don't think a lot were preserved, and you can tell that the author was pulling out all the stops (large font, small book, long intro, etc.) to stretch relatively little source material into a book length manuscript. Hardly any of the letters from Einstein; in the end I just don't think a lot were preserved, and you can tell that the author was pulling out all the stops (large font, small book, long intro, etc.) to stretch relatively little source material into a book length manuscript.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matt and Kenna Ford

    I bought this book for my dad before he died and he loved it. It is soooo charming! And I LOVE the way Einstein thought about things and corresponded with children whose parents and teachers said "Ask Albert Einstein" when they didn't know the answers to life's questions. Highly recommend! I bought this book for my dad before he died and he loved it. It is soooo charming! And I LOVE the way Einstein thought about things and corresponded with children whose parents and teachers said "Ask Albert Einstein" when they didn't know the answers to life's questions. Highly recommend!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Pastor

    Love Einstein but I couldn't shake the feeling that this book was just an attempt to capitalize off of a found box of letters. Some were cute but most lacked responses (which probably exist). A nice, quick flip through. Love Einstein but I couldn't shake the feeling that this book was just an attempt to capitalize off of a found box of letters. Some were cute but most lacked responses (which probably exist). A nice, quick flip through.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dennis

    Must read-1 Meaningful-1 Well written-3 Very quick life timeline in the beginning is a nice addition to this collection of children's correspondence with Einstein. Must read-1 Meaningful-1 Well written-3 Very quick life timeline in the beginning is a nice addition to this collection of children's correspondence with Einstein.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rosie

    Cute. Interesting insight into how he related to children. Not a keeper, though.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    I'm sure Herr Einstein LOVED to read all of these adorable letters. I'm sure Herr Einstein LOVED to read all of these adorable letters.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    A fun look at the man behind the theories in his own words, in the form of his letters to and from children. Both entertaining and enlightening!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jason Linden

    Insubstantial. This could have been delightful, and while there were a few moments, it was mostly dull.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    The concept was very interesting. I did learn a lot about Einstein's life and relationship with children. However, many of the letters were repetitive and there was often no response from Einstein. The concept was very interesting. I did learn a lot about Einstein's life and relationship with children. However, many of the letters were repetitive and there was often no response from Einstein.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Fuller

    A sweet book about Einstein, filled primarily with letters he received from children.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Zhijing Jin

    (Objective 1) If your target is to understand more about Einstein from this first-hand material: (a) Einstein received way too many letters than what he could reply to. (b) Einstein's image was raised too high, like a hero. But this idolization is not something that can keep a scientist calm and focused, nor did he enjoy it. E.g. "Let every man be respected as an individual and no man be idolized." (c) Einstein told his own son to "enjoy" playing piano, instead of excelling at it. So is schoolwork. (Objective 1) If your target is to understand more about Einstein from this first-hand material: (a) Einstein received way too many letters than what he could reply to. (b) Einstein's image was raised too high, like a hero. But this idolization is not something that can keep a scientist calm and focused, nor did he enjoy it. E.g. "Let every man be respected as an individual and no man be idolized." (c) Einstein told his own son to "enjoy" playing piano, instead of excelling at it. So is schoolwork. He does not care about marks, but more the fun when doing it. E.g., "On the piano, play mainly the things that you enjoy, even if your teacher doesn't assign them to you. You learn the most from things that you enjoy doing so much that you don't even notice the time is passing." (Objective 2) If you are junior in a field, and would love to reach out to more senior people for their mentoring advice: (a) Einstein replies quickly to some Japanese kids, because he feels a mission to do so for a country that he seldom gets letters from. He is also driven to reply because he admires Japanese culture. When you are from a underprivileged group, you can also state this to get the attention of the senior person. (b) Einstein replies to *extremely kind* admirations. (c) Einstein replies to Jewish kids (with the same identity as him). (Objective 3) If you want to advance your skills when replying to letters from kids. (a) Einstein is generally tender to kids. But the most tender way of replying to kids should be learned from Mister Rogers. (b) If you want to explain physics in a structured manner to kids, then learn from Feymann. Keep in mind that Einstein does not enjoy teaching that much. So he might be good at replying to science questions in short, but not in a well-structured manner in the position of an experienced educator. (c) If you want to answer kids' questions on physics, or science versus religion, then you can learn from Einstein. Take the following two examples: January 17, 1953 Dear Children: We should not ask "What is an animal" but "what sort of thing do we call an animal?" Well, we call something an animal which has certain characteristics: it takes nourishment, it descends from parents similar to itself, it grows, it moves by itself, it dies if its time has run out. That's why we call the worms, the chicken, the dog, the monkey an animal. What about us humans? Think about it in the above mentioned way and then decide for yourselves whether it is a natural thing to regard ourselves as animals. With kind regards, Albert Einstein „January 24, 1936 Dear Phyllis, I will attempt to reply to your question as simply as I can. Here is my answer: Scientists believe that every occurrence, including the affairs of human beings, is due to the laws of nature. Therefore a scientist cannot be inclined to believe that the course of events can be influenced by prayer, that is, by a supernaturally manifested wish. However, we must concede that our actual knowledge of these forces is imperfect, so that in the end the belief in the existence of a final, ultimate spirit rests on a kind of faith. Such belief remains widespread even with the current achievements in science. But also, everyone who is seriously involved in the pursuit of science becomes convinced that some spirit is manifest in the laws of the universe, one that is vastly superior to that of man. In this way the pursuit of science leads to a religious feeling of a special sort, which is surely quite different from the religiosity of someone more naive. With cordial greetings, your A. Einstein

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bob Lewis

    Einstein famously credited his scientific achievements not to his superior intelligence but to his enduring sense of child-like curiosity about the universe. Given that philosophy, I was intrigued to read about his correspondence with children. I expected a collection of charming exchanges ranging from the thoughtful to the humorous. This book only occasionally rises to that expectation. Einstein's correspondence is fascinating, but this book contains fewer than twenty letters written by the grea Einstein famously credited his scientific achievements not to his superior intelligence but to his enduring sense of child-like curiosity about the universe. Given that philosophy, I was intrigued to read about his correspondence with children. I expected a collection of charming exchanges ranging from the thoughtful to the humorous. This book only occasionally rises to that expectation. Einstein's correspondence is fascinating, but this book contains fewer than twenty letters written by the great scientist himself. Of those, some are personal letters to Einstein's own children and one is a response to a letter from a grieving father following the death of a child. The remaining correspondence with children from around the world is charming indeed though hardly enough to fill even this short a book. What does fill the remainder of the book? The first half of the book presents a brief biographical treatment of Einstein which makes for interesting reading but hardly detailed enough to provide any new information to anyone who has studied Einstein in the past (which seems to my mind like the primary audience of a book of Einstein's letters). The second half of the book, devoted to Einstein's correspondence with children, would have been better titled "Children's Letters to Einstein" because most of the children's letters are published without Einstein's replies (if indeed he did respond at all). That's not to say this is a bad book. It certainly has its moments and it's short enough that it was able to retain my interest for the hour or so it took me to read. However, it was a little disappointing in that I expected far more of Einstein's own words than the book actually contained. Buy it when its on sale, and it makes for a nice quick read or a nice gift for an Einstein fan, but I wouldn't recommend ever paying the cover price.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.