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The New Worship: Straight Talk on Music and the Church

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This expanded edition offers practical advice for centering worship styles on praise, fellowship, and evangelism. It helps pastors, worship leaders, and musicians guide the scope and direction of their worship program as they navigate changes, resolve conflicts, and use a blend of both traditional and nontraditional music in praise formats.


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This expanded edition offers practical advice for centering worship styles on praise, fellowship, and evangelism. It helps pastors, worship leaders, and musicians guide the scope and direction of their worship program as they navigate changes, resolve conflicts, and use a blend of both traditional and nontraditional music in praise formats.

30 review for The New Worship: Straight Talk on Music and the Church

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Ok, so a few things. First off, as is common for books on worship, the author takes a loosely related verse and builds a theory onto it that isn't necessarily not true, just not necessarily true either. Then, they build another theory that is based on that theory, and another theory that is based on the second theory. By the third or fourth theory that each build upon each other, you have some weird stuff going on, with a very fragile leaning tower. Once again, it takes him too long to say thing Ok, so a few things. First off, as is common for books on worship, the author takes a loosely related verse and builds a theory onto it that isn't necessarily not true, just not necessarily true either. Then, they build another theory that is based on that theory, and another theory that is based on the second theory. By the third or fourth theory that each build upon each other, you have some weird stuff going on, with a very fragile leaning tower. Once again, it takes him too long to say things and he has a fairly boring way or writing, but this was still better than his previous book. This book is dated and seems to be written for churches that are stuck in the 60's, which is REALLY unfortunate since it was written in the 80's. There are some valuable insights, but more for the sake of personal theories, not really for application (such as his different models of praise styles, and his ideas of diversity in worship). You can tell that he's never really been a church leader but only a church musician for a few reasons: he often says stuff that will cause pastors and worship leaders to be at odds, a common problem anyways, but then talks about how they should work together out of the other side of his mouth. He thinks worship is the most important thing in the world. He fails to take into account individual contexts, a church's mission or strategy, background, etc. He fails to understand how songs are often so outdated that people have no idea what they mean when they're singing it - such as "here I raise mine ebenezer". Do I know what this means? Yes. Do the druggies that are (hopefully) coming in from off the streets? No. He also only really considers verses and concepts that support his beliefs. This book by all means did have value, which is why it got 3 stars, it just didn't have a lot of value. If you're new to worship, you may want to consider reading it as one among many resources, but it is by no means the only book you'll ever need. Now a brief analysis of some specific things he said: he made the comment that worship isn't meant to just be a personal thing between us and God, and I think he's dead on with that. Worship is connected with God's Spirit moving, and I think he's dead on with that as well. His discussion of performers was a good start, but ultimately inadequate. It attempted to make worship extremely structured and legalistic, a contradiction of terms in this context, and catered to a church being entertainment based. Christians need to stop getting offended about everything, especially since the culture has started getting offended about everything as well. If you don't like it, it's ok. The church doesn't function so you can like everything in it, but so we can join together for a common goal. His contrast with modern choruses and ancient hymns was inadequate as it only considered the best cases for hymns and largely bad cases for choruses and only from specific points in time. His models for free-flowing praise were excellent, especially for starters. He clearly has a lot of experience, which helped a lot. His "journey into the holy of holies" was man-focused, ignored the context, had no basis, missed the point of the tabernacle, and seemed to overlook the point that only the priest was allowed to enter in in the ancient context. A lot of half-thought, almost good ideas that often fell on their faces when faced with scrutiny. But such are the woes of worship books. There is no such thing as a one-stop shop with worship books. You have to read massive amounts of them, and wade through a lot of repeated metaphors, and take a little bit of gold dust in each, which eventually may combine to make a single gold ingot, that you can then possibly use. But you have to be patient, and weigh it all against the bible. Analyze everything that's said, even when it's "supported" by scripture.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rich

    Don't skip the appendices in this one! Several helpful resources are highlighted. Don't skip the appendices in this one! Several helpful resources are highlighted.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

    I pull this book back off my shelf more than most books on music. The author is thoughtful and engaging. I would recommend it to anyone seeking to settle or to challenge their thoughts about music and the church.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Steven Barr

    After reading manifest presence by Jack hayford this is hard going. It is written with big churches in mind. The heart of worship is not easily discovered in these pages. We'll written though specific to certain types of churches in America. After reading manifest presence by Jack hayford this is hard going. It is written with big churches in mind. The heart of worship is not easily discovered in these pages. We'll written though specific to certain types of churches in America.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    This book was a textbook for a class I am taking. I found it to be a great resource.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Don

    Talbot Course: Pastoral Ministry Foundational Book on Biblical worship -its theology and practicality.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kessia Reyne

    This book has some awesome theological insights into worship AND some very practical suggestions for the practioners. I highly recommend it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sharayah

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brad

  10. 5 out of 5

    David Marsh

  11. 5 out of 5

    Morris

  12. 5 out of 5

    Evghenii

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Robison

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lewis Worthington

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ken

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jared

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  18. 5 out of 5

    Travis R.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mila

  20. 4 out of 5

    Davey Ermold

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nathaniel

  22. 4 out of 5

    Charlane Leslie

  23. 5 out of 5

    Allison

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kim

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jane Doe

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brian Michael Stegner

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dominic German

  30. 5 out of 5

    David

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