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A Moment on the Edge: 100 Years of Crime Stories by Women

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New York Times bestselling author Elizabeth George serves up a century's worth of superb crime fiction penned by women. This veritable all-star team delivers tales of dark deeds that will keep you reading long into the night. Included are these works: "A Jury of Her Peers" by Susan Glaspell The Summer of People" by Shirley Jackson "The Irony of Hate" by Ruth Rendell New York Times bestselling author Elizabeth George serves up a century's worth of superb crime fiction penned by women. This veritable all-star team delivers tales of dark deeds that will keep you reading long into the night. Included are these works: "A Jury of Her Peers" by Susan Glaspell The Summer of People" by Shirley Jackson "The Irony of Hate" by Ruth Rendell "Country Lovers" by Nadine Gordimer "Wild Mustard" by Marcia Muller "Murder-Two" by Joyce Carol Oates A Moment on the Edge is a rare treat not only for fans of crime fiction but also for anyone who appreciates a skillfully written, deftly told story.


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New York Times bestselling author Elizabeth George serves up a century's worth of superb crime fiction penned by women. This veritable all-star team delivers tales of dark deeds that will keep you reading long into the night. Included are these works: "A Jury of Her Peers" by Susan Glaspell The Summer of People" by Shirley Jackson "The Irony of Hate" by Ruth Rendell New York Times bestselling author Elizabeth George serves up a century's worth of superb crime fiction penned by women. This veritable all-star team delivers tales of dark deeds that will keep you reading long into the night. Included are these works: "A Jury of Her Peers" by Susan Glaspell The Summer of People" by Shirley Jackson "The Irony of Hate" by Ruth Rendell "Country Lovers" by Nadine Gordimer "Wild Mustard" by Marcia Muller "Murder-Two" by Joyce Carol Oates A Moment on the Edge is a rare treat not only for fans of crime fiction but also for anyone who appreciates a skillfully written, deftly told story.

30 review for A Moment on the Edge: 100 Years of Crime Stories by Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Teresa TL Bruce

    This collection of "crime" stories ran the gamut from amusing to disturbing. The twenty-seven authors represented each have a unique style, and the biographical introductions highlight each writer's strengths and best-known works. Caution: If you don't want to add more authors and titles to your "to read" list then you should avoid reading this collection. By the time I finished I added fifteen more authors to my own list. This collection of "crime" stories ran the gamut from amusing to disturbing. The twenty-seven authors represented each have a unique style, and the biographical introductions highlight each writer's strengths and best-known works. Caution: If you don't want to add more authors and titles to your "to read" list then you should avoid reading this collection. By the time I finished I added fifteen more authors to my own list.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    Another anthology of mystery and crime stories, these by women. This volume was edited by Elizabeth George. I love her attitude towards crime fiction: "One man at a writing conference told me that he was going to write crime fiction as practice and then, later on, he would write a 'real novel.' 'Like making tacos until you can graduate to chocolate cake from scratch?' I asked him innocently." Like Ms George says, "For my money, literature is whatever lasts." I strongly recommend reading her introd Another anthology of mystery and crime stories, these by women. This volume was edited by Elizabeth George. I love her attitude towards crime fiction: "One man at a writing conference told me that he was going to write crime fiction as practice and then, later on, he would write a 'real novel.' 'Like making tacos until you can graduate to chocolate cake from scratch?' I asked him innocently." Like Ms George says, "For my money, literature is whatever lasts." I strongly recommend reading her introduction. Unlike a lot of introductions, it's informative and interesting (are you listening, editors?) These stories span roughly 100 years and the authors range from Susan Glaspell to Ruth Rendell to Sharyn McCrumb to Nancy Pickard. This is one of the few volumes of short stories where I actually like the majority of the stories. Of course, the quality of the writing is better than most anthologies I run across. Usually, there's one or two writers I'm familiar with and then the rest are total unknowns, for reasons which become very apparent. Not this time around. If you're interested in trying out some new authors - whether they are current ones like Minette Walters or Marcia Muller, or Golden Age ones like Dorothy L. Sayers or Ngaio Marsh - this is a good source to try. My personal favorite is "A Jury of Her Peers" by Susan Glaspell. Based on her play, "Trifles," she adapted it into this classic short story. It is based on an actual murder that she covered for the "Des Moines Daily News." To say a lot about this story is to ruin the experience. I read it twice because I missed some things the first time around. It's hard to single out stories from this volume since they're all good, but my other favorites are: "The Man Who Knew How" by Dorothy L. Sayers (a non-Lord Peter Wimsey tale); "St Patrick's Day in the Morning" by Charlotte Armstrong, one of my favorite mystery writers; "Money to Burn" by Margery Allingham, who is usually not one of my favorite authors; "Clever and Quick" by the wonderful Christianna Brand; "The Irony of Hate" by Ruth Rendell; "Sweet Baby Jenny" by Joyce Harrington; and "Wild Mustard," which is one of the earliest Sharon McCone stories by Marcia Muller. This is a good anthology to use in determining what kind authors you might be interested in trying, such as the ones listed above. Very recommended.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Eustacia Tan

    I’ve been reading this over the past few days and finally finished it! The nice thing about anthologies is that it’s easy to read it in bits and pieces, which makes it really good for commute reading. A Moment on the Edge is a collection of crime stories over the past 100 years. This book doesn’t just feature noted crime writers, but stories from a wider range of authors. All stories “share in common a desire to explore mankind in a moment on the edge”. Each story is introduced with a brief biogra I’ve been reading this over the past few days and finally finished it! The nice thing about anthologies is that it’s easy to read it in bits and pieces, which makes it really good for commute reading. A Moment on the Edge is a collection of crime stories over the past 100 years. This book doesn’t just feature noted crime writers, but stories from a wider range of authors. All stories “share in common a desire to explore mankind in a moment on the edge”. Each story is introduced with a brief biography of the author, but to be honest, I skipped those. My interest is solely in the stories, which were: - A Jury of Her Peers by Susan Glaspell: Martha Hale is called to the scene of her crime. While she and the Sheriff’s wife are taken lightly by the men, the two women get to the heart of the matter and must decide - do they tell what they know? A very interesting story and a good start to the anthology. - The Man Who Knew How by Dorothy L. Sayers: this makes me want to read more Sayers. A clever story with a twist, about a man who claims to have discovered the perfect way to kill. - I Can Find my Way Out by Ngaio Marsh: A murder mystery set in a theatre, I found this to be a bit confusing. I think it’s because of the number of characters in the story. - The Summer People by Shirley Jackson: This was a creepy story about whether a location is trying to kill the two main characters or if they’re just paranoid. - St. Patrick’s Day in the Morning by Charlotte Armstrong: I thought that this was confusing at the start but it had such an excellent twist that I ended up liking it very much. - The Purple is Everything by Dorothy Salisbury Davis: This wasn’t a murder mystery but about art theft. It’s a pretty good character study type of story. - Money to Burn by Margery Allingham: I’ve heard of this author but I don’t remember if I’ve read her stuff! I thought this was a very tightly written story, although I had to read the ending twice to understand it. I definitely need to look for books by her! - Nice Place to Stay by Nedra Tyre: This turned the crime story on its head by looking at things from the perspective of the criminal. I really enjoyed this one! - Clever and Quick by Christianna Brand: There are murders in this and it’s not till the end that you get to see who comes up on top in this. Would highly recommend this too. - Country Lovers by Nadine Gordimer: To be honest, I didn’t quite get why this was a crime story. Sounded like love gone wrong. - The Irony of Hate by Ruth Rendell: This story is the confession of a killer and I have to say, I did not expect it. I should probably pick up another Ruth Rendell novel soon. - Sweet Baby Jenny by Joyce Harrington: I don’t know if it’s the dialect style of this, but I found this a little hard to read. I managed to understand what was going on, but only towards the end. - Wild Mustard by Marcia Miller: A tragic story, though like with Country Lovers, I don’t quite understand how this is a crime story. - Jemima Shore at the Sunny Grave by Antonia Fraser: Set in the Caribbean, this story has its protagonist investigate the death of the women she came to interview. The story started off well but I did not see the denouement coming or enough clues to guess at it. - The Case of Pietro Andromache by Sara Paterson: I really liked this one! It involves a statue during WWII, duelling doctors, an a private investigator determined to help her friend. I need to go find more from this author too! - Afraid All the Time by Nancy Pickard: A leading up to, but stopping just before, a tragic event. I feel like although the ending stopped at the climax, it didn’t feel that way because I never did find out what happened. - The Young Shall See Visions, and the Old Dream Dreams by Kristine Kathryn Rush: This wasn’t my cup of tea, mostly because parts of the story seemed irrelevant to the crime. (Maybe because it’s a short story?) - A Predatory Woman by Sharyn McCrumb: You have a reporter doing anything to get her story and a murderess who’s served her time. I wonder who the predatory woman in the title is? - Jack be Quick by Barbara Paul: I really enjoyed this historical mystery, which imagines a solution to the Jack the Ripper serial killings (and why they stopped) - Ghost Station by Carolyn Wheat: I wasn’t sure if I was going to like this story, but it turns out I did. It looks at women in the police force, alcoholism, and family. - New Moon and Rattlesnakes by Wendy Hornsby: Lise is both on the run and looking for revenge. I didn’t know what was happening at first, but once I did, the story grabbed me and didn’t let go. - Death of a Snowbird by J. A. Lance: Didn’t quite get this one, to be honest. - The River Mouth by Lia Matera: Didn’t get this one either - and it felt like the protagonist navel-gazed a fair bit. - A Scandal in Winter by Gillian Linscott: This is a tale involving an elderly Sherlock Holmes and it’s great fun! Really enjoyed reading this. - Murder-Two by Joyce Carol Oates: I’ve heard of Joyce Carol Oates and had high expectations of this, but the stream of consciousness style of narration just confused me. - English Autumn - American Fall by Minette Walters: The last story in the anthology, it was unfortunately rather weak. I think this is in part because of its lack of length because I didn’t connect to the characters and had absolutely no idea what was going on (and no memory of what it was about less than an hour after I read it). Overall, this anthology was a good one. While I felt like it faltered a little towards the end, most of the stories were varied and excellent. While I knew of some of the authors, I haven’t heard of others and I got so many author recommendations from this! This review was first posted at Inside the mind of a Bibliophile

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Anthology of brilliant stories by 27 women crime writers. I liked the biographical introductions to each story. I found a bunch of authors that I want to read more of.

  5. 5 out of 5

    DeAnna Knippling

    Collection of stories by female crime writers. I didn't care for the editing on this. None of the stories were bad, but they didn't strike me as especially great or telling of the author's work or individually showing either the range of the field or what women have been writing. I felt like it was editor's preference rather than a comprehensive plan in a lot of cases. Not bad, all solid, just not stories I was surprised and delighted to read, and often stories where a fair number of rough edges Collection of stories by female crime writers. I didn't care for the editing on this. None of the stories were bad, but they didn't strike me as especially great or telling of the author's work or individually showing either the range of the field or what women have been writing. I felt like it was editor's preference rather than a comprehensive plan in a lot of cases. Not bad, all solid, just not stories I was surprised and delighted to read, and often stories where a fair number of rough edges were showing. Recommend for someone who wants to read a solid mystery anthology.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    Reading short stories was the perfect thing for me during this time of upheaval. I also needed to get some big chores done around the house and when I am reading a good book, that is all I want to do. I like almost all the authors included and Elizabeth's summaries before each story also includes information on other writings. This will help me select my future readings. This book has been sitting on my shelf for many years and luckily I have a few others like it. I am glad these anthologies are Reading short stories was the perfect thing for me during this time of upheaval. I also needed to get some big chores done around the house and when I am reading a good book, that is all I want to do. I like almost all the authors included and Elizabeth's summaries before each story also includes information on other writings. This will help me select my future readings. This book has been sitting on my shelf for many years and luckily I have a few others like it. I am glad these anthologies are available for readers like me.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sydney

    A good, if standard, collection. Some stories too long for an anthology like this. Leaving out Joyce Carol Oates would have made room for several, younger writers. Still it is good to trace the expansion of women writers and protagonists in this field. Reminded me to go read more Minette Walters.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Paige Murphy

    The only outstanding story is the Summer people by Shirley Jackson. As far as the others- some were good, just a couple were not so good

  9. 4 out of 5

    B.V.

    Author Elizabeth George, best known for her Inspector Lynley mysteries, selected 26 crime stories by women authors for the anthology A Moment on the Edge: 100 Years of Crime Stories by Women (2002). In her introduction, George analyzes how and why people have been fascinated with crime stories since ancient times and takes to task those critics of the genre who believe crime writing is a lesser form of literary endeavor. The stories George chose certainly make a strong argument for their inclusi Author Elizabeth George, best known for her Inspector Lynley mysteries, selected 26 crime stories by women authors for the anthology A Moment on the Edge: 100 Years of Crime Stories by Women (2002). In her introduction, George analyzes how and why people have been fascinated with crime stories since ancient times and takes to task those critics of the genre who believe crime writing is a lesser form of literary endeavor. The stories George chose certainly make a strong argument for their inclusion in any anthology of quality short fiction, whether it's crime-themed or not. The anthology arranges the stories chronologically, starting with the classic "A Jury of Her Peers" by Susan Glaspell from 1917. From there, the timeline progresses to stories by Golden Age mystery writers Dorothy L. Sayers and Ngaio Marsh, and then "New Golden Age" authors including Sara Paretsky and Marcia Muller. There are also selections by writers considered to lie outside the genre: Shirley Jackson, Nadine Gordiner, Antonia Fraser and Joyce Carol Oates. Each selection is prefaced with a description by George that includes a brief bio of the author and a tidbit or two about the story, as with "The Man Who Knew How" by Sayers, which was adapted for radio starring Charles Laughton and Hans Conreid. All the sub-genres in crime fiction are well-represented, from the supernatural in "Death of a Snowbird" by J. A. Jance, where the spirit of a dead Native American girl appears in a retired couple's RV as they spend the winter in Arizona (1994); psychological suspense in "Afraid All the Time" by Nancy Pickard, following a woman who moves to the plains and descends into a nightmare (1989); a police procedural featuring Ngaio Marsh's Inspector Allyn in "I Can Find My Way Out" (1946); a "whydunnit" from Margery Allingham in "Money to Burn" (1957); the noirish "New Moon and Rattlesnakes" by Wendy Hornsby (1994); and even a Sherlock Holmes/Dr. Watson pastiche by Gillian Linscott ("A Scandal in Winter," from 1996). George's intention was to have the stories illustrate how crime fiction, particularly that written by women about women, has changed in the last hundred years. This is likely one reason she bookends her choices with two tales about the death of abusive husbands, written 80 years apart (the authors' lives span 100 years, but not necessarily the stories). As Elizabeth George notes in her intro: "All of these authors share in common a desire to explore mankind in a moment on the edge. The edge equates to the crime committed. How the characters deal with the edge is the story."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This was a good compilation and I think I found some new authors that I am interested in. I would give it a higher rating but the problem with so many short stories is that many are forgettable, but the ones that stand out are totally worth the read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Elena

    I enjoyed most of these stories but noticed that as they became more modern (i. e. written by contemporary women), in general they became less interesting. Or maybe it was that the murders became more gruesome and somehow more commonplace, like tv murders? Almost all the women had interesting plot twists and some were really creepy (Joyce Carol Oates' was especially hard to read). But I guess I prefer that mood of mystery in the past. I enjoyed most of these stories but noticed that as they became more modern (i. e. written by contemporary women), in general they became less interesting. Or maybe it was that the murders became more gruesome and somehow more commonplace, like tv murders? Almost all the women had interesting plot twists and some were really creepy (Joyce Carol Oates' was especially hard to read). But I guess I prefer that mood of mystery in the past.

  12. 4 out of 5

    JUDY ANN

    I KEPT THIS BOOK IN MY CAR IN CASE I HAD TO WAIT FOR MY HUSBAND SOMEWHERE (USUALLY LOWE'S OR HOME DEPOT). THE STORIES WERE GREAT AND I ENJOYED HAVING SOMETHING I COULD READ QUICKLY. I KEPT THIS BOOK IN MY CAR IN CASE I HAD TO WAIT FOR MY HUSBAND SOMEWHERE (USUALLY LOWE'S OR HOME DEPOT). THE STORIES WERE GREAT AND I ENJOYED HAVING SOMETHING I COULD READ QUICKLY.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Mysteries are my go to books. They have been part of my life for as long as I can remember, starting with Encyclopedia Brown. I have always loved reading them, both as novels and short stories. However, almost all of the books I read are by male writers. I have visited the worlds of a few women mystery writers, and Sara Paretsky is one of my favorites, but I have never read a lot of their work. So, when my wife told me about this collection of short mysteries, I was intrigued. Edited by Elizabeth Mysteries are my go to books. They have been part of my life for as long as I can remember, starting with Encyclopedia Brown. I have always loved reading them, both as novels and short stories. However, almost all of the books I read are by male writers. I have visited the worlds of a few women mystery writers, and Sara Paretsky is one of my favorites, but I have never read a lot of their work. So, when my wife told me about this collection of short mysteries, I was intrigued. Edited by Elizabeth George, the creator of the aristocratic Inspector Lyndley, one of wife’s favorite detectives, the book presents a comprehensive overview of history of mysteries written by female writers. Her choices range from women who are well known, such as Dorothy Sayers, Ruth Rendell and Joyce Carol Oates, to some lesser known writers including Lia Matera and Minette Walters. All are excellent, and they provide a wide variety of examples of the mystery genre. One of my favorite stories is A Jury of Her Peers by Susan Glaspell. A writer of fiction and plays, Ms. Glaspell (1876-1948) was a member of the Provincetown Players. A Jury takes place out on the plains. The story revolves around the women of a small town and how they react when the husband of one is found, hanged, in his home. In Murder-Two, Joyce Carol Oates (b. 1938) presents a deep and dark look at the psychology of a young man whose mother has been found murdered. The tale is told through the eyes of his lawyer, a self-assured young lady, who quickly forms doubts about her client and herself. It is no real surprise that my favorite story comes from my favorite author in the collection – Sara Paretsky (b. 1947). In The Case of the Pietro Andromache, she takes to the short story form and still presents her detective – V.I. Warshawski, with her usual mix of social class awareness, politics and, in this case, she even throws in art history and holocaust for good measure. She does all of this without losing the thread of the mystery or the interest of the reader. If you love mysteries, especially short ones, and you want to expand your knowledge of women writers, pick up A Moment on the Edge. It is an excellent collection.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    I really wanted to hit 4 stars, but the last of E. George's short stories left me disappointed. First of all, I love Elizabeth George's novels especially those featuring Detective Lynley so when I saw she had compiled a selection of crime short stories written by women, I was all over it. I have really just developed an appreciation of short stories thanks to our dear Catherine (Goodreads) who began a special group who were interested in SS. I am so glad she continued with it for another year! A I really wanted to hit 4 stars, but the last of E. George's short stories left me disappointed. First of all, I love Elizabeth George's novels especially those featuring Detective Lynley so when I saw she had compiled a selection of crime short stories written by women, I was all over it. I have really just developed an appreciation of short stories thanks to our dear Catherine (Goodreads) who began a special group who were interested in SS. I am so glad she continued with it for another year! Anyway, I enjoyed reading this over a period of about 6 months picking it up between other books to read a selection or two especially when I was on the treadmill. Women crime and mystery writers were a rarity for a long while with some writing under a male pseudonym to get published. So E. George selected some of the earliest stories written by women and they are for the most part very good and have endured! I enjoyed being able to pick this up read a story or two and then putting it down to more on to the other 3 04 4 books I always have going!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    "A Moment on The Edge" by Elizabeth George is a compilation of short mystery stories by accomplished women novelists. Each story is accompanied by a brief bio of the writer and her place among top mystery writers. I was pleasantly surprised to discover several of my favorite authors are among the highly rated. I was also introduced to additional writers I want to read. Just as important, the book identified at least one author I'll skip. Not because she isn't a good writer but because the subjec "A Moment on The Edge" by Elizabeth George is a compilation of short mystery stories by accomplished women novelists. Each story is accompanied by a brief bio of the writer and her place among top mystery writers. I was pleasantly surprised to discover several of my favorite authors are among the highly rated. I was also introduced to additional writers I want to read. Just as important, the book identified at least one author I'll skip. Not because she isn't a good writer but because the subject matter is not appealing to me. I'm glad I came across this book and decided to read it, even though short stories are not my usual cup of tea.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    “A Moment on the Edge” by Elizabeth George is light reading containing numerous short stories by women writers over 100 or so years, with an introduction to each author and the writers that they admired or were motivated by. As short stories are not as well fleshed out as novels, and as there are probably not as many to choose from, these vary from two to four-stars, and some are only lightly in the crime genre. The pluses are that it is interesting to read older writing styles, that you find a “A Moment on the Edge” by Elizabeth George is light reading containing numerous short stories by women writers over 100 or so years, with an introduction to each author and the writers that they admired or were motivated by. As short stories are not as well fleshed out as novels, and as there are probably not as many to choose from, these vary from two to four-stars, and some are only lightly in the crime genre. The pluses are that it is interesting to read older writing styles, that you find a lot of authors mentioned and admired to add to your reading list, and that these stories are very handy for quick reading when waiting or when having time constraints.

  17. 4 out of 5

    GEORGE MARQUES

    As most anthologies I come to, there is an uneven quality to the selection of stories. In this case most of them range from average to uninteresting. There are two glaring exceptions, one being Shirley Jackson’s “The Summer People”. Most writers presented here were unknown to me, with obvious exceptions like Ruth Rendell and Minette Walters. I believe their best work to be in novels, not short stories. That may be also true for most of the other writers represented here. The short forms are more As most anthologies I come to, there is an uneven quality to the selection of stories. In this case most of them range from average to uninteresting. There are two glaring exceptions, one being Shirley Jackson’s “The Summer People”. Most writers presented here were unknown to me, with obvious exceptions like Ruth Rendell and Minette Walters. I believe their best work to be in novels, not short stories. That may be also true for most of the other writers represented here. The short forms are more difficult to master, especially in the mystery genre. Anyway reader are much better served in other anthologies. This one is just for those that want an all female set of authors.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Celeste McGoogan

    This collection of short stories is arranged chronologically according to publication date. The first half of the book is excellent; however, my enthusiasm evaporated with the second half. A couple of the more modern tales were well written, but they lacked the extra dimension I enjoyed in the earlier ones. They seemed to revolve around social issues or individual angst rather than a mystery, or at least a puzzle of some sort. Since I had read three stories before, I gave this book three stars f This collection of short stories is arranged chronologically according to publication date. The first half of the book is excellent; however, my enthusiasm evaporated with the second half. A couple of the more modern tales were well written, but they lacked the extra dimension I enjoyed in the earlier ones. They seemed to revolve around social issues or individual angst rather than a mystery, or at least a puzzle of some sort. Since I had read three stories before, I gave this book three stars for the thirty percent or so of the book that was a real treat.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Katie Bee

    I really enjoyed this anthology. Quite a lot of styles collected here! No novellas - they're all short stories, with the occasional very short story thrown in. Obviously I enjoyed some of the stories more than others, but honestly I can't remember any real duds. 25 stories in all. Sayers, Marsh, & Allingham are all represented, but there are also quite a few names I didn't recognize. Oh, no Christie (but that's okay, I've read all of hers a gazillion times). I really enjoyed this anthology. Quite a lot of styles collected here! No novellas - they're all short stories, with the occasional very short story thrown in. Obviously I enjoyed some of the stories more than others, but honestly I can't remember any real duds. 25 stories in all. Sayers, Marsh, & Allingham are all represented, but there are also quite a few names I didn't recognize. Oh, no Christie (but that's okay, I've read all of hers a gazillion times).

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pat

    As a fan of E. George and also of Catherine’s short stories on Goodreads, I was drawn to this series of crime stories! It was COOL to read about these early female writers of mystery who were published before female mystery writers were recognized as legit! I enjoyed most of the stories but not all, but I ❤️ Having a book available to read a story or section to read when I feel the urge - this filled the bill nicely!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    This book is a series of crime short stories written by women in the last 100 years. The stories are largely well-written, with a varied quality of surprise outcomes. My favorite one was the woman in Victorian England who was convinced she was married to Jack the Ripper. I won't give the ending away, but it's incredible and unexpected. This book is a series of crime short stories written by women in the last 100 years. The stories are largely well-written, with a varied quality of surprise outcomes. My favorite one was the woman in Victorian England who was convinced she was married to Jack the Ripper. I won't give the ending away, but it's incredible and unexpected.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Meier

    I'll start by saying, I've not been a big reader of short stories. I thought I'd give it another go and unfortunately I don't think they are my wheelhouse. That being said, some interesting reads, but nothing that made me want to read more by any particular author. Still, greatly appreciated the bio information on the writers to help contextualize the stories. I'll start by saying, I've not been a big reader of short stories. I thought I'd give it another go and unfortunately I don't think they are my wheelhouse. That being said, some interesting reads, but nothing that made me want to read more by any particular author. Still, greatly appreciated the bio information on the writers to help contextualize the stories.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alexis

    The first story was the most interesting to me. I wish there was more consistency in theme between stories; yes, they are all written by women, but that's all they have in common, and I didn't feel that was enough for a consistent theme. The very first story and the one about the young couple in South Africa were the most interesting to me. The first story was the most interesting to me. I wish there was more consistency in theme between stories; yes, they are all written by women, but that's all they have in common, and I didn't feel that was enough for a consistent theme. The very first story and the one about the young couple in South Africa were the most interesting to me.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Robertson

    Most of these stories were unquestionably 5 stars. There was a small sprinkling of ones that I didn't care for because the language was a little too old or too British for me to relate to, but for the most part it was an excellent collection. I took a long time reading it with breaks to read novels. This was not a quick read, but definitely worth the time of any crime fiction fan. Most of these stories were unquestionably 5 stars. There was a small sprinkling of ones that I didn't care for because the language was a little too old or too British for me to relate to, but for the most part it was an excellent collection. I took a long time reading it with breaks to read novels. This was not a quick read, but definitely worth the time of any crime fiction fan.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne

    I was seduced by Elizabeth George's name on the cover as I am seriously addicted to everything she writes, but I failed to consider that while she edited and compiled the book she didn't actually write any of the stories. Also, I have a guilty secret: I don't really like short stories all that much. Please don't tell any of my English professors. I was seduced by Elizabeth George's name on the cover as I am seriously addicted to everything she writes, but I failed to consider that while she edited and compiled the book she didn't actually write any of the stories. Also, I have a guilty secret: I don't really like short stories all that much. Please don't tell any of my English professors.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Overall, a very good collection. There were a couple that I had read in other short story collections (the Shirley Jackson, which is always worth re-reading; the Nedra Tyre) and a couple I didn't enjoy much (the Jemima Shore story doesn't have me racing to read more of Antonia Fraser's series, that's for sure), but most of them were great. Overall, a very good collection. There were a couple that I had read in other short story collections (the Shirley Jackson, which is always worth re-reading; the Nedra Tyre) and a couple I didn't enjoy much (the Jemima Shore story doesn't have me racing to read more of Antonia Fraser's series, that's for sure), but most of them were great.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    It is always enjoyable to read well designed anthologies that connect me to old favorites and introduce authors new to me. With 26 women represented there were stories I liked more than others but overall it was fun to have a short story to read when I was either between books or had just a few minutes to read..

  28. 4 out of 5

    Richard Mann

    This is a remarkable collection of mystery stories. Many of them, while being wonderful mystery stories, also have the feel of literature--for lack of a better word. I am currently embarked on a campaign to read as many mystery short story anthologies as I can. This is one of the best of the several hundred I've read so far. This is a remarkable collection of mystery stories. Many of them, while being wonderful mystery stories, also have the feel of literature--for lack of a better word. I am currently embarked on a campaign to read as many mystery short story anthologies as I can. This is one of the best of the several hundred I've read so far.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hind

    I really enjoyed the short stories from the first half of the century, but it starts to go downhill once it gets to the 60s. I had to skip some of the more modern stream-of-consciousness style stories.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Georgia Carvalho

    This compilation of crime stories by women has some great pieces, but I found myself enjoying the older, more classic stories way more than the contemporary ones. Probably just a reflection of my taste. If you are looking for short crime stories, do give this volume a go.

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