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Meter and Meaning: An Introduction to Rhythm in Poetry

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Poet, Thomas Carper, and scholar, Derek Attridge, join forces in Meter and Meaning to present an illuminating and user-friendly way to explore the rhythms of poetry in English. They begin by showing the value of performing any poem aloud, so that we can sense its unique use of rhythm. From this starting point they suggest an entirely fresh, jargon-free approach to reading Poet, Thomas Carper, and scholar, Derek Attridge, join forces in Meter and Meaning to present an illuminating and user-friendly way to explore the rhythms of poetry in English. They begin by showing the value of performing any poem aloud, so that we can sense its unique use of rhythm. From this starting point they suggest an entirely fresh, jargon-free approach to reading poetry. Illustrating their 'beat/offbeat' method with a series of exercises, they help readers to appreciate the use of rhythm in poems of all periods and to understand the vital relationship between meter and meaning. Beginning with the very basics, Meter and Meaning enables a smooth progression to an advanced knowledge of poetic rhythms. It is the essential guide to meter for anyone who wants to study, write, better appreciate, or simply enjoy poetry. Carper and Attridge make studying meter a pleasure and reading poetry a revelation.


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Poet, Thomas Carper, and scholar, Derek Attridge, join forces in Meter and Meaning to present an illuminating and user-friendly way to explore the rhythms of poetry in English. They begin by showing the value of performing any poem aloud, so that we can sense its unique use of rhythm. From this starting point they suggest an entirely fresh, jargon-free approach to reading Poet, Thomas Carper, and scholar, Derek Attridge, join forces in Meter and Meaning to present an illuminating and user-friendly way to explore the rhythms of poetry in English. They begin by showing the value of performing any poem aloud, so that we can sense its unique use of rhythm. From this starting point they suggest an entirely fresh, jargon-free approach to reading poetry. Illustrating their 'beat/offbeat' method with a series of exercises, they help readers to appreciate the use of rhythm in poems of all periods and to understand the vital relationship between meter and meaning. Beginning with the very basics, Meter and Meaning enables a smooth progression to an advanced knowledge of poetic rhythms. It is the essential guide to meter for anyone who wants to study, write, better appreciate, or simply enjoy poetry. Carper and Attridge make studying meter a pleasure and reading poetry a revelation.

43 review for Meter and Meaning: An Introduction to Rhythm in Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    A lovely little introduction to metrical analysis of English poetry. The authors are actually Thomas Carper and Derek Attridge, the former a poet and the latter a scholar. Aimed at a general audience, this book reads easily, making a somewhat arcane topic accessible. Rather than chopping up lines into "feet" and labeling them with Greco-Latinate names, they focus on "beats." We get an analysis of various types of beats, offbeats, and virtual beats. The authors take great pains to be clear about A lovely little introduction to metrical analysis of English poetry. The authors are actually Thomas Carper and Derek Attridge, the former a poet and the latter a scholar. Aimed at a general audience, this book reads easily, making a somewhat arcane topic accessible. Rather than chopping up lines into "feet" and labeling them with Greco-Latinate names, they focus on "beats." We get an analysis of various types of beats, offbeats, and virtual beats. The authors take great pains to be clear about all this, and if the book has one fault, it's that it talks down to the reader a little bit. However, this slim volume is useful to the specialist, too, as it presents a better beat notation system than the one provided in Attridge's more scholarly book, The Rhythms of English Poetry. Heartily recommended for those interested in rhythm in English poetry.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    This books is a fairly short (~170 page) introduction to meter and scansion in poetry, specifically looking at how the rhythm of poetry can support or create meaning in performance. It presents a fairly original "beat" focused method of scansion which is mostly based on preforming the poems out-loud. It's a easy to preform method that is much more revealing than the traditional short explanations of meter found in other introductory texts, and offers a good way to record your own personal perfor This books is a fairly short (~170 page) introduction to meter and scansion in poetry, specifically looking at how the rhythm of poetry can support or create meaning in performance. It presents a fairly original "beat" focused method of scansion which is mostly based on preforming the poems out-loud. It's a easy to preform method that is much more revealing than the traditional short explanations of meter found in other introductory texts, and offers a good way to record your own personal performances for a given poem, to be compare with other examples. It's a simple and well written book that has had more impact on my enjoyment of poetry than perhaps any other book I have read so far. Definitely an excellent read for any fans of poetry.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    Read this book as a part of a Romantic Poetry class in college. Modern and well-written, it makes you think twice about reading and performing poetry. I really recommend it to poetry lovers to have on their shelves - it's small and actually interesting to read! For me, it helped me make Coleridge's poetry come alive when I had to study it!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jilly

    best book I've read on poetic meter

  5. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

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    Aritz

  9. 5 out of 5

    David Pegna

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shelley Diemart

  11. 5 out of 5

    thestorygirl

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rusty

  13. 4 out of 5

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  14. 4 out of 5

    Milan

  15. 4 out of 5

    James Mumford

  16. 4 out of 5

    J

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael Sheehan

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marci

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lawrence E. Smead

  20. 4 out of 5

    Yong Tang

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Craighead

  22. 4 out of 5

    Harry Red

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

  24. 5 out of 5

    Celestine

  25. 5 out of 5

    Fahad Nasir

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laurel Siler

  27. 4 out of 5

    Susana Rato

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    Alina

  29. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  30. 5 out of 5

    L.

  31. 5 out of 5

    Marius Roman

  32. 4 out of 5

    Helen

  33. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

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    Lewis Roy

  35. 5 out of 5

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  36. 5 out of 5

    Dung Duong

  37. 5 out of 5

    Gemma Mahadeo

  38. 5 out of 5

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  39. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas

  40. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Walker

  41. 4 out of 5

    James

  42. 5 out of 5

    Kalle Oskar

  43. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

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