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Paula Wall, the national bestselling author of "The Rock Orchard," returns with another witty, wise, and romantic tale of two sisters with a talent for seduction and the unfortunate habit of falling for the wrong man every time.The Wilde sisters dove headfirst into this world on fire with life and expectation. With hair black as midnight and eyes blazing blue, they grow in Paula Wall, the national bestselling author of "The Rock Orchard," returns with another witty, wise, and romantic tale of two sisters with a talent for seduction and the unfortunate habit of falling for the wrong man every time.The Wilde sisters dove headfirst into this world on fire with life and expectation. With hair black as midnight and eyes blazing blue, they grow into truly irresistible women. But as well as being blessed with beauty and determination, the Wilde sisters are cursed with equal tastes for mischief and bad men. And both of these appetites always lead to trouble. Love either lifts a woman up or drags her down. When a Wilde woman dies, they don't have to dig a hole. On Black Friday in Five Points, Tennessee, Pearl Wilde finds her sister, Kat, in the barn wearing both her favorite shoes and her fiance. As quick to fury as she is to passion, Pearl leaves town immediately. She returns five years later a sophisticated femme fatale, with her claws sharpened like stainless steel and a demeanor so cool that the townspeople can no longer tell if she even has sweat glands. Slowly and deliberately, Pearl begins her revenge on Kat by captivating all the men of Five Points, but all the while never forgetting the one man who had the power to break her heart. In "The Wilde Women," Paula Wall once again bewitches the reader with humor, sass, smarts, and sensuality, creating a hilarious and beguiling world where sometimes the best revenge is forgiveness.


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Paula Wall, the national bestselling author of "The Rock Orchard," returns with another witty, wise, and romantic tale of two sisters with a talent for seduction and the unfortunate habit of falling for the wrong man every time.The Wilde sisters dove headfirst into this world on fire with life and expectation. With hair black as midnight and eyes blazing blue, they grow in Paula Wall, the national bestselling author of "The Rock Orchard," returns with another witty, wise, and romantic tale of two sisters with a talent for seduction and the unfortunate habit of falling for the wrong man every time.The Wilde sisters dove headfirst into this world on fire with life and expectation. With hair black as midnight and eyes blazing blue, they grow into truly irresistible women. But as well as being blessed with beauty and determination, the Wilde sisters are cursed with equal tastes for mischief and bad men. And both of these appetites always lead to trouble. Love either lifts a woman up or drags her down. When a Wilde woman dies, they don't have to dig a hole. On Black Friday in Five Points, Tennessee, Pearl Wilde finds her sister, Kat, in the barn wearing both her favorite shoes and her fiance. As quick to fury as she is to passion, Pearl leaves town immediately. She returns five years later a sophisticated femme fatale, with her claws sharpened like stainless steel and a demeanor so cool that the townspeople can no longer tell if she even has sweat glands. Slowly and deliberately, Pearl begins her revenge on Kat by captivating all the men of Five Points, but all the while never forgetting the one man who had the power to break her heart. In "The Wilde Women," Paula Wall once again bewitches the reader with humor, sass, smarts, and sensuality, creating a hilarious and beguiling world where sometimes the best revenge is forgiveness.

30 review for The Wilde Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Holly VanWert

    ‘The Lord giveth and most women piss it away.’ With just the first sentence of the prologue of The Wilde Women, I knew I was in for a treat–honest insight of the intricate, and sometimes misunderstood minds of women–straight from the source. Paula Wall is brutally honest, charming and hilarious in this book that, from the title, synopsis and throughout the prologue and first few chapters, we are led to believe is about the Wilde women. Sisters, Kat and Pearl come from a long line of exquisite bea ‘The Lord giveth and most women piss it away.’ With just the first sentence of the prologue of The Wilde Women, I knew I was in for a treat–honest insight of the intricate, and sometimes misunderstood minds of women–straight from the source. Paula Wall is brutally honest, charming and hilarious in this book that, from the title, synopsis and throughout the prologue and first few chapters, we are led to believe is about the Wilde women. Sisters, Kat and Pearl come from a long line of exquisite beauty that stops all men in their tracks, as well as rebellion that only they can understand. However, The Wilde Women does not simply tell the tales of the lives Kat, Pearl and their mother, Lorna have lived, but it brings you in and accepts you as part of the small town of Five Points, a town much like any other, set in Tennessee circa 1920 after the historical stock market crash. Encompassing sisters who are bitter rivals, townspeople who are so real and who you know so much about you feel like you’ve known them for years, disgustingly rich personalities, poor personalities with lost hope, whiskey, a shotgun wedding, love gained and lost and gained again, and a whorehouse that saves a town, Paula Wall has struck gold with this novel. As soon as Wall broke away from Kat and Pearl Wilde, I didn’t think I would enjoy this book as much as I did. I loved both of the characters simply because I felt validated in some of the decisions I have personally made in the journey of my life; I felt as if I could be one of these women. The first step an author must take in writing a novel is making their characters easy to relate to and for me, these two characters hit the nail on the head. While I admittedly slowed down the pace in which I had begun reading this book, as soon as I began to know more about the townspeople in Five Points, my pace quickened again and I was hooked; I did not want this book to end. Wall’s writing style is eccentric, poetic and tragically beautiful; I swear that if Paula Wall was a journalist, she could make the Iraq war sound stunning. Her style reminded me a bit of Virginia Woolf in Mrs. Dalloway and also Jeanette Winterson in Written on the Body; all beautiful, poetic, captivating and hard to tear yourself away from. While this is the first piece of writing I have read by Wall, I am eager to read the others. She has previously written The Rock Orchard, a national bestselling novel, as well as two collections of writing entitled If I Were a Man, I’d Marry Me and My Love Is Free…But the Rest of Me Don’t Come Cheap, all possessing extremely favorable reviews and equally-as-luring titles. If you are in the mood for an entertaining, thought-provoking, hilarious and eccentric read unlike any of the books you’ve read this year, I could not recommend The Wilde Women enough.

  2. 4 out of 5

    mark

    “A woman is like whiskey. She evaporates a little over time, distilled by disappointments and grief. One can never predict if the angels will take the best of her or the worst. Only time will tell if the woman that remains will be bitter, dispirited, or aged to perfection.” (pg. 180) “The Wilde Women.” Paula Wall (2007). I loved this book, or more to the point—the characters in the book—or, more to a sharper point—the author, Paula Wall. She likes her women strong, as do I. She likes the sexual “A woman is like whiskey. She evaporates a little over time, distilled by disappointments and grief. One can never predict if the angels will take the best of her or the worst. Only time will tell if the woman that remains will be bitter, dispirited, or aged to perfection.” (pg. 180) “The Wilde Women.” Paula Wall (2007). I loved this book, or more to the point—the characters in the book—or, more to a sharper point—the author, Paula Wall. She likes her women strong, as do I. She likes the sexual position of “girl on top,” as do I. She likes the dynamic of attraction, as do I. She likes to look at history to get a framework for the present, as do I. She likes alliteration as a writing style, as do I. She understands cadence and gravity and momentum. Reading about the making of whiskey in Tennessee during prohibition made me want to switch my spirit of choice from tequila to “Old Number 7”; hop in the Batmobile, drive to the Highland Rim near Nashville (that’s enough of a direction for me), find this wild woman, sit down at her kitchen table, throw down two shots … and see what happens. Now isn’t that THE definition of a good book? I would have given it five stars except for the abundance of clichés and the “Chit-Lit” ending. Nevertheless, it is a fine piece of work. There is a lot of truth in this story, and it opened my eyes to a question that has been eating at me: Why do women do what they do? Now I know the answer when it comes to mate selection. Given the choice between a Dickhead and an Idiot—a wild woman will take the DH; and that just makes sense (or cents.)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    I define this as sassy southern dramedy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Marion

    The old South is alive and well and kickin' in Paula Wall's books. I wouldn't call her books historical romances....(that sounds so dry and boring) more like hilarious, witty novels of the South. When Pearl catches her little sister, Kat, with her legs up in the air and her fiance on board for the ride in the well house, she skips town and vows revenge, no matter the cost. Thus begins this witty, fascinating, fun novel. It's one of my favorite reads from my Summer reading list. Pearl and Kat com The old South is alive and well and kickin' in Paula Wall's books. I wouldn't call her books historical romances....(that sounds so dry and boring) more like hilarious, witty novels of the South. When Pearl catches her little sister, Kat, with her legs up in the air and her fiance on board for the ride in the well house, she skips town and vows revenge, no matter the cost. Thus begins this witty, fascinating, fun novel. It's one of my favorite reads from my Summer reading list. Pearl and Kat come from a long line of Wilde women who tend to be fiercely independent, beautiful, hard-headed and hot-blooded. Even though this book sounds like an old-fashioned `bodice-ripper' romance, it's not. Paula Wall is the undisputed queen of the one-liner and had me holding my sides from laughing so hard at the quips her characters uttered. I've never seen so many bitter, old hags who learned valuable life lessons from a creative, enterprising whore. I loved the surprise ending which wrapped the story up perfectly. And when the old broad who tried so blatantly and creatively to kill her husband (being a widow was much preferred over being a wife for many women back then) got her comeuppance, I laughed so hard I had tears running down my face. The chicken house scenes are worth the price of the book, for sure! I borrowed this book from the library, but plan to buy my own copy as soon as it comes out in paperback. This is a fabulous Summer read with characters who you won't soon forget.

  5. 4 out of 5

    LeighAnn

    4.5 stars - Fun, easy read

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Five Points, Tennessee: where the whiskey is mellow and the women are strong. Though this book is titled after several central characters, the stories center on most of the women of the town. There is a touch of Alice Hoffman's style in the writing, which lured me into thinking there would be a bit more magic in the tales, but in truth, the main magic is in the characters depicted in this small town, hit hard by the depression and Prohibition. There's pithiness, and grit there (you can tell from Five Points, Tennessee: where the whiskey is mellow and the women are strong. Though this book is titled after several central characters, the stories center on most of the women of the town. There is a touch of Alice Hoffman's style in the writing, which lured me into thinking there would be a bit more magic in the tales, but in truth, the main magic is in the characters depicted in this small town, hit hard by the depression and Prohibition. There's pithiness, and grit there (you can tell from the very first sentence " The Lord giveth and most women piss it away.") But there also are some great characters (female and male) who evolve and age, taking their tones and tastes from the world around them. And though the individual characters and arcs drew me, I think what kept me coming back to the book (I had to put it aside for several ARCs that came in) was the way the making of whiskey was interwoven through the life of the characters and town. It was the livelihood of many, and when times became tough, the currency of life. As the author says: “A woman is like whiskey. She evaporates a little over time, distilled by disappointments and grief. One can never predict if the angels will take the best of her or the worst. Only time will tell if the woman that remains will be bitter, dispirited, or aged to perfection.” (pg. 180) Liquor can be like moonshine quick, strong, and straight to your head, or like that fine whiskey which takes on the nuances of the world around it to become something more. This is a book shaped by whiskey

  7. 4 out of 5

    Pansy

    I am torn with this book. I gave it 4 stars because the individual stories were entertaining. The disappointment is that the author did not focus on the Wilde women. The story centers around the people of Five Points, Tennessee. Pearl and Kat Wilde are from a long line of strong, Southern, independent women. The sisters are close until Kat is accused of sleeping with Pearl's fiance. Pearl leaves for 3 years and when she returns, she returns in a big and glamorous way. Revenge can be sweet. Littl I am torn with this book. I gave it 4 stars because the individual stories were entertaining. The disappointment is that the author did not focus on the Wilde women. The story centers around the people of Five Points, Tennessee. Pearl and Kat Wilde are from a long line of strong, Southern, independent women. The sisters are close until Kat is accused of sleeping with Pearl's fiance. Pearl leaves for 3 years and when she returns, she returns in a big and glamorous way. Revenge can be sweet. Little did Pearl know that her return would stimulate the town. A town going through economic hard times. The author did not focus enough the relationship of the sisters. The sisters did not see each other until the end of the book and it was not climatic at all. It was such a disappointment. When Pearl finally sees her ex-finance, there was some heat but nothing dramatic. Very disappointing. If the author was going to do this she should have named the book, The Stories of Five Points. We got more history from the townspeople than the actual main character. At least I thought the Wilde sisters were the main characters.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    I have to say I was not crazy about this book! It was entertaining but I thought it was somewhat unorganized and disjointed. During the first half of the book I thought she floated around giving us the history of various characters but failing to show us how they all related together - I wanted more of the story vs. the history early on so I could stay interested. I don't know, maybe it was just too southern for me, since I am a transplant from California! Oh well, you can't please everyone. I have to say I was not crazy about this book! It was entertaining but I thought it was somewhat unorganized and disjointed. During the first half of the book I thought she floated around giving us the history of various characters but failing to show us how they all related together - I wanted more of the story vs. the history early on so I could stay interested. I don't know, maybe it was just too southern for me, since I am a transplant from California! Oh well, you can't please everyone.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Solid book. Colorful characters in colorful situations. I enjoyed the little side stories as much as I did the sections about the sisters and probably would have liked it if some of the supporting characters were fleshed out a little more. To me some of the funniest and most memorable parts were about the Lesters and Joy's ultimate demise. Solid book. Colorful characters in colorful situations. I enjoyed the little side stories as much as I did the sections about the sisters and probably would have liked it if some of the supporting characters were fleshed out a little more. To me some of the funniest and most memorable parts were about the Lesters and Joy's ultimate demise.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Naija Mom Loves Books

    This book was written in such a witty manner, I found myself chuckling a lot. It was entertaining and engaging. I love when authors flip the peer paradigm and show the society's Rebels. The women here were the rebels and they were strong, and crazy too. The story wasn't solely about the sunsets but about the whole community. So bear that in mind as you read or listen to it. This book was written in such a witty manner, I found myself chuckling a lot. It was entertaining and engaging. I love when authors flip the peer paradigm and show the society's Rebels. The women here were the rebels and they were strong, and crazy too. The story wasn't solely about the sunsets but about the whole community. So bear that in mind as you read or listen to it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

    My book club chose this book, and I'm so glad they did. I wouldn't have picked it up otherwise - looks too much like a Jackie Collins read for my taste - but Paula Wall's writing was witty and clever and homey and thorougly enjoyable. My book club chose this book, and I'm so glad they did. I wouldn't have picked it up otherwise - looks too much like a Jackie Collins read for my taste - but Paula Wall's writing was witty and clever and homey and thorougly enjoyable.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mollie

    badly written. repetitive and mostly stupid.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Terri

    I read this several years ago and still have it on my bookshelf. I loved it that much. The language is just exquisite; the characters richly drawn; and it’s just plain fun to read about strong women and the intricate world of spirit production.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Patti

    As far as I can tell, Paula Wall only wrote two books. the Wilde Women and The Rock Orchard. The Rock Orchard was, by far, the best. This story missed the mark. I didn't care as much about the characters in the Wilde Women. As far as I can tell, Paula Wall only wrote two books. the Wilde Women and The Rock Orchard. The Rock Orchard was, by far, the best. This story missed the mark. I didn't care as much about the characters in the Wilde Women.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ruby

    the style of writing is great. i just wish it was longer to give more to it

  16. 5 out of 5

    Meagan

    This book has some great writing but also some major flaws. Wanted to give it 5 stars but the ending was disappointing.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Diana Petty-stone

    What a wild ride with the Wilde Women. A mother and two sisters all strong willed and stubborn and a story line that keeps the pages turning.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Denise Ellis

    I enjoyed reading about a diverse group of characters and the way they made it through the hard times of a small rural town. A pretty quick read for me as I couldn't put it down for long! I enjoyed reading about a diverse group of characters and the way they made it through the hard times of a small rural town. A pretty quick read for me as I couldn't put it down for long!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Williams

    I loved this book. She has. Way with words that hit deep.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    2nd time reading this book - I took my time reading it. But, once again, I really enjoyed the story, the characters and the humor.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I didn’t expect to like the book as much as I did - a pleasant surprise! Most surprising and fun was the author’s sarcastic humor.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Starfire

    This book is a must-read. By women, men, lovers of literature. This is a master-piece teeming with perfectly timed and precised diction that flow with a syntax crafted by the hands of a true writing artist. The author, Paula Wall, reinvigorated by need for great fiction. When I first read the book, I was a teenager (20 now) and settling for stories like 50 Shades of Grey, even though I'd started developing a more exquisite taste in novels and literature in high school. I was still a girl, not ye This book is a must-read. By women, men, lovers of literature. This is a master-piece teeming with perfectly timed and precised diction that flow with a syntax crafted by the hands of a true writing artist. The author, Paula Wall, reinvigorated by need for great fiction. When I first read the book, I was a teenager (20 now) and settling for stories like 50 Shades of Grey, even though I'd started developing a more exquisite taste in novels and literature in high school. I was still a girl, not yet a budding woman, and this book brought me into womanhood. It's most dazzling ingredient are its characters. From the petulant (like Devin) to the mightier-than-thou (like Joy Meachum) to the paragon of a man (like the Colonel) to the man's man (like Bourne) and even to the vastly different yet equally mesmerizing Wilde girls, there are no shortage of a diversity of characters and personalities so eloquently wrapped they arrive as if a gift that seemingly would get out of hand in inexperienced care. And when I mention a diversity of characters, I actually mean it. The love story between Devin and Sessalee could've easily become that of a random teenage love story, but Ms. Wall, gave it something that most authors don't give youth credit for: the ability to create something powerful, real. She creates characters and sticks to them, they don't do anything that doesn't seem true to them. Their reactions come across so raw and genuine because they come from more than a place of imagination, but rather heart and craft. This is a book where the plot takes a backseat to pure entertainment. From the violently funny scenes of Joy Meachum and her husband, to the Hughes, no story got left behind. The plot was consumed by the town, and I can see why it would upset some readers who wanted the main entree to be that of Pearl and Kat, but I personally think plot can become formulaic and all-too-familiar when it follows a status quo. That isn't to say the plot isn't progressive and cohesive, because, actually, it is. Everything is happening in real-time at the same time from start to finish with each character. There's no jumping months forward only to go back and pick up with a different character. And it's a romance! Although I would've liked to see more of Devin and Sessalee (sequel maybe?) there is enough spice and heat to burn the tongue in this book. When characters ignite, they do so fearlessly, and it's incredibly sensual, well-placed, and realistic. This is a author who should be writing eroticas, and could actually bring greater credibility to the genre as well as do some real justice. I'm a huge sucker for a pop a wine (yes, even at 20), grab some cheese and crackers and bath bombs to enjoy a book as much as I am for a sun-bathed cozy area to curl up in. This book is for all seasons, from winter fire place readings to summer free time. Because even if you're only going to read it to work on learning how to write expertly (you can't write without reading, like Stephen King said), or if you're reading it to learn how create larger-than-life characters, this book will still find a way to entertain you, and that's what you should also be striving for as a writer. As a reader, it's simply just that re-readable. Bottom line, Paula Wall is the literary romance world's gift from the south.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ns

    The Wilde Women is a book with personality. I knew immediately that I was in for a treat (or trick). The opening sentence says it all, or at least allude to tone of the story. The writing and tone is what really gives life and personality to the story. The tone is crude, unapologetic, feisty, and witty. It can be easy to overlook some of the wittiness or innuendos but upon a second read you're almost surprised to have missed it. There is a lot of substance to be read that dawns on the reader, if The Wilde Women is a book with personality. I knew immediately that I was in for a treat (or trick). The opening sentence says it all, or at least allude to tone of the story. The writing and tone is what really gives life and personality to the story. The tone is crude, unapologetic, feisty, and witty. It can be easy to overlook some of the wittiness or innuendos but upon a second read you're almost surprised to have missed it. There is a lot of substance to be read that dawns on the reader, if not right away then eventually as the story progresses. The story started off slow with introductions to various characters and their own relationships, whether it is between a widow learning to let go of her only son, or an old couple whose marriage have stalled, a new marriage with a rocky start, or a vengeful sister returned to knock the town of Five Points off its boots. At the heart of the story is Pearl Wilde, the wronged sister who found herself betrayed by her fiance and sister. After three years away, she has returned for vengeance. While she's at it, she's also building an exclusive and controversial establishment that shocks her hometown. What she is also doing is bringing life to the economy, which is in the midst of a depression. Her establishment is not only a testament to her intelligence, and business skills but triggers a positive chain effect on other businesses. What seems very normal in the business sense is a purposeful agenda. Everything Pearl is doing is meant to set into her motion what will be her revenge. It may not seem obvious but Pearl and Kat Wilde have a close sisterly bond, which explains how much Kat's betrayal hurt Pearl. Despite this, sh reluctantly still holds a place in heart for her younger sister. The feeling is mutual for Kat. The Wilde sisters are as different as night and day but likewise they hold onto their last names as they do their independence -with a tight rein. In the meantime and midway through the story, things really pick up. An assortment of interesting couples and the different complexities in their relationships emerge. These characters have their own stories to tell and they are worth reading. They all come from different walks of life, have different problems and outcomes but are also interrelated. They all find their outcomes, along with the culmination of Pearl's vengeance with a slight twist. Things aren't quite as they seem and wants aren't quite needs. What results is a sastifying end.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rosina Lippi

    Another southern town dominated by a family of beautiful, smart, sexually provocative, self-assured women. Five Points Tennessee has been brought low by the depression, but the residents retain their abiding interest in the Wilde sister's fight over Bourne Cavanagh, the heir to a legendary whiskey distillery empire, and the man who Pearl leaves at the altar to travel the world. Her younger sister Kat stays behind, the star employee at the shirt factory. She's self confident enough to rebuff Maso Another southern town dominated by a family of beautiful, smart, sexually provocative, self-assured women. Five Points Tennessee has been brought low by the depression, but the residents retain their abiding interest in the Wilde sister's fight over Bourne Cavanagh, the heir to a legendary whiskey distillery empire, and the man who Pearl leaves at the altar to travel the world. Her younger sister Kat stays behind, the star employee at the shirt factory. She's self confident enough to rebuff Mason Hughes, the factory owner, while she leads a secret life of the mind. Then Pearl sashays home three years after the canceled wedding in order to open a high-class bordello that will draw the state's wealthy and powerful. Pearl single-handedly turns the economy around. While Kat continues to entice but evade Mason, Pearl takes up the old battle with Bourne. These main story lines are broken up by vignettes about the many secondary characters, ranging from the odd to the disturbing. The wryly observant, opinionated and omniscient narrator is entertaining, but overall the story is uneven and unfocused. first written for pw

  25. 4 out of 5

    MBenzz

    After reading 'The Rock Orchard' and LOVING it, I was so excited for the next Paula Wall book to come out! When my local library didn't have this available, I knew couldn't wait, so I went to the store and bought it! Well let me tell you, this book sure didn't disappoint! Two nights in a row I was up till 3 am...I kept telling myself 'One more chapter, then I'll go to sleep, for REAL this time!'...and I couldn't do it :) The Wilde women of Tennessee sure have a lot of fire in them, but the girls After reading 'The Rock Orchard' and LOVING it, I was so excited for the next Paula Wall book to come out! When my local library didn't have this available, I knew couldn't wait, so I went to the store and bought it! Well let me tell you, this book sure didn't disappoint! Two nights in a row I was up till 3 am...I kept telling myself 'One more chapter, then I'll go to sleep, for REAL this time!'...and I couldn't do it :) The Wilde women of Tennessee sure have a lot of fire in them, but the girls aside, this book is also about an entire town. I was surprised by how many characters were in this story, but I just couldn't wait to know more about each and every one of them! I highly recommend this book, and if you haven't read 'The Rock Orchard' yet, then make that the next book you read. Ms. Walls novels are just dripping with southern sensuality, good gossip, and irresistible characters. I only wish she wrote faster, cause I'm already looking forward to the next one!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Coralie

    This was the best book I've read in a long time. From the comments on the front page, and the subject matter, you would think that the book would have a lot of sex, but there isn't much at all. The book is about a feud between two sisters, who live in Tennessee during the Depression. One sister leaves town and the other stays, and works at a local shirt factory. The other sister comes back to town with a plan to get revenge on the sister that stayed. At the core of her plan - to start a "house o This was the best book I've read in a long time. From the comments on the front page, and the subject matter, you would think that the book would have a lot of sex, but there isn't much at all. The book is about a feud between two sisters, who live in Tennessee during the Depression. One sister leaves town and the other stays, and works at a local shirt factory. The other sister comes back to town with a plan to get revenge on the sister that stayed. At the core of her plan - to start a "house of ill repute". The new establishment brings a dying town back to life. This book is very much along the veins of "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas", a movie that I have to admit is one of my favorites. The author had a way of repeating key phrases in key places that made the book even more enjoyable.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Susan E

    I picked this book up after reading this description: "This is a meringue of a book, deliciously wicked, irresistibly satisfying, and over all too soon." Wicked and meringue-like it was... but the rest? Not so much for me. I liked the writing style, and the strong female characters, but there were so many characters, I kept getting them confused. It didn't help that two of the major male characters had names that seemed similar to me. The author liked making sweeping, blanket statements that got I picked this book up after reading this description: "This is a meringue of a book, deliciously wicked, irresistibly satisfying, and over all too soon." Wicked and meringue-like it was... but the rest? Not so much for me. I liked the writing style, and the strong female characters, but there were so many characters, I kept getting them confused. It didn't help that two of the major male characters had names that seemed similar to me. The author liked making sweeping, blanket statements that got a bit tiresome after awhile. A few statements were fun, but then it seemed gimmicky. Still, it was an entertaining read, more on the literary side of romance fiction.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Wall gets an extra star for a clever turn of phrase and for being a local girl; otherwise, this would definitely be a 3-star book. The novel has a Toni Morrison-like magical quality - with ghosts and the Southern grotesque - but the story itself, while fun, is too pat in the end, I think. The women read like a man wrote them; Wall embraces their sexuality in a positive way, but it also flattens them and makes them almost only that. Quotables abound, though - "useless as wet toilet paper" among t Wall gets an extra star for a clever turn of phrase and for being a local girl; otherwise, this would definitely be a 3-star book. The novel has a Toni Morrison-like magical quality - with ghosts and the Southern grotesque - but the story itself, while fun, is too pat in the end, I think. The women read like a man wrote them; Wall embraces their sexuality in a positive way, but it also flattens them and makes them almost only that. Quotables abound, though - "useless as wet toilet paper" among them.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shawna

    I just finished "the Wilde Women: A Novel" by Paula Wall and it is an amazing book! The storytelling is wonderful with rich characters and a seductive undertone that makes it so you can not walk away from it. I listened to the mp3 version read by Susan Ericksen. Ms. Ericksen truly made the book even better, her voice (or should I say voices?) brings to life the many interesting people in the book. The story comes to life with her narration. This is a book I WILL recommend over and over! You won' I just finished "the Wilde Women: A Novel" by Paula Wall and it is an amazing book! The storytelling is wonderful with rich characters and a seductive undertone that makes it so you can not walk away from it. I listened to the mp3 version read by Susan Ericksen. Ms. Ericksen truly made the book even better, her voice (or should I say voices?) brings to life the many interesting people in the book. The story comes to life with her narration. This is a book I WILL recommend over and over! You won't be bored at any momment, I promise!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Deon Stonehouse

    The Wilde Women by Paula Wall is a wild read! It captures the eccentricity of a small depression era southern town perfectly. Pearl discovers her sister Kat intimately entertaining Pearl’s fiancée Bourne. Pearl is upset. She heads out of town in a huff, sending back postcards from exotic locales. Years pass, then Pearl returns to take her revenge. She opens a Bordello upsetting the local women and tempting the men. Expect zany happenings, this is a fabulously funny look at a pair of Wilde cats!

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