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Are Women Human?: And Other International Dialogues

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Exposing the consequences and significance of the systematic maltreatment of women, and its systemic condonation, this book takes us into the heart of the international law of conflict to ask - and reveal - why the international community can rally against terrorists' violence, but not against violence against women. Exposing the consequences and significance of the systematic maltreatment of women, and its systemic condonation, this book takes us into the heart of the international law of conflict to ask - and reveal - why the international community can rally against terrorists' violence, but not against violence against women.


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Exposing the consequences and significance of the systematic maltreatment of women, and its systemic condonation, this book takes us into the heart of the international law of conflict to ask - and reveal - why the international community can rally against terrorists' violence, but not against violence against women. Exposing the consequences and significance of the systematic maltreatment of women, and its systemic condonation, this book takes us into the heart of the international law of conflict to ask - and reveal - why the international community can rally against terrorists' violence, but not against violence against women.

30 review for Are Women Human?: And Other International Dialogues

  1. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Howard

    I am presently visiting my dear girlfriend at her restaurant where she works, reading Barthes, and Alex (her name) said to me that she is hungry and wondering if she should put an order in in the kitchen. I know that some cooks back there suck at cooking, so I asked who is working. Alex said, "So-and-so, he kinda sucks at cooking." I told her, "tell him you're really hungry, so make you a really good burger." Alex said, "He hates women." Which is to say, she isn't allowed to be really hungry and I am presently visiting my dear girlfriend at her restaurant where she works, reading Barthes, and Alex (her name) said to me that she is hungry and wondering if she should put an order in in the kitchen. I know that some cooks back there suck at cooking, so I asked who is working. Alex said, "So-and-so, he kinda sucks at cooking." I told her, "tell him you're really hungry, so make you a really good burger." Alex said, "He hates women." Which is to say, she isn't allowed to be really hungry and demand of some dude a really good burger like I might be able to. Which is why all I can think is how I want men to stop being disgusting and full of ungrounded hate and just make really good burgers for women. I once was talking with a dude my age online who identified with the alt-right before it had coalesced into a cultural phenomenon worthy of MSNBC's reporting, before I could mention it in public without worried citizens being worried that just by my mentioning that these people exist that I sympathize or even relate with them, and this anon dude online, trusting me, and knowing that I had real-world encounters with "women", asked me whether women were actually human, and although we were speaking on AOL instant messenger, I could see his eyes earnestly looking into mine with all sincerity; he really wanted to know whether women were human. As someone who is about to spend a significant amount of my life in a classroom with the youth of America, all I can think is, I hope I can convince a generation of young men that women are human, and that they (young men) need to go out and convince their friends of this too. I just find it unforgivable that men aren't doing this at every opportunity that they can and should, and so (I do and) I want to do this much more explicitly in my life. Because women like really good burgers, and really good burgers are really good, and women deserve really good burgers when they're hungry.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alisa

    My star rating of this book is tainted by the fact that this is the first serious feminist book I can remember reading (I sadly missed taking femstudies in college), and I suddenly have a huge amount of respect for Catherine MacKinnon, and I get to take her CLASS. I could go on and on about Kadic v. Karadzic, where she won $745 million in damages for survivors of the genocidal rapes in Bosnia. I could also go on and on about new thoughts I am having about the pornography industry, but instead I My star rating of this book is tainted by the fact that this is the first serious feminist book I can remember reading (I sadly missed taking femstudies in college), and I suddenly have a huge amount of respect for Catherine MacKinnon, and I get to take her CLASS. I could go on and on about Kadic v. Karadzic, where she won $745 million in damages for survivors of the genocidal rapes in Bosnia. I could also go on and on about new thoughts I am having about the pornography industry, but instead I will just say, read her book. Though, warning, I felt like as a newbie to feminist thought that I probably could have picked a better introductory text. Recommend me one?

  3. 4 out of 5

    Antonella

    One of the greatest minds in history. A towering intellect.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Fadwa Rizek

    These were a series of essays by a prominent women's rights attorney, Catherine MacKinnon, on a theme: the treatment of women internationally and locally-- from genocidal rapes in Eastern Europe to pornography within the United States. Though lacking cohesion and at times, coherency in the overall presentation, MacKinnon outlines a devastating image of women's rights, quality of life, and equality. Aside from that, the title has a funny connotation that I'm sure the author didn't intend: that wo These were a series of essays by a prominent women's rights attorney, Catherine MacKinnon, on a theme: the treatment of women internationally and locally-- from genocidal rapes in Eastern Europe to pornography within the United States. Though lacking cohesion and at times, coherency in the overall presentation, MacKinnon outlines a devastating image of women's rights, quality of life, and equality. Aside from that, the title has a funny connotation that I'm sure the author didn't intend: that women could possibly be inhumane.

  5. 4 out of 5

    l.

    Poorly compiled - you see sections of one essay repeated verbatim in another. I picked this up because I wanted to know more about Kadic v. Karadzic. Those essays were interesting though not as informative as I had hoped. There's also a depressing focus on Canada as a leader in equality rights... Poorly compiled - you see sections of one essay repeated verbatim in another. I picked this up because I wanted to know more about Kadic v. Karadzic. Those essays were interesting though not as informative as I had hoped. There's also a depressing focus on Canada as a leader in equality rights...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Honestly I didnt read this book cover to cover. I started that way but it is a very info dense book and I felt like it was written in lawyer-speak. I did find that it was informative and worth the time I spent on it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    cchrissyy

    Valuable book but hard to push through such rough topics.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    Great read, very informative, although, repetitive in some parts.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    There were a couple of minor points on which I disagreed with MacKinnon, but overall I found her thinking original and well reasoned. I enjoyed reading this one.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    It's a collection of speeches and articles on similar topics, so it gets repetitive in parts. Also, even when I agree with what she's saying, MacKinnon's writing can be a tough slog. It's a collection of speeches and articles on similar topics, so it gets repetitive in parts. Also, even when I agree with what she's saying, MacKinnon's writing can be a tough slog.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    Total lack of editing.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    lol no (apparently)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Terese

    Very good, very erudite book. Worth both time and thought. My one beef with it is that it's dense in the sense that since it's a compiliation of speeches and essays the themes and language turn out to be kind of repetitive if you read them back to back. The best way to read this book is to read it slowly, taking time and pause between the essays so that you can enjoy them fully. Very good, very erudite book. Worth both time and thought. My one beef with it is that it's dense in the sense that since it's a compiliation of speeches and essays the themes and language turn out to be kind of repetitive if you read them back to back. The best way to read this book is to read it slowly, taking time and pause between the essays so that you can enjoy them fully.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Yoshida

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hastin Hasikin

  17. 5 out of 5

    Reader

  18. 5 out of 5

    Janice

  19. 4 out of 5

    Red

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nicki Mosher

  21. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  23. 5 out of 5

    Aysha Taryam

  24. 4 out of 5

    Zoey Cooper

  25. 4 out of 5

    John Preston

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kendra

  27. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  28. 4 out of 5

    Yoav

  29. 5 out of 5

    Prakash K

  30. 4 out of 5

    David

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