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The Poetry of John Greenleaf Whittier: A Reader's Edition

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William Jolliff, Professor of English at George Fox University, has selected 55 of John Greenleaf Whittier's more than 500 poems with the intention of turning Quaker (and other) readers into Whittier fans. His guiding focus for this edition is readability by contemporaries. A biographical and critical introduction and the identification of themes in introductions to each s William Jolliff, Professor of English at George Fox University, has selected 55 of John Greenleaf Whittier's more than 500 poems with the intention of turning Quaker (and other) readers into Whittier fans. His guiding focus for this edition is readability by contemporaries. A biographical and critical introduction and the identification of themes in introductions to each section are important guides. William Jolliff's brief introductions to the poems themselves give specific historical background and interpretive help when necessary. Includes Snow-Bound, Ichabod, Telling the Bees, The Barefoot Boy, Skipper Ireson's Ride, and In the Old South.


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William Jolliff, Professor of English at George Fox University, has selected 55 of John Greenleaf Whittier's more than 500 poems with the intention of turning Quaker (and other) readers into Whittier fans. His guiding focus for this edition is readability by contemporaries. A biographical and critical introduction and the identification of themes in introductions to each s William Jolliff, Professor of English at George Fox University, has selected 55 of John Greenleaf Whittier's more than 500 poems with the intention of turning Quaker (and other) readers into Whittier fans. His guiding focus for this edition is readability by contemporaries. A biographical and critical introduction and the identification of themes in introductions to each section are important guides. William Jolliff's brief introductions to the poems themselves give specific historical background and interpretive help when necessary. Includes Snow-Bound, Ichabod, Telling the Bees, The Barefoot Boy, Skipper Ireson's Ride, and In the Old South.

46 review for The Poetry of John Greenleaf Whittier: A Reader's Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    I really enjoyed Joliff's annotations at the beginning of the poems. Selection and organization are well done and help make Whittier accessible. I really enjoyed Joliff's annotations at the beginning of the poems. Selection and organization are well done and help make Whittier accessible.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    Whittier was a writer of popular verse. My favorite in the entire collection is not a verse poem, ironically, but “Snow-Bound: A Winter Idyll.” I can think of nothing that better evokes the time and place than this bit of prose, and it is beautiful. That being said, his verse is quite famous. My favorite selections from this volume are: “When things go wrong, as they sometimes will, When the road you’re trudging seems all uphill, When the funds are low and the debts are high, And you want to smile, Whittier was a writer of popular verse. My favorite in the entire collection is not a verse poem, ironically, but “Snow-Bound: A Winter Idyll.” I can think of nothing that better evokes the time and place than this bit of prose, and it is beautiful. That being said, his verse is quite famous. My favorite selections from this volume are: “When things go wrong, as they sometimes will, When the road you’re trudging seems all uphill, When the funds are low and the debts are high, And you want to smile, but you have to sigh, When care is pressing you down a bit, Rest, if you must, but don’t you quit. Life is queer with its twists and turns, As every one of us sometimes learns, And many a failure turns about, When he might have won had he stuck it out; Don’t give up though the pace seems slow- You may succeed with another blow. Often the goal is nearer than, It seems to a faint and faltering man, Often the struggler has given up, When he might have captured the victor’s cup, And he learned too late when the night slipped down, How close he was to the golden crown. Success is failure turned inside out- The silver tint of the clouds of doubt, And you never can tell how close you are, It may be near when it seems so far, So stick to the fight when you’re hardest hit- It’s when things seem worst that you must not quit” From “Ichabod” Oh, dumb be passion’s stormy rage, When he who might Have lighted up and led his age, Falls back in night From “Official Piety” A pious magistrate! Sound his praise throughout The wondering churches. Who shall henceforth doubt That the long-wished millennium draweth nigh? Sin in high places has become devout, Tithes mint, goes painful-faced, and prays its lie Straight up to Heaven, and calls it piety! From “Maud Muller” For all sad words of tongue or pen, The saddest are these: “It might have been!” From “Mabel Martin” Beautiful in her holy peace as one Who stands, at evening, when the work is done, Glorified in the setting of the sun! See my other reviews here!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I love John Whittier. I would personally rate him the best American poet, second only to Emily Dickinson. I wonder why he isn't quite as famous as the others. My favorite poem is "Choose Something Like a Star," which I understand is often misattributed to Robert Frost. Here's my favortie stanza: Say something to us we can learn By heart and when alone repeat. Say something! And it says "I burn." But say with what degree of heat. Talk Fahrenheit, talk Centigrade. Use language we can comprehend. Te I love John Whittier. I would personally rate him the best American poet, second only to Emily Dickinson. I wonder why he isn't quite as famous as the others. My favorite poem is "Choose Something Like a Star," which I understand is often misattributed to Robert Frost. Here's my favortie stanza: Say something to us we can learn By heart and when alone repeat. Say something! And it says "I burn." But say with what degree of heat. Talk Fahrenheit, talk Centigrade. Use language we can comprehend. Tell us what elements you blend...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Judy Riley

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kristi Schoonover

  6. 5 out of 5

    Debra Manseau

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shana

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tom Costello

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Enos

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nupur Shree

  11. 4 out of 5

    Beth

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ish

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Joy

  14. 4 out of 5

    MaryAnn

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paris

  18. 5 out of 5

    Akhil Mishra

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jeri Martin

  20. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Shedd

  21. 4 out of 5

    Luke

    Guess what... Jolliff edited this book

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rae

  23. 5 out of 5

    Khojiakbar

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joel

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael Hughes

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Mcfarlane

  29. 4 out of 5

    Erica Perry

  30. 4 out of 5

    Inna

  31. 4 out of 5

    Ami

  32. 4 out of 5

    Synthia

  33. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Goff

  34. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

  35. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

  36. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  37. 5 out of 5

    Kim

  38. 5 out of 5

    Mercy

  39. 4 out of 5

    Saburi Pandit

  40. 5 out of 5

    Esdaile

  41. 4 out of 5

    Jason Manford

  42. 4 out of 5

    Judith

  43. 4 out of 5

    Saad Huseen

  44. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  45. 5 out of 5

    Christian Scott

  46. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

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