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Jaroslav Pelikan begins this volume with the crisis of orthodoxy that confronted all Christian denominations by the beginning of the eighteenth century and continues through the twentieth century in its particular concerns with ecumenism. The modern period in the history of Christian doctrine, Pelikan demonstrates, may be defined as the time when doctrines that had been as Jaroslav Pelikan begins this volume with the crisis of orthodoxy that confronted all Christian denominations by the beginning of the eighteenth century and continues through the twentieth century in its particular concerns with ecumenism. The modern period in the history of Christian doctrine, Pelikan demonstrates, may be defined as the time when doctrines that had been assumed more than debated for most of Christian history were themselves called into question: the idea of revelation, the uniqueness of Christ, the authority of Scripture, the expectation of life after death, even the very transcendence of God. "Knowledge of the immense intellectual effort invested in the construction of the edifice of Christian doctrine by the best minds of each successive generation is worth having. And there can hardly be a more lucid, readable and genial guide to it than this marvellous work."—Economist "This volume, like the series which it brings to a triumphant conclusion, may be unreservedly recommended as the best one-stop introduction currently available to its subject."—Alister E. McGrath, Times Higher Education Supplement "Professor Pelikan's series marks a significant departure, and in him we have at last a master teacher."—Marjorie O'Rourke Boyle, Commonweal "Pelikan's book marks not only the end of a dazzling scholarly effort but the end of an era as well. There is reason to suppose that nothing quite like it will be tried again."—Harvey Cox, Washington Post Book World


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Jaroslav Pelikan begins this volume with the crisis of orthodoxy that confronted all Christian denominations by the beginning of the eighteenth century and continues through the twentieth century in its particular concerns with ecumenism. The modern period in the history of Christian doctrine, Pelikan demonstrates, may be defined as the time when doctrines that had been as Jaroslav Pelikan begins this volume with the crisis of orthodoxy that confronted all Christian denominations by the beginning of the eighteenth century and continues through the twentieth century in its particular concerns with ecumenism. The modern period in the history of Christian doctrine, Pelikan demonstrates, may be defined as the time when doctrines that had been assumed more than debated for most of Christian history were themselves called into question: the idea of revelation, the uniqueness of Christ, the authority of Scripture, the expectation of life after death, even the very transcendence of God. "Knowledge of the immense intellectual effort invested in the construction of the edifice of Christian doctrine by the best minds of each successive generation is worth having. And there can hardly be a more lucid, readable and genial guide to it than this marvellous work."—Economist "This volume, like the series which it brings to a triumphant conclusion, may be unreservedly recommended as the best one-stop introduction currently available to its subject."—Alister E. McGrath, Times Higher Education Supplement "Professor Pelikan's series marks a significant departure, and in him we have at last a master teacher."—Marjorie O'Rourke Boyle, Commonweal "Pelikan's book marks not only the end of a dazzling scholarly effort but the end of an era as well. There is reason to suppose that nothing quite like it will be tried again."—Harvey Cox, Washington Post Book World

30 review for The Christian Tradition 5: Christian Doctrine & Modern Culture since 1700

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jackson Brooks

    Pelikan's Christian Tradition was my project for the year. It was a good one. It challenged my knowledge of Church History in general, filled in blind spots, and gave me directions for later research. Comprehensive, satisfying, and rich. I am filled with hope for God's Church in the future. Pelikan's Christian Tradition was my project for the year. It was a good one. It challenged my knowledge of Church History in general, filled in blind spots, and gave me directions for later research. Comprehensive, satisfying, and rich. I am filled with hope for God's Church in the future.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rad

    Jaroslav Pelikan concludes volume 5 of The Christian Tradition with the same words with which he begins volume 1: Credo unam sanctam catholicam et apostolicam ecclesiam. Covering the period in church history from 1700 to roughly the middle of the 20th century, Pelikan highlights the familiar faces (Harnack, Newman, Schleiermacher, et al.) and the somewhat less familiar (Rauschenbusch, Reimarus, and Zinzendorf, among many others). As I've stated in other reviews of previous volumes, I reiterate: Jaroslav Pelikan concludes volume 5 of The Christian Tradition with the same words with which he begins volume 1: Credo unam sanctam catholicam et apostolicam ecclesiam. Covering the period in church history from 1700 to roughly the middle of the 20th century, Pelikan highlights the familiar faces (Harnack, Newman, Schleiermacher, et al.) and the somewhat less familiar (Rauschenbusch, Reimarus, and Zinzendorf, among many others). As I've stated in other reviews of previous volumes, I reiterate: now after 1500+ pages and five volumes, the biggest surprise is perhaps how much remains unsaid! For that, Pelikan provides an unparalleled bibliography for further research. The breadth of Pelikan's learning is extraordinary. Chapter 6 it titled "The Sobornost of the Body of Christ." One may think of chapter titles as metaphors or generalizations devoted to common themes, but I admit that there was nothing about "sobornost" that resonated with any of my education to date, Christian or otherwise. Shame on me, it would seem. The following is typical Pelikan: "A sign of [Eastern Orthodoxy's] increasing influence was the adoption, as almost a technical term, of the Russian word "sobornost" by Western theologians of many linguistic and denominational traditions. The term "sobornaja" had been -- if not, as Aleksej Chomjakov claimed, already in the usage of Cyril and Methodius, "the apostles to the Slavs," then at least as early as the eleventh century -- the Old Church Slavonic rendering of "catholic" in the Nicene Creed; use of the word "sobor" for the church councils to which Eastern Orthodoxy assigned authority in the church helped to make the term a way of distinguishing Eastern ecclesiology from both the "papal monarchy" of Roman Catholicism and the "sola Scriptura" of Protestantism. "Sobornost" in this sense entered the vocabulary and the thought world of the West just as, for reasons that lay in the political and cultural upheavals of the modern era, Western Christianity, whether Roman Catholic or Anglican or Protestant, was, throughout the twentieth century, rediscovering the Christian East, whether Slavic or Greek or Near Eastern, within much of which the nineteenth century had been a period of such intense ecclesiological renewal" (287-288). Now you know. If there is a criticism of Pelikan, it is this simultaneous density and prolixity that is characteristic of much of his writing. It does not make for easy reading. But it is rewarding. Maugham said "to write simply is as difficult as to be good": while that may be true, it must also then be true that there is more than one measure of goodness. Credo unam sanctam catholicam et apostolicam eccelsiam: "I believe in one holy catholic and apostolic church." These familiar words from the Nicene creed, echoed in the Apostle's Creed, are appropriate bookends for Pelikan's thoughts on the subject. But after 1500+ pages, he's not done: I can now read his Credo, which is devoted to explicating the history of these creeds.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Aitken

    With this volume Pelikan--the master of Church History--finishes his supreme project. By reading these volumes--and meditating on the causes of the controversies found therein-- the reader will have a knowledge of church history far surpassing that of the average seminary student. This present volume, though, is not Pelikan's best work. That distinction belongs to either the third or fourth volume in this series. Here Pelikan details the problems that all forms of Orthodoxy--Easter, Catholic, or With this volume Pelikan--the master of Church History--finishes his supreme project. By reading these volumes--and meditating on the causes of the controversies found therein-- the reader will have a knowledge of church history far surpassing that of the average seminary student. This present volume, though, is not Pelikan's best work. That distinction belongs to either the third or fourth volume in this series. Here Pelikan details the problems that all forms of Orthodoxy--Easter, Catholic, or Protestant--faced in the crisis of modernity (circa 1700 onward). Most of the discussion isn't all that different from what one would find in a decent manual on worldview. It is in the last two chapters, though, that Pelikan's genius really shines. Pelikan notes that the challenge of historical criticism, especially the parts that couldn't simply be ignored, forced church traditions, particularly that of Roman Catholicism, to create something akin to "dogmatic development." The Vincentian Canon, while claiming to be that faith which was believed everywhere by all, more likely means believed by "most people in most places." Pelikan is equally fair and brutal to all traditions. Contra Catholicism, the immaculate conception and papal infalliblity are not only not found in the earlier fathers, but are openly contradicted by the facts of history. This led Newman--who did not dispute the challenge--to say that they were "secretly believed" or that the "truth was there somehow." This is special pleading with a vengeance. Eastern Orthodoxy, too, has its own development. This is seen in the problem of divine images. While the theology behind it might be correct, the fact remains that there isn't all that much earlier reference in the Fathers to it. Likewise, Protestantism must account for the fact that justification by faith alone is not found in the fathers. The book ends with an observation concerning ecuemnicism. While much of ecumenicism is wrong-headed, the fact remains that the different traditions are working together (Eastern theologians are using critical editions of the Schaff Fathers Series). Who knows what the Lord's Spirit might work in the future.

  4. 5 out of 5

    M Christopher

    This final volume of Jaroslav Pelikan's 5 volume review of the history of Christian doctrine probably engaged me the least of any of the set. The same high quality workmanship is there in writing and research. The problem for me is that the issues of the 1700s and 1800s seem dusty in a way that the problems of the Early Church, Middle Ages and Reformation do not, as those issues continue to inform the doctrinal questions of today, while the doctrinal development of the Eastern Church was interes This final volume of Jaroslav Pelikan's 5 volume review of the history of Christian doctrine probably engaged me the least of any of the set. The same high quality workmanship is there in writing and research. The problem for me is that the issues of the 1700s and 1800s seem dusty in a way that the problems of the Early Church, Middle Ages and Reformation do not, as those issues continue to inform the doctrinal questions of today, while the doctrinal development of the Eastern Church was interesting because it was unknown to me. In this volume, Pelikan must delve into such movements as Jansenism & Pietism, both of which have had their day and left their trace but do not remain important strains in the thought of the Church. The chapters that deal with the 19th and 20th centuries, on the other hand, were of more interest because those controversies are still playing out. Like the wheels of justice and the mills of God, the problem-solving of the Church grinds slow and exceeding fine. Inspiration and infallibility (the name of one of the sections of Pelikan's chapter on the 19th century) are still at the root of many disagreements in the church in 2014. Nor have we seen the final outcome of the Ecumenical Movement and of Vatican II, which dominate the chapter on the 20th century, still 11 years from its close at the publication of this volume. On the whole, I'm very glad I made the effort to work through this important and exhaustive series. I am quite sure that I will find it a valuable resource for future study, thought and writing.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cherry

    此書是作者Pelikan教會教義史歷史著作系列(A History of the Development of Doctrine)的最後一卷,以1700年後的教義發展為時限,講述傳統基督教教義與現代文化間的互動過程。 本人只閱讀了此書的第二至五章。作者從18世紀啟蒙運動對傳統教義的衝擊開始,先描述教義的支柱如何一步一步的被理性主義拆毀,然後講述教會以強調教義的主觀內容和宗教情感作為反擊。其後,論述十九世紀後教會神學家致力運用現代的思維邏輯來解釋和證明信仰的真確性的現象。最終教會還是發現教義無法以人的理性和歷史思為解釋,這些論證也無助挽回行將崩潰的教理權威。因而有學者提出「默示 (inspiration)」觀念,以此確立聖經和教會(天主教)的絕對觀威。不過,也有學者認為真理是通過歷史演進而來,所以教義的轉變是自然不過的事,唯有教義中的核心價值和內容,才是歷久常新的。作者在文末小結,指出普世教會同有一個共識,就是教會與神學在任何時代都有其需要解決不特殊議題,而在教會觀嚴重多元的二十世紀,在神學上將會是個「教會的時代(the age of the church)」。 不少人認為此書文字不太容易閱 此書是作者Pelikan教會教義史歷史著作系列(A History of the Development of Doctrine)的最後一卷,以1700年後的教義發展為時限,講述傳統基督教教義與現代文化間的互動過程。 本人只閱讀了此書的第二至五章。作者從18世紀啟蒙運動對傳統教義的衝擊開始,先描述教義的支柱如何一步一步的被理性主義拆毀,然後講述教會以強調教義的主觀內容和宗教情感作為反擊。其後,論述十九世紀後教會神學家致力運用現代的思維邏輯來解釋和證明信仰的真確性的現象。最終教會還是發現教義無法以人的理性和歷史思為解釋,這些論證也無助挽回行將崩潰的教理權威。因而有學者提出「默示 (inspiration)」觀念,以此確立聖經和教會(天主教)的絕對觀威。不過,也有學者認為真理是通過歷史演進而來,所以教義的轉變是自然不過的事,唯有教義中的核心價值和內容,才是歷久常新的。作者在文末小結,指出普世教會同有一個共識,就是教會與神學在任何時代都有其需要解決不特殊議題,而在教會觀嚴重多元的二十世紀,在神學上將會是個「教會的時代(the age of the church)」。 不少人認為此書文字不太容易閱讀,本人卻未有此等感覺。其實 Pelikan 以其獨到的歷史觸覺,抽取了近代教會史發展的精粹:教義發展為整套著作的主線,層層遞進的剖釋今日教會(尤其新教)不再重視傳統教義的原因。全書未有冗長註腳,閱讀時常見教會、神學家與現代文化思潮爭鋒相對,讓讀者有更多深層的神學思想,也對現今教會所面對的神學問題有進深的理解。

  6. 5 out of 5

    Wyatt Houtz

    Helpful but lacking. Author has personal criticisms of dogmas that prevent a full treatment of issues.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Greg Jones

  8. 4 out of 5

    Guilherme Cordeiro

  9. 5 out of 5

    Eric Sammons

  10. 4 out of 5

    Martin Fuller

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jake

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marcelo Nascimento

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michael Brooks

  14. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  15. 4 out of 5

    John

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Tomlinson

  18. 4 out of 5

    James Hoey

  19. 4 out of 5

    sam tannehill

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bryce

  21. 5 out of 5

    Everly Reynolds

  22. 5 out of 5

    George Mathews

  23. 4 out of 5

    Diego

  24. 5 out of 5

    Vagabond of Letters, DLitt

  25. 5 out of 5

    Phillip

  26. 4 out of 5

    John-Paul

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cole Feix

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  29. 5 out of 5

    Julius

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chad

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