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‘. . . Archetypal and stirring. . . Amish’s books unfold the deepest recesses of the soul.’ - DEEPAK CHOPRA Stories can be both entertaining and educative. They can also be insightful and illuminating, especially when they have travelled down the generations, through the centuries, taking on and eliding new meanings with each retelling. In this genre-bending book, the first ‘. . . Archetypal and stirring. . . Amish’s books unfold the deepest recesses of the soul.’ - DEEPAK CHOPRA Stories can be both entertaining and educative. They can also be insightful and illuminating, especially when they have travelled down the generations, through the centuries, taking on and eliding new meanings with each retelling. In this genre-bending book, the first of a series, Amish and Bhavna dive into the priceless treasure trove of the ancient Indian epics, as well as the vast and complex universe of Amish’s Meluha (through his Shiva Trilogy and Ram Chandra Series), to explore some of the key concepts of Indian philosophy. What is the ideal interplay between thought and action, taking and giving, self-love and sacrifice? How can we tell right from wrong? What can we do to bring out the best in ourselves, and to live a life with purpose and meaning, not just one fuelled by the ego and material needs? The answers lie in these simple and wise interpretations of our favourite stories by a lovable cast of fictional characters who you’ll enjoy getting to know.


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‘. . . Archetypal and stirring. . . Amish’s books unfold the deepest recesses of the soul.’ - DEEPAK CHOPRA Stories can be both entertaining and educative. They can also be insightful and illuminating, especially when they have travelled down the generations, through the centuries, taking on and eliding new meanings with each retelling. In this genre-bending book, the first ‘. . . Archetypal and stirring. . . Amish’s books unfold the deepest recesses of the soul.’ - DEEPAK CHOPRA Stories can be both entertaining and educative. They can also be insightful and illuminating, especially when they have travelled down the generations, through the centuries, taking on and eliding new meanings with each retelling. In this genre-bending book, the first of a series, Amish and Bhavna dive into the priceless treasure trove of the ancient Indian epics, as well as the vast and complex universe of Amish’s Meluha (through his Shiva Trilogy and Ram Chandra Series), to explore some of the key concepts of Indian philosophy. What is the ideal interplay between thought and action, taking and giving, self-love and sacrifice? How can we tell right from wrong? What can we do to bring out the best in ourselves, and to live a life with purpose and meaning, not just one fuelled by the ego and material needs? The answers lie in these simple and wise interpretations of our favourite stories by a lovable cast of fictional characters who you’ll enjoy getting to know.

30 review for Dharma: Decoding the Epics for a Meaningful Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nishit

    Basic.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sumit Banerjee

    Amish and Bhavna dissect the greats epics of India and bring forth the hidden meaning lying in the texts. Stripping the personification off the emotions and ideals, they show what the heroes and the villains represent and what might be learnt from their lives. If you have been missing dada-nana ki kahaniya that always had a deeper meaning in them, and a lens to look within, pick this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nakul Menon

    I am happy that I got to read this book on 1st of Jan 2021 itself. There are pearls of wisdom here and there in this book. I appreciate how they have tried to mix story telling and spirituality. I am a sucker for literature that talks of self awareness so it would be really unfair if I say I didn't entirely enjoy the book. But I have to mention the biggest downside of the book. Despite the title suggesting to decode the epics, lion's share of the contents are taken from Shiva Trilogy. People who I am happy that I got to read this book on 1st of Jan 2021 itself. There are pearls of wisdom here and there in this book. I appreciate how they have tried to mix story telling and spirituality. I am a sucker for literature that talks of self awareness so it would be really unfair if I say I didn't entirely enjoy the book. But I have to mention the biggest downside of the book. Despite the title suggesting to decode the epics, lion's share of the contents are taken from Shiva Trilogy. People who have not read Amish Tripathi's previous books could confuse this content with the actual stories from Mahabharata or Ramayana. If you are a serious reader who wants to dive into the world of Indian mythology or if you would love to start reading up on spiritual/mythological stories please don't even for a second think of starting with this book. I am quite sure "Dharma" have only been able to scratch the surface or perhaps even less.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Pulkit Tiwari

    Fluid. Flows like a breezy conversation. Touches upon perspectives on confusions that are left unanswered & as matters of debate in the stories of Mahabharata & Ramayana. Most stay true to the ambition of being open ended. A worthy use of time for the curious minds that enjoy discourse

  5. 5 out of 5

    Pushkar Marathe

    Too many cooks... This is not an entirely positive review, which might be apparent enough given the Star Rating I updated, but I felt it important to mention regardless. This might be because the "positive" if any is very limited in my viewpoint. Cutting straight to the chase (unlike the book...), here we go. What works: 1. The book has its heart in the right place, about wanting to educate and act as a torchbearer for continuing the legacy of India's dharmic culture. 2. Nothing else actually. What Too many cooks... This is not an entirely positive review, which might be apparent enough given the Star Rating I updated, but I felt it important to mention regardless. This might be because the "positive" if any is very limited in my viewpoint. Cutting straight to the chase (unlike the book...), here we go. What works: 1. The book has its heart in the right place, about wanting to educate and act as a torchbearer for continuing the legacy of India's dharmic culture. 2. Nothing else actually. What doesn't work: 1. Everything else. 2. I feel like the book jumps between several different topics without completely addressing them. One would argue that the authors have clarified this in the Introduction, about how they intend to guide the way of thinking rather than provide answers. But to me, the book did neither. 3. It continuously references the "Amish-verse", that is, it references the past books written by Amish. 4. The dialogues between characters seem forced, and the characters always find one way or another to reference Amish's books as guideposts of the tales/characters being referenced. To readers who haven't read the past books, it can be very confusing. 5. No argument ever seems to reach a conclusion. The actions of characters from epics like Mahabharat and Ramayan are questioned, but no attempt is ever made to determine the conclusion. That is also probably why it feels like you are just jumping from one topic to another. 6. The authors could have chosen very specific topics and characters, and stuck to the moral deconstruction of their ideals/choices/dilemmas. However, because they flit between too many of them, nothing significant gets said. (view spoiler)[ The part mentioning Sex feels like it is added just as a prop. While they do try to discuss aspects of Celibacy, the whole intent of bringing Sex into the conversation is pointless. They could just directly address Celibacy without needing to use the unnecessary reference through discussing Sex - which they don't discuss per se, anyway. (hide spoiler)] All in all, if you are new to the genre of Myth-Fiction, this book would not be a good place to start. Also if you are already familiar with the epics, it will still leave you feeling unsatisfied, because it never reaches the depth one would expect. Or maybe that's just me. 2.5/5 stars.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ronak

    https://youtu.be/CQWaR2NfGxM full review on youtube 2nd nonfiction book by Amish Tripathi Dharma: Decoding the Epics for A Meaningful Life", offers practical, philosophical lessons drawn from ancient Hindu epics. It is co-authored by Amish's sister Bhavana Roy. I enjoyed reading this book This is a mixture of philosophy+ nonfiction+ mythology If you're a fan of mythology and nonfiction you will enjoy this. Here are my favorite chapter The burden of envy Listen to your heart The present is what matters Quo https://youtu.be/CQWaR2NfGxM full review on youtube 2nd nonfiction book by Amish Tripathi Dharma: Decoding the Epics for A Meaningful Life", offers practical, philosophical lessons drawn from ancient Hindu epics. It is co-authored by Amish's sister Bhavana Roy. I enjoyed reading this book This is a mixture of philosophy+ nonfiction+ mythology If you're a fan of mythology and nonfiction you will enjoy this. Here are my favorite chapter The burden of envy Listen to your heart The present is what matters Quotes - When you find your purpose and rhythm in the universe, you are in a state of dharma. Even a lion on the hunt is in a state of dharma. And the hunted deer too.’ Remember, what is in the interest of the beehive is always in the interest of the bee. The opposite is not always true. Check out the full review on youtube

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dev Pradhan

    Amish's second non-fiction book co-authored by her sister Bhavna Roy is coming. This book is a work of Amishverse. It will describe some philosophies from ancient Hindu epics like Ramayana and Mahabharata. "A person's ethics and character are not tested in good times. It is only in bad times that a person shows how steadfast he is to his dharma." Amish's second non-fiction book co-authored by her sister Bhavna Roy is coming. This book is a work of Amishverse. It will describe some philosophies from ancient Hindu epics like Ramayana and Mahabharata. "A person's ethics and character are not tested in good times. It is only in bad times that a person shows how steadfast he is to his dharma."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anand Nair

    The poverty of English translation of Sanskrit terms has been an issue of much debate ever since SN Balagangadhara published Heathen In His Blindness (1994), continuing till date with the latest blow being made by Rajiv Malhotra and Satyanarayana Dasa Babaji with their Sanskrit Non Translatables. One such word is Dharma. This term gets loosely translated to 'duty' in most places. But as Amish and Bhavna Roy show, Dharma has wider meanings – the Earth revolving around the sun could also be said t The poverty of English translation of Sanskrit terms has been an issue of much debate ever since SN Balagangadhara published Heathen In His Blindness (1994), continuing till date with the latest blow being made by Rajiv Malhotra and Satyanarayana Dasa Babaji with their Sanskrit Non Translatables. One such word is Dharma. This term gets loosely translated to 'duty' in most places. But as Amish and Bhavna Roy show, Dharma has wider meanings – the Earth revolving around the sun could also be said to be performing its dharma (hence encompassing the western concept of 'natural fine-tuning). There is also the pivotal concept of swadharma (roughly one's own duty) which is to be understood as the teleos of the human being in realising fully its rational and emotional capabilities. According to the Amish and Bhavna Roy, the Puranas and their characters provide a blueprint for realising these aims, and hence need to be 'decoded' so as to learn their lessons on how to lead a meaningful life. The book is structured in the form of a Socratic dialogue between a couple and their in-laws (Nachiket, Gargi, Dharmaraj, Lopamudra). The four discuss swadharma, its various aspects, impediments to achieving it, with each of these aspects being made clear by connecting them with examples from the Puranas as well as Amish's own fiction work. Although relevant passages and context is given whenever these stories are discussed, it would be fair to say that the authors presume a basic knowledge of them from the part of the reader (especially with regards to Amish's work). The authors make clear in the introduction that the work will not give 'answers' to the problems answered, rather presenting various viewpoints on the same issue. Those looking for a Western foothold will find the spirit of the Hegelian dialectic, where contradictions complement each other rather than create conflict. A much more apt comparison would be with the philosophy of the Lao Tzu who says 'Must you value and avoid what others avoid ? How ridiculous !' As such this philosophy seeks to cultivate what is unique in each individual, hence letting him or her fashion her own path to his/her swadharma, with philosophy acting only as means to augment the action. If this resembles the virtue ethics tradition revived by the likes of Bernard Williams and Martha Nussbaum, it is also plagued by the issues by the issues of the same. When a moral ethic has its impetus focused on the action rather than intention, virtue becomes merely practicing a skill. This raises the conundrum of whether an exceptionally skilled torturer is also practising his swadharma. The authors try to work around these quandary in two ways. The first is their affirmation of a divine authority when it comes to the ontological nature of virtues, and hence affirms there is a teleos for the human life, a general design of how we ought to become. But such a view can only hold ground if we take certain values as 'good-in-themselves' while maintaining in a broad sense the distinctions of good and evil. But as with the story of Kumbhakarna or with that of Parvateshwar, the authors seem to imply that evil is a necessary element in the soteriological design. Even when it is condemned, it is through a form of consequentialist viewpoint (dharma being read as the utilitarian more of the greater good of the greatest number, and hence adharma being whatever is on the contrary). This line however creates a discord between the self-centred vision of swadharma. But such a disagreement is probably what the authors have in mind, for they make clear on the outset that they are not privileging any view. Whether this is perceived as a welcome change to dehumanizing argumentative rigour, or a copout to evade giving a coherent ethical picture would boil down to reader's preferences. There may also be a side-objection made that the book assumes an Indian version of gnosticizing scriptures, i.e. reading religious scriptures as archetypal works for personal development, hence draining them of their holy nature (Jordan Peterson, Carl Jung and Christopher Dawson have been the main accused in the West). But since Indian texts have always been subject to reinterpretations, and since the authors have a genuine respect of the Puranic traditions, this is an objection that can be dismissed with just as soon as it is raised. As a book based on practical ethics, the strongest point is the closing chapter which discusses about Yoga and breathing at length, and hence provides a good stepping stone for the reader to imbue what is of worth here into practice into his/her own life. Dharma : Decoding the Epics for A Meaningful Life is brisk, engaging, short and a sure treat for Amish afficionados, all virtues considerable sufficient to warrant a read and enough to turn a blind eye to seeing Devdutt Patnaik, Osho and Deepak Chopra being cited in the bibliography

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anoon Nishit Chinmayatri

    "If our actions are motivated by fear, passion, anxiety, desire- if they are driven by the ego – then even hard work can take us away from Dharma” Dharma, which is a term of fundamental significance to Indian philosophy and faith, has many definitions. It has been quite impossible to offer a single coherent description of dharma, since the term has a long and varied history and a diverse collection of definitions and interpretations. The meaning of the term dharma depends on the context, and its m "If our actions are motivated by fear, passion, anxiety, desire- if they are driven by the ego – then even hard work can take us away from Dharma” Dharma, which is a term of fundamental significance to Indian philosophy and faith, has many definitions. It has been quite impossible to offer a single coherent description of dharma, since the term has a long and varied history and a diverse collection of definitions and interpretations. The meaning of the term dharma depends on the context, and its meaning has changed for a long time as the doctrines of Hinduism have progressed throughout history. We all have different meaning and understanding of Dharma. As the authors narrate in the Introduction, “why Dharma? Don’t we understand the concept by now? But Dharma is quite the Scarlet Pimpernel among words. Difficult to pin down, it is invisible to the eye and confounding in the extreme. Shift the definition just a little, and it slides into another meaning. Yet, it is the universe within which Indian philosophy nestles.” I was completely spell-bound and impressed. Amish definitely has a way with the words, they stir you internally, challenge your thoughts (in a good way, of course). I have always loved reading his works. His work has always been supported by his extensive research and deep analysis. They offer a fresh and fascinating view to our vast culture and ancient history. In the book, the writers have adroitly narrated the philosophy of Dharma. Discussing multiple dimensions and decoding the meaning of several principles of Indian history, deducing myths and mythological characters, the ideas; their vices and virtues. They delve into the precious jewels of ancient Indian epics, as well as through the complex world of Amish's Shiva Trilogy and Ram Chandra Series, to traverse some of the core principals, concepts and foundations of Indian philosophy. They have not adopted the typical non-fiction method of writing and describing the Dharma, expanding on the hypothesis and then backing up the sources. Instead, they adopted the classical form of discussions that present multiple viewpoints, sometimes opposing views. They have strived to achieve an understanding of ethics, morals, humanity, sacrifice, loyalty, rigour, restraint, aspiration, wisdom, and many other imponderables. However, they have not written, in any way, in the form of lessons that they derive from these viewpoints, only ideas and suggestions. For it is we, who will have to make up our own mind and how we have a take on things as such. “Karma, like I said, is activity; to do. And activity should be a tool for self-discovery. You have to walk that path alone, though. Understand your own inner drama. Confront it. Then master it. That will bring you closer to dharma.” I have been able to relate to all these discussions since I come from a common context, straddled between worlds, with contemporary life at school, and the traditions and rich heritage from the family. Few instances and some points of view were eye-openers, having never thought so intensely on some of these concepts. It was pretty impressive. At times, we must all pause to acknowledge our uncertainty and to discover answers to our questions, to our inner wars. Confusion is going to act as a step stone. It will inspire us to seek and appreciate. We need to ask the right questions; we need to inquire intelligently. We need to ask about the answer, to quench our thirst for knowledge, and not just because we want to sound clever, or smart. If there are so many certitudes about life and ourselves, it could lead to an untested life that does not grow to its fullest. “Anything that is not constantly examined by our higher intelligence cannot be wholly positive” It has been fittingly said that Mother India is unique and special. The only one with an unbroken chain, with its roots extending back to the dawn of the human civilization. We must keep the flame alive. Pass on the torch. The more we share it, the more it expands. And all of us will benefit from the light of ancient India. “Traditions are not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire” In several ways, the book Dharma was really an eye-opener and was a stimulating and insightful read on our ancient history and philosophy, giving us a new outlook on some ideas and concepts. I would recommend the book to anyone interested in Indian mythology and philosophy, who is open to a healthy discussion of our pre-conceived conceptions.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rujuta

    Honestly, I struggled to finish the book. Firstly, I was quite excited when I read the title of the book. But, as I began reading it, page after page, I became increasingly annoyed. The entire book was filled with references from Amish’s earlier works on Shiva Trilogy and Ramayana…while occasionally referring to Greek mythos! I was not warned about this. So, I would recommend a tagline when promoting this book – “Only for readers familiar with Amish’s trilogies”. The book centers around a family Honestly, I struggled to finish the book. Firstly, I was quite excited when I read the title of the book. But, as I began reading it, page after page, I became increasingly annoyed. The entire book was filled with references from Amish’s earlier works on Shiva Trilogy and Ramayana…while occasionally referring to Greek mythos! I was not warned about this. So, I would recommend a tagline when promoting this book – “Only for readers familiar with Amish’s trilogies”. The book centers around a family of four who sit together and have a discussion on the qualities and lessons one can learn from the Epics – Mahabharata and Ramayana (but Amish’s versions) – whether they were “good” or “bad” people, whether their actions were justified or not…etc. So, for someone who is not familiar with his works, it was naturally quite boring and disorienting. Unfortunately or fortunately, I have only heard about Amish’s books but never actually read them. Therefore, I was extremely confused when one of the characters in the book asked the other “whether he was referring to Valmiki's Ramayana or Amish’s Ramayana”. I had no idea that there was a difference and what even was the difference! Secondly, to answer the question of why I would continue to read a book that has a pre-requisite of ‘reading author’s earlier books’. Logically, I should stop. But, I was curious. I was curious to know the message and the content of their discussions on morality, “right” and “wrong”, “dharma”, “karma”. Long story short, it was disappointing and shallow. While the authors touch upon these concepts of dharma and karma, what makes a “bad” person, or “good” person – it was done so on a very shallow level. This is not a book to read if you want to understand the basic concepts of “dharma” and “karma”. Thirdly, as a fellow counseling psychologist, it was mildly shocking and entertaining to come across Freud’s name in the book. Additionally, the mention of Victor Frankl's in the context of quitting victimhood was a great addition! The paragraph on him focused on what Frankl managed to achieve after his life in concentration camps. But, the authors failed to highlight the most essential information about him which was - HOW he managed to survive the concentration camps, in the first place. It was the realization of - ‘When we are no longer able to change a situation - we are challenged to change ourselves’ – that allowed him to survive the concentration camps. His merits in life post-concentration camp are the aftermath of the change in that particular mindset. Anyway, while on one hand, the book is all of the things above, it was fun to read the banter between the characters. I quite enjoyed the conversational style of presenting the knowledge, too. Overall, I give 2 stars for the production of the book, solely. It is well-bound, simple language, good typography, small and portable. Otherwise, the content is pretty basic.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tanya Talwar

    In a climate where life is beginning to seem uncertain and futile at times, the nihilist in us wishes to throw away every sense of duty and embrace a life minus discipline and all efforts of self-fulfilment. This book comes at the right time for new adults and adults alike. The external chaos of a hopeless year should not deviate us from the path of Dharma. However, the word is profound and requires many layers of unravelling before we can consider ourselves closer to the Truth. Authors Amish Tri In a climate where life is beginning to seem uncertain and futile at times, the nihilist in us wishes to throw away every sense of duty and embrace a life minus discipline and all efforts of self-fulfilment. This book comes at the right time for new adults and adults alike. The external chaos of a hopeless year should not deviate us from the path of Dharma. However, the word is profound and requires many layers of unravelling before we can consider ourselves closer to the Truth. Authors Amish Tripathi and Bhavna Roy have tried to do just that. A family finds itself in prandial conversation on the topics of loyalty, morality, envy, lust and victimhood among other strands of this weighty term- Dharma. The one thing that had me hooked from the word go was the affability of the characters. I instantly took a liking to the camaraderie between Dharma Raj and his son-in-law (yes, that is unusual and I am all for it). Apart from that, the language is simple and conversational; unlike Plato’s dialogues which had my head spinning. This book is bolstered by inter-textuality: alluding to myths, Amish’s previous books and a host of other authors and their ideas. It is interesting to delve into archetypes that govern most of humankind and how they have evolved into a solid discussion on the idea of Dharma, which may be phrased differently in other societies but is universally a marker of the relentless endeavour to uplift humankind. This is the merit of the book- it takes you on a journey across lands, works of literature and ideas that you cannot help but actively engage with. The book does not promise answers, instead piques the interest and curiosity towards our immense oeuvre of epics and scriptures that have been passed down orally for generations. This brings me to my primary grouse- I wish it had dwelt more on the actual epics and interpretations for the same than taking on Amish’s characters and their dilemmas (the stories are summarised for the uninitiated). But I concede that that is a mammoth task, difficult to capture within the scope of such a book. It is sure to become a conversation starter among disillusioned adults and I would recommend it as a primer if the perusal of the scriptures and their multiple exegeses are as yet a daunting idea. The authors promise to follow up with a series of such narratives on various other conversations on Dharma which I eagerly look forward to reading, debating and following up with my own research, through the scriptures as well as life experiences.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ganesh Satpute

    Let me start by saying that I really loved Shiva Trilogy by Amish. I was so excited when I read that the book is formatted in the form of conversation between people exchanging ideas, arguing, and counter-arguing, just like it happens in all of our Epics. I liked first 1-2 chapters of this book. The book titles "Dharma: Decoding the Epics for a Meaningful Life". Naturally, characters from this book takes stories from epics and discusses them. When anybody says Indian epics only Mahabharat and Ra Let me start by saying that I really loved Shiva Trilogy by Amish. I was so excited when I read that the book is formatted in the form of conversation between people exchanging ideas, arguing, and counter-arguing, just like it happens in all of our Epics. I liked first 1-2 chapters of this book. The book titles "Dharma: Decoding the Epics for a Meaningful Life". Naturally, characters from this book takes stories from epics and discusses them. When anybody says Indian epics only Mahabharat and Ramayan comes to mind, at least to me. But stories from these actual Epics are only 5-10% of this book. Most stories are from Shiva Triology, and other Amish's books. Now, if Amish wants to call his own book as Epics that's little bit far fetched, in my opinion (and even though I have liked his books). Secondly, it's been years since I've read Shiva Triology, I've forgotten major chunk of it. But I do remember the stories from Ramayan, Mahabharat (probably because they are the true epics). On the other hand we can draw (many) conclusions from any story. In my personal opinion, Amish should've stick to well known stories of the actual epics. Because most Indian people would be aware about it. If you're drawing conclusions from the stories which most people won't be able to connect, that's a wasted effort. Coming to few discussions from actual Epics, the book fails to give a new perspective. Saying "Bhishma, shouldn't have taken oath", "Duryodhana was bad", "Karna's loyalty is at wrong place", etc aren't new perspectives in my opinion. You can read Quora and get better perceptions, views than this book. I was expecting little better from a professional author and that too Amish specifically. To conclude, I would like to say that the idea is really good but execution is really poor.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shagun Chauhan

    Good one from Amish and Bhavna Roy. They have touched very debatable topics in this book which in itself is courageous. Yes, they have trivialized many deep stories from Mahabharata but i see the reason behind that. They obviously are targeting the larger audience here. There are some very good line/s in this book which stand alone in themselves. Over all, a very good read. But i would have been more happy if they have been more nuanced while writing about motives of characters in Mahabharata and Good one from Amish and Bhavna Roy. They have touched very debatable topics in this book which in itself is courageous. Yes, they have trivialized many deep stories from Mahabharata but i see the reason behind that. They obviously are targeting the larger audience here. There are some very good line/s in this book which stand alone in themselves. Over all, a very good read. But i would have been more happy if they have been more nuanced while writing about motives of characters in Mahabharata and have looked at the Mahabharata from more different perspectives. But it is always a problem when someone writes about Mahabharata that no matter how much one goes into it, there are always more to it. Hoping to see more from these two in this series. Really, well done.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lunatica

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Average I expected a bit more. It was interesting to think about the characters like our inner self. I have done so many a times. However, it became repetitive sometimes and lacked the 'Amish' factor. And there are major spoilers if you have not read his novel and want to. I think we could have dwelled more into the real ramayan a bit more. Real as in the first version. I was a bit disappointed as a read but the book and its hardcover looks stunning. I have my share of favourite quotes and words Average I expected a bit more. It was interesting to think about the characters like our inner self. I have done so many a times. However, it became repetitive sometimes and lacked the 'Amish' factor. And there are major spoilers if you have not read his novel and want to. I think we could have dwelled more into the real ramayan a bit more. Real as in the first version. I was a bit disappointed as a read but the book and its hardcover looks stunning. I have my share of favourite quotes and words and my points where I questioned the author, which I will share in some days. I am okay with the read. Nevertheless could have been better.

  15. 4 out of 5

    RISHAV

    As always unique and attractive. The people who are a fan of Amish’s writing will definitely get attracted towards this book and will try to read these books in one go. He has already mentioned that the modern people have started forgetting their own culture and dharma and are leaning more towards the western culture. This book is not a proper fiction type of book. He has followed the ancient Indian Upanishads style of conversation, which presents different views, even opposing or rejecting view As always unique and attractive. The people who are a fan of Amish’s writing will definitely get attracted towards this book and will try to read these books in one go. He has already mentioned that the modern people have started forgetting their own culture and dharma and are leaning more towards the western culture. This book is not a proper fiction type of book. He has followed the ancient Indian Upanishads style of conversation, which presents different views, even opposing or rejecting views. This book contains eight chapters and in every chapter a beautiful family discusses about the different topic of dharma on a personal life. They discuss about KARMA, SWADHARMA, DHARMA, ENVY, LOVE, LUST, EGO, HUMILITY, LOYALTY, DISLOYALTY and many more. Amish this time used his mythological and fictional characters of his books to describe this above things. It serious taught me a lot and gave some clear perceptions towards dharma. I haven’t read any book till now with this much clarification about everything.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Juhi Bansal

    Rating: 3/5 It is a story of a family that is discussing what Dharma and Karma mean. There is a healthy debate going on where each member uses characters from Ramayana, Mahabharata, Shiva Trilogy, and Greek mythology to justify what they want to say. However, I wouldn't say I liked this book as much as I have loved Amish's other works. I guess when you increase the benchmark a little too much, the expectations also increase manifold. It is a short book, but after the 4th chapter, it becomes bori Rating: 3/5 It is a story of a family that is discussing what Dharma and Karma mean. There is a healthy debate going on where each member uses characters from Ramayana, Mahabharata, Shiva Trilogy, and Greek mythology to justify what they want to say. However, I wouldn't say I liked this book as much as I have loved Amish's other works. I guess when you increase the benchmark a little too much, the expectations also increase manifold. It is a short book, but after the 4th chapter, it becomes boring. Or maybe, this is because, usually, I'm not particularly eager to read Non-Fiction. But one thing for sure, if you love Amish for Shiva Trilogy and Ram Chandra Series (for stories basically), I would recommend you stay away from this one.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anu

    Absolute Masterpiece Delightful read offering the readers thought-provoking and inspiring lessons by decoding the ancient epics with a fascinatingly modern outlook for a meaningful life. The concepts discussed in the book are explained in simpler terms and interpretations of favorite stories by a lovable cast of fictional characters who you’ll enjoy getting to know. The learnings from the book impart knowledge and perfect examples in understanding the practicality of life values in the modern world Absolute Masterpiece Delightful read offering the readers thought-provoking and inspiring lessons by decoding the ancient epics with a fascinatingly modern outlook for a meaningful life. The concepts discussed in the book are explained in simpler terms and interpretations of favorite stories by a lovable cast of fictional characters who you’ll enjoy getting to know. The learnings from the book impart knowledge and perfect examples in understanding the practicality of life values in the modern world. Instills immense curiosity in the reader’s minds about India’s rich past and culture.’ Excellent book with wonderful life experiences and learnings. Highly recommended to read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pushkar Sohony

    This is the first book of 2021, the language is simple and story telling is just ok. Though there are few important takeaways from the book, but the book is not at par with Author's earlier books. This is my 5th book of the author (all books of Ramchandra Series and Immortals of India) and this one seems to have lot of references from his earlier books. A topic is discussed but not concluded so may leave you dissatisfied This is the first book of 2021, the language is simple and story telling is just ok. Though there are few important takeaways from the book, but the book is not at par with Author's earlier books. This is my 5th book of the author (all books of Ramchandra Series and Immortals of India) and this one seems to have lot of references from his earlier books. A topic is discussed but not concluded so may leave you dissatisfied

  19. 5 out of 5

    Neeharika Vempati

    Dharma: Decoding the epics for a meaningful life Its a non fiction written by Amish and Bhavana. The story starts as a family dicussion with Dharma Raj his wife lopamudra their son in law nachiket and his wife Gargi.. The discussions is completely about dharma and karam using the references form shiva trilogy and Ram chandra series.. some part of Mahabharat as well.. we can expect Mahabharat series from Amish Tripathi.. 4 out of 5

  20. 4 out of 5

    Darshan

    Pretty interesting read .. it’s a short book , but some conversations are deep enough that will warrant a re-read.. When I started reading the book , I didn’t like the references to his previous books .. it felt like a forced endorsement of his books .. but as the conversation progressed.. the references started making more sense.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vaishali Sekar Rama

    As usual, Amish has done an incredible job. Co-authored by his sister Bhavna Roy, Dharma-Decoding the epics for a meaningful life is fantastically written. Such an informative book. One must have read all his books in order to understand the debates and discussions that has been covered in this awesome book. Truly amazing. I wish Amish comes up with more such wonderful books.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sharath

    Amazing narrating styles and as always logical way of explaining things. Amish uses his past books to explain concepts like Dharma, Karma, Anger, Loyalty etc. Although the book does feels like marketing his past books, moreover it feels like explaining his thought process while writing those books. It feels like the argument he may had with himself while writing about Shiva, Ram, Sita, Ravan...

  23. 5 out of 5

    arjun

    Nice read Nice explanation on dharma and karma. Significance of managing emotions like Anger, loyalty vs love. The last chapter is an interesting read

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bhavik

    The only good part is comparison between two People from history, like karna and kumbhakarna.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nitish Joshi

    Some chapters seems confusing, otherwise very well put view point on various aspects of Dharma. Amazing dissection of all characters from scriptures. The plot although a bit unconventional.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Pradhuman Bhati

    A wonderful book to read to understand life and it’s purpose. A narrative very well brought out. Must read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Siddarth

    Gives you questions and makes you reflect on yourself and your responses. The book also gives us an idea about hard concepts in simplified stories.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sahoda

    It's delight to read Author Amish's books. It's simply beautiful how he entangles his stories together. It's delight to read Author Amish's books. It's simply beautiful how he entangles his stories together.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nirjhar Majumder

    A bit disappointed after reading the book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Satvik

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