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Christians first expressed these political truths under Caesars, kings, popes, and emperors. We need them in the age of presidents. Leviathan is rising again, and the first weapon we must recover is the storied Christian tradition of resisting governmental overreach. Our bloated bureaucratic state would have been unrecognizable to the Founders, and our acquiescence to its e Christians first expressed these political truths under Caesars, kings, popes, and emperors. We need them in the age of presidents. Leviathan is rising again, and the first weapon we must recover is the storied Christian tradition of resisting governmental overreach. Our bloated bureaucratic state would have been unrecognizable to the Founders, and our acquiescence to its encroachments on liberty would have infuriated them. But here is the point: our Leviathan would not have surprised them. They were well acquainted with the tendency of governments to turn tyrannical: “Eternal vigilance is the price we pay for liberty.” In Slaying Leviathan, historian Glenn S. Sunshine surveys some of the stories and key elements of Christian political thought from Augustine to the Declaration of Independence. Specifically, the book introduces theories that were synthesized into a coherent political philosophy by John Locke, who influenced the American founders and was, like us, fighting against the spirit of Leviathan in his day.


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Christians first expressed these political truths under Caesars, kings, popes, and emperors. We need them in the age of presidents. Leviathan is rising again, and the first weapon we must recover is the storied Christian tradition of resisting governmental overreach. Our bloated bureaucratic state would have been unrecognizable to the Founders, and our acquiescence to its e Christians first expressed these political truths under Caesars, kings, popes, and emperors. We need them in the age of presidents. Leviathan is rising again, and the first weapon we must recover is the storied Christian tradition of resisting governmental overreach. Our bloated bureaucratic state would have been unrecognizable to the Founders, and our acquiescence to its encroachments on liberty would have infuriated them. But here is the point: our Leviathan would not have surprised them. They were well acquainted with the tendency of governments to turn tyrannical: “Eternal vigilance is the price we pay for liberty.” In Slaying Leviathan, historian Glenn S. Sunshine surveys some of the stories and key elements of Christian political thought from Augustine to the Declaration of Independence. Specifically, the book introduces theories that were synthesized into a coherent political philosophy by John Locke, who influenced the American founders and was, like us, fighting against the spirit of Leviathan in his day.

30 review for Slaying Leviathan: Limited Government and Resistance in the Christian Tradition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Kyriosity

    Excellent. Very clear explanation of how we got here and where exactly we are. Lots of new information for me on the history of political theory. It's certainly not my first subject of choice, but Sunshine managed to keep me engaged so that when we got to conclusions and applications, I was tracking. Made me appreciate how remarkable the U.S. founding documents are in the context of Western political thought through history and how tragic it is that we have virtually shredded them. Excellent. Very clear explanation of how we got here and where exactly we are. Lots of new information for me on the history of political theory. It's certainly not my first subject of choice, but Sunshine managed to keep me engaged so that when we got to conclusions and applications, I was tracking. Made me appreciate how remarkable the U.S. founding documents are in the context of Western political thought through history and how tragic it is that we have virtually shredded them.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Becky Pliego

    Super helpful. History is in itself an argument against tyranny. Recommended to all who want to learn more about us, Romans 13, and tyrants.

  3. 4 out of 5

    John

    Slaying Leviathan is an introduction to the Christian political tradition. Glenn Sunshine surveys the history of Christian political thought, from the early church to the Constitution of the United States. It is a broad survey, so he rarely goes deep, but he goes wide enough that there are probably some new things that most readers haven’t encountered—at least that was true in my case. He makes the case that limited government is a fruit of Protestant theology, and came to full flower in the Unit Slaying Leviathan is an introduction to the Christian political tradition. Glenn Sunshine surveys the history of Christian political thought, from the early church to the Constitution of the United States. It is a broad survey, so he rarely goes deep, but he goes wide enough that there are probably some new things that most readers haven’t encountered—at least that was true in my case. He makes the case that limited government is a fruit of Protestant theology, and came to full flower in the United States Constitution. We’ve sadly not flexed these political muscles enough in America, and they have atrophied. We have largely lost the understanding of this heritage in the American church, so we do not realize that resistance to tyranny is actually a fruit of the Christian political tradition. Christians have been defying tyrants for millennia, but we’ve been leaning on Romans 13 in America, in ways that were easy to understand and do when the civil magistrate is largely obedient and just. So our default response to a just magistrate has been easy deference. But now that we’re awakening to the unrighteousness of many of our civil magistrates, we’re unprepared for any other response than deference and compliance. This book is a well-timed reminder, that there is more to the Christian tradition than what too many today, has turned into servility.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jake Litwin

    Leviathan shut down the church in the name of public health this year and the church seems to be scattered and divided, not knowing what to do. “...churches were prohibited from meeting in direct violation of the First Amendment while Black Lives Matter protests were permitted. In other words, freedom of peaceable assembly applied only to groups promoting approved messages.” - from the Epilogue, page 174. Glenn Sunshine gives a well written overview of the history of Christian political thought. Leviathan shut down the church in the name of public health this year and the church seems to be scattered and divided, not knowing what to do. “...churches were prohibited from meeting in direct violation of the First Amendment while Black Lives Matter protests were permitted. In other words, freedom of peaceable assembly applied only to groups promoting approved messages.” - from the Epilogue, page 174. Glenn Sunshine gives a well written overview of the history of Christian political thought. The author is very engaging and does a difficult task, taking a huge amount of detailed history and compiling it into a survey under 200 pages. Outside of the influential thinkers he traces including Augustine, Luther, Calvin, Hobbes, Rutherford, and Locke, Sunshine covers unalienable rights, resistance, liberty, problematic Two Kingdom Theology and how Protestants responded to threats of Leviathan rising over other spheres in history. My only minor critique would be wishing there was more direct quotes from these thinkers but Sunshine basically makes up for it by providing an extensive appendix for further reading of all the original sources he was pulling from. A much needed book in understanding the times we are in today.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Corey

    The cry “Liberty, equality, fraternity or death!” was much in vogue during the Revolution. Liberty ended by covering France in prisons, equality by multiplying titles and decorations, and fraternity by dividing us. Death alone prevailed. - Louis de Bonald

  6. 5 out of 5

    Spencer

    A great overview of historical instances of Christian resistance to governmental tyranny and their implications and applications to today's society. A great overview of historical instances of Christian resistance to governmental tyranny and their implications and applications to today's society.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mason Bruza

    This was a good survey of Christian Political thought. I was pleased to see that Dr. Sunshine largely avoids oversimplifying the issues at stake, an all too common pitfall for Christian advocates of liberalism. Still, I think Dr. Sunshine overlooks a few key principles (e.g. the relationship between private property and the Universal Destination of Goods), and by treating Lockean liberalism as the only consistent version of Christian political thought; he ends up mischaracterizing earlier Christ This was a good survey of Christian Political thought. I was pleased to see that Dr. Sunshine largely avoids oversimplifying the issues at stake, an all too common pitfall for Christian advocates of liberalism. Still, I think Dr. Sunshine overlooks a few key principles (e.g. the relationship between private property and the Universal Destination of Goods), and by treating Lockean liberalism as the only consistent version of Christian political thought; he ends up mischaracterizing earlier Christian thinkers. For example, in his discussion of religious liberty and state churches, instead of showing how Luther and Calvin viewed state churches as a good and necessary consequence of the magistrate's duties and consistent with their view of Christian liberty; Dr. Sunshine just assumes that they were ignorant of the tension and moves on. On the more positive side, I found his definition of "ordered liberty" one of the stronger points and one that's extremely helpful for our time: "And yet, the laws of nature and nature's God also impose on us obligations to act for the good of our neighbors. Thus, we cannot take a radically individualistic view of our rights. Instead, the law of love suggests that we balance individual freedom with public order and concern for the common good... Exactly where to draw the lines between order and liberty is not always clear, and governments frequently get the lines wrong, allowing freedom where it is harmful and restricting liberty where it is not... Liberty thus may be an unalienable right, but it is not an absolute right." This is a helpful antidote to the libertarian tendencies in fusionist conservativism which often veer towards license and an absolutist notion of liberty. Modern conservatives would likely be appalled to find out that their theological heroes used to support such things as sumptuary laws, public hospitals, and guild-based price and labor controls; none of which were seen as threats to liberty, but rather were seen to promote ordered liberty in those circumstances. Overall, the book is to be commended for its ad fontes approach and encouraging modern Christians to begin thinking about politics at a deeper level than what we get from social media.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Knowlton Murphy

    (Typed on a phone late at night...please excuse any typos!) I really enjoyed this book. It provides a quick introduction to the history of Protestant resistance theory. I loved the idea of sphere sovereignty--that different spheres (government, education, labor, etc.) exist as sovereign realms. When a sphere's efficiency is somehow compromised, it's tempting for a separate sphere--usually government--to step up to replace that defunct sphere. So education fails, government provide education. Two (Typed on a phone late at night...please excuse any typos!) I really enjoyed this book. It provides a quick introduction to the history of Protestant resistance theory. I loved the idea of sphere sovereignty--that different spheres (government, education, labor, etc.) exist as sovereign realms. When a sphere's efficiency is somehow compromised, it's tempting for a separate sphere--usually government--to step up to replace that defunct sphere. So education fails, government provide education. Two problems here are that government isn't well equipped for assuming the added role, and that as it's sphere sovereignty increases, you find a petty form of tyrany with a limitless trajectory--what starts as nothing more than a nose eventually becomes a whole camel in your tent. I was struck by what seems to be an odd relationship--Hobbes' vision of a sovereign ruler is for all practical purposes the same as an absolute monarch with divine rights. The king hypothetically faces God for judgment one day--an unimaginable circumstance in Hobbes' mechanical philosophy--but whether by God or by social contract, they both have carte blanche to do whatever they want. Perhaps the biggest surprise was how modern everything felt. Hobbes just sounds like anyone I might talk with today, and that makes sense, but even the medieval thinkers and the Scottish Covenanters struck me as remarkably accessible. All in all, this was a great thought provoking intro to a history I am convinced most of my peers are ignorant of. I don't say that arrogantly or anything--I just don't think many of my fellow 21st century American evangelical friends are aware of this. They typically oversimplify obedience to governing officials without taking into account our rich philosophical and theological heritage, the demonstrable governmental trends in world history, or the fact that our modern obedience to governing officials necessarily looks different from 1st-3rd century Christianity because we are citizens of a democratic republic. Good stuff.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Zak Schmoll

    This short book provides an overview of the development of the relationship between church and state in the Christian tradition. Glenn Sunshine provides a historical overview of from the early church to the American founding, and in each chapter where he talks about a different stage of that development, he adds a concluding section subtitled Implications where he discusses how this principle is still relevant today. I was actually most interested in the chapters where he discusses Christian resi This short book provides an overview of the development of the relationship between church and state in the Christian tradition. Glenn Sunshine provides a historical overview of from the early church to the American founding, and in each chapter where he talks about a different stage of that development, he adds a concluding section subtitled Implications where he discusses how this principle is still relevant today. I was actually most interested in the chapters where he discusses Christian resistance. Obviously it is a significant chapter in church history, but I had not read much about it, so I appreciated that. As you can tell from the title, this book will obviously appeal to those of us who favor smaller government and a high degree of religious liberty. However, even if you disagree with those beliefs, I think you will probably appreciate Sunshine's journey through the different ways that Christian thinkers have gone back-and-forth on how the church and state ought to interact.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    An educated, well-written, and robust survey of Christian political philosophy through the centuries. The focus is on what constitutes legitimate authority and what limits does that authority have placed on it by nature and divine law. The result is a very readable and engaging history of limited government and the need for checks and balances. The author clearly understands philosophy in general, and political philosophy in particular. He also, as an added bonus, really gets right the two kingd An educated, well-written, and robust survey of Christian political philosophy through the centuries. The focus is on what constitutes legitimate authority and what limits does that authority have placed on it by nature and divine law. The result is a very readable and engaging history of limited government and the need for checks and balances. The author clearly understands philosophy in general, and political philosophy in particular. He also, as an added bonus, really gets right the two kingdom theology of Luther and the early Reformers, even while he seems to favor some form of sphere sovereignty. In particular he sees how the older two kingdom teaching was not opposed to transformationalism as modern R2K guys do with their odd modern version. Loved it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    A superb and eminently readable overview of the history of Christianity's thinking about, and relationship to, the state and the the state's relationship to Christianity in under 200 pages, with a worthwhile epilogue offering suggestions on applying what was discussed. Anyone contemplating the relationship of church and state should probably read this book. I very seldom, on principle, give five stars to a book. But, I would have given five stars to this book save one grievous shortcoming—it has A superb and eminently readable overview of the history of Christianity's thinking about, and relationship to, the state and the the state's relationship to Christianity in under 200 pages, with a worthwhile epilogue offering suggestions on applying what was discussed. Anyone contemplating the relationship of church and state should probably read this book. I very seldom, on principle, give five stars to a book. But, I would have given five stars to this book save one grievous shortcoming—it has no index. Why anyone would write a book of this nature, with so much information packed into it, with so many names, ideas, and movements discussed, without including an index baffles me. I may need to buy the Kindle version simply to be able to find things I want to look at again.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Schwisow

    A concise and easy to understand historical summary of Christian views of government and civil resistance. Excellent tract for the times.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Samuel

    Fantastic overview. Read this as the starting point for any study of this topic, as it provides a historical and theoretical framework to hang everything else on.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Parkison

    Most Christians I meet are governmental absolutists in their political convictions and don't even know it. This book is very good and the historical context set here is necessary for Christians to make judicial decisions about how they are going to conceptualize the Church-State relationship moving forward. It's unfortunate that the reputation Canon Press has garnered for having bare-knuckled brawlers for authors will render this little book beyond consideration for some (though, granted, that re Most Christians I meet are governmental absolutists in their political convictions and don't even know it. This book is very good and the historical context set here is necessary for Christians to make judicial decisions about how they are going to conceptualize the Church-State relationship moving forward. It's unfortunate that the reputation Canon Press has garnered for having bare-knuckled brawlers for authors will render this little book beyond consideration for some (though, granted, that reputation is warranted. I dare say the folks in Moscow, ID would wear the description like a badge of honor, God bless them). They'll read the title and subtitle, see the publisher, and conclude that this is merely fuel for the fire of ungracious hot-heads who are looking for any excuse to justify their absence of the fruit of the Spirit. Folks that leach off of others, building platforms by dunking on other people for their platform-building, etc. etc. Of course, it's not hard to find real life examples of these types, and more than a few of them will quickly reveal great affection for Canon Press. But I'm going to be so bold as to say that few of those examples will cite *this* book as their favorite Canon Press book. Why? Because it's *too boring.* It doesn't readily present itself to the fire-breathing types. We can forgive them for assuming it would, given the title and publisher. But what readers will find in this book is a cool-headed, flat-footed, learned historical treatment. Virtually none of the characteristically Canon Press zingers--those sharp rhetorical quotes with which to pummel liberals. Sunshine practices enough restraint on editorializing that Christians from a wide spectrum of political impulses can read the book without feeling ostracized. He's not shy about what he thinks, but he's careful to distinguish his recommendations from the historical survey he develops in each chapter, to the end that any Christian can read it and not feel like the target of a polemical attack.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    The behaviour of our governments during the last year have given rise to questions around just how far governments can go to restrict the activities of its people - particularly Christians in their worship of the One True, Triune God revealed in the Bible. My context is Australia, where restrictions on meeting numbers were in play and then singing and then the mask wearing, all being guided by the same global pseudoscience. Glenn Sunshine’s book helps to understand the Christian view of governme The behaviour of our governments during the last year have given rise to questions around just how far governments can go to restrict the activities of its people - particularly Christians in their worship of the One True, Triune God revealed in the Bible. My context is Australia, where restrictions on meeting numbers were in play and then singing and then the mask wearing, all being guided by the same global pseudoscience. Glenn Sunshine’s book helps to understand the Christian view of government and its historical development, although more specifically to the US context, but there is still enough to be gleaned for Australians that seek to honour their government but honour Christ above all. One thing I was really pleased about was Sunshine’s explanation of Hobbes’ Leviathan being a secularised, bastardised Calvinistic vision - as it confirmed my suspicions. In my philosophy undergrad I observed this to my tutor, who hadn’t realised it before. That’s because they often teach/taught philosophy with no real context. (Of course, it would mean contending with Christianity which is no-no for them). Highly recommended!

  16. 4 out of 5

    NG

    My wife and I read this book at the recommendation of Doug Wilson (see his YouTube video where he talks with the author for a general intro to the book). I was not let down. This book was excellent. I would guess that most Christians (and an even greater majority of Americans) are ignorant of how political theory developed over time. Furthermore, how many people understand Augustine’s or Calvin’s connection with our current governmental structure/theories? I throughly enjoyed this one. Will have My wife and I read this book at the recommendation of Doug Wilson (see his YouTube video where he talks with the author for a general intro to the book). I was not let down. This book was excellent. I would guess that most Christians (and an even greater majority of Americans) are ignorant of how political theory developed over time. Furthermore, how many people understand Augustine’s or Calvin’s connection with our current governmental structure/theories? I throughly enjoyed this one. Will have to read again in the future. The quoted speech from Ben Franklin at the end was a perfect climax to the book. I could hardly read through his speech without tearing up. To think that at one time our founders sought help from the God of heaven in political deliberations in the context of our current leaders consulting critical race theory and gender studies to make decisions regarding our liberties was almost too much to bear. We’ve allowed leviathan to raise his ugly head once again.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    “If the state can insinuate itself into religion, is there any area of life than can truly claim to be independent of state regulation? Government regulations dictate what can be taught in public schools, determine accreditation for non-government schools, determine what we can eat or drink, set rules for businesses that are not applied equally to all and thereby determine which businesses are likely to survive, set rules for hiring and firing, limit landlords’ ability to collect rent, dictate w “If the state can insinuate itself into religion, is there any area of life than can truly claim to be independent of state regulation? Government regulations dictate what can be taught in public schools, determine accreditation for non-government schools, determine what we can eat or drink, set rules for businesses that are not applied equally to all and thereby determine which businesses are likely to survive, set rules for hiring and firing, limit landlords’ ability to collect rent, dictate what messages and even words are acceptable in media, set rules on acceptable forms of outdoor recreation in a pandemic...the list goes on and on and gets more specific. And in some areas, the government actively encourages people to report on their neighbors for violating the rules. This is not a lifestyle of a free people. This is soft totalitarianism. This is how Leviathan is reborn.” Amen.

  18. 4 out of 5

    DAVID N SNYDER

    Dr. Sunshine does a great job of presenting the history of Christian resistance to unjust or oppressive Governments. My review is based on memory of what I read - and any mistakes in the review are simply because of my memory failing me, not a shortcoming of the author. From Aristotle (brought in for his valuable insights on the forms of Government, not his views on Christianity), to Church history starting with Augustine and moving on through the various struggles of the reformation and how Prote Dr. Sunshine does a great job of presenting the history of Christian resistance to unjust or oppressive Governments. My review is based on memory of what I read - and any mistakes in the review are simply because of my memory failing me, not a shortcoming of the author. From Aristotle (brought in for his valuable insights on the forms of Government, not his views on Christianity), to Church history starting with Augustine and moving on through the various struggles of the reformation and how Protestants struggled to find a biblical way to "slay leviathan". The theories developed over the centuries are identified, such as subservience to the King, no matter what, to the idea of a lesser magistrate taking the lead against oppressive leadership, to a modern understanding of the responsibilities of a Christian in today's modern Republic - which is a result of, in the USA, a long history of Christian thought. Also identified are the ideas of "inalienable rights" such as the right to life, the rights to property, and the right to liberty. One fascinating truth is that the right to property is actually the result of Franciscan monks identifying this "right" in order to renounce the right and take a vow of poverty. This helped codify property rights. In as much as these rights are threatened the Christian has a responsibility to resist - but that resistance comes through the Gospel. This is also a wonderful overview of Church history and the influence it has had on the establishment of governments that protect the rights of the governed. We can easily lose these rights - indeed we already see this happening at an accelerated pace today. My take on "Slaying Leviathan" is to establish strong churches, strong families, and strong communities centered on God and his blessings to us. A moral and God-fearing people will indeed "slay leviathan" and keep their inalienable rights.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matthew McGuire

    This book took a little bit of warming up to. The early sections didn't seem to fit into what I was expecting, but the further I proceeded into the book the more impressed I was with Sunshine's arrangement of the content. While I will say his overview of Christian theories of resistance to government is very cursory, I found it extremely helpful to get a bird's eye view of the landscape of historic development and variation in this area of theology. His sources will be a good jumping point from This book took a little bit of warming up to. The early sections didn't seem to fit into what I was expecting, but the further I proceeded into the book the more impressed I was with Sunshine's arrangement of the content. While I will say his overview of Christian theories of resistance to government is very cursory, I found it extremely helpful to get a bird's eye view of the landscape of historic development and variation in this area of theology. His sources will be a good jumping point from which to conduct a more thorough survey. Content like this is much needed in the contemporary evangelical world, which has been fed with little more than cliché sound bite theology regarding our relationship to the state.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    A useful survey of Christian and Reformed thought on why the civil government ought to be limited and not absolute, and the lawfulness of resistance to tyranny. There are a few points here and there where I disagree with the author, but it is a very useful introduction to the topic. He also drew attention to a few primary sources of which I was previously unaware. I read it for free on Kindle Unlimited. Amazon currently permits you to take out a free Kindle Unlimited subscription for two months, A useful survey of Christian and Reformed thought on why the civil government ought to be limited and not absolute, and the lawfulness of resistance to tyranny. There are a few points here and there where I disagree with the author, but it is a very useful introduction to the topic. He also drew attention to a few primary sources of which I was previously unaware. I read it for free on Kindle Unlimited. Amazon currently permits you to take out a free Kindle Unlimited subscription for two months, so you can read this book without it costing your a penny.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Grant Van Brimmer

    Glenn Sunshine remarkably walks the ready through history to show what the fight for liberty has looked like. Obviously a Christian himself, he winsomely shows how Christian principles and God's created order are the root of liberty. This book is extremely timely given the year 2020 has been. He hits the nail on the head in the end. Religious liberty are the legs by which all other liberties rest. Everyone should read this. Glenn Sunshine remarkably walks the ready through history to show what the fight for liberty has looked like. Obviously a Christian himself, he winsomely shows how Christian principles and God's created order are the root of liberty. This book is extremely timely given the year 2020 has been. He hits the nail on the head in the end. Religious liberty are the legs by which all other liberties rest. Everyone should read this.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matt Harmless

    A must-read for understanding our government today. This book is an absolute must read when attempting to understand where our government came from. As I read through this book I became increasingly aware of my lack of historical understanding for the roots of our government as it is today. Comprehending where our government came from, the ideas that formed it, and the beliefs that framed it, seem absolutely essential to determining where it ought to go today.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kyle McC

    This book was a helpful history and background of many lost practices in the church like Protestant resistance theory, the doctrine of the lesser magistrates, and how a Christian should act with their government. This was a helpful book because it shows the foundation of not only America but of the civilized world and how culture was enhanced by scripture. It is a must read for anyone in church leadership.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Tegart

    Slaying Leviathan is not the practical guide I was expecting, but rather is a concise historical overview of Christian thought on government and resistance to tyranny. I think it could have benefitted from being a little longer, but overall, helpful and informative. And very relevant for our time. Recommended!

  25. 4 out of 5

    James Gilmore

    Excellent book. If you have heard of Locke, Luther, Calvin, and Augustine but do not really know how their writings affected the world's views on the separation between church and state, you need to read and, dare I say, study this book. It has brought clarity to this issue in a wonderful, understandable way. Excellent book. If you have heard of Locke, Luther, Calvin, and Augustine but do not really know how their writings affected the world's views on the separation between church and state, you need to read and, dare I say, study this book. It has brought clarity to this issue in a wonderful, understandable way.

  26. 4 out of 5

    P.J. Mills

    Outstanding This was an extremely helpful book in examining both history and also causes for many of the problems we face today in the West as regards our eroding freedoms. I highly recommend this book. It is informative, accessible, and well thought out in both its information and argumentation.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jim Becker

    Very good book for people who need a refresher of the ways of American government written in a very understandable way. It's not a Gov 101 book so much as the author gives a clear account of the system the founders cam up with. Aristotle plays a key role which for many may be a surprise. Very good book for people who need a refresher of the ways of American government written in a very understandable way. It's not a Gov 101 book so much as the author gives a clear account of the system the founders cam up with. Aristotle plays a key role which for many may be a surprise.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Wayne Layton

    An excellent summary of the history of governance from a Christian world view. The author provides clarity concerning how to submit to the government in ways that are appropriate while reserving the right to resist as equal responsibility.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emily Shields

    This is one of those books that reminded me of how much I don't know!! While at times it was slow (due to my own lack of European church history) it was well worth it. The last chapter is worth the purchase. It did seem to end abruptly. I must read it again... maybe more will sink in! This is one of those books that reminded me of how much I don't know!! While at times it was slow (due to my own lack of European church history) it was well worth it. The last chapter is worth the purchase. It did seem to end abruptly. I must read it again... maybe more will sink in!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Groen

    Much more descriptive than prescriptive, this book traces the long history of Christian resistance. The fact that most American Christians don’t know any history is probably why we are in the mess we currently are in. A must read for times like these.

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