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Terror to the Wicked: America's First Trial by Jury That Ended a War and Helped to Form a Nation

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A brutal killing, an all-out manhunt, and a riveting account of the first murder trial in U.S. history--set in the 1600s in colonial New England against the backdrop of the Pequot War (between the Pequot tribe and the colonists of Massachusetts Bay), an explosive trial whose outcome changed the course of history, ended a two-year war, and brought about a peace that allo A brutal killing, an all-out manhunt, and a riveting account of the first murder trial in U.S. history--set in the 1600s in colonial New England against the backdrop of the Pequot War (between the Pequot tribe and the colonists of Massachusetts Bay), an explosive trial whose outcome changed the course of history, ended a two-year war, and brought about a peace that allowed the colonies to become a full-blown nation. The year: 1638. The setting: Providence, Plymouth Colony. A young Nipmuc tribesman, returning home from trading beaver pelts, is fatally stabbed in a robbery in the woods near Plymouth Colony, by a white runaway servant and fellow rogues. The young tribesman, fighting for his life, is able, with his final breaths, to reveal the details of the attack to Providence's governor, Roger Williams. A frantic manhunt by the fledgling government of Plymouth ensues, followed by the convening of the first trial, with Plymouth's governor Thomas Prence presiding as judge. The jury: local settlers (white) whose allegiance seems more likely to be with the accused than with the murdered (a native) . . . Tobey Pearl, piecing together a fascinating narrative through original research and first-rate detective work, re-creates in detail the full and startling, pivotal moment in pre-revolutionary America, as she examines the evolution of our nascent civil liberties and the role of the jury as a safeguard against injustice.


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A brutal killing, an all-out manhunt, and a riveting account of the first murder trial in U.S. history--set in the 1600s in colonial New England against the backdrop of the Pequot War (between the Pequot tribe and the colonists of Massachusetts Bay), an explosive trial whose outcome changed the course of history, ended a two-year war, and brought about a peace that allo A brutal killing, an all-out manhunt, and a riveting account of the first murder trial in U.S. history--set in the 1600s in colonial New England against the backdrop of the Pequot War (between the Pequot tribe and the colonists of Massachusetts Bay), an explosive trial whose outcome changed the course of history, ended a two-year war, and brought about a peace that allowed the colonies to become a full-blown nation. The year: 1638. The setting: Providence, Plymouth Colony. A young Nipmuc tribesman, returning home from trading beaver pelts, is fatally stabbed in a robbery in the woods near Plymouth Colony, by a white runaway servant and fellow rogues. The young tribesman, fighting for his life, is able, with his final breaths, to reveal the details of the attack to Providence's governor, Roger Williams. A frantic manhunt by the fledgling government of Plymouth ensues, followed by the convening of the first trial, with Plymouth's governor Thomas Prence presiding as judge. The jury: local settlers (white) whose allegiance seems more likely to be with the accused than with the murdered (a native) . . . Tobey Pearl, piecing together a fascinating narrative through original research and first-rate detective work, re-creates in detail the full and startling, pivotal moment in pre-revolutionary America, as she examines the evolution of our nascent civil liberties and the role of the jury as a safeguard against injustice.

42 review for Terror to the Wicked: America's First Trial by Jury That Ended a War and Helped to Form a Nation

  1. 5 out of 5

    David

    In 1638 four indentured servants attempt to make their way from Plymouth Colony to New Amsterdam. Along the way they encounter a native tribesman and kill him. At a time when the relations between natives and colonists are beginning to devolve into the tragedy for the natives to come, the several colonies agree to sit a jury to hear evidence, some of which is provided by the natives. Pearl does a great job of describing the world of this time. He adds context and fleshes out the players, many of In 1638 four indentured servants attempt to make their way from Plymouth Colony to New Amsterdam. Along the way they encounter a native tribesman and kill him. At a time when the relations between natives and colonists are beginning to devolve into the tragedy for the natives to come, the several colonies agree to sit a jury to hear evidence, some of which is provided by the natives. Pearl does a great job of describing the world of this time. He adds context and fleshes out the players, many of whom are well known in our nation’s history: Standish and Williams for example. As we grapple with the more negative aspects of our nation’s history, this book sheds light on an episode mixed with impending doom and with uplifting hope.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shawna Corner

    I only wanted to read about the trial, not about the pilgrims settling in Plymouth and the Pequot war.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Johnson

  4. 4 out of 5

    eileen m henthorne

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Tresser

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay Miraglia

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Thomas

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bill

  9. 5 out of 5

    TEELOCK Mithilesh

  10. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Folan

  11. 5 out of 5

    James M. Hilton

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jodie

  13. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Linton

  14. 4 out of 5

    Liz Sullivan

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Engle

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  17. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rose Alexander

  19. 5 out of 5

    MBP

  20. 5 out of 5

    Olive Fellows (abookolive)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ingrid

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Kiefer

  23. 4 out of 5

    DanaMAnonfiction

  24. 5 out of 5

    De

  25. 5 out of 5

    Amy Sturgis

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina Rourke

  27. 5 out of 5

    librarian4Him02

  28. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Fenton

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elia

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tera Slawson

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    Mary

  32. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Forsberg

  33. 5 out of 5

    Malissa

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    Ari

  35. 5 out of 5

    Mel

  36. 5 out of 5

    Kimberley

  37. 5 out of 5

    Jeanna Bosick

  38. 5 out of 5

    Nick

  39. 4 out of 5

    Jan L

  40. 5 out of 5

    Charlie

  41. 5 out of 5

    David

  42. 5 out of 5

    Mortisha Cassavetes

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