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"Anne Lamott is my Oprah." -Chicago Tribune From the bestselling author of Help, Thanks, Wow comes an inspiring guide to restoring hope and joy in our lives. In Dusk Night Dawn, Anne Lamott explores the tough questions that many of us grapple with. How can we recapture the confidence we once had as we stumble through the dark times that seem increasingly bleak? As bad newsp "Anne Lamott is my Oprah." -Chicago Tribune From the bestselling author of Help, Thanks, Wow comes an inspiring guide to restoring hope and joy in our lives. In Dusk Night Dawn, Anne Lamott explores the tough questions that many of us grapple with. How can we recapture the confidence we once had as we stumble through the dark times that seem increasingly bleak? As bad newspiles up--from climate crises to daily assaults on civility--how can we cope? Where, she asks, "do we start to our world and joy and hope and our faith in life itself back . . . with our sore feet, hearing loss, stiff fingers, poor digestion, stunned minds, broken hearts?" We begin, Lamott says, by accepting our flaws and embracing our humanity. Drawing from her own experiences, Lamott shows us the intimate and human ways we can adopt to move through life's dark places and toward the light of hope that still burns ahead for all of us. As she does in Help, Thanks, Wow and her other bestselling books, Lamott explores the thorny issues of life and faith by breaking them down into manageable, human-sized questions for readers to ponder, in the process showing us how we can amplify life's small moments of joy by staying open to love and connection. As Lamott notes in Dusk Night Dawn, "I got Medicare three days before I got hitched, which sounds like something an old person might do, which does not describe adorably ageless me." Marrying for the first time with a grown son and a grandson, Lamott explains that finding happiness with a partner isn't a function of age or beauty but of outlook and perspective. Full of the honesty, humor, and humanity that have made Lamott beloved by millions of readers, Dusk Night Dawn is classic Anne Lamott--thoughtful and comic, warm and wise--and further proof that Lamott truly speaks to the better angels in all of us.


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"Anne Lamott is my Oprah." -Chicago Tribune From the bestselling author of Help, Thanks, Wow comes an inspiring guide to restoring hope and joy in our lives. In Dusk Night Dawn, Anne Lamott explores the tough questions that many of us grapple with. How can we recapture the confidence we once had as we stumble through the dark times that seem increasingly bleak? As bad newsp "Anne Lamott is my Oprah." -Chicago Tribune From the bestselling author of Help, Thanks, Wow comes an inspiring guide to restoring hope and joy in our lives. In Dusk Night Dawn, Anne Lamott explores the tough questions that many of us grapple with. How can we recapture the confidence we once had as we stumble through the dark times that seem increasingly bleak? As bad newspiles up--from climate crises to daily assaults on civility--how can we cope? Where, she asks, "do we start to our world and joy and hope and our faith in life itself back . . . with our sore feet, hearing loss, stiff fingers, poor digestion, stunned minds, broken hearts?" We begin, Lamott says, by accepting our flaws and embracing our humanity. Drawing from her own experiences, Lamott shows us the intimate and human ways we can adopt to move through life's dark places and toward the light of hope that still burns ahead for all of us. As she does in Help, Thanks, Wow and her other bestselling books, Lamott explores the thorny issues of life and faith by breaking them down into manageable, human-sized questions for readers to ponder, in the process showing us how we can amplify life's small moments of joy by staying open to love and connection. As Lamott notes in Dusk Night Dawn, "I got Medicare three days before I got hitched, which sounds like something an old person might do, which does not describe adorably ageless me." Marrying for the first time with a grown son and a grandson, Lamott explains that finding happiness with a partner isn't a function of age or beauty but of outlook and perspective. Full of the honesty, humor, and humanity that have made Lamott beloved by millions of readers, Dusk Night Dawn is classic Anne Lamott--thoughtful and comic, warm and wise--and further proof that Lamott truly speaks to the better angels in all of us.

30 review for Dusk, Night, Dawn: On Revival and Courage

  1. 5 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    Challenging times. In times like these I try to find wisdom, comfort in other's words. Lamott is a favorite of mine. Her books are honest, humorous, tackle issues which are of concern to many. Climate change, political issues and challenges she has personally faced and continues facing. Newly married at 66, she speaks of personal adjustments as well as the adjustments required for this time in which we are living. She loves nature and uses it to soothe and see. It is not that I like reading of ot Challenging times. In times like these I try to find wisdom, comfort in other's words. Lamott is a favorite of mine. Her books are honest, humorous, tackle issues which are of concern to many. Climate change, political issues and challenges she has personally faced and continues facing. Newly married at 66, she speaks of personal adjustments as well as the adjustments required for this time in which we are living. She loves nature and uses it to soothe and see. It is not that I like reading of others misfortunes but so often they/she can show me the way through. This provides comfort. I also love the humor, she doesn't spare herself, her often outlandish, anxiety ridden thoughts seem funny in retrospect. Above all she has a strong faith, not in any particular religion, but in the Bible stories, in the kindness of man, in the hood that we can leave and live a better future. "Seeing is a form of pure being, unlike watching or looking at. Seems why we're here." "We rise up to help the best we can, and we summon humor to amend ghastly behavior and dismal ongoing reality." "Friends save us, service to others save us. Books, nature, community, and music save us." "Kindness anywhere gives me hope; it changes us." ARC from Edelweiss.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cheri

    ’Where on earth do we start to get our world and joy and hope and our faith in life itself back?' Love, perfectionism, emotional scars, marriage, life, frustration. In other words - life, in a general sense, through the eyes and thoughts of Anne Lamott. Urging, softly, for us to remember to be ‘our better selves’ - at least as often as possible. She doesn’t shy away from sharing when she falls short of achieving this goal. She also shares some messages that offer a somewhat soothing reminder that ’Where on earth do we start to get our world and joy and hope and our faith in life itself back?' Love, perfectionism, emotional scars, marriage, life, frustration. In other words - life, in a general sense, through the eyes and thoughts of Anne Lamott. Urging, softly, for us to remember to be ‘our better selves’ - at least as often as possible. She doesn’t shy away from sharing when she falls short of achieving this goal. She also shares some messages that offer a somewhat soothing reminder that life, and the people living, is often messy, disappointing and difficult to navigate on our own. ’My comedian friend Duncan Trussel once said nine words onstage that changed me. He said that when you first meet him, you’re meeting his bodyguard. I wrote it down and later taped it to my bathroom mirror, where all truth resides at least briefly. His bodyguard is smart and charming, and keeps people out. Deep inside, his true self is very human, which is to say beautiful and kind of a mess --needy, insecure, judgmental, like most of us. It is full of love, warmth, and rage.’ Even the children in her Sunday school class are somewhat aware of the flaws of this world. ’Even now, they know that the world leaves grubby fingerprints all over everything: our hearts, minds, hope.’ This is, I think, the tenth of her books that I’ve read. There is a comfort, for me, in reading her books, in feeling that sense of acceptance in imperfection, even in love. Life isn’t perfect, and her words are not necessarily profound in a ‘new’ sense, but - especially in this last, crazy, year that we’ve all been affected by - it helps to be reminded that life can, indeed, be messy. ’I know the secret of life. If you want to have loving feelings, do loving things.’ These days life seems so fragile, I can’t avoid seeing or hearing the daily death count. Daily reminders have left most people feeling vulnerable and fearful, while others seem to believe they are immune. I believe, as most do, that life is precious. ’Some poet once wrote that we think we are drops in the ocean, but that we are really the ocean in drops, both minute and everything there is.’ The antidote to hate and fear is love. Love is patient, love is kind. Not arrogant, dishonorable or selfish. It delights in truth. Love is hope in action.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Lamott’s best all-new essays (if you don’t count Small Victories, which reprinted some greatest hits) in nearly a decade. The book is a fitting follow-up to Almost Everything in that it tackles the same central theme: how to have hope in God and in other people even when the news (here, Trump, Covid, and climate breakdown) heralds the worst. One major thing that has changed in Lamott’s life since her last book is getting married for the first time, in her mid-sixties, to a Buddhist. (“How’s marr Lamott’s best all-new essays (if you don’t count Small Victories, which reprinted some greatest hits) in nearly a decade. The book is a fitting follow-up to Almost Everything in that it tackles the same central theme: how to have hope in God and in other people even when the news (here, Trump, Covid, and climate breakdown) heralds the worst. One major thing that has changed in Lamott’s life since her last book is getting married for the first time, in her mid-sixties, to a Buddhist. (“How’s married life?” people can’t seem to resist asking her.) In thinking of marriage she writes about love and friendship, constancy and forgiveness, none of which comes easy. Her neurotic nature flares up every now and again, but Neal helps to talk her down. Fragments of her early family life come back as she considers all that her parents were up against and concludes that they did their best (“How paltry and blocked our family love was, how narrow the bandwidth of my parents’ spiritual lives”). Opportunities for maintaining quiet faith in spite of circumstances arise all the time for her, whether it’s a storytelling evening that feels like it will never end, a four-day power cut, the kitten going missing, or young people taking to the streets to protest about the climate crisis they’re inheriting. A short postscript entitled “Covid College” gives thanks for “the blessings of COVID: we became more reflective, more contemplative.” The prose and the anecdotes feel fresher here than in several of the author’s other recent books. I highlighted quote after quote. Some of these essays will be well worth rereading and deserve to become classics in the Lamott canon, especially “Soul Lather,” “Snail Hymn,” “Light Breezes,” and “One Winged Love.”

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kaeleigh Reynolds

    I pretty much just wept the entire time I read this. Just because it felt very nice and not many things feel very nice these days. A nice reset and reminder.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Teri

    I am usually a huge fan of Anne Lamott’s writing. That is not the case with this book. It just feels random and disjointed. Maybe because she wrote it during the time of Covid when most of our brains are feeling random and disjointed, and hers is feeling that way as well. Looking forward to her next right in the post Covid world! Thanks to NetGalley for a complimentary copy of the book in exchange for my honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Mierlak

    Beautiful, hilarious, enlightening, hopeful and human as only Anne Lamott can be!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    3.5 stars

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dkbbookgirl

    Not my favorite Anne Lamont book- but worth the read

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Well Hallelujah – I finally actually finished a book by Anne LaMott! With the exception of the articles she used to write for Salon many years ago, which I loved, I’ve never been a huge fan of Anne Lamott’s books. Part of that is that she is a bit too “Jesus-y” for my atheist self, but for whatever reasons, I have never been able to finish a single one of her books, and I’ve tried. I’ve tried hard, and many times, but they just never resonated. Even, as a writer, her famous “Bird by Bird” which Well Hallelujah – I finally actually finished a book by Anne LaMott! With the exception of the articles she used to write for Salon many years ago, which I loved, I’ve never been a huge fan of Anne Lamott’s books. Part of that is that she is a bit too “Jesus-y” for my atheist self, but for whatever reasons, I have never been able to finish a single one of her books, and I’ve tried. I’ve tried hard, and many times, but they just never resonated. Even, as a writer, her famous “Bird by Bird” which every writer I know adores – I just couldn’t read it, though I don’t remember why. Again, for whatever reason, I not only finished listening to her read this book, but went back and listened to it a second time. There are still plenty of Jesus-y ponderings, so maybe it’s just the hoped-to-be-winding-down-soon pandemic times, but this one caught me. I discovered that I really like her dark humor and how that humor colors her world, and I was able to not get caught up in her Jesus stories, of which there were plenty. In a recent interview with her in The Salon, Anne Lamott calls all her books and writings a “mixed grill” of life’s feelings – hope and despair and love and loathing and a mixture of all of that together - and that is a perfect way to describe this newest book. It is indeed a “mixed grill” of many subjects, and her words are funny, sad, despairing and hopeful – sometimes all in a single sentence. Not just anyone can do this, but she has done it here, and the time was right for me to read this book now. She almost makes me wish that I too was “Jesus-y.” The Prologue is what sucked me in. She talks about the pandemic, the 45th president, reports on climate change, the extinction of species and how easy it is to feel hopeless in the midst of all this. “I mostly love being in the third third of my life, as it is the easiest that life has ever been except for – well, of course, the bodily aspects, and the dither and fogginess.” It’s a meditation on how our nation and the world seems to have reached the point of no return. “Where on earth do we start to get our world and joy and hope and faith in life itself back?“ Here are some other lines I bookmarked that resonated: “Perfection is the most toxic condition for the soul. The next most toxic is chronic contempt for oneself - the belief that one is less than and secretly defective. The next is the obsession that one is right and better than.” “Expectations are resentments under construction.” “Soul is a place. The innermost nesting doll. The soul is the lighthouse from which we see the vast celestial ocean; a kiosk from which we watch the world pass by.” And my favorite: “People like to say we cannot forgive another until we forgive ourselves. Isn’t that nice? People like to say all sorts of stupid bumper sticker things that aren’t true and that in fact can be shaming, such as ‘God never gives us more than we can handle. What a crock!’” In the “Light Breezes” chapter she personifies dread, and that is pretty funny. “Dread was my governess growing up. She kept me alive. She was my most reliable companion: always there for me, like God in a bad mood. Dread taught me how to succeed. She kept me in line. Helped me to be someone everyone would like. It does seem she has loosened her grip in the last third third of my life. She steps in to offer her cranky thoughts on just how utterly fucked and inadequate things are, starting with me. Dread is not right there by my side, she is waiting in the wings. Knowing there is always a place for her in my heart. I’ve put a lot on her plate. She can work with any smell, news, or ache.” The fact that I liked, finished, and even read this book twice makes me wonder if I should go back and try to reread some of her previous books. I doubt I will, but I did enjoy this one.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Miriam Downey

    Read my full review here: http://mimi-cyberlibrarian.blogspot.c... Like me, Anne Lamott is in the “third third” of her life. (I love that thought.) Newly married for the first time, she is coping with her life that has changed dramatically and the world that she is living in which has changed dramatically as well. In Dusk, Night, Dawn, Lamott is trying to manage all these changes and to find a way forward. She is looking for revival and renewal—something most of us are seeking, as well. Lamott is Read my full review here: http://mimi-cyberlibrarian.blogspot.c... Like me, Anne Lamott is in the “third third” of her life. (I love that thought.) Newly married for the first time, she is coping with her life that has changed dramatically and the world that she is living in which has changed dramatically as well. In Dusk, Night, Dawn, Lamott is trying to manage all these changes and to find a way forward. She is looking for revival and renewal—something most of us are seeking, as well. Lamott is a recovering alcoholic, and that horrific time in her life as well as her recovery is seldom off her mind. The lessons she learned continue to reverberate in her writing. She is also a Christian, and the spiritual side of her life determines her outward actions as well as her inner turmoil. What makes her writing compelling is that she laces practically every paragraph with a self-deprecating zinger. For example, in speaking of surviving this difficult year, she says, “I am sober, loved, grateful, sometimes brave, and wearing dry pants.” The chapters in the book are random essays, each written on the general theme of managing life and calling upon the grace of God to help get through the turmoil of our current situation. Of course, she discusses the Trump years and this Covid year. Each essay is filled with her personal experiences, laced as they are with humor and insight. While she attempts to justify the reasoning for her marriage to Neal, and to understand what being married means, she is ultimately so pleased that she was able to find someone to share her craziness with. One of the strengths of her writing is the humor. The reader can say, yeah, I’ve felt that way. While she is a very spiritual person, she is not a very pious person, and in a lot of ways, her faith matches mine. Probably Lamott’s greatest strength is her ability to connect with her readers. The strength of her faith is matched only by her questioning. Here is one of her prayers: “Help me start walking in your general direction. And the greatest prayer: Help me not to be such an asshole.” What we realize when we read Lamott is that this life of ours is a major journey, and it is through the grace of God that we survive and perhaps even thrive. I have read several of Lamott’s books, and if you have not read one of her books, I highly recommend them, although this is probably not the one to begin with. This may just be agism fatigue on my part, because much of this particular book by Lamott deals with aging. Several of the last books I have read concerned aging, including Face: One Square Foot of Skin by Justine Bateman and Women Rowing North by Mary Pipher. In a conversation with my brother-in-law last night, he mentioned that everyone he knows is talking about Covid, aging, and dying. He said he was sick of talking about it. I am feeling the same, although in both of the aforementioned books, and now including Dusk, Night, Dawn, I have gained inspiration and encouragement to persist and move ahead.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lesa

    Sometimes when I read Anne Lamott’s books I feel as lost as she does. Her philosophical musings in Dusk, Night, Dawn: On Revival and Courage are filled with fear, frustration, despair, sarcasm, and love. She often uses her language as a weapon to strike out at her own fears. But, she never hides them. Other times, her rambling thoughts lead to moments of insight and understanding. In the “third third of her life”, Lamott celebrates her new marriage to Neal, a wonderful man who drives her nuts at Sometimes when I read Anne Lamott’s books I feel as lost as she does. Her philosophical musings in Dusk, Night, Dawn: On Revival and Courage are filled with fear, frustration, despair, sarcasm, and love. She often uses her language as a weapon to strike out at her own fears. But, she never hides them. Other times, her rambling thoughts lead to moments of insight and understanding. In the “third third of her life”, Lamott celebrates her new marriage to Neal, a wonderful man who drives her nuts at times because he’s a know-it-all, as are others in his family. When he proposed to her, she asked if they could get a cat. But, that cat led to panic when they both thought it was gone, a victim of a car or a coyote. Anyone who ever had a cat knows that feeling of fear and hopelessness when the cat disappears. It takes Lamott to find a lesson in a normal moment of life with a cat. Remember. “The kitten isn’t dead. The kitten is in the living room.” Sometimes, it’s Lamott’s irreverent comments and questions about her faith that strike me. One night, she and Neal went to see a friend perform with a storytelling guild. And, it hadn’t even started when Lamott started to hate the entire experience, facing anxiety and panic. It’s an extended episode in her life, but the comment I remember is, “I’d like to know if God gives us points for showing up or simply marks us present.” In one chapter, Lamott discusses the prophets. Her off-the-wall comments are the ones that always surprise me. “Most of these prophets were introverts. Jesus definitely was. He’s never really doing all that much, if you really think about it. He doesn’t even tell His own stories.” Anne Lamott is a fearful, anxious survivor of her own past, as we all are. But, despite her fears and anxieties, she puts one step in front of another, and steps up to confess her fears and discuss her attempts to lead a better life. It takes courage. She never really talks openly about that subtitle that includes the word courage. But, somewhere in the stream of consciousness storytelling, she makes the reader see the courage it takes just to live.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andee

    A friend messaged me the other day, telling me Anne Lamott's newest book is coming out soon. We both agreed we needed her words now. NetGalley read my mind - thank you for the ARC in exchange for review. And I truly mean it. Thank you. Anne Lamott's words are always a salve, but after the last four years in this country, I wasn't even sure her words could touch my inner wounds. I was wrong. Mostly because my inner wounds are nothing compared to what so many are going through. But really, because A friend messaged me the other day, telling me Anne Lamott's newest book is coming out soon. We both agreed we needed her words now. NetGalley read my mind - thank you for the ARC in exchange for review. And I truly mean it. Thank you. Anne Lamott's words are always a salve, but after the last four years in this country, I wasn't even sure her words could touch my inner wounds. I was wrong. Mostly because my inner wounds are nothing compared to what so many are going through. But really, because Lamott has this gift of knowing my soul, and the souls of my friends, and the souls of strangers...which leads me to believe we are all more alike than different. Fans know Lamott is still a newlywed at 60ish. She spends a good deal of the book talking about imperfections, what love is, and what it isn't. I'm guilty of looking for perfection in love. I'm also constantly disappointed. I do have the love Lamott describes and I just needed her words to remind me. In addition to her new marriage, she opens up about her childhood and her alcoholism. In those chapters I found a forgiveness for my own parents and an appreciation for those struggling with addiction. But the most personal part of the book came at the very end. Here, Lamott talks about a retreat she attended. As she was talking, it reminded me of a "life changing/mountain top" retreat experience I had 20 years ago. A week that changed my life. I fondly compared my week to what she was describing. As I ended the book, I kept reading, looking at the acknowledgements - which I don't usually do. This time, I saw a name I will never forget. She thanked Mark Yaconelli, the retreat leader of my life changing experience 20 years ago. What are the odds? I'm not sure. But a good friend told me we needed this book. NetGalley offered it immediately. Lamott's words entered my inner being. And I was reminded of a spiritual guide who helped shaped my life. Dusk, Night, Dawn is fate. *PS I just noticed my goodreads profile picture I put in years ago. Yeah, this is the book for me at this time.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Roy Howard

    Does Anne Lamott have anything new to say? Are you joking? No, I know you’re not. After nearly a dozen books labeled “self help” or “spirituality,” some wonder if the stream is dry. As one who has read them all, I will testify, without embarrassment, that her voice is needed now in these crazy days just as it was when she wrote her most famous memoir: Traveling Mercies. Since we last heard from her much has happened. A global pandemic that may be with us much longer than we ever anticipated even Does Anne Lamott have anything new to say? Are you joking? No, I know you’re not. After nearly a dozen books labeled “self help” or “spirituality,” some wonder if the stream is dry. As one who has read them all, I will testify, without embarrassment, that her voice is needed now in these crazy days just as it was when she wrote her most famous memoir: Traveling Mercies. Since we last heard from her much has happened. A global pandemic that may be with us much longer than we ever anticipated even post-vaccine and five hundred thousand dead. The final days of Trump that, after a deadly insurrection, may not be final after all, given the plague of guns among us. The unveiling of racism (once again.) With all of this dread, one more thing happened: a surprising, late life marriage. So, thanksfull, Lamott does have something new to say, although the newness is new only in the way Jesus’ ancient familiar words are new. The familiar wisdom brings new life at precisely the moment you need it - which is now during this unsettled time. For many, I am one, the hilarity she weaves into commentary on the human condition is a balm to heal the sin-sick soul. With her well-known humor comes the characteristic honesty about her own foibles. She would gladly confess with Saint Paul: I am the chief of all sinners; after skewering the pompous, self-righteousness. She speaks of the pain of her own upbringing that most of us can recognize. “I’ve been seen,” is our response. Describing her marriage with hilarious candor (and tenderness,) one comes away relieved - and strengthened without being burdened by sentimental demands of “love.” Lamott’s persistent hope comes through but not at the cost of real suffering and the demands to be a kind human being, especially to the ones who deserved no kindness (even yourself.) The testimony that is Coda could serve as a model to all of us who summon the courage to say how - by God’s astonishing grace - we are alive.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joy Matteson

    Anne Lamott’s newest collection of essays was written during the early days of the pandemic, and her wise vulnerable words that lovingly confront the fear and anxiety of our current age seems especially appropriate and well timed. Her stark questions and hilarious turns of phrase (like comparing an agonizing family conversation to reading Wikipedia’s entry on PMS) disarms the listener to probe more deeply into the soul’s layers underneath the seemingly endless reasons for anxiety. Lamott, who al Anne Lamott’s newest collection of essays was written during the early days of the pandemic, and her wise vulnerable words that lovingly confront the fear and anxiety of our current age seems especially appropriate and well timed. Her stark questions and hilarious turns of phrase (like comparing an agonizing family conversation to reading Wikipedia’s entry on PMS) disarms the listener to probe more deeply into the soul’s layers underneath the seemingly endless reasons for anxiety. Lamott, who always narrates her own audiobooks, is known for saying that “laughter is a bubbly, effervescent form of holiness”, but her witticisms don’t come cheap or without cost. Her meditations on her late father and mother’s influence are her most grace-filled, thoughtful and wise words she’s written yet. Her voice gets rougher as she shares how she separates the trauma they left her, while also holding onto the good she still clings to. Her distinct, slightly raspy voice is more grandmotherly, enlightened, and wry as ever as she attempts to remind the young generation of protesters that her generation still has something left to offer--they know all the protest songs, after all. This newest collection of essays is the perfect antidote to the constant doom scrolling of social media. Recommended for lovers of memoirs, essay collections, and spiritual wisdom seekers. 

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    Sigh. Well, I've always loved Anne Lamott and her writing is still good and can make me laugh out loud. I've read all her non-fiction and have been known to say she is one of my favorite writers. But, but, but......maybe it's just me or where I'm at in my life right now. I didn't find this book all that interesting or new. It seemed mostly like rambling stream of consciousness mixed with typical Annie angst and how she tries to talk herself out of all her obsessions. It is memoir-ish and include Sigh. Well, I've always loved Anne Lamott and her writing is still good and can make me laugh out loud. I've read all her non-fiction and have been known to say she is one of my favorite writers. But, but, but......maybe it's just me or where I'm at in my life right now. I didn't find this book all that interesting or new. It seemed mostly like rambling stream of consciousness mixed with typical Annie angst and how she tries to talk herself out of all her obsessions. It is memoir-ish and includes new experiences and stories with her new husband and old stories about her parents and her dark pre-recovery days. It's pretty Jesus-y, which is fine by me - I'm Jesus-y also so that wasn't a turn-off at all. Her brand of California old-hippie spirituality is always a presence in her books to some extent and makes me smile. We are the same age, so I've always felt it was easy to relate to her ways of thinking even though we don't have similar early life experiences at all. I love her short Facebook posts. Maybe a whole book of them just isn't what I needed right now. I kind of just wanted to finish reading this book quickly instead of savoring it, as I used to do. I'll still read everything she writes, though. Reluctant 3 stars.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    Much of Dusk Night Dawn: On Revival and Courage by Anne Lamott sounds like what readers have heard from her in previous books. Something new is Anne got married! She talks about her new husband and married life. Now she has someone with whom she can share her insecurities. Lamott talks much about contemporary issues in this volume: the pandemic, politics, and taking care of the earth followed by thoughts on redemption and forgiveness. Her sense of humor is infused throughout each chapter. As usual Much of Dusk Night Dawn: On Revival and Courage by Anne Lamott sounds like what readers have heard from her in previous books. Something new is Anne got married! She talks about her new husband and married life. Now she has someone with whom she can share her insecurities. Lamott talks much about contemporary issues in this volume: the pandemic, politics, and taking care of the earth followed by thoughts on redemption and forgiveness. Her sense of humor is infused throughout each chapter. As usual, I have no idea what Lamott is talking about in places – the governess? -- while in other parts, she makes great sense of the confusing world. Fans of Lamott’s might find this to be a lightweight contender in her body of work but will read it anyway. First time readers would be better off with Bird by Bird, my personal favorite. Anne Lamott, writer of both novels and nonfiction, uses her life experiences in her books, including alcoholism, single motherhood, and spiritual experiences. My review will be posted on Goodreads starting January 1, 2021. I would like to thank the Penguin Group Riverhead and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in return for an objective opinion.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    "Windex for the soul." Lamott does it again with her heartfelt, relatable, resonating writing. When I read Ann's books I feel like I'm having coffee with an aunt. She shares her experiences and inner thoughts, offering them to anyone who needs a friend to understand or a guide on their own journey. She frequently refers to the "third third" of her life and the comfort of knowing herself while recognizing her patterns and managing her anxiety. Loved learning about her marriage and her friends and "Windex for the soul." Lamott does it again with her heartfelt, relatable, resonating writing. When I read Ann's books I feel like I'm having coffee with an aunt. She shares her experiences and inner thoughts, offering them to anyone who needs a friend to understand or a guide on their own journey. She frequently refers to the "third third" of her life and the comfort of knowing herself while recognizing her patterns and managing her anxiety. Loved learning about her marriage and her friends and cried along with her when she shared some painful truths. I shared her dismay about the state of our country, climate change, and the vague, heavy ugliness that seems to have settled in as a backdrop over the last five years. The book threw me a lifeline, noting other dark times in history when "love and science" were the only way through to better days. She proposes that the same thing could help us all now. A quick read with lovely colored text on satisfyingly thick pages, this book should be kept on a nightstand or an end table in easy reach to be enjoyed over and over again when things feel bleak or your grip on hope starts to slip.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jt O'Neill

    I very much enjoy reading anything Anne Lamott writes. I appreciate her outlook on life. She is an authentic memoirist who tells the truth of her days. I immediately devour any new book she writes, I delightfully follow her on Twitter, and I wish I could be her IRL friend. This newest collection didn't get my customary four or five star rating for an Anne Lamott book. I will own that. It may just be that COVID and all the assorted personal and community challenges of the last year have left me em I very much enjoy reading anything Anne Lamott writes. I appreciate her outlook on life. She is an authentic memoirist who tells the truth of her days. I immediately devour any new book she writes, I delightfully follow her on Twitter, and I wish I could be her IRL friend. This newest collection didn't get my customary four or five star rating for an Anne Lamott book. I will own that. It may just be that COVID and all the assorted personal and community challenges of the last year have left me empty and unable to be inspired. This collection seemed heavier than usual on the Christian message and that was off putting to me as well. I have nothing against the Christian message. It just doesn't resonate with me at this moment. I found myself skimming pages rather than savoring pages. That tells me that the book is just not grabbing me. But, as LeVar Burton says, don't take my word for it. Try reading it yourself. I could be way off. I will continue to look forward to Anne Lamott's words . I might even try reading this book again in a few months when the world might be lighter. As I say, the three star rating could just be me.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Fontenot

    Anne is the Queen forever but tbh, I didn't love this one as much as I wanted to. That being said, there are always so many gold nuggets in anything she touches. Per usual, I had deep resonation, a lot of 'hell yes's', and so much encouragement. "Never give up on intimate friendships or science or nature. They have always saved us, and they will again." - "Our human response to each other's hurt and loss is what most gives me hope, along with science and modern medicine. We rise up to help the be Anne is the Queen forever but tbh, I didn't love this one as much as I wanted to. That being said, there are always so many gold nuggets in anything she touches. Per usual, I had deep resonation, a lot of 'hell yes's', and so much encouragement. "Never give up on intimate friendships or science or nature. They have always saved us, and they will again." - "Our human response to each other's hurt and loss is what most gives me hope, along with science and modern medicine. We rise up to help the best we can, and we summon humor to amend ghastly behavior and dismal ongoing reality. Help and humor save us." - "Laughing is the breeziest breeze of them all; laughter is grace exhaling bubbly breath." - "Fear is not facts. We have seen life self-correct again and again. Stick around, and against all odds, you will, too. We know that science and love almost always win the day, honest to God." - "Light thinks it's Beyonce, shimmying with celestial meaning, but shadow knows that without it, we ain't got nothing to show for ourselves - no paintings, poetry, or song." - "The first great prayer: Help me help me help me."

  20. 4 out of 5

    Judith von Kirchbach

    Dusk, Night, Dawn: On Revival and Courage contains readable, poetic meditations by Anne Lamott – a great Book club pick to dissect and pick through. I read it with #zibbyvirtualbookclub and found the ruminations interestings and good starting points for my own… How can we recapture the confidence we once had as we stumble through the dark times that seem increasingly bleak? How do we cope as bad news piles up? When do we get our sense of ourselves and our safety back? And how did we get so much o Dusk, Night, Dawn: On Revival and Courage contains readable, poetic meditations by Anne Lamott – a great Book club pick to dissect and pick through. I read it with #zibbyvirtualbookclub and found the ruminations interestings and good starting points for my own… How can we recapture the confidence we once had as we stumble through the dark times that seem increasingly bleak? How do we cope as bad news piles up? When do we get our sense of ourselves and our safety back? And how did we get so much older so fast? Is there anything we can do about climate change, do our small steps really amount to anything ? We begin, Lamott says, by accepting our flaws and embracing our humanity. The book is rooted in our current moment and the past year, how hard it is to find hope in the middle of it and how we can do it anyway. As usual, Lamott is interested in justice, and spends a lot of time meditating on things like the climate crisis, but her best writing is inward as she dissects her recent marriage (fort he first time at age 65), alcoholism, getting older and, God. It was inspiring to hear Anne Lamott speak in the pandemic intimate setting of a Zoom Bookclub Meet.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Swati

    Thank you @riverheadbooks for this gorgeous copy of Anne Lamott’s latest book. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Written during COVID, celebrating her marriage, and lamenting life - this series of essays is as tessellated as we might be feeling now. Lamott’s version of courage isn’t to point out the silver linings - those blaring deceptions... Rather, Lamott talks about the anxieties that emerge through life and maybe never go away. Perhaps age intensifies it , but the wisdom Lamott taps into is exceptional. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Some Thank you @riverheadbooks for this gorgeous copy of Anne Lamott’s latest book. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Written during COVID, celebrating her marriage, and lamenting life - this series of essays is as tessellated as we might be feeling now. Lamott’s version of courage isn’t to point out the silver linings - those blaring deceptions... Rather, Lamott talks about the anxieties that emerge through life and maybe never go away. Perhaps age intensifies it , but the wisdom Lamott taps into is exceptional. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Something about this has a raw edge compared to Lamott’s earlier books, as if in the third third of her life she said ‘eff it’ and told her truth. The only other Lamott I have read is Bird by Bird, which is instructional and rosy in comparison to this one. DND retains her trademark wry humor and connection to nature and spirituality, but with an undercurrent of the mature and tender. I felt cared for by these essays, not instructed. Like a reflection that applies to everyone by virtue of being born. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ I recommend this collection to fans of Mary Oliver or would like more Lamott in their lives, albeit a more emo version 😝

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anna W.

    Was this my favorite Lamott book? No. Was it absolutely worth reading? Yes. Tackling subjects like marriage, disliking one's spouse for any period of time, losing a pet within the house which one lives, mistakes and redemption, and of course the classic Self Forgiveness, Lamott is refreshingly content with her discontent in life. Dusk leads to night which leads to dawn, and we revive. Another recommended read for Lamott lovers, although I do feel Hallelujah Anyway: Rediscovering Mercy and Almost Was this my favorite Lamott book? No. Was it absolutely worth reading? Yes. Tackling subjects like marriage, disliking one's spouse for any period of time, losing a pet within the house which one lives, mistakes and redemption, and of course the classic Self Forgiveness, Lamott is refreshingly content with her discontent in life. Dusk leads to night which leads to dawn, and we revive. Another recommended read for Lamott lovers, although I do feel Hallelujah Anyway: Rediscovering Mercy and Almost Everything: Notes on Hope are my personal favorites. :)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Julia Fink

    This is one of her better ones and I read them all. I love how her recovery is so parallel to what our recovery from this Covid nightmare will look like...messy, doubtful, ugly...yet wonderful, loving, and generous. Highly recommend it as more of Spiritual Read...not a 'who done it' or "needing a new me," style of book. Very personal and loving. I do wish she would not talk so much about how she sees the worst side of herself...she is offering far more so she has far more inside her than the put This is one of her better ones and I read them all. I love how her recovery is so parallel to what our recovery from this Covid nightmare will look like...messy, doubtful, ugly...yet wonderful, loving, and generous. Highly recommend it as more of Spiritual Read...not a 'who done it' or "needing a new me," style of book. Very personal and loving. I do wish she would not talk so much about how she sees the worst side of herself...she is offering far more so she has far more inside her than the put-downs she makes about her self. Yes, we are all flawed but until we come to terms with it, it will not pass or just be forgotten even with the love she mentions. I too have a governess, a body guard, and a telegraph operator inside of me. I too have tried to fire them or at least told them to shut-up but my introvert thinks of them as best friends and part of a loving savior. Life is messy... recommend and enjoy it as you would a best friend at your side.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Such brilliant wisdom and humor. Reading Anne Lamott, followed by Jericho Brown's poetry is a perfect way to begin the morning. I'm sending it to my sister today. This is the kind of thing Anne is so good at: taking our ordinary impulse to be anything else but present in our lives and making it seem funny, normal and possible to change...if only a moment or two at a time:" I want to learn to be," she writes. "Then I remembered something sober diocesan priest named Terry said: 'We don't get over Such brilliant wisdom and humor. Reading Anne Lamott, followed by Jericho Brown's poetry is a perfect way to begin the morning. I'm sending it to my sister today. This is the kind of thing Anne is so good at: taking our ordinary impulse to be anything else but present in our lives and making it seem funny, normal and possible to change...if only a moment or two at a time:" I want to learn to be," she writes. "Then I remembered something sober diocesan priest named Terry said: 'We don't get over much here.' So maybe if I couldn't do sackcloth and ashes, I could at least muster ruefulness, rein in my mind in more frequent presence. And I did: You'll often see me with a loose rubber band around my wrist to snap myself back to the present when I am tripping, when I am numbing out on a trance of toxic obsessing. Minds change all the time. Besides, it's not only toxic and obsessive thoughts that are the problem. Sometimes it's more a foggy slide show about bad people, about foods I crave, the aisles at Target, Neal on life support. When I gently snap my rubber band, it stings just enough that I come back to my body, my soft container. When Father Terry told me that we would not get over much here, that was not the point--the point was to lean towards goodness, to resist less. The point was to have a spiritual awakening of any sort that helped us live more often in kind awareness....if I'm repenting by leaning in closer to life, trying not to focus on everyone and everything that annoys me, then my perspective changes and I'm kinder. This is a passage that rings true for me...but I love the passages that just make me laugh out loud just as much. We are, almost all of us, such silly, obsessive people. When my next-door neighbors aren't outside chain smoking and ruining the outside for me, as well as making me shut my windows so the entire house doesn't fill with that awful fog, I mull over the fact that they will be soon. Actually just typing that sends me down a spiral of spite and revenge. I'm sitting her perfectly happy typing and the windows are closed because it's cold for April. Wake up. I smack myself gently on the cheek bec. I don't wear a rubber band yet. I'm alive. I just got a wonderful photo of my grand daughter Bea who has cut her bright red bangs and any hair that wasn't in braids...and is so delighted with herself. Life is very good.

  25. 5 out of 5

    RL Hansford

    “Trust me on this: We are loved out of all sense of proportion. Yikes and hallelujah.” From the watch tower of her “third third” of her life, Miss Annie reflects on what it is to be a soul, to be love wrapped in these mortal chains. What it means to forgive others and oneself, what it means to remove our Halloween masks and show up for people, and what it means to be loved by Jesus so much that we just can’t help but turn around and love the messy people around us, because gosh, we’re the messies “Trust me on this: We are loved out of all sense of proportion. Yikes and hallelujah.” From the watch tower of her “third third” of her life, Miss Annie reflects on what it is to be a soul, to be love wrapped in these mortal chains. What it means to forgive others and oneself, what it means to remove our Halloween masks and show up for people, and what it means to be loved by Jesus so much that we just can’t help but turn around and love the messy people around us, because gosh, we’re the messiest. In this broken world spinning ever toward entropy, we have the pleasure of spelunking for hope in the dark crags of climate change, political upheaval, and old dogs getting older. The center will hold, if we turn on our headlamps and love the heck out of the darkness. I hope I get to hang out with Anne Lamott in heaven so we’re never interrupted by doctors appointments or needing to go make dinner, and we can swap notes on how we nurtured our souls.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis

    I have read almost all of Anne Lamott's nonfiction, so I was expecting this to be more of a good thing. But this book was disappointing. While I encountered one laugh-out-loud section, most of it was complaining and overwrought prose. The subtitle is "On Revival and Courage." I didn't come across anything that could be described like that, nor was this "an inspiring guide to restoring hope and joy in our lives." If anything, it was kind of depressing. Lamott honestly describes her current health I have read almost all of Anne Lamott's nonfiction, so I was expecting this to be more of a good thing. But this book was disappointing. While I encountered one laugh-out-loud section, most of it was complaining and overwrought prose. The subtitle is "On Revival and Courage." I didn't come across anything that could be described like that, nor was this "an inspiring guide to restoring hope and joy in our lives." If anything, it was kind of depressing. Lamott honestly describes her current health issues, her relationship with her new husband, how bleak the world is becoming with climate issues, etc. I found very little to encourage me, and no real references to faith. Yes, she's honest about where she is with her life right now, but if you're expecting something uplifting, be prepared to look elsewhere.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    A new book by Anne Lamott is like going for a long walk with a fascinating, insightful and slightly off-kilter friend that you haven't seen for a while. Catching up with her this time included learning about her recent first marriage at age 65. (She might be surprised to learn that the adjustments she and Neal are making to life together are not so different from what those of us married for a long time still go through.) There is also talk of spirituality, the environment, and the difficulties A new book by Anne Lamott is like going for a long walk with a fascinating, insightful and slightly off-kilter friend that you haven't seen for a while. Catching up with her this time included learning about her recent first marriage at age 65. (She might be surprised to learn that the adjustments she and Neal are making to life together are not so different from what those of us married for a long time still go through.) There is also talk of spirituality, the environment, and the difficulties of living in a pandemic. Despite the book's brief length, Dusk, Night, Dawn includes the humor and wisdom - as well as plenty of self-deprecating stories - that make a "visit" with Anne something to look forward to. Please note that I don't use the star rating system, so this review should not be viewed as a zero.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Zibby Owens

    In "Dusk, Night, Dawn," the author explores the tough questions that many of us grapple with daily by collecting short, timely, yet intimate essays. Questions like: How can we rebuild ourselves after we go through dark times in our lives? Can we love again? She gives us many things to think about, especially around finding forgiveness, love and connection. The author talks about her own relationship and the question of, "Can you love me now?" If we reveal our true selves and be authentic, will w In "Dusk, Night, Dawn," the author explores the tough questions that many of us grapple with daily by collecting short, timely, yet intimate essays. Questions like: How can we rebuild ourselves after we go through dark times in our lives? Can we love again? She gives us many things to think about, especially around finding forgiveness, love and connection. The author talks about her own relationship and the question of, "Can you love me now?" If we reveal our true selves and be authentic, will we still be loved for who we are, or will love turn us away? She even has a saying that she says to her husband to point out when she's feeling hopeless or stressed about something, a code phrase, "Is the cat in the living room?" To listen to my interview with the author, go to my podcast at: https://zibbyowens.com/transcript/ann...

  29. 4 out of 5

    D.S.

    A luminous book of essays from one of my favorite writers. There were parts where I laughed out loud, and parts where I teared up - many magical, medicinal sections. On the strength of those alone, I was tempted to give it five stars. There are also parts that come off as slightly smug, and that may be because she has lived in one of richest counties in the United States for a long time. These are tempered by the large helpings of self-deprecating humor. The essay about having a panic attack whi A luminous book of essays from one of my favorite writers. There were parts where I laughed out loud, and parts where I teared up - many magical, medicinal sections. On the strength of those alone, I was tempted to give it five stars. There are also parts that come off as slightly smug, and that may be because she has lived in one of richest counties in the United States for a long time. These are tempered by the large helpings of self-deprecating humor. The essay about having a panic attack while trying to appear normal in public will help a lot of people to let go of shame, and the several references to perfectionism as the oppressor. The whole book brought to mind a line from "Wild Geese," an old Mary Oliver poem: "Let your soft, animal body love what it loves."

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Now THIS is the Anne Lamott who's been missing in action for a few years. Starting with "Help. Thanks. Wow" in 2012, I've had a hard time getting through her books. These "newer" books were books of essays around a theme, and often she got so bogged down trying to make a point that I had to reread passages over in order to figure out what she was trying to say. For most of this book, though, she seems to have gotten over that. Perhaps it's because she includes a lot more stories of her life, whi Now THIS is the Anne Lamott who's been missing in action for a few years. Starting with "Help. Thanks. Wow" in 2012, I've had a hard time getting through her books. These "newer" books were books of essays around a theme, and often she got so bogged down trying to make a point that I had to reread passages over in order to figure out what she was trying to say. For most of this book, though, she seems to have gotten over that. Perhaps it's because she includes a lot more stories of her life, which is one of my favorite parts of her writing. She's gone back to telling a story, then relating it to a point. She's also funnier (and snarkier) than she's been in years - could it be because she's happy and more settled in her new marriage? Quite possibly.

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