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Amanda Leduc's brilliant new novel, woven with fairy tales of her own devising and replete with both catastrophe and magic, is a vision of what happens when we ignore the natural world and the darker parts of our own natures. Heather is sleeping peacefully after the birth of her twin daughters when the sound of the world ending jolts her awake. Stumbling outside with he Amanda Leduc's brilliant new novel, woven with fairy tales of her own devising and replete with both catastrophe and magic, is a vision of what happens when we ignore the natural world and the darker parts of our own natures. Heather is sleeping peacefully after the birth of her twin daughters when the sound of the world ending jolts her awake. Stumbling outside with her babies and her new husband, Brendan, she finds that their city has been destroyed by falling meteors and that her little family are among only a few who survived. But the mountain that looms over the city is still green--somehow it has been spared the destruction that has brought humanity to the brink of extinction. Heather is one of the few who know the mountain, a place city-dwellers have always been forbidden to go. Her dad took her up the mountain when she was a child on a misguided quest to heal her legs, damaged at birth. The tragedy that resulted has shaped her life, bringing her both great sorrow and an undying connection to the deep magic of the mountain, made real by the beings she and her dad encountered that day: Estajfan, a centaur born of sorrow and of an ancient, impossible love, and his two siblings, marooned between the magical and the human world. Even as those in the city around her--led by Tasha, a charismatic doctor who fled to the city from the coast with her wife and other refugees--struggle to keep everyone alive, Heather constantly looks to the mountain, drawn by love, by fear, by the desire for rescue. She is torn in two by her awareness of what unleashed the meteor shower and what is coming for the few survivors, once the green and living earth makes a final reckoning of the usefulness of human life and finds it wanting. At times devastating, but ultimately redemptive, Amanda Leduc's fable for our uncertain times reminds us that the most important things in life aren't things at all, but rather the people we want by our side at the end of the world.


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Amanda Leduc's brilliant new novel, woven with fairy tales of her own devising and replete with both catastrophe and magic, is a vision of what happens when we ignore the natural world and the darker parts of our own natures. Heather is sleeping peacefully after the birth of her twin daughters when the sound of the world ending jolts her awake. Stumbling outside with he Amanda Leduc's brilliant new novel, woven with fairy tales of her own devising and replete with both catastrophe and magic, is a vision of what happens when we ignore the natural world and the darker parts of our own natures. Heather is sleeping peacefully after the birth of her twin daughters when the sound of the world ending jolts her awake. Stumbling outside with her babies and her new husband, Brendan, she finds that their city has been destroyed by falling meteors and that her little family are among only a few who survived. But the mountain that looms over the city is still green--somehow it has been spared the destruction that has brought humanity to the brink of extinction. Heather is one of the few who know the mountain, a place city-dwellers have always been forbidden to go. Her dad took her up the mountain when she was a child on a misguided quest to heal her legs, damaged at birth. The tragedy that resulted has shaped her life, bringing her both great sorrow and an undying connection to the deep magic of the mountain, made real by the beings she and her dad encountered that day: Estajfan, a centaur born of sorrow and of an ancient, impossible love, and his two siblings, marooned between the magical and the human world. Even as those in the city around her--led by Tasha, a charismatic doctor who fled to the city from the coast with her wife and other refugees--struggle to keep everyone alive, Heather constantly looks to the mountain, drawn by love, by fear, by the desire for rescue. She is torn in two by her awareness of what unleashed the meteor shower and what is coming for the few survivors, once the green and living earth makes a final reckoning of the usefulness of human life and finds it wanting. At times devastating, but ultimately redemptive, Amanda Leduc's fable for our uncertain times reminds us that the most important things in life aren't things at all, but rather the people we want by our side at the end of the world.

30 review for The Centaur's Wife

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Walsh

    DNF. Liked the concept, but failed to engage me. Liked the centaurs. The humans not so much.

  2. 4 out of 5

    ilovebooksokae

    This wasn't good... bordering on racist lmao From the just the prologue things are ... lowkey racist. We see a black stallion become a Black man who then marries a pretty white girl who then has kids and they end up being centaur triplets. Mom realizes her kids are half horse and freaks out, the doctor who helped mom give birth make the dad and the kids escape and they go live on this magical mountain. Fast forward a little bit and we meet Heather and one of the triplets Estjafan begin ??? Talkin This wasn't good... bordering on racist lmao From the just the prologue things are ... lowkey racist. We see a black stallion become a Black man who then marries a pretty white girl who then has kids and they end up being centaur triplets. Mom realizes her kids are half horse and freaks out, the doctor who helped mom give birth make the dad and the kids escape and they go live on this magical mountain. Fast forward a little bit and we meet Heather and one of the triplets Estjafan begin ??? Talking ??? after her fathers death until Heather has sex w a human man and ends up pregnant. After giving birth there’s an apocalyptic event and then shit is just weird and the only people of colour are the centaurs or either Annie the nurse who puts up with way too much bullshit. If white people wanna write a post apocalyptic book where there’s only horses and whites I sure as shit hope everyone dies in the bird box second apocalypse that hit them 🤡

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jael Richardson

    Proud to have this as my first read of 2021.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Emily Stewart

    Leduc masterfully captures the darkness and hope of fairytales in this story of survival and community, weaving together magic, sorrow, and the wonder of nature. The story captures attention right from the beginning with a tale of impossible love that is everything you'd expect of a fairy tale. It then takes us to a more contemporary setting as a meteor shower wreaks havoc on a city near a mountain. As we follow the survivors, we gradually learn their backstories and uncover the forces and storie Leduc masterfully captures the darkness and hope of fairytales in this story of survival and community, weaving together magic, sorrow, and the wonder of nature. The story captures attention right from the beginning with a tale of impossible love that is everything you'd expect of a fairy tale. It then takes us to a more contemporary setting as a meteor shower wreaks havoc on a city near a mountain. As we follow the survivors, we gradually learn their backstories and uncover the forces and stories that drive them both together and apart. As the story progresses, the boundaries between the "real" word of the city and the magic of the mountain grow slimmer and the line between truth and story blurs, allowing for a captivating examination of what it means to be in-between. There's a weirdness to the novel for sure. It's part post-apocalypse survival tale, part fairytale, part love story, part family drama. It's got humans and guns and medicine, but also centaurs, and screaming flowers, and transformations. It does not offer easy answers for how or why events happen. But all this weirdness is definitely delightful.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Andrea McDowell

    This novel starts out tentatively based in realism, and then steadily grows into magic and fairy tale, until by the end it is almost purely myth. I read Leduc's Disfigured: On Fairy Tales, Disability, and Making Space when it came out a few years ago--I bought a copy for Echo at the release party, and we both loved it. Echo has since made disability a main focus in a number of her art projects, including a strange fishy-monster Little Mermaid comic for art class directly inspired by the book and This novel starts out tentatively based in realism, and then steadily grows into magic and fairy tale, until by the end it is almost purely myth. I read Leduc's Disfigured: On Fairy Tales, Disability, and Making Space when it came out a few years ago--I bought a copy for Echo at the release party, and we both loved it. Echo has since made disability a main focus in a number of her art projects, including a strange fishy-monster Little Mermaid comic for art class directly inspired by the book and Leduc's talk at the release. So I was thrilled to see her new novel coming out containing many of the themes she previously explored in non-fiction, and asked for and received a copy from NetGalley. Aside: NetGalley's copies often suck. I've sometimes received pdfs which I'm sure would be wonderful if I were reading it on a tablet, but I'm not, I'm reading them on my little phone, and even zoomed in as far as I can the print is tiny and it makes my old-lady eyeballs hurt. It takes me forever to read these, and I sometimes abandon them. The Centaur's Wife was worth it, but knowing how forcefully Leduc advocates for accessibility in all her publications (they are published simultaneously in print and other accessible formats such as braille, audio, etc.), I have to think she's be pissed to know that the netgalley version is such a pita. Anyway. It's a NetGalley release; I received a pdf version in tiny, tiny print in exchange for this review. The Centaur's Wife is about Heather, a woman with cerebral palsy who survives the end of the world, along with her husband and newborn twin daughters. The initial cause is (or appears to be) asteroid strikes, but as magic grows and the earth becomes alive and not at all disposed to be kind to humans, the initial cause is complicated and mythologized. The main narrative is interspersed both with short fairy-tales by Leduc set in this version of the world, and another storyline about a doctor in a vague historical period who helped to deliver a human woman of her centaur triplets, sired by a horse in human disguise. All three threads slowly converge throughout the novel, and while the story is often dark, the writing is beautiful. The characters are interesting, complicated, and human; questions of frailty of all kinds--disability and otherwise--are raised throughout and shown to give rise to a particular kind of strength. Strongly recommended, and I'm looking forward already to Leduc's next book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    A magical book (pun intentional) and not quite like any I've read before. It is also one of the best speculative fiction novels I've read in the past few years. As far as I'm concerned it's an instant classic. Do yourself a favour and read it. A magical book (pun intentional) and not quite like any I've read before. It is also one of the best speculative fiction novels I've read in the past few years. As far as I'm concerned it's an instant classic. Do yourself a favour and read it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rosie | rossiereads

    I wasn't sure what to expect with The Centaurs Wife as I've not read anything from Amanda Leduc before but the synopsis intrigued me. I found the alternating chapters based on the main storyline and the thought-provoking "fable" style stories a refreshing change from a lot of books I've read recently. All the way through there is a mystery element that comes together at the end, showing how the fables are purposeful and linked. This fictional fantasy with a message gets a 3.5 rating from me. Tha I wasn't sure what to expect with The Centaurs Wife as I've not read anything from Amanda Leduc before but the synopsis intrigued me. I found the alternating chapters based on the main storyline and the thought-provoking "fable" style stories a refreshing change from a lot of books I've read recently. All the way through there is a mystery element that comes together at the end, showing how the fables are purposeful and linked. This fictional fantasy with a message gets a 3.5 rating from me. Thank you to Penguin Random House Canada and NetGalley for the digital ARC in return for my honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Clare

    I loved this book. Stories within stories within stories, full of magic and yet so relevant to our world "in real life," as they say. "Stories are never only stories." Although it's very different, I was reminded of Danny Ramadan's The Clothesline Swing, and often of Erin Morgenstern's The Starless Sea. It also hearkens back to favourites of my youth, including stories by Alan Garner. The fables in The Centaur's Wife feel both ancient and fresh, and they carry a cautionary tale. I loved this book. Stories within stories within stories, full of magic and yet so relevant to our world "in real life," as they say. "Stories are never only stories." Although it's very different, I was reminded of Danny Ramadan's The Clothesline Swing, and often of Erin Morgenstern's The Starless Sea. It also hearkens back to favourites of my youth, including stories by Alan Garner. The fables in The Centaur's Wife feel both ancient and fresh, and they carry a cautionary tale.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    This is one of those books that just sucked me in. I read it in two sittings. I loved the way that despite being nominally set in the present day it still feels like an old fable that happened sometime else, somewhere far away.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Rideout

    I was granted eARC access to The Centaur's Wife via NetGalley, and unfortunately, I wasn't quite able to get my review out before publication day, but better late than never, right? We're still within the first week. We've still got time to send people rushing to purchase in time for the bestseller lists! But in all seriousness, thank you to all involved in granting me this complimentary copy. My thoughts are my own and my review is honest. The Centaur's Wife is a whimsical, brutal, dark, heartb I was granted eARC access to The Centaur's Wife via NetGalley, and unfortunately, I wasn't quite able to get my review out before publication day, but better late than never, right? We're still within the first week. We've still got time to send people rushing to purchase in time for the bestseller lists! But in all seriousness, thank you to all involved in granting me this complimentary copy. My thoughts are my own and my review is honest. The Centaur's Wife is a whimsical, brutal, dark, heartbreaking, and uplifting blend of storylines that take us from the creation of centaurs to the end of the modern world as we know it. Every piece of the story is full of sadness and joy, love and loss, and somehow most of it winds together to leave us in a cautiously hopeful mindset by the end of the book. Representation: Visible disabilities (Cerebral Palsy, Cystic Fibrosis), invisible disabilities (depression, anxiety), LGBTQIA relationships, racial/visible minorities Content warnings: Surgery while awake, pregnancy and infant loss, loss of a parent, disability-focused bullying, firearm violence, suicide, threat of starvation This is an apocalypse story tied together with fairytales that happen to be true. It's the story of those who survive the end of the world, how the world continues to try to destroy them, and what it takes to keep going. We meet people who are willing to band together and help one another and people who aren't. These people face fear, dwindling supplies from before the event, and the new threat of nature that is literally trying to snuff them out. (Vines that move at a visible rate to reclaim anything and everything, soil that will not produce crops, etc.) Only those who join up together, pool resources and efforts, and lift each other up emotionally are able to survive the first year. To describe this book as weird would definitely be fair, but not weird in a bad way. It feels experimental, it takes processing, and it probably needs to be read more than once. It's a beautiful blend of science fantasy with magical realism and apocalypse fiction, told from a variety of points of view, and it doesn't care for such constraints as linear time. This book jumps around a lot and this does mean some may find it too confusing to finish, but think those who do will come out the other end having gained something. Gained what? I'm not sure. It feels like it'll be different for everyone. This is definitely going to be one of those cult following books with a loud fan base who force it on everyone else. Not everyone will like it. Not everyone will get it. Those who do will probably not stop trying to convince everyone who doesn't. In that way, it reminds me of The Night Circus or Piranesi. Those who love it, LOVE it. Those who don't get it don't understand what the fuss is about. I honestly don't know who to recommend this to, specifically. It isn't quite like anything I've ever read before, other than having that same sense of "not every reader is going to get it" that the books I mentioned above have. Perhaps I'll start there? I would highly recommend this to fans of Erin Morgenstern, or of Susanna Clarke's Piranesi. I would also recommend it more broadly to fans of magical realism who don't mind twisty, turny plots and multiple POVs, and to people who liked the concept of gritty end of the world stories like Dies the Fire by S.M. Sterling but want something a little less in-your-face real.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alyson

    Before reading this book, I did not know what to expect (and it's probably for the best in retrospect). The story starts out with a woman named Heather who has just given birth to twin girls. It is nighttime and she is trying to rest in the hospital. That's when "it" happens. Large meteors crash down to earth forcing Heather to flee with her girls and new husband, B. They hide in a basement with other people from the hospital hoping to survive the destruction. A little while later, they emerge a Before reading this book, I did not know what to expect (and it's probably for the best in retrospect). The story starts out with a woman named Heather who has just given birth to twin girls. It is nighttime and she is trying to rest in the hospital. That's when "it" happens. Large meteors crash down to earth forcing Heather to flee with her girls and new husband, B. They hide in a basement with other people from the hospital hoping to survive the destruction. A little while later, they emerge and find the city has been mostly destroyed. The only place that remains green is the mountain. The city dwellers have always feared the mountain and no one has ever set foot there since Heather's father died on the mountain years ago. Now, the city dwellers have no choice but to band together and attempt to survive, but what if the earth and the mountain have different plans... The Centaur's Wife is at once a post-apocalyptic story, a fantasy novel and a story woven with fairy tales. It is utterly unique and in a class of its own. There is so much imagination emanating from this novel. The narration shifts a lot from Heather's perspective (past and present), to the other characters' perspectives (past and present) and to the fairy tales that Heather tells her twin girls. Although the perspective jumps would normally irritate me, I found that it kept me hooked and wanting to know more. One of the aspects that make this book so memorable are the fairy tales and fables woven into the storyline. The fairy tales are not the typical ones you might have heard as a child. They are darker and completely original from the mind of the author. Fairy tales become essential to the survival of the humans left in the city, especially for Heather who continuously whispers stories to her young daughters. I would highly recommend The Centaur's Wife for its abundant creativity and its hopeful message. *I received an advanced reader's copy of The Centaur's Wife from NetGalley and Penguin Random House Canada in exchange for an honest review*

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    I loved the atmosphere of the book and the author's #ownvoices portrayal of disabled people as complex and worthy of lead character status, even if I didn't always understand the reason for certain plot events. It's not something you read to cheer yourself up - this is a mix the post-apocalyptic, magic realism, and fantasy/fairytale genres. Leduc alternates between the central plot and a series of original fairy tales which function as both backstory and counterpoint. Her fluid, unpretentious sty I loved the atmosphere of the book and the author's #ownvoices portrayal of disabled people as complex and worthy of lead character status, even if I didn't always understand the reason for certain plot events. It's not something you read to cheer yourself up - this is a mix the post-apocalyptic, magic realism, and fantasy/fairytale genres. Leduc alternates between the central plot and a series of original fairy tales which function as both backstory and counterpoint. Her fluid, unpretentious style lets the novelty of her genre-blending shine, but this is not always to the book’s advantage. Sometimes the magic makes sense, and sometimes it does not. In the first half of the book, a portal between worlds is mentioned twice, but never explained or (as far as I could tell) used. The mountain seems belligerent towards humans – but is that only because they believe it to be so, or because the mountain contains the bones of a bereaved centaur who blames humans for his pain? Not all kinds of magical or supernatural force need to be explained down to the smallest detail, but the inconsistency of magical power in The Centaur's Wife frustrated me. Within individual scenes and fairy tales, plot and character develop more naturally, and this patchwork comes together into a fascinating if disorienting novel.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Derek Newman-Stille

    Heather and Tasha are both storytellers. Both weave tales for their own needs. When meteors fall and humanity is left starving and disoriented, Heather carries on her father’s tradition of telling fairy tales to create a more magical life while Tasha keeps telling others the bigger fairy tale – that they can all survive. In The Centaur’s Wife, Amanda Leduc reveals the power of storytelling, necessary lies, and complicated truths. She reveals the human need to create stories and the transformativ Heather and Tasha are both storytellers. Both weave tales for their own needs. When meteors fall and humanity is left starving and disoriented, Heather carries on her father’s tradition of telling fairy tales to create a more magical life while Tasha keeps telling others the bigger fairy tale – that they can all survive. In The Centaur’s Wife, Amanda Leduc reveals the power of storytelling, necessary lies, and complicated truths. She reveals the human need to create stories and the transformative power of the tales we tell. Part apocalyptic fiction, part myth, and part collection of new fairy tales, The Centaur’s Wife demonstrates Leduc’s versatility and brilliance as a storyteller. The Centaur’s Wife is a tale of the liminal, the between, and not just because centaurs are half human and half horse. Leduc tells a story about outsiders, edgy Others who belong neither completely to one world or another. Leduc reveals the power of not belonging, of existing outside the order imposed by those in power. Her characters question easy categories and simple social structures, revelling in complexities. They disrupt norms and it is through this disruption that they invite in new possibilities.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cat

    In the acknowledgements, Amanda Leduc says "Grief was the hardest mountain I ever climbed,"*--and after considering how to talk about this book, I think that is the most succinct way of putting it. The Centaur's Wife is an intergenerational, folk magic story about caring for others and the earth, taking place at different times in the seam of normalcy and apocalypse as the earth reclaims itself in an environmental succession, wiping humanity from existence. A handful of people are able to survive In the acknowledgements, Amanda Leduc says "Grief was the hardest mountain I ever climbed,"*--and after considering how to talk about this book, I think that is the most succinct way of putting it. The Centaur's Wife is an intergenerational, folk magic story about caring for others and the earth, taking place at different times in the seam of normalcy and apocalypse as the earth reclaims itself in an environmental succession, wiping humanity from existence. A handful of people are able to survive in a city at the foot of a looming mountain that is known for its danger, and legendary mystery. I feel like something was processed, beneath the writing; something about grief, resilience, the difference between love and marriage, and ancient, inescapable fate. For the sake of rating, 3.5 rounded up. Audiobook accessed through the libro.fm bookseller program, via my place of work, Oxford Exchange bookstore in Tampa, FL. * I may be misquoting as I listened to the audiobook but same sentiment ok

  15. 4 out of 5

    Y. Lepage

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ I can honestly say that I have never read a book like this one before. It's very different to what I'm used to, and I didn't see that coming when I read the premise. This book is set in a very realistic world, except that it is surrounded by a hoard of fairy tales and nature. It is set in an apocalyptic/post-apocalyptic kind of world, where the nature finally has enough of humans destroying it and decides to take revenge. The further you get into the book the more you feel the realism di ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ I can honestly say that I have never read a book like this one before. It's very different to what I'm used to, and I didn't see that coming when I read the premise. This book is set in a very realistic world, except that it is surrounded by a hoard of fairy tales and nature. It is set in an apocalyptic/post-apocalyptic kind of world, where the nature finally has enough of humans destroying it and decides to take revenge. The further you get into the book the more you feel the realism disappear and the myths start taking more and more place. I really like the tales that the author wrote for us every few chapter, they gave so much depth to the world and enthralled me into the story almost like nothing before. And even though this book can be very dark at place, the tales make it so satisfying to read, and so easy to enjoy.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hollay Ghadery

    Loved this story. I was hooked from the word Centaur, since Sagittarius by Greg Hrbek is one of my favourite short stories of all time and I am a fairy tale and fantasy junkie--especially when they bleed into our real, modern lives. (Think Nights at the Circus by Angela Carter). Leduc does a wonderful job controlling the unruly narrative of her book, which mimicked the lurking vines we encounter while reading: that constant threat. From beginning to end, The Centaur's Wife has a feeling that it' Loved this story. I was hooked from the word Centaur, since Sagittarius by Greg Hrbek is one of my favourite short stories of all time and I am a fairy tale and fantasy junkie--especially when they bleed into our real, modern lives. (Think Nights at the Circus by Angela Carter). Leduc does a wonderful job controlling the unruly narrative of her book, which mimicked the lurking vines we encounter while reading: that constant threat. From beginning to end, The Centaur's Wife has a feeling that it's barely being held together: the story could explode or implode at any minute. To my mind, this is not a slight against Leduc's skill as a writer, but a credit to her: she melds form and content, perfectly. The Centaur's Wife is one of my favourite books of the year, to date.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea M

    Meh.... Some parts had me in to the story but others felt dragged on. There was no in between. Either I was flipping the pages like crazy trying to read what happens next or I was speed reading just to get a chapter over with. The overall story was okay, just not my cup of tea. The fantasy elements seemed sub par and at times repetitive throughout the story. The world itself was pretty intriguing and it was nice to see how everything came together in the end although the final “wrap up” seemed f Meh.... Some parts had me in to the story but others felt dragged on. There was no in between. Either I was flipping the pages like crazy trying to read what happens next or I was speed reading just to get a chapter over with. The overall story was okay, just not my cup of tea. The fantasy elements seemed sub par and at times repetitive throughout the story. The world itself was pretty intriguing and it was nice to see how everything came together in the end although the final “wrap up” seemed far fetched. Some parts of the story got pretty dark but those were the elements that I found were written best. It was a simple easy read that could be finished in one seating. Would recommend if you are looking for something a little off the beaten path.

  18. 5 out of 5

    more.books.than.days

    Amanda Leduc takes the dark beauty found in the original Grimm fairytales, and makes it into something new, crafting her own tales that rival those we've grown up with. She brings out the monsters, the weak, the dispossessed, and reveals that they are exactly who and what they should be. She reveals the power of community, of chosen family, and of the stories we tell ourselves. This novel is magical realism meets post-apocalyptic, and for any lover of fairy tale and fantasy, it is a must read. I Amanda Leduc takes the dark beauty found in the original Grimm fairytales, and makes it into something new, crafting her own tales that rival those we've grown up with. She brings out the monsters, the weak, the dispossessed, and reveals that they are exactly who and what they should be. She reveals the power of community, of chosen family, and of the stories we tell ourselves. This novel is magical realism meets post-apocalyptic, and for any lover of fairy tale and fantasy, it is a must read. I also highly recommend reading Leduc's work of non-fiction, Disfigured, which reveals many of the foundational ideas, along with her own disability rights activism, that have been formative to this work of fiction.

  19. 4 out of 5

    -RadioactiveBookworm-

    When I say this book is unlike anything I've ever read, I really mean it. A crazy mix of scifi apocalypse and green fantasy, this story combines the two pretty seamlessly. And that's something I can't say I've read before. A meteor shower that takes out the human world as we know it, centaurs that live on a magical safeguarded mountain, and the most effortless mass murdering of characters I've ever read, this book was strangely very stressful and also very calming at the same time to read. Can y When I say this book is unlike anything I've ever read, I really mean it. A crazy mix of scifi apocalypse and green fantasy, this story combines the two pretty seamlessly. And that's something I can't say I've read before. A meteor shower that takes out the human world as we know it, centaurs that live on a magical safeguarded mountain, and the most effortless mass murdering of characters I've ever read, this book was strangely very stressful and also very calming at the same time to read. Can you say you've read anything like that before? Check out my full review here! https://radioactivebookreviews.wordpr...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Aly

    3.5* This story of a post-apocalyptic small town with a mysterious infamous mountain was delightfully enchanting! Switching between the main narrative, and one of fables about magical creatures and events happening on the mountain, keeps the plot engaging as you uncover more and more about the backstories of the citizens who are trying to band together and survive in seemingly hopeless circumstances, while plagued with local superstitions. Thank you to the author and publisher as well as Netgalle 3.5* This story of a post-apocalyptic small town with a mysterious infamous mountain was delightfully enchanting! Switching between the main narrative, and one of fables about magical creatures and events happening on the mountain, keeps the plot engaging as you uncover more and more about the backstories of the citizens who are trying to band together and survive in seemingly hopeless circumstances, while plagued with local superstitions. Thank you to the author and publisher as well as Netgalley for providing me with a free e-arc in exchange for an honest review!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    Fiction, fantasy, fairy tale, dystopian all of these could be used to describe Amanda Leduc's "The Centaur's Wife". A beautiful yet tragic blend of fairy tale and reality, an overwhelming feeling of grief drives the story - grief for what might have been but hope for what might yet be possible. The story encompasses generations of man and centaur whose lives intertwine in various ways. I recommend for lovers of magical fantasy and fairy tales. It will not disappoint. #TheCentau'sWife#NetGalley Fiction, fantasy, fairy tale, dystopian all of these could be used to describe Amanda Leduc's "The Centaur's Wife". A beautiful yet tragic blend of fairy tale and reality, an overwhelming feeling of grief drives the story - grief for what might have been but hope for what might yet be possible. The story encompasses generations of man and centaur whose lives intertwine in various ways. I recommend for lovers of magical fantasy and fairy tales. It will not disappoint. #TheCentau'sWife#NetGalley

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hannah (wetheliteraries)

    This book is WEIRD, but in such a delicious way. And it builds up, so at the beginning you’re like ‘ah just your regular old apocalypse novel’ and by the end you’re like ‘wait a second? where did all this magic come from?’ One of my favourite aspects of this, is all the fables Leduc weaves in that flesh out the world and the story, they all tie together beautifully at the end!! And the way disability is weaved into the story is so well done (of course it is), it’s an important part the character This book is WEIRD, but in such a delicious way. And it builds up, so at the beginning you’re like ‘ah just your regular old apocalypse novel’ and by the end you’re like ‘wait a second? where did all this magic come from?’ One of my favourite aspects of this, is all the fables Leduc weaves in that flesh out the world and the story, they all tie together beautifully at the end!! And the way disability is weaved into the story is so well done (of course it is), it’s an important part the characters’ identities, but it isn’t just used as a metaphor for something else. The characters just all feel like real life human beings, who sometimes do bad things, sometimes do good things, as they try to navigate the end of the world together. Eee I loved it!! As a brief description, this starts off with meteors crashing down on earth right after Heather has given birth to twins. From there we follow as a town of people come together to try and keep themselves alive, as it becomes increasingly more obvious that help isn’t coming and that there is more to the forest surrounding the town than originally meets the eyes. Right away this gave me similar vibes to Station Eleven (but with more magic!) so I knew I would love it! I do want to briefly mention that this is more brutal in places than I was expecting, so tread carefully if you need to.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Stoltz

    I devoured this book in record time. I enjoyed it immensely. The fantasy component was not overdone, and the weaving of the various character's storylines was superb. I truly admire the imagination of the author. The book held my attention from start to finish. I often judge a book by its ending, and this was well crafted. I can highly recommend this book. I devoured this book in record time. I enjoyed it immensely. The fantasy component was not overdone, and the weaving of the various character's storylines was superb. I truly admire the imagination of the author. The book held my attention from start to finish. I often judge a book by its ending, and this was well crafted. I can highly recommend this book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Polly Krize

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. With fairytales and magic woven into this novel, cataclysmic events force Heather and her newborns to hide from the destruction. As survivors, they approach a legendary mountain, still green and full or promise. Mesmerizing and seductive, this is well worth the read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Love B.

    *ARC kindly provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.* 3.5 I didn't really know what to expect when I first started reading this one but after the first few chapters I was really intrigued mostly by the storyline and I FLEW through it. *ARC kindly provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.* 3.5 I didn't really know what to expect when I first started reading this one but after the first few chapters I was really intrigued mostly by the storyline and I FLEW through it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sayo

    This book is somewhere between a two and a three for me. Some parts were really enjoyable and other parts I just had no interest in. I could not get into the flow of the story. I guess magical realism just isn't for me. This book is somewhere between a two and a three for me. Some parts were really enjoyable and other parts I just had no interest in. I could not get into the flow of the story. I guess magical realism just isn't for me.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This is a dreamy, dark book with a lot of magic AND it was well-written. The pandemic we're in is no comparison to the destruction in this novel but the way this novel addressed grief & loss & moving forward felt apt for right now. This is a dreamy, dark book with a lot of magic AND it was well-written. The pandemic we're in is no comparison to the destruction in this novel but the way this novel addressed grief & loss & moving forward felt apt for right now.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Simmons

    This is not a genre or style I usually gravitate towards but I know the author (like, know her on Twitter) and teaching Writer’s Craft I’m finding it useful to explore outside my comfort zone. This is a lovely story, rich with description and imagery and mythology all its own.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Davis

    I really wanted to like this book. I enjoyed the fairy tale portions but there were so few characters that were worth saving. Like they were just all annoying and really didn’t deserve to see the end of the world.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Webber

    I rate this 3.5.

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