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From social psychologist Dr. Devon Price, a fascinating and thorough examination of what they call the “laziness lie”—which falsely tells us we are not working or learning hard enough—filled with practical and accessible advice for overcoming society’s pressure to “do more.” Extra-curricular activities. Honors classes. 60-hour work weeks. Side hustles. Like many Americans From social psychologist Dr. Devon Price, a fascinating and thorough examination of what they call the “laziness lie”—which falsely tells us we are not working or learning hard enough—filled with practical and accessible advice for overcoming society’s pressure to “do more.” Extra-curricular activities. Honors classes. 60-hour work weeks. Side hustles. Like many Americans, Dr. Devon Price believed that productivity was the best way to measure self-worth. Price was an overachiever from the start, graduating from both college and graduate school early, but that success came at a cost. After Price was diagnosed with a severe case of anemia and heart complications from overexertion, they were forced to examine the darker side of all this productivity. Laziness Does Not Exist explores the psychological underpinnings of the “laziness lie,” including its origins from the Puritans and how it has continued to proliferate as digital work tools have blurred the boundaries between work and life. Using in-depth research, Price explains that people today do far more work than nearly any other humans in history yet most of us often still feel we are not doing enough. Dr. Price offers science-based reassurances that productivity does not determine a person’s worth and suggests that the solution to problems of overwork and stress lie in resisting the pressure to do more and instead learn to embrace doing enough. Featuring interviews with researchers, consultants, and experiences from real people drowning in too much work, Laziness Does Not Exist encourages us to let go of guilt and become more attuned to our own limitations and needs and resist the pressure to meet outdated societal expectations.


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From social psychologist Dr. Devon Price, a fascinating and thorough examination of what they call the “laziness lie”—which falsely tells us we are not working or learning hard enough—filled with practical and accessible advice for overcoming society’s pressure to “do more.” Extra-curricular activities. Honors classes. 60-hour work weeks. Side hustles. Like many Americans From social psychologist Dr. Devon Price, a fascinating and thorough examination of what they call the “laziness lie”—which falsely tells us we are not working or learning hard enough—filled with practical and accessible advice for overcoming society’s pressure to “do more.” Extra-curricular activities. Honors classes. 60-hour work weeks. Side hustles. Like many Americans, Dr. Devon Price believed that productivity was the best way to measure self-worth. Price was an overachiever from the start, graduating from both college and graduate school early, but that success came at a cost. After Price was diagnosed with a severe case of anemia and heart complications from overexertion, they were forced to examine the darker side of all this productivity. Laziness Does Not Exist explores the psychological underpinnings of the “laziness lie,” including its origins from the Puritans and how it has continued to proliferate as digital work tools have blurred the boundaries between work and life. Using in-depth research, Price explains that people today do far more work than nearly any other humans in history yet most of us often still feel we are not doing enough. Dr. Price offers science-based reassurances that productivity does not determine a person’s worth and suggests that the solution to problems of overwork and stress lie in resisting the pressure to do more and instead learn to embrace doing enough. Featuring interviews with researchers, consultants, and experiences from real people drowning in too much work, Laziness Does Not Exist encourages us to let go of guilt and become more attuned to our own limitations and needs and resist the pressure to meet outdated societal expectations.

30 review for Laziness Does Not Exist

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sheena

    Laziness Does Not Exist was requested and read by me just from the title alone. Devon Price exceeded my expectations and was the justification I needed when feeling lazy about myself. A lot of my personal goals haven’t been fulfilled, especially lately with a pandemic going on. “We expect ourselves to achieve at a superhuman level, and when we fail to do so, we chastise ourselves for being lazy”. The book really resonates with me because it made me feel validated and seen. There were so many poi Laziness Does Not Exist was requested and read by me just from the title alone. Devon Price exceeded my expectations and was the justification I needed when feeling lazy about myself. A lot of my personal goals haven’t been fulfilled, especially lately with a pandemic going on. “We expect ourselves to achieve at a superhuman level, and when we fail to do so, we chastise ourselves for being lazy”. The book really resonates with me because it made me feel validated and seen. There were so many points where I was like “wow that is so true” and I ended up highlighting so much of the book. It may be my most highlighted book of all time. There is criticism of society, capitalism, technology, and social media but also tackles other issues that may get in the way such as mental illness. While I agree with a lot of points in this book, I do think there’s a line between being burnt out from exhaustion or just being plain lazy. Sometimes I am the latter but that is okay with me. The book also offers some self-help tools which I thought were helpful points. This ARC was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ayelet Reiter

    I expected this to be mostly capitalist criticism (which I am super into), as it turns out it was that but mostly self-help. Still, it definitely deviates from most self-help books just by virtue of being anti-capitalist and presenting the somewhat radical idea presented in its title. Basically, it's anti-capitalist enough for your lefty comrades to enjoy but self-help enough that you could gift it to your liberal friends and family and they wouldn't be too scandalized. Personally, even as someon I expected this to be mostly capitalist criticism (which I am super into), as it turns out it was that but mostly self-help. Still, it definitely deviates from most self-help books just by virtue of being anti-capitalist and presenting the somewhat radical idea presented in its title. Basically, it's anti-capitalist enough for your lefty comrades to enjoy but self-help enough that you could gift it to your liberal friends and family and they wouldn't be too scandalized. Personally, even as someone who has criticized rugged individualism and the American obsession with productivity for many years, I still learned a lot and had many of my viewpoints challenged by this book. Who knew accepting laziness could be so much work? Some of my favorite sections included the history of how America's aversion to laziness was built (spoiler alert: it's a whole lot of white supremacy) and the conclusion, which focused on how compassion towards what we perceive as others' laziness will help us love ourselves more. What I connected less to were the copious descriptions of burnout, even though there were definitely times in the past when I could relate. I think this is mostly because there have been at least a handful of books and thousands of think pieces written about burnout in the last few years, so those didn't really feel like anything revolutionary compared to other parts of the book. It's pretty hard to argue with the notion that burnout is bad both for the capitalist machine and for actual human beings, and reading descriptions of people experiencing burnout is never a good time (Price even acknowledges how much of a toll these interviews took on their own health), so I wish this took up less of the book. The other thing that peeved me was the most of the advice for dealing with burnout and "the laziness lie" at work assumed that the person reading (a) has a white-collar job which is salaried and probably provides benefits, (b) that their supervisor is understanding and flexible, (c) that they have enough power and say in their job to enact changes to it, (d) that they won't lose their job by enacting those changes or saying "no" to their assigned tasks and (e) that dropping a few of their job responsibilities won't cause them to be unable to pay for basic living expenses. These all seem like pretty rare privileges at any time but especially during COVID times. Still though, I would recommend this book, and think it would make a great gift to any friends who need a little compassion in their lives or for book clubs to discuss.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Abriana

    I just lost my job, and it was a huge comfort to me to read a book that reminded me that my value as a person is not rooted in how productive I am, that it's okay if my capabilities to work hard and live a passionate life fall outside of said work. I really enjoyed the reminders to take stock of your values and figure out how to prioritize them in your own life. This conversation is both universal but also pretty privileged, and while I feel this was acknowledged, there also were some observatio I just lost my job, and it was a huge comfort to me to read a book that reminded me that my value as a person is not rooted in how productive I am, that it's okay if my capabilities to work hard and live a passionate life fall outside of said work. I really enjoyed the reminders to take stock of your values and figure out how to prioritize them in your own life. This conversation is both universal but also pretty privileged, and while I feel this was acknowledged, there also were some observations that weren't approached with the nuance they deserved. (Ex: when talking about the gig economy, it was implied the only reason people were working side hustles and monetizing all of their hobbies was because of societal pressures not because they literally can't afford not to.) But overall, I felt like this was a good message, a well thought out response to all of these collective conversations about burnout, and just a really timely read for me personally.

  4. 5 out of 5

    jenny✨

    I initially read and reviewed this for NetGalley as an advance review copy back in December/January. Yesterday I got my hands on the audiobook and listened to this again, just in time to help me come to terms with the fact that 1) I'm not making as much progress as I'd like on my graduate scholarship application; and 2) that's okay. Interweaving activism and self-help, psychology and memoir, this book isn't very long but it nonetheless packs an interdisciplinary punch. ◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️ I initially read and reviewed this for NetGalley as an advance review copy back in December/January. Yesterday I got my hands on the audiobook and listened to this again, just in time to help me come to terms with the fact that 1) I'm not making as much progress as I'd like on my graduate scholarship application; and 2) that's okay. Interweaving activism and self-help, psychology and memoir, this book isn't very long but it nonetheless packs an interdisciplinary punch. ◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️ 01/2021: This book made me feel… called out. In the best way possible. Because I felt seen. I felt validated and affirmed. I did not feel so alone in the cycles of burnout and bone-deep fatigue that I persistently subject myself to—cycles that were driven, ultimately, by a pathological fear of somehow exposing the laziness that I was convinced festered at my core. My productivity and accomplishments were a facade I had to effortfully, continually maintain. And it’s EXHAUSTING. I’d say this was the best book I could’ve read at this moment. I say this because I’m about to start my second semester of grad school in a few days and I don’t feel ready whatsoever to face it. Dr. Devon Price’s words have been a balm for my anxieties, opening a space for me to better understand and forgive myself. It's helped ease my transition back into so-called “productivity.” ◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️◻️ The minute I set eyes on its gradient-shaded cover, I was immediately intrigued by Laziness Does Not Exist. Don’t lie to me: the title alone piqued your interest, too. Whether skeptic or desperate grad student (guess which one I am), I think we’d all like to get to the bottom of the affliction—the bane of our capitalist, industrial clime, if you will—known as laziness. Moreover, Dr. Price is a social psychologist and an activist, another reason I knew I had to read their book. I’m a psych grad currently doing my Master’s in counselling & clinical psychology, and I’ve been fighting all my (admittedly not-so-long) academic career to carve out a space for activism in psychology, a social scientific field that’s notorious for its inability—read: unwillingness—to get with the social-justice-times. Dr. Price’s insights have been invaluable in helping me see the ways in which my self-identified “over-ness”—over-stressing, overworking, over-planning, over-managing—have hurt me both in the short- and long-term. They criticize capitalism, fatphobia, “pull yourself by your bootstraps” mentalities that obscure systemic injustice, and cultural patterns of tech and social media use; each of these issues is situated in broader historical and sociopolitical contexts. They discuss activism fatigue (and how to combat it), setting boundaries in our friendships and professional lives, intersectional social justice issues, and self-care methods rooted in positive psychology. Throughout it all, the book champions the living of fruitful, fulfilling lives: lives in which we listen to and honour our “laziness” (i.e., burnout, rest, idleness, healing) and advocate for our own autonomy. I cannot underscore enough: Everyone should read their book. Thank you NetGalley and Atria Books for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I'm not generally much into self help but this came to me exactly when I needed this message. Bonus points for its queer-positivity. Sometimes the best thing good people can do is hunker down, care for one another, and survive. I'm not generally much into self help but this came to me exactly when I needed this message. Bonus points for its queer-positivity. Sometimes the best thing good people can do is hunker down, care for one another, and survive.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Noe

    "If your life has value no matter how productive you are, so does every other human life." You aren't your productivity. Work isn't inherently good and neither is "doing." "If your life has value no matter how productive you are, so does every other human life." You aren't your productivity. Work isn't inherently good and neither is "doing."

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

    It’s important to note that I read most of this book in between dismantling and cleaning our washer on a lazy Sunday afternoon. 🙄I was raised with a strong Protestant work ethic and two perfectionist parents and it’s really hard to unlearn the ingrained drive to never stop working. The parts about your body telling you it’s time to let up have been my experience and, overall, this book was a good way to reframe my mindset as I dive into a new job with more responsibilities.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The thesis of this book, which appears on the third to last page, is that individuals who seem “lazy,” face unseen barriers and challenges that are unbeknown to others. This is not a book for those seeking advice on how to become more productive or strike a better work-life balance. Instead, the author makes an explicit argument for individuals to be more lazy in their daily lives (i.e., get comfortable with being less productive than society tells them they ought to be). This objective is highl The thesis of this book, which appears on the third to last page, is that individuals who seem “lazy,” face unseen barriers and challenges that are unbeknown to others. This is not a book for those seeking advice on how to become more productive or strike a better work-life balance. Instead, the author makes an explicit argument for individuals to be more lazy in their daily lives (i.e., get comfortable with being less productive than society tells them they ought to be). This objective is highlighted throughout the book from the authors’ personal anecdotes with individuals being overworked to the point of physical exhaustion. Although most can agree that there is a need to create a healthier relationship with our work in the United States, a real opportunity was missed by the author to discuss evidence-based approaches supported by the scientific literature that we can take to create balance in our lives. Much of the book is riddled with politically-laden comments, rather than scientific evidence. Though this will be liked by some, I purchased this book believing that it would be written in a more scientific manner given the credentials of the author; thus, I was greatly disappointed. Overall, it is an interesting premise for an essay, but in my opinion, the content is undeserving of a full-length book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kalyn

    I cannot tell you how much I needed to read this book! I kept seeing myself in all of the author's descriptions of how people end up berating themselves for being "lazy" when actually the problem is the way society demands too much of us. I see a lot of this same thinking in my students (juniors and seniors in high school, who are overburdened with trying to create the perfect resume and transcript for college applications), and it breaks my heart to see how society is twisting their minds. Read I cannot tell you how much I needed to read this book! I kept seeing myself in all of the author's descriptions of how people end up berating themselves for being "lazy" when actually the problem is the way society demands too much of us. I see a lot of this same thinking in my students (juniors and seniors in high school, who are overburdened with trying to create the perfect resume and transcript for college applications), and it breaks my heart to see how society is twisting their minds. Reading this book opened my eyes to the ways in which society has conditioned us to believe that we are only worthy when we are being actively productive; that is, doing something to earn earn approval from others, rarely ourselves. Dr. Price helped me see that doing less was actually better for me, since it allowed my poor brain to take a break and for me to rest and energize myself to tackle the things in life that really matter.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ape Bleakney

    Listened to as an audiobook. A wonderful read recommended for anyone in our productivity driven culture - if you've examined your own habits and/or the social science and psychology related to slowing down in a highly capitalistic society, this may not be new information to you - but nonetheless great to be reminded that we are not machines, and our worth is so much more than how much we do or accomplish. Each chapter looks at a different bias or niche, including activism burnout and how product Listened to as an audiobook. A wonderful read recommended for anyone in our productivity driven culture - if you've examined your own habits and/or the social science and psychology related to slowing down in a highly capitalistic society, this may not be new information to you - but nonetheless great to be reminded that we are not machines, and our worth is so much more than how much we do or accomplish. Each chapter looks at a different bias or niche, including activism burnout and how productivity relates to our boundaries (or lack of) in personal relationships.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    Did Dr. Price read my diary?? Because they have written exactly the book I needed. Some thoughts... ...on caffeine and Parks and Rec: This TOTALLY called me out for my love of coffee and Leslie Knope, and gently nudged me to see how both are problematic. And also gave me more of an understanding of why I can never seem to get to the *extra* hobbies that would be “good for me,” like doing nightly DuoLingo lessons. Again, did Dr. Price read my diary? ...on social issues and sustainable activism: “S Did Dr. Price read my diary?? Because they have written exactly the book I needed. Some thoughts... ...on caffeine and Parks and Rec: This TOTALLY called me out for my love of coffee and Leslie Knope, and gently nudged me to see how both are problematic. And also gave me more of an understanding of why I can never seem to get to the *extra* hobbies that would be “good for me,” like doing nightly DuoLingo lessons. Again, did Dr. Price read my diary? ...on social issues and sustainable activism: “Stressing out about a topic is not actually a means of working to address the problem. It may feel productive, because it keeps our minds busy and engaged, but it actually saps us of the energy to put up a genuine fight.” -Ch. 5 ...on the stories used in this book: Hell yes to the clear respect for people’s journeys, identities, passions and pronouns—and to the expansive, diverse, relatable examples and stories that Price uses. This book steers away from many self-help tropes and normative examples.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    I won a copy of this book. I knew this sh*t was a myth. You knew it too. My grandmother told the Lazy Lie all the time, when I was growing up. She knew all the stereotypes and was very vocal about them to me. She passed from cancer when I was in my early 20s. The day she died, she was cutting the lawn and fell violently ill. As I'm calling the ambulance, she's yelling at me to put the mower away and clean off the driveway. She didn't want to stop. She never learned to slow down. I bet you know pe I won a copy of this book. I knew this sh*t was a myth. You knew it too. My grandmother told the Lazy Lie all the time, when I was growing up. She knew all the stereotypes and was very vocal about them to me. She passed from cancer when I was in my early 20s. The day she died, she was cutting the lawn and fell violently ill. As I'm calling the ambulance, she's yelling at me to put the mower away and clean off the driveway. She didn't want to stop. She never learned to slow down. I bet you know people just like her. I've since been diagnosed with an autoimmune disease and I've learned I have to listen to my body when it tells me to slow down, because I'll have earned myself a trip to the hospital if I don't. This life we live in America is not sustainable. Covid should have been our reboot, a time to slow and reflect. So here's the review: This is a self-help book, but for sure has some amazing points as to why we should slow down and enjoy life. There are usually reasons that can be pointed to as to why someone is being empathetic, unmotivated, or any number of things out society associates with being "lazy". Price has some great suggestions for unplugging and teaching yourself to enjoy things at a slower pace.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Bayer

    Ironically, this book took me a really long time to get through. ;) I really enjoyed the read though, and it was very thought provoking. Price challenges everything about the lazy stereotype, and does so very convincingly. The author is a non-binary college professor and the book is filled with examples of people who appeared lazy but were in fact exhibiting absolutely appropriate behavior. They point out that our modern work ethic was very strategically designed to support slavery and capitalis Ironically, this book took me a really long time to get through. ;) I really enjoyed the read though, and it was very thought provoking. Price challenges everything about the lazy stereotype, and does so very convincingly. The author is a non-binary college professor and the book is filled with examples of people who appeared lazy but were in fact exhibiting absolutely appropriate behavior. They point out that our modern work ethic was very strategically designed to support slavery and capitalism, that is supports completely false beliefs about hard work, that it makes us all actually less productive and unhealthy, and that it keeps us from treating each other (or ourselves) with compassion. This is a fantastic read and one that should be on everyone's must-read list for 2021. You may not agree with it all (I didn't at the start, but got it by the end), but it is likely to make for some great discussions and personal realizations. I read a digital ARC of this book for review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bryn

    Good book to lend to people you want to help realise capitalism sucks but disguised as a self-help book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Beard

    Strongly recommend. Productivity is incidental to your life. You are more than how you work. When I was a kid, growing up with undiagnosed ADHD, I was taught I was lazy and I believed it. No one understood, much less me, that confronting tasks caused severe anxiety that I didn't know how to manage. Over the last couple years I've been deconstructing the concept of laziness and questioning whether it actually exists. So imagine my excitement on finding this book. Take care of yourselves, y'all. Strongly recommend. Productivity is incidental to your life. You are more than how you work. When I was a kid, growing up with undiagnosed ADHD, I was taught I was lazy and I believed it. No one understood, much less me, that confronting tasks caused severe anxiety that I didn't know how to manage. Over the last couple years I've been deconstructing the concept of laziness and questioning whether it actually exists. So imagine my excitement on finding this book. Take care of yourselves, y'all.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    I don't usually write reviews but this was honestly just so refreshing and relatable. I felt myself constantly nodding my head like "yes, yes, yes so true". I think the timing of reading this also fit perfectly for me personally and probably for many others dealing with overload of mentally, emotionally and physically taxing impacts from the pandemic and the related stress and anxiety that may feel overwhelming at times. It also opened up my eyes to the concept of emotionally immaturity which I'm I don't usually write reviews but this was honestly just so refreshing and relatable. I felt myself constantly nodding my head like "yes, yes, yes so true". I think the timing of reading this also fit perfectly for me personally and probably for many others dealing with overload of mentally, emotionally and physically taxing impacts from the pandemic and the related stress and anxiety that may feel overwhelming at times. It also opened up my eyes to the concept of emotionally immaturity which I'm looking forward to digging into more!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Sund

    Like most self-help style books, Price goes off on a lot of tangents beyond the thesis that laziness does not exist. Luckily, most of those tangents were interesting. I don't struggle with feelings of guilt and spend a LOT of time doing "nothing" already, but there was still a lot I could get out of this book. The author helps articulate why I get so hurt when people ask me when I'm going to teach philosophy. NEVER! NEVER! I got a bunch of philosophy degrees and I'm glad I did, but it turns out Like most self-help style books, Price goes off on a lot of tangents beyond the thesis that laziness does not exist. Luckily, most of those tangents were interesting. I don't struggle with feelings of guilt and spend a LOT of time doing "nothing" already, but there was still a lot I could get out of this book. The author helps articulate why I get so hurt when people ask me when I'm going to teach philosophy. NEVER! NEVER! I got a bunch of philosophy degrees and I'm glad I did, but it turns out that's not the job I want. NEVER NEVER NEVER! (NEVER!) I like my job even thought it doesn't seem "good enough" to a lot of people. It's good enough for me, so F*@K off! I think this book would appeal most to Millennials and younger, but over-extended gen-Xers would find a lot to think about to. I'm just old enough not to care about social media, but the sections that focused on social media reminded me of the college students I work with. There's a lot of things students do that seems "lazy" but are actually a call for help. I work at a university and plan to suggest that we read this for my work book club this summer. I also appreciated how diverse the examples were. The overworked parent example was a transman talking about pregnancy difficulties and parenting pressure. Too many books of this type lean into "mom" stereotypes as the only examples of parenting stress. This book uses all kinds of examples, but I have a feeling that a lot of older guys would haaaaaaate it. I like that Price doesn't try to speak to that audience, and it's okay. Price works very hard to respect each persons' identity and pronouns.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rae Slezak

    WOW! This book is a life-changer. I have been trying for years to undo the damage that capitalism has done to my brain, trying to stop equating productivity with goodness and worthiness, but this book propelled me into healing. The way that Devon explained how the Laziness Lie was created to get slaves and exploited employees to work harder, not for their own good but for the good of the slave-owners and employers, was so eye-opening, and really helped me to shed off the last bits of guilt I had WOW! This book is a life-changer. I have been trying for years to undo the damage that capitalism has done to my brain, trying to stop equating productivity with goodness and worthiness, but this book propelled me into healing. The way that Devon explained how the Laziness Lie was created to get slaves and exploited employees to work harder, not for their own good but for the good of the slave-owners and employers, was so eye-opening, and really helped me to shed off the last bits of guilt I had about never being enough, never doing or accomplishing enough. I do still struggle with feeling guilty if I don't accomplish as much as I wanted to in a day, but that guilt is a lot smaller than it used to be, and there are times I can genuinely enjoy doing "nothing" without feeling guilty, which never used to happen. I also really, really enjoyed the way Devon talked about radical compassion, for ourselves and our fellow beings. Regardless of how much anyone achieves, or does, or owns, etc. every single human and non-human is valuable. We are all deserving of joy. This book really helped me to let go of those last bits of the Laziness Lie I'd been clinging on to.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Justina

    At first I was caught by a colorful cover and later by the oxymoron ‘laziness does not exist’. It triggered me because I have never heard this kind of nonsense in my life. My curiosity led me to reading a description later reviews and the introduction after that. Everything sounded absolutely the opposite of what I believed is THE truth and even my values. Then I got hooked. The book goes through a pattern of human behavior in different circumstances calling it ‘The Laziness Lie’. It gives example At first I was caught by a colorful cover and later by the oxymoron ‘laziness does not exist’. It triggered me because I have never heard this kind of nonsense in my life. My curiosity led me to reading a description later reviews and the introduction after that. Everything sounded absolutely the opposite of what I believed is THE truth and even my values. Then I got hooked. The book goes through a pattern of human behavior in different circumstances calling it ‘The Laziness Lie’. It gives examples of situations and steps that leads to exhaustion, burnouts and self hatred. It precisely describes that voice in your head that convince you that you are not good enough on a daily basis. Besides that it also offers tools and coping mechanisms how to deal with that voice. I could call it an easy colorful read that felt like an extended therapy session, a compassionate voice that helped me to go through a hard time. It’s also the most inclusive book that I have ever read - using examples of different genders, races and social backgrounds. Highly recommended to those who believe that the world only consists of caucasian men and women without anything in between.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andria

    Fabulous book. I'd read Dr. Price's original essay that inspired this book many times and it has become a favorite. When a book deal comes out of an essay, there's always the risk that nothing new will be said. That is definitely not the case here. Dr. Price expands upon the original thesis, that perceived "laziness" is most often simply a symptom of other underlying factors and takes it out of an academic setting and into the real world. Overworking in the work place and home is easy enough to Fabulous book. I'd read Dr. Price's original essay that inspired this book many times and it has become a favorite. When a book deal comes out of an essay, there's always the risk that nothing new will be said. That is definitely not the case here. Dr. Price expands upon the original thesis, that perceived "laziness" is most often simply a symptom of other underlying factors and takes it out of an academic setting and into the real world. Overworking in the work place and home is easy enough to recognize, but it's never something I would have expected to find in my online life or in relationships. This is an illuminating book that not only inspires the reader to take a closer look at their own habits but also offers practical solutions. Highly recommended, especially for those who have the temptation to overachieve. Anyone worn out by tiresome "bootstrap" rhetoric that never seems to die no matter how many times it's been disproven will find this book a balm to the soul.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Signed, Iza

    I know am not alone in this. Students, employed ones, even as parents, we’re always cautious of not being labeled as ‘lazy’. Hence, we tend to work incredibly hard all the time over the term. Even within our conscience. The author’s highlights of how we feel when we are termed laziness strikes so deep, such as: My worth is earned through my productivity Work is the center of life. Anyone who isn’t accomplished and driven is immoral There’s always more we could be doing. You cannot trust your feelings I know am not alone in this. Students, employed ones, even as parents, we’re always cautious of not being labeled as ‘lazy’. Hence, we tend to work incredibly hard all the time over the term. Even within our conscience. The author’s highlights of how we feel when we are termed laziness strikes so deep, such as: My worth is earned through my productivity Work is the center of life. Anyone who isn’t accomplished and driven is immoral There’s always more we could be doing. You cannot trust your feelings of exhaustion and limit. It also highlights how capitalism has played a major role in this. The fact is, we’re doing far more work than is healthy. So we deserve to work less. See full review https://signediza.com/?p=275

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cari

    I finished this book in a day. Dr. Price's stories of burnout and overwork are very familiar to me. While I've worked on mindfulness and staying present, plus limiting my time on devices and giving myself space to think, Dr. Price's insights tied all those concepts together in an intriguing and concrete way. Their interviews with multiple people as well as their intersectional approach to dismantling the Laziness Lie helped to illustrate exactly how this story we tell ourselves manifests in West I finished this book in a day. Dr. Price's stories of burnout and overwork are very familiar to me. While I've worked on mindfulness and staying present, plus limiting my time on devices and giving myself space to think, Dr. Price's insights tied all those concepts together in an intriguing and concrete way. Their interviews with multiple people as well as their intersectional approach to dismantling the Laziness Lie helped to illustrate exactly how this story we tell ourselves manifests in Western culture. We tie our productivity to our worth, and it's unhealthy. I will be sharing this with my team at work, particularly the chapter about boundaries.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Miss Susan

    pretty good for a self-help book! i think the thesis is stretched a little to cover areas price wanted to discuss but as i found everything they said interesting i have no objections. it did have the inherent problem all self-help books have of only offering advice that works for people with an underlying level of privilege/support -- if you're on the verge of burnout because you have two minimum wage jobs and are only barely making rent you're not actually going to be able to protect your healt pretty good for a self-help book! i think the thesis is stretched a little to cover areas price wanted to discuss but as i found everything they said interesting i have no objections. it did have the inherent problem all self-help books have of only offering advice that works for people with an underlying level of privilege/support -- if you're on the verge of burnout because you have two minimum wage jobs and are only barely making rent you're not actually going to be able to protect your health by quitting unless you get a sudden infusion of steady cash quick. i'm def one of the white collar professionals this book does address though so i found it useful 4 stars

  24. 5 out of 5

    Diana N.

    The drive to want to be productive no matter the cost is deeply rooted in our society. We are all on a hamster wheel between the demands of work, family and friends, media, and the desire to change the world. All of these things can lead to burnout and we need to "take time to smell the roses" sometimes. This book really embraces that we really aren't lazy if we take that time to enjoy life. We need to embrace our own shortcomings and have compassion for the shortcomings of others (they don't re The drive to want to be productive no matter the cost is deeply rooted in our society. We are all on a hamster wheel between the demands of work, family and friends, media, and the desire to change the world. All of these things can lead to burnout and we need to "take time to smell the roses" sometimes. This book really embraces that we really aren't lazy if we take that time to enjoy life. We need to embrace our own shortcomings and have compassion for the shortcomings of others (they don't really make us lazy). This book surprisingly gave me a new prospective that I wasn't expecting!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Victor Matthew

    I love this book! This book provides readers with the much needed sociological imagination of modern capitalism. Dr. Price's discussion of the Laziness Lie is the perfect intersection between personal and economic wellness. Laziness Does Not Exist is a must read for everyone: artists, academics, young professionals, blue-collar workers, entrepreneurs, and business tycoons - both aspiring and experienced. Dr. Price helps readers understand our role in living a healthy life in a healthy economy by I love this book! This book provides readers with the much needed sociological imagination of modern capitalism. Dr. Price's discussion of the Laziness Lie is the perfect intersection between personal and economic wellness. Laziness Does Not Exist is a must read for everyone: artists, academics, young professionals, blue-collar workers, entrepreneurs, and business tycoons - both aspiring and experienced. Dr. Price helps readers understand our role in living a healthy life in a healthy economy by explaining research across multiple fields of study, including individual psychology, industrial psychological, and economics in a digestible, friendly, and relatable way.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Shepard

    A thoughtful and timely argument for being kinder to ourselves and others. This books reminds us that our worth is not defined by our productivity - and that we should be mindful of judging others for their perceived “laziness” as well. Overall, I enjoyed this book. The message resonated with me strongly. That said, I did feel like the second half in particular touched on a broad range of issues that would have benefited from a more in-depth discussion. I came away from this read with a renewed A thoughtful and timely argument for being kinder to ourselves and others. This books reminds us that our worth is not defined by our productivity - and that we should be mindful of judging others for their perceived “laziness” as well. Overall, I enjoyed this book. The message resonated with me strongly. That said, I did feel like the second half in particular touched on a broad range of issues that would have benefited from a more in-depth discussion. I came away from this read with a renewed promise to myself: to let myself rest when needed, without judgment.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bookish Boshemian

    I thoroughly enjoyed this as my first non-fic read of the year. Thanks Atria for sending me an ARC and giveaway copy. I enjoyed this in October ‘20 and felt it was a great way to start 2021 with. Dr. Devin Price is a social psychologist; and they examine the “Laziness Lie” - a belief system rooted in slavery, industrialization and capitalism. This lie filters through so many outlets we come in daily contact with; culturally programming us to believe: -our work is our productivity -we arent doing eno I thoroughly enjoyed this as my first non-fic read of the year. Thanks Atria for sending me an ARC and giveaway copy. I enjoyed this in October ‘20 and felt it was a great way to start 2021 with. Dr. Devin Price is a social psychologist; and they examine the “Laziness Lie” - a belief system rooted in slavery, industrialization and capitalism. This lie filters through so many outlets we come in daily contact with; culturally programming us to believe: -our work is our productivity -we arent doing enough -we are incapable of trusting our feelings and establishing boundaries. This isnt your typical self-help book; its fresh and very timely considering the state of society’s climate. Dr. Price integrates their own personal experiences, discusses ways to combat burnout; and shares tools for establishing the strength to not take on the pressures of society. They also emphasize the recognition of the societal conditioning that instigates self shame; thus perpetuating the lie that we arent being productive. I love that they endorse self care and reminding readers less can actually be more. I also love the reminder that having compassion for whats percieved as laziness can actually propel us even further in the act of self love. This will potentially challenge many thought processes and has many hidden jewels if read with an open mind.

  28. 4 out of 5

    ArchaeoLibraryologist

    This is one of the best nonfiction books I've read in a long time. I've struggled hard with the idea of always needing to be productive and never give in to the evil idea of laziness. I've gotten much better in the past few years of learning to find my worth beyond what I can produce, but this book opens up so many new avenues and ideas I never considered before. While I'm sure I'll fall into the Laziness Lie trap from time to time (both with my own life and judging others), I'm really glad for This is one of the best nonfiction books I've read in a long time. I've struggled hard with the idea of always needing to be productive and never give in to the evil idea of laziness. I've gotten much better in the past few years of learning to find my worth beyond what I can produce, but this book opens up so many new avenues and ideas I never considered before. While I'm sure I'll fall into the Laziness Lie trap from time to time (both with my own life and judging others), I'm really glad for the information this book provides to help me take a step back an re-evaluate my thoughts and opinions.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mariana

    I spent half of this book going “I needed to hear this!!” and the other half like, “so many people I know need to hear this!!” So everyone do me a favor and go read this book, okay? Also, it made aware that it might be time to get my anxiety treated, and I’m not sure how to feel about that. We’ll see.

  30. 5 out of 5

    JB

    I was compassionately called out on every page of this book, and I will certainly come back to it again and again. Many of us live our lives associating productivity or usefulness to others with our value and right to rest or enjoy things. Price explains how this came to be, why it's optional, and why we all deserve better, for ourselves, and those around us. Laziness does not exist. I was compassionately called out on every page of this book, and I will certainly come back to it again and again. Many of us live our lives associating productivity or usefulness to others with our value and right to rest or enjoy things. Price explains how this came to be, why it's optional, and why we all deserve better, for ourselves, and those around us. Laziness does not exist.

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