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Kids on the March: 15 Stories of Speaking Out, Protesting, and Fighting for Justice

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From the March on Washington to March for Our Lives to Black Lives Matter, the powerful stories of kid-led protest in America.     Kids have always been activists. They have even launched movements. Long before they could vote, kids have spoken up, walked out, gone on strike, and marched for racial justice, climate protection, gun control, world peace, and more.     Kids on th From the March on Washington to March for Our Lives to Black Lives Matter, the powerful stories of kid-led protest in America.     Kids have always been activists. They have even launched movements. Long before they could vote, kids have spoken up, walked out, gone on strike, and marched for racial justice, climate protection, gun control, world peace, and more.     Kids on the March tells the stories of these protests, from the March of the Mill Children, who walked out of factories in 1903 for a shorter work week, to 1951’s Strike for a Better School, which helped build the case for Brown v. Board of Education, to the twenty-first century’s most iconic movements, including March for Our Lives, the Climate Strike, and the recent Black Lives Matter protests reshaping our nation.     Powerfully told and inspiring, Kids on the March shows how standing up, speaking out, and marching for what you believe in can advance the causes of justice, and that no one is too small or too young to make a difference. 


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From the March on Washington to March for Our Lives to Black Lives Matter, the powerful stories of kid-led protest in America.     Kids have always been activists. They have even launched movements. Long before they could vote, kids have spoken up, walked out, gone on strike, and marched for racial justice, climate protection, gun control, world peace, and more.     Kids on th From the March on Washington to March for Our Lives to Black Lives Matter, the powerful stories of kid-led protest in America.     Kids have always been activists. They have even launched movements. Long before they could vote, kids have spoken up, walked out, gone on strike, and marched for racial justice, climate protection, gun control, world peace, and more.     Kids on the March tells the stories of these protests, from the March of the Mill Children, who walked out of factories in 1903 for a shorter work week, to 1951’s Strike for a Better School, which helped build the case for Brown v. Board of Education, to the twenty-first century’s most iconic movements, including March for Our Lives, the Climate Strike, and the recent Black Lives Matter protests reshaping our nation.     Powerfully told and inspiring, Kids on the March shows how standing up, speaking out, and marching for what you believe in can advance the causes of justice, and that no one is too small or too young to make a difference. 

54 review for Kids on the March: 15 Stories of Speaking Out, Protesting, and Fighting for Justice

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amy Imogene Reads

    The future is hopeful. And it's being led by our youngest generation. Walk in the steps of those who protested in 1903 in the March of the Mill Children and see where the fight continues on in those who participated in the George Floyd protests... as well as all of the ones that came between. 15 powerful stories. 1 nation. Organization of stories: ★★★★★ Resonance: ★★★★★ Enjoyment: ★★★★★ When you think of a line of protesters, who do you picture? How old are they? If you're like me, the group of peo The future is hopeful. And it's being led by our youngest generation. Walk in the steps of those who protested in 1903 in the March of the Mill Children and see where the fight continues on in those who participated in the George Floyd protests... as well as all of the ones that came between. 15 powerful stories. 1 nation. Organization of stories: ★★★★★ Resonance: ★★★★★ Enjoyment: ★★★★★ When you think of a line of protesters, who do you picture? How old are they? If you're like me, the group of people attending a social protest is a varied group in my imagination but, in general, they have one thing in common—they're adults. Adults tend to have louder voices, more ability to self-advocate, and more experience to draw from in an organized space. Right? In Kids on the March, you'd be wrong. Delving into 15 stories of kid-led and kid-focused protests for social justice, this slim volume packs a very memorable punch. When the youngest of us know what is right, and what is wrong, and they decide to speak up... their voices are loud enough to be heard. And they have a right to their space. I devoured this collection. There's no other word for it. Author Michael B Long is on to something when he pulls us along on a journey through the twentieth century's most active youth-led protests—and the changes they demanded. From young children desperate for more ethical work hours in 1903 to the 1951 Strike for a Better School that led to the Brown v. Board of Education titan of social justice to the more modern March for Our Lives and the Black Lives Matter protests.... this is a powerful body of work. And an inspiring one. "Let us pray with our legs. Let us march in unison to the rhythm of justice, because I say enough is enough." -Demetri Hoth, Senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School (2018) I recommend this to all, especially my fellow Americans. Many thanks to Algonquin for Young Readers for my copy in exchange for an honest review. Blog | Instagram

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nursebookie

    Kids on the March: 15 Stories of Speaking Out, Protesting, and Fighting for Justice By Michael Long This book was simply amazing! I loved how powerful and truly impactful this read is, where Michael Long deftly tells the stories of how children's voices do make a difference in the world we live in. The stories include marches in Washington to Black Lives Matter and other kid-led activism stories and protests against injustices in the world. Through inspirational stories that span from the early 19 Kids on the March: 15 Stories of Speaking Out, Protesting, and Fighting for Justice By Michael Long This book was simply amazing! I loved how powerful and truly impactful this read is, where Michael Long deftly tells the stories of how children's voices do make a difference in the world we live in. The stories include marches in Washington to Black Lives Matter and other kid-led activism stories and protests against injustices in the world. Through inspirational stories that span from the early 1900's to the current, we learn about the changes and impact kids have done through activism and having their voices heard. There are so many social issues and social justice topics on-going now such as the increasing violence and hate against Asians that this book will really inspire and motivate children and adults alike today. I found the writing and the organization of the book easy to read for young readers. The fifteen stories mentioned were wonderfully curated that shares the themes of civil rights, immigration, gun violence, climate issues and a whole slew of other important topics. This should be a required reading for adults and children alike. Thank you Algonquin Young Readers and Michael Long for this advanced readers copy. My reviews and opinions are my own.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    I would imagine that there are many folks out there, especially teens, who think that activism is the purview of adults and that only recent movements such as the March for Our Lives and Black Lives Matter have involved youngsters. But as this book and Phillip Hoose's 2001 title, We Were There Too!: Young People in U.S. History, demonstrate, that simply isn't the case. Starting with the March of the Mill Children led by Mother Jones in 1903 and concluding with the George Floyd Protests in 2020 w I would imagine that there are many folks out there, especially teens, who think that activism is the purview of adults and that only recent movements such as the March for Our Lives and Black Lives Matter have involved youngsters. But as this book and Phillip Hoose's 2001 title, We Were There Too!: Young People in U.S. History, demonstrate, that simply isn't the case. Starting with the March of the Mill Children led by Mother Jones in 1903 and concluding with the George Floyd Protests in 2020 with thirteen other stops along the way, this book traces youth involvement in efforts for social justice. Whether those efforts were for better schools and educational opportunity, gun control, the right for free speech in an academic setting or action on climate change or immigration policies, it's clear that standing up for what's right or advocating for change know no age barrier. Accompanied by archival black and white photographs and extracted quotes, most of the chapters allow readers to hear the voices of those young leaders. These protests or actions are all important parts of this nation's history, and the well-written accounts of each of them may inspire others to work for change in whatever areas are important to them. But the stories are also realistic as, sadly, sometimes all those efforts fail to result in meaningful change despite the marchers' best intentions. A case in point is the Dakota Access Pipeline, first halted by President Obama and then reinstated by President Trump, and then halted again for additional review. Two of the most heartbreaking chapters concern the Bonus March as veterans and their families sought the bonus money the government had promised them and "Running for Water," which involved Native American youth running a relay to bring attention to the Dakota Access Pipeline. These stories are the kind of history that makes my heart beat faster and my eyes well up with tears. Having a timeline at the start of each chapter helps provide important historical context for these stories. While I might have wished for a more attractive book design and more young voices, I enjoyed reading this one, which is very accessible for young readers. There are some notable omissions, of course, which makes me hope that the author plans to write a second volume. This would be an essential addition to any middle grade or high school social studies or American history classroom library.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dee Dee (Dee Reads for Food)

    At first, I didn't know what to rate this but I think 4 stars seems reasonable. I wholeheartedly recommend this book as a conversation started between parents/guardians and kids to help teach kids how to take charge of their own destiny. It speaks to finding your own sense of agency (there's even a guide to starting your own protest in the back) that I personally think will help broaden any child's horizon. However, this book is appropriate for all ages as the information and time period that it At first, I didn't know what to rate this but I think 4 stars seems reasonable. I wholeheartedly recommend this book as a conversation started between parents/guardians and kids to help teach kids how to take charge of their own destiny. It speaks to finding your own sense of agency (there's even a guide to starting your own protest in the back) that I personally think will help broaden any child's horizon. However, this book is appropriate for all ages as the information and time period that it covers means that there's bound to be at least one cause/protest that you didn't know much about. Very accessible.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kari

    This is a powerful and impactful read that includes 15 kid led protests that have occurred between the early 1900’s - 2020. Kids are becoming more involved in today’s movements and are considered activists for finding and using their voices to speak up for their beliefs. I feel the positivity and inspiration this book invokes to teach kids to use their voice and that change is a necessary result of standing up for your rights and what you believe in.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dianna

    Kids on the March is an inspiring book about kids and activism. The book tells the story of 15 different protests that children have participated in between 1903 and 2020. The book is well written, touching on important subjects in a way that children can understand. It demonstrates to children that they do have a voice and it can be heard. By reading about other children who were willing to stand up for what they believe in despite adversity, children can be inspired to stand up for what they t Kids on the March is an inspiring book about kids and activism. The book tells the story of 15 different protests that children have participated in between 1903 and 2020. The book is well written, touching on important subjects in a way that children can understand. It demonstrates to children that they do have a voice and it can be heard. By reading about other children who were willing to stand up for what they believe in despite adversity, children can be inspired to stand up for what they think is right. I think that it is important for children to realize that adults aren't the only ones that can change the world and I would highly recommend this book to everyone!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mutually Inclusive

    Kids On The March by Michael G. Long is an inspiring book for young activists. Opening in 1903 with the March of The Mill Children and spanning all the way to the George Floyd protests of 2020, this book shares fifteen stories of students standing up for their rights. With the way some people talk about “kids these days”, some may forget that children have always taken part in civil disobedience in our country. Children were absolutely crucial to the efforts of the March For Jobs on Washington an Kids On The March by Michael G. Long is an inspiring book for young activists. Opening in 1903 with the March of The Mill Children and spanning all the way to the George Floyd protests of 2020, this book shares fifteen stories of students standing up for their rights. With the way some people talk about “kids these days”, some may forget that children have always taken part in civil disobedience in our country. Children were absolutely crucial to the efforts of the March For Jobs on Washington and, of course, the Children’s Crusade in Birmingham, Alabama. Though they are no longer children, we have them to thank for the end of segregation, proving that no voice is too small to speak up for what’s right. Though there were several protests I was familiar with, I was very pleased to find some that I was not aware of, like the Bonus March in 1932. I have to admit that I was not always the greatest listener in history class, so it excited me to learn about some lessons I missed in school myself. There is also a very helpful “Tips For Marching” section at the back of the book, with plenty of advice for young readers who are ready to organize their own protests. I really appreciate the way Michael Long presents the facts of each uprising while highlighting the injustices Americans were protesting. He clearly lays out the thoughts and feelings of the protestors, helping young readers empathize with their causes. Kids on The March is sure to inspire another generation of outspoken activists. I believe this title is a must-read for any child showing an interest in fairness, equality, or justice. Though I would recommend this title for a slightly older audience (10 years and up), as there is some discussion of violence, racism, and sexism. Michael G. Long is an author and editor based in Pennsylvania. Though he has written many books about civil rights, LGBTQ+ rights, protests, and politics, Kids On The March is his first book for young readers. I would like to thank Algonquin Young Readers and Workman Publishing for providing me with a review copy of this fantastic book. I am so proud to share this book with my readers, and can’t wait to meet all the future activists this book will inspire. Blog | Instagram | Facebook | Goodreads | Storygraph

  8. 5 out of 5

    Libriamo3116

    What can one person do? What can one kid do? Kids on the March explores how children have marched for, protested for, and demanded a better world. Many times, that's what they got. Being an activist is possible even before a person can vote, and when they band together, kids are able to start movements for many causes, including better working conditions, for protecting the environment, for safety in schools, and for racial equality. Kids on the March examines iconic protests, movements, and mar What can one person do? What can one kid do? Kids on the March explores how children have marched for, protested for, and demanded a better world. Many times, that's what they got. Being an activist is possible even before a person can vote, and when they band together, kids are able to start movements for many causes, including better working conditions, for protecting the environment, for safety in schools, and for racial equality. Kids on the March examines iconic protests, movements, and marches in the 20th and 21st centuries, examining how kids got ahead of the curve to make a difference, ask for more, do what adults wouldn't do at times, and shape their world into one that deserves their courage. I hope that every kid reads this book, because being actively engaged in the world around you is important and can shape the future! This is a great resource for classrooms and youth, discussing methods for social and political activism, with plenty of illustrations, timelines, and overall layout geared toward child readers. I wish I'd had a similar resource when I was in middle school. I really appreciated how this book emphasizes the link between activism and actual outcomes, proving that marching matters. A wide variety of marches were addressed, across two centuries and covering many different subjects. After World War I, children marched to ensure that veterans received the benefits they were due for their time in the war. Students walked out of East Los Angeles schools in 1968 to protest for improved equality in education. Children campaigned for the attention of Ronald Reagan during the Cold War in a bid to end the nuclear arms race, and further, for worldwide nuclear disarmament. Kids are amazing when they believe in their ability to make positive change! I think that this book hits the mark for reaching its intended audience. I previously discussed the layout, but the content itself aims to inform youth and help them to be effective activists. Within its pages, there are helpful tips for forming effective marches, including information about what to do before a march, during a march, and after a march. This includes organization, effectiveness, reflection, and building momentum. The Notes section at the back of the book is extensive and helpful for dedicated readers who want to go farther with their activism. I think that Kids on the March is a critical book for today's youth, and I think that even adults can appreciate its historical information and practical observations. I highly recommend this for all humans who care about the world and community they live in, because a little effort from many people goes a long way to a brighter future. Thank you Algonquin Young Readers for sending me a free copy of this book to read and review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    Powerful. Informative. Revolutionary. Kids on the March is a great resource for kids who have always wanted to speak up, march, protest, or stand up for others. Although many children think that protesting is something that adults do, this book confirms the fact that many of the protests that have been conducted around the world initially started off because of the children. Children watch adults and the world around them. Kids know and have a good sense of what’s right or wrong. Protesting is s Powerful. Informative. Revolutionary. Kids on the March is a great resource for kids who have always wanted to speak up, march, protest, or stand up for others. Although many children think that protesting is something that adults do, this book confirms the fact that many of the protests that have been conducted around the world initially started off because of the children. Children watch adults and the world around them. Kids know and have a good sense of what’s right or wrong. Protesting is something that any person can do at any age. This book details 15 stories from around the world of how children have stepped into the roles of activism and organizing people together for marches, protests, sit-ins, die-ins, etc. This book tells of 15 stories of how children have participated in protests since 1903 to current day, and how the protests have impacted the communities around them. This book shares the details of 15 different protests/marches in such a way that children are able to understand the information. More importantly, the book has an interactive section where it shares information about how kids can start their own protest and provide what’s needed for a march. This book is definitely inspiring to other children who have a heart for standing up for civil rights, climate change, gun control, immigration, and a host of other issues that plague humanity. This book shares an important message with other children; you are never too young to protest or march or stand up for what’s right. Anyone can change the world and fight for what’s right. Don’t wait on the adults to get it right; children have a voice as well! I thoroughly enjoyed reading the accounts of the children in all of these movements; however, the ones that pulled on my heart strings were the protests and marches surrounding Standing Rock and their water source, the protest for a better school during Jim Crow, March on Washington, George Floyd, and the protests around the Chicanx community in East Los Angeles. The author did an incredible job in making the writing especially accessible for children of all ages, and I’m excited seeing something like this out in the world for our children. The children are our future and we need to protect them and our earth so that they can have an earth to live on when we leave this place. I would highly recommend this book to all children, but especially 4th grade and up as required reading in school. This book can easily be a great conversation starter in social studies classes and allow children to research other protests and marches that were not included in this book. Solid 4 stars. Well done! Thank you Algonquin Young Readers and Michael Long for this advanced readers copy in exchange for a fair an honest review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paige Green

    Disclaimer: I received this arc from the publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own. Book: Kids on the March Author: Michael Young Book Series: Standalone Rating: 5/5 Recommended For...: Activists and every young reader Genre: Non- Fiction Publication Date: March 23, 2021 Publisher: Algonquin Young Readers Pages: 304 Recommended Age: 10+ (slight violence mentioned, racism, sexism) Synopsis: From the March on Washington to March for Our Lives to Black Lives Matter, the powerful stories of kid-led protest in Disclaimer: I received this arc from the publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own. Book: Kids on the March Author: Michael Young Book Series: Standalone Rating: 5/5 Recommended For...: Activists and every young reader Genre: Non- Fiction Publication Date: March 23, 2021 Publisher: Algonquin Young Readers Pages: 304 Recommended Age: 10+ (slight violence mentioned, racism, sexism) Synopsis: From the March on Washington to March for Our Lives to Black Lives Matter, the powerful stories of kid-led protest in America.     Kids have always been activists. They have even launched movements. Long before they could vote, kids have spoken up, walked out, gone on strike, and marched for racial justice, climate protection, gun control, world peace, and more.     Kids on the March tells the stories of these protests, from the March of the Mill Children, who walked out of factories in 1903 for a shorter work week, to 1951’s Strike for a Better School, which helped build the case for Brown v. Board of Education, to the twenty-first century’s most iconic movements, including March for Our Lives, the Climate Strike, and the recent Black Lives Matter protests reshaping our nation.     Powerfully told and inspiring, Kids on the March shows how standing up, speaking out, and marching for what you believe in can advance the causes of justice, and that no one is too small or too young to make a difference. Review: I really like this book and it's premise. I think that in today's world we should be teaching our children about speaking up for what they believe in and getting them involved in activism and politics early on. the issues that we debate in Congress are issues that will affect them when they are older, so why don't they have a voice? I also think that children, as cliche as it is, are the future and they need to be heard first and foremost. I also like the books commentary on racism and sexism and things that we have improved on and things that we still need to improve on. The book shows our progress, but also reminds us that we still have so far to go. Verdict: Highly recommend!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Thompson McLeod

    Kids On the March is a detailed history of young people who stood up and spoke out against the policies and behaviors of their politicians and government. They were and are the voice of change and the voice of the future. Michael G. Long tells fifteen stories of history being made from 1903 with the March of the Mill Children to the Climate Strike of 2019 and the protests of policing policies in the deaths (murders) of black men and women in 2020 and the national movement of protests that swept Kids On the March is a detailed history of young people who stood up and spoke out against the policies and behaviors of their politicians and government. They were and are the voice of change and the voice of the future. Michael G. Long tells fifteen stories of history being made from 1903 with the March of the Mill Children to the Climate Strike of 2019 and the protests of policing policies in the deaths (murders) of black men and women in 2020 and the national movement of protests that swept the nation after the killing of George Floyd. Whether it's marching, wearing a black armband, signing petitions, gathering at state houses, peacefully demonstrating, making and carrying signs, young people were brave and believed in making their country a better place for all. There are tips for marching--how to decide if you'll participate, what to do on the day of the march, what to do after the march. A detailed bibliography and many black and white photos make this book a great reference. Inspiring stories of kid-led marches and movements will move readers to become involved in their present and their future. The publisher recommends ages 10-14. I think this book has a wider audience with an older age group including high school. Recommended for any history and government buff and for any research on children-led movements. Read all my reviews at Young Adult Books--What We're Reading Now.

  12. 5 out of 5

    books_to_review

    This book follows 15 powerful stories led by kids in America. From The March On Washington to Black Lives Matter, this book has it all. These inspiring movements and protests are what changed America and shaped the way it is now. I felt so attached to these kids and their stories. It was definitely difficult getting through this because every single story had an impactful meaning. Just reading about what these kids and their families were going through was so difficult. I really loved how the aut This book follows 15 powerful stories led by kids in America. From The March On Washington to Black Lives Matter, this book has it all. These inspiring movements and protests are what changed America and shaped the way it is now. I felt so attached to these kids and their stories. It was definitely difficult getting through this because every single story had an impactful meaning. Just reading about what these kids and their families were going through was so difficult. I really loved how the author structured everything. It was so neat and organized. I definitely remember a lot of these marches and they definitely made a change and difference in today’s society. I would highly recommend this book to the younger audiences. I really suggest they read about these other kids and feel that inspiration and motivation they need. They’re our future and should know that they can do anything they set their mind on. All of these stories were so impactful and moving. I really enjoyed reading each one. This book really speaks to the younger audience informing them that anyone is powerful enough to make a change! Such great stories with illustrations. Considering this was for a younger audience, I still felt motivated to make a change! **Huge thank you to Algonquin Young Readers for sending me an ARC in exchange for an honest review.**

  13. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    Thank you to Algonquin Young Readers for a review copy of this book! This was an incredible account of children’s involvement in some of our greatest social movements of the past century. This book covers fifteen different monumental protests that changed the fabric of American history, but this book did something a little different than other publications- it put the younger revolutionaries in the spotlight. From child labor marches of the early twentieth century to the climate strikes that have Thank you to Algonquin Young Readers for a review copy of this book! This was an incredible account of children’s involvement in some of our greatest social movements of the past century. This book covers fifteen different monumental protests that changed the fabric of American history, but this book did something a little different than other publications- it put the younger revolutionaries in the spotlight. From child labor marches of the early twentieth century to the climate strikes that have become a worldwide movement, this book highlights the children at the forefront of the cause. It is an eye opening look at how even the smallest kids can make a huge difference. While I knew some of the children led protests that were most prominent (the children from Parkland who founded the March for our Lives movement, and Greta Thunberg’s involvement in the climate crisis protests), it was wonderful to see the accounts from children at the Civil Rights Movement and anti-war demonstrations. It gives me a sense of hope that our future generations are going to be proactive in making some real changes, but at the same time it really sheds a light on the responsibilities that we adults owe these young people so that they can have normal childhoods without having to fight for their lives and livelihoods.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    For over a century, kids have led protests in America. This book tells 15 of those powerful stories, starting in 1903 and ending in 2020. As activists, children have spoken up, walked out, gone on strike, and marched for racial justice, climate protection, gun control, world peace, and more.  Readers learn more about their bravery, tenacity, solidarity, and passion via this book. I appreciated the clear, cohesive writing that includes plenty of facts and statistics but also deeply personal stori For over a century, kids have led protests in America. This book tells 15 of those powerful stories, starting in 1903 and ending in 2020. As activists, children have spoken up, walked out, gone on strike, and marched for racial justice, climate protection, gun control, world peace, and more.  Readers learn more about their bravery, tenacity, solidarity, and passion via this book. I appreciated the clear, cohesive writing that includes plenty of facts and statistics but also deeply personal stories of real kids. I laughed, cried and felt inspired by the stories. Author Michael Long even includes tips at the end for hosting a successful march. Children’s protests have reshaped our nation. We owe it to ourselves, our children and future generations to read these stories carefully and let their impact move us to protest for the causes we believe in.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Britt

    Kids on the March is a nonfiction book spotlighting 15 marches in the United States in which children participated and sometimes even organised. Fifteen marches from the 1900s to the Black Lives Matter march for George Floyd in 2020 are explained so well with a few children explaining why they marched. Michael Long did such a good job explaining topics some adults might now even fully grasp or know how to explain to their children. The book was very informative and I enjoyed learning about the m Kids on the March is a nonfiction book spotlighting 15 marches in the United States in which children participated and sometimes even organised. Fifteen marches from the 1900s to the Black Lives Matter march for George Floyd in 2020 are explained so well with a few children explaining why they marched. Michael Long did such a good job explaining topics some adults might now even fully grasp or know how to explain to their children. The book was very informative and I enjoyed learning about the marches. The author also spotlighted marches from various communities which I found important. At the back of the book are some very useful tips for what to do, bring and how to organise a march. I hope Kids on the March will inspire a new generation to stand up for their rights.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    I look forward to reading this with my kids when they are a bit older. Good mix of stories including immediate wins, losses that bore some fruit in the long run, tactical change-ups, and retaliation. Emphasis on contemporary stories including BLM and other POC-led movements.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dara

    Kids on the March contains 15 stories of kids involved in protests from 1903-2020. It covers protests from mill workers striking for shorter work weeks, protests for better schools, running for clean water at Standing Rock, the March for Our Lives after the Parkland shooting, school strikes for the climate, marches for Dreamers, and the Black Lives Matter protests this past summer. The kids described in this book are inspiring, and it is written in a way that can inspire other kids, including wa Kids on the March contains 15 stories of kids involved in protests from 1903-2020. It covers protests from mill workers striking for shorter work weeks, protests for better schools, running for clean water at Standing Rock, the March for Our Lives after the Parkland shooting, school strikes for the climate, marches for Dreamers, and the Black Lives Matter protests this past summer. The kids described in this book are inspiring, and it is written in a way that can inspire other kids, including ways to get involved in marches or to start their own.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Merricat

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Alexander

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jason Stanley

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Troike

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alex Richey

  23. 5 out of 5

    Abby

  24. 4 out of 5

    240

  25. 4 out of 5

    Angela

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amber K.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Quiroa

  29. 4 out of 5

    Phoebe

  30. 5 out of 5

    Reading_ Tam_ Ishly

  31. 4 out of 5

    Em(ily) Ann ♡︎♡︎♡︎ - theglitterybookworm_

  32. 5 out of 5

    Taryn

  33. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

  34. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Doyle

  35. 5 out of 5

    Alexis

  36. 5 out of 5

    Sabra Gerber

  37. 4 out of 5

    Mrs. G

  38. 5 out of 5

    Kendra Winchester

  39. 4 out of 5

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  40. 5 out of 5

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  41. 5 out of 5

    Miah D

  42. 4 out of 5

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  43. 5 out of 5

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  44. 4 out of 5

    Alysson

  45. 5 out of 5

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  46. 4 out of 5

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  47. 5 out of 5

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  48. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  49. 4 out of 5

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  50. 4 out of 5

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  51. 5 out of 5

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  52. 4 out of 5

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  53. 5 out of 5

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  54. 5 out of 5

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