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10 Questions Every Teen Should Ask (and Answer) about Christianity

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Written by Rebecca McLaughlin, Author of Confronting Christianity In a world of increasing ideological diversity, kids are being challenged to think through their own beliefs at an early age. Questions like How can you believe the Bible is true?; Why can't we just agree that love is love?; and Isn't Christianity against diversity? can seem like roadblocks for kids who are Written by Rebecca McLaughlin, Author of Confronting Christianity In a world of increasing ideological diversity, kids are being challenged to think through their own beliefs at an early age. Questions like How can you believe the Bible is true?; Why can't we just agree that love is love?; and Isn't Christianity against diversity? can seem like roadblocks for kids who are following Jesus, as well as for those who might otherwise consider faith in Christ. In this helpful book--written both for Christian kids and for those who think Jesus is just a fairy tale character--Rebecca McLaughlin invites readers ages 12-15 to dig deep into hard questions for themselves and perhaps discover that the things that once looked like roadblocks to faith might actually be signposts.


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Written by Rebecca McLaughlin, Author of Confronting Christianity In a world of increasing ideological diversity, kids are being challenged to think through their own beliefs at an early age. Questions like How can you believe the Bible is true?; Why can't we just agree that love is love?; and Isn't Christianity against diversity? can seem like roadblocks for kids who are Written by Rebecca McLaughlin, Author of Confronting Christianity In a world of increasing ideological diversity, kids are being challenged to think through their own beliefs at an early age. Questions like How can you believe the Bible is true?; Why can't we just agree that love is love?; and Isn't Christianity against diversity? can seem like roadblocks for kids who are following Jesus, as well as for those who might otherwise consider faith in Christ. In this helpful book--written both for Christian kids and for those who think Jesus is just a fairy tale character--Rebecca McLaughlin invites readers ages 12-15 to dig deep into hard questions for themselves and perhaps discover that the things that once looked like roadblocks to faith might actually be signposts.

30 review for 10 Questions Every Teen Should Ask (and Answer) about Christianity

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey D'alessandro

    I teach middle school Bible and am always looking for solid apologetics resources to use with my students. After reading this book, I will definitely be integrating it into my curriculum. It can be challenging to find resources that are solid, while being accessible to younger teens. This book tackles challenging topics with accessibility and compassion. With any book on apologetics, this is not a book that will answer every question about Christianity, but is an excellent jumping off point for I teach middle school Bible and am always looking for solid apologetics resources to use with my students. After reading this book, I will definitely be integrating it into my curriculum. It can be challenging to find resources that are solid, while being accessible to younger teens. This book tackles challenging topics with accessibility and compassion. With any book on apologetics, this is not a book that will answer every question about Christianity, but is an excellent jumping off point for important conversations and further study. Highly recommend!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brandi Breezee

    Loved Confronting Christianity so I knew I would love this just as much. Even though this book says it’s for 12-15 yr olds, I think it’s definitely more for 15+ as it tackles mature topics. Aiden is currently reading it, but Gavin won’t be for at least a few more years. Highly recommend parents read it prior to their teens, but once they are ready, I highly recommend it for teens (if that makes sense).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tomsugi

    Summary Rebecca McLaughlin’s first book, Confronting Christianity: 12 Hard Questions for the World’s Largest Religion, was named Christian Book of the Year in 2020 by Christianity Today magazine. Her second book, which simplifies many of those concepts for teens, intrigued me from the beginning with its table of contents. My boys, on the cusp of the teen years, are already asking these questions. So I read this book as a father thinking how to instruct my boys and as a pastor considering how it w Summary Rebecca McLaughlin’s first book, Confronting Christianity: 12 Hard Questions for the World’s Largest Religion, was named Christian Book of the Year in 2020 by Christianity Today magazine. Her second book, which simplifies many of those concepts for teens, intrigued me from the beginning with its table of contents. My boys, on the cusp of the teen years, are already asking these questions. So I read this book as a father thinking how to instruct my boys and as a pastor considering how it would be received by our youth. Strengths This book was well-written, humorous, and filled with pop culture references familiar to teens (i.e., Harry Potter and Disney movies). McLaughlin also quotes experts in their fields to show the evidence backing her claims and describes how scientists, psychologists, and philosophers have scrambled to the top of the hill to come to the same conclusions the Bible had been saying all along. She also references many historical examples as a way to broaden young people’s minds as they navigate the confusion in our world today. McLaughlin writes from a conservative evangelical background, but she doesn’t tell the reader exactly what to think. Instead, she teaches Christians how to better talk about these questions and to engage in honest conversations about the hard parts of Christianity. Readers may not always agree with McLaughlin as she addresses difficult subjects such as abortion (ch. 4), transgenderism (ch. 8), sexual abuse, and same-sex attraction (ch. 7). She also asserts the “Big Bang” theory of the universe’s origin is more in line with science (100-101). She writes, however, in a gentle manner that is greatly needed among Christians today. McLaughlin also writes conversationally about challenging apologetic questions to encourage opportunities for discussion. Most importantly, she presents the clear gospel message and invites the reader to believe in Jesus. I enjoyed this book from start finish and would encourage parents to read it with their kids. Suggestions I only have a few suggestions for improvement due to the book’s limited purpose. Those who read Confronting Christianity will find many of the ideas repackaged and watered down for teens. In addition, although McLaughlin has a degree in theology, don’t expect a Bible study. She talks a lot about the Bible, but doesn’t get too preachy. I think a discussion guide or questions at the end of each chapter would be helpful in a small group or discipleship setting. I would also like to see video material available as McLaughlin is an excellent communicator. Her multiple references to Harry Potter and Disney movies might fall flat with certain audiences or with future readers. Conclusion McLaughlin has written an excellent conversation piece for parents and teens to converse about today’s social issues and sticky questions Christians face. Each chapter concludes with a punchy summary to refresh the main points. The book is written for youth, but provides a plethora of academic footnotes should the reader desire to study more. Topical and Scripture indices also fill out the back matter. Readers who enjoyed this book might explore further with Confronting Christianity. * Crossway has provided a media copy of this book for my honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bella Schroeder

    When I began reading, I could not put this book down. McLaughin used a mix of Biblical Theology and Disney to perfectly illustrate how our questions are answered. From childhood memories to Moana quotes all the way to quotes from the Bible, I was sucked into a world filled with answers to many questions that I had been asking. Most theology books are geared towards children or adults. So much so that I was jumping for joy when I found that an author had taken time away from writing to Children o When I began reading, I could not put this book down. McLaughin used a mix of Biblical Theology and Disney to perfectly illustrate how our questions are answered. From childhood memories to Moana quotes all the way to quotes from the Bible, I was sucked into a world filled with answers to many questions that I had been asking. Most theology books are geared towards children or adults. So much so that I was jumping for joy when I found that an author had taken time away from writing to Children or Adults to write a story for me. For all teens. A book for just us to learn that it is ok to have questions about our faith, but it is not ok to leave them unanswered because that is when doubt creeps in. I loved being able to see McLaughin use Disney quotes to better explain the points that she made. It was unlike anything that I had ever seen. I never thought movies that I use to watch as a child would be able to point me to the Lord. I also loved the way that McLaughin gave a short background of each Disney character or Harry Potter reference. I felt as though each background allowed every reader to understand the point McLaughin was trying to make without the need to read or watch the movies. This book was not written for the purpose to answer all questions perfectly. No, it was written to teach us the importance of being in the word. To going to Him when we struggle with doubt and not allowing the enemy to draw us away from the word. Now do not get me wrong. This book is able to answer ten questions over the course of this book, but since this book is so short and geared for any teen during their walk, there are some points that the author did not go too deep into. **I received this book from crossway's blog review program. My thoughts are my own and not paid for.**

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    This is an extremely accessible book for teens, and would serve as both a book on discipleship and apologetics. Author Rebecca McLaughlin is essentially rewriting her previous book "Confronting Christianity" for teens, and does a marvelous job of hitting a number of important issues facing teens today. This is not intended to be a book with all the answers, and it reminds me a lot of Dan Kimball's "How Not to Read the Bible", published late last year. They are different books for sure, with Kimb This is an extremely accessible book for teens, and would serve as both a book on discipleship and apologetics. Author Rebecca McLaughlin is essentially rewriting her previous book "Confronting Christianity" for teens, and does a marvelous job of hitting a number of important issues facing teens today. This is not intended to be a book with all the answers, and it reminds me a lot of Dan Kimball's "How Not to Read the Bible", published late last year. They are different books for sure, with Kimball focusing on the hermeneutical aspects of difficult questions, whereas McLaughlin focuses on the logic of difficult questions. They compliment one another I think, and when read together, teens should have a great framework from which to begin thinking through those issues.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Borwick

    I have mixed reviews on this book. Without a doubt, many of the chapters that are written are rich with sound-doctrine and careful teaching. But, the very first chapter of the book was frustrating for me to read. I personally believe that the first chapter included dangerous teaching with heavy-handed articulation—I would not recommend this book for a teenager, unless it was read in a group setting with the filter of an experienced ministry leader.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nickolas Hartman

    An excellent book that would be good to build a student ministry study based off of. Definitely written for the 11 to 15 age range but if you have a good mix, this book is perfect, just May have to take it a bit deeper with the older students. McLauglin lays it all out on the table, doesn’t sugar coat and deals with real issues which is something we need to do as well.

  8. 5 out of 5

    MRS ALLISON DYER

    Fantastic book!! Rebecca deals with the questions teenagers and adults are faced with day in day out and it’s been so helpful to consider each one. Thank you 👌

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Lovelace

  10. 4 out of 5

    Shelby

  11. 4 out of 5

    Idalisse

  12. 4 out of 5

    Heather Ham

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amy Harris

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristy Simpson-Alvarez

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anthony E.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emily Wallace

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matt Smith

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dan Nichols

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sean Roberts

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Packer

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brett Johnson

  22. 5 out of 5

    Martha

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lauren H. Clawson

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brady

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael Anderson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael Smith

  27. 4 out of 5

    Danny Freed

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jed Walker

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  30. 4 out of 5

    Adam Henker

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