counter Imagine That!: The story of Ed Smith, one of the first African Americans to work in the design of video games and personal computers - Free Download Books
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Imagine That!: The story of Ed Smith, one of the first African Americans to work in the design of video games and personal computers

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32 review for Imagine That!: The story of Ed Smith, one of the first African Americans to work in the design of video games and personal computers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    First of all, thank you Benj Edwards for helping get this story out here. I would never have known about Ed Smith otherwise. I appreciate your articles and tweets that educate me about the early years of one of my hobbies and favorite fields. Second, there was some cool stuff going on in the late 70s/early 80s computing of which I am still largely ignorant, and I am happy to have learned a bit about the MP1000 and the IM1 in this book, when I knew nothing about them before. There was some really First of all, thank you Benj Edwards for helping get this story out here. I would never have known about Ed Smith otherwise. I appreciate your articles and tweets that educate me about the early years of one of my hobbies and favorite fields. Second, there was some cool stuff going on in the late 70s/early 80s computing of which I am still largely ignorant, and I am happy to have learned a bit about the MP1000 and the IM1 in this book, when I knew nothing about them before. There was some really cool things done in the development and marketing. Just because it failed as the industry switched from cassette to floppy disks doesn't mean the people who worked on it were bad at their jobs. I found that to be a valuable lesson to take with me. I found Ed's insights into the industry and how to be a good manager and a good employee to be reminders of how we can work to be better people. Third, this book needs editing. Badly. The first half meanders and rambles like we're sitting down and Ed is just reminiscing about his early life, with tangents as friends and mentors show up that don't add to the story at hand. It could be reworked and made tighter and more compelling. If the friend has a later development in life, maybe we could slide that that in when we reach that point in time later in the book. The second half is more straightforward as we move through his career and accomplishments. However I noticed several copy edits that needed caught in the latter half. This book deserves a 4 star rating for telling the story of an African American pioneer in the computing industry, and for the humility and grace with which he describes his lucky breaks and the way to move your own career forward and up - some of the advice feels a little dated as we move more fully into the gig economy, but most of the principles about leveraging who you know and how to build your own skills still apply. This book deserves a 2 star or even 1 star rating for editing, it needs a lot of work to become a more compelling story and clean up the copy edit misses. So I am averaging it to a 3.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    This was super interesting to read, having knowledge of the SOME of the things, like the history of microprocessors and personal computers and video games, but not other things, like growing up in Brownsville, NY and feeling lucky to escape a cycle of crime and incarceration by getting into tech and one of his first jobs as a traffic signal test engineer. Ed talks a lot about his race and his childhood in the first part of the book, and the development of his career. By the end of the book, he's This was super interesting to read, having knowledge of the SOME of the things, like the history of microprocessors and personal computers and video games, but not other things, like growing up in Brownsville, NY and feeling lucky to escape a cycle of crime and incarceration by getting into tech and one of his first jobs as a traffic signal test engineer. Ed talks a lot about his race and his childhood in the first part of the book, and the development of his career. By the end of the book, he's talking about his corporate jet setting career that kind of goes over my head, but along the way, he shares lessons about holding on to your dreams, imagining thing that are beyond your current reality, and doing the work to make what you've imagined real.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joseph De Maria

    Before I heard about this book I had no idea who Ed Smith is or what the Imagination Machine is. The first portion of the books reads like a conversation Ed is having with you about his youth in Brownsville, jumping around from anecdotes about friends and family. As the books gets more into his career it becomes more linear, and easier to understand the timeline. Both formats feel good, but the first part left me a little confused about when things where happening in his life. There are some tec Before I heard about this book I had no idea who Ed Smith is or what the Imagination Machine is. The first portion of the books reads like a conversation Ed is having with you about his youth in Brownsville, jumping around from anecdotes about friends and family. As the books gets more into his career it becomes more linear, and easier to understand the timeline. Both formats feel good, but the first part left me a little confused about when things where happening in his life. There are some technical descriptions of computers and technology that are hard to follow for a layman, but the story of Ed Smith is interesting and easy enough to follow. If you're interested in video game history or African American history (which is American history) this is worth checking out.

  4. 5 out of 5

    John Engelman

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andy Diller

  6. 4 out of 5

    Donal Heidenblad

  7. 5 out of 5

    Howard

  8. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Smith

  11. 4 out of 5

    Isaac Nitschke

  12. 4 out of 5

    Christian

  13. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Bittner

  14. 5 out of 5

    Billy Kumo

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Sharp

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ken

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  18. 4 out of 5

    Devon

  19. 4 out of 5

    Xargos

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ian Seabrook

  21. 5 out of 5

    Allison Lara

  22. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  23. 5 out of 5

    Italo Felipe Capasso Ballesteros

  24. 5 out of 5

    Blake

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wayne Marsh

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah NoBody

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paul Paradigm

  28. 4 out of 5

    Robbie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Grant Harvey

  30. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

  31. 4 out of 5

    Dave Cheney

  32. 5 out of 5

    Joe

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