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At a stop along her campaign trail, Judge Deborah Knott attends a community picnic at the Mr. Olive Church. When the historic building is destroyed by a fire shortly after the outing -- and the charred skeleton of a young man is found among the ashes -- Knott begins her own investigation into the tragedy. Earlier national news reports of a fire at a local African-American At a stop along her campaign trail, Judge Deborah Knott attends a community picnic at the Mr. Olive Church. When the historic building is destroyed by a fire shortly after the outing -- and the charred skeleton of a young man is found among the ashes -- Knott begins her own investigation into the tragedy. Earlier national news reports of a fire at a local African-American church had already gained the attention of Wallace Adderly, a Black Panther from the '70s. Knott and Adderly team up to discover if the blazes are merely coincidence, or the work of a racist arsonist. As the number of suspects rises, Deborah finds herself re-examining her own beliefs and values as she and Adderly race to prevent another devastating loss in the community.


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At a stop along her campaign trail, Judge Deborah Knott attends a community picnic at the Mr. Olive Church. When the historic building is destroyed by a fire shortly after the outing -- and the charred skeleton of a young man is found among the ashes -- Knott begins her own investigation into the tragedy. Earlier national news reports of a fire at a local African-American At a stop along her campaign trail, Judge Deborah Knott attends a community picnic at the Mr. Olive Church. When the historic building is destroyed by a fire shortly after the outing -- and the charred skeleton of a young man is found among the ashes -- Knott begins her own investigation into the tragedy. Earlier national news reports of a fire at a local African-American church had already gained the attention of Wallace Adderly, a Black Panther from the '70s. Knott and Adderly team up to discover if the blazes are merely coincidence, or the work of a racist arsonist. As the number of suspects rises, Deborah finds herself re-examining her own beliefs and values as she and Adderly race to prevent another devastating loss in the community.

30 review for Home Fires

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jack Heath

    4 Stars. I liked it. Judge Deborah Knott grows on you; she's smart but she doesn't flaunt it; she's a people person but not overly to everyone; she likes a good party but there's a limit; she's in her 30s, not married, and she likes men. How could she not with nine brothers! I'd enjoy meeting her in real life. What I would have done for a list of players though! Rural and small town North Carolina takes some getting used to for this big city, non-American. You'd better get ready for third cousin 4 Stars. I liked it. Judge Deborah Knott grows on you; she's smart but she doesn't flaunt it; she's a people person but not overly to everyone; she likes a good party but there's a limit; she's in her 30s, not married, and she likes men. How could she not with nine brothers! I'd enjoy meeting her in real life. What I would have done for a list of players though! Rural and small town North Carolina takes some getting used to for this big city, non-American. You'd better get ready for third cousins once removed. And a different view of race relations. Plus so many churches - every chapter starts with a church sign such as, "Angels don't look for angles." When a cemetery is desecrated and a black church torched, with the resulting arrest of her nephew, our hero gets drawn in by one of those brothers. She's in the middle of her judicial re-election campaign (!) and building a new house; she knows this is not a judge's role, but she really can't say "No." A murder or two makes an appearance, and more black churches are burned. All in all, an eye-opener of an outing in a beautiful part of the United States. (November 2019)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ferne

    I've been reading the Deborah Knott Mysteries that I have had on my tbr pile so this has moved me from Book 3 to Book 6. Readers of my previous reviews may remember my delight with the feature of italicized sentences which I enjoy as it provides a "heading" and/or very effective "lead-in" at the beginning of each chapter and have been related to the overall theme of each novel. In "Home Fires" although the sentences are related to the novel's theme, I did not find them as effective as in Books 2 I've been reading the Deborah Knott Mysteries that I have had on my tbr pile so this has moved me from Book 3 to Book 6. Readers of my previous reviews may remember my delight with the feature of italicized sentences which I enjoy as it provides a "heading" and/or very effective "lead-in" at the beginning of each chapter and have been related to the overall theme of each novel. In "Home Fires" although the sentences are related to the novel's theme, I did not find them as effective as in Books 2 and 3. As no credit was given on the copyright page I'm not sure if the author saw these sayings on church signage or if they are also of her own creation. This is the first time that I have viewed "Deborah Knott's Family Tree" on the opposite page of Chapter 1 and it is very helpful. After reading several books in the series right in a row I'm more familiar with Deborah's large family but it was still convenient to refer back to the chart and I wish it would have been available in the first book I read in the series which was Book 2, "Southern Discomfort." A very poignant paragraph in the novel states "God knows life would be a lot simpler if we could all wake up one morning color-blind, but we're nowhere close to it on either side. Not by a long shot. We continue to lead separate, parallel personal lives, seldom connecting without self-consciousness, at genuine ease only at points of old familiarity such as Maidie and me here in my mother's kitchen. It was at that point that I had to pause in my reading to look at the copyright page to learn when the novel was published and was saddened by the copyright date of 1998. 22 years since the author wrote those words. How little progress we have made as the author later writes, "...that people might quit letting their eyes stop at a person's skin but keep on looking deeper until each saw the other's humanity." Or as the saying goes, “If not us, who? If not now, when?” Margaret Maron writes excellent murder mysteries and they occur in the midst of everyday life and highlight relevant themes that all beg the reader and even challenge the reader to be better tomorrow than we were today not merely with our words but more importantly with our actions.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Richard Brand

    This is a story of church burnings in North Carolina in the early 60's or 70's. I am not real sure. Helms and Harry Gant were listed as senate candidates. Of course, one of the Knott relatives is accused of the being a part of a group of teenagers who did the fires. We have all kinds of love interest with Deborah and her game warden. There is her building of a new house. There are lots of interesting discussion about race relations and there are many good insights into the dynamics of black whit This is a story of church burnings in North Carolina in the early 60's or 70's. I am not real sure. Helms and Harry Gant were listed as senate candidates. Of course, one of the Knott relatives is accused of the being a part of a group of teenagers who did the fires. We have all kinds of love interest with Deborah and her game warden. There is her building of a new house. There are lots of interesting discussion about race relations and there are many good insights into the dynamics of black white. This being read at a time when Black Lives Matter and Dallas cops being shot, it was troubling how much of this story is still deja vue. Maron does make her major character and the supporting cast feel like real people you know, and being southerners in North Carolina it is fun to know the TV announcers she mentions and the locales.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kilian Metcalf

    Judge Knott is back home in Colleton County where she belongs. She's nesting now, building her own home on a parcel of land her daddy deeded her. She needs the privacy now for visits from her beau. Another great mystery from a master. Judge Knott is back home in Colleton County where she belongs. She's nesting now, building her own home on a parcel of land her daddy deeded her. She needs the privacy now for visits from her beau. Another great mystery from a master.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dail Sams

    The burning of three black churches causes Deborah and her neighbors to recognized the subtle racism that still pervades their community. Deborah builds a house on Knott land and prepares to begin a new stage of life.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Wanda

    Judge Knott's nephew gets involved with two boys who vandalize a cemetery. Some black churches are burned down and similar writing as found in the cemetery is found on the church walls. She believes her nephew innocent and starts poking around to find out the truth. There is still a lot of conflict between blacks and whites in this southern county and tension simmers. She doesn't want things to get out of hand and is trying to understand things from both perspectives. She is also concerned with t Judge Knott's nephew gets involved with two boys who vandalize a cemetery. Some black churches are burned down and similar writing as found in the cemetery is found on the church walls. She believes her nephew innocent and starts poking around to find out the truth. There is still a lot of conflict between blacks and whites in this southern county and tension simmers. She doesn't want things to get out of hand and is trying to understand things from both perspectives. She is also concerned with the building of her new house and her relationship with her boyfriend who doesn't live very close to her town. She tries to befriend a deputy DA who has issues from.her past that have been brought back to the present. Deals with some interesting racial issues along with how connected to each other some families are and how important family history can be to some.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Merlot58

    I really love the Deborah Knott series. Set in the South, there is always an intriguing mystery, but more importantly, family and the general social network of the towns in the area factor as a more important part of the story. The characters are consistently well fleshed out and believable. These are relatively short books but they are so good. This book (and others in the series) also deals with the race issues inherently found in North Carolina, in what feels to me a very real way. Admittedly I really love the Deborah Knott series. Set in the South, there is always an intriguing mystery, but more importantly, family and the general social network of the towns in the area factor as a more important part of the story. The characters are consistently well fleshed out and believable. These are relatively short books but they are so good. This book (and others in the series) also deals with the race issues inherently found in North Carolina, in what feels to me a very real way. Admittedly, this is fiction. This was written in 1998 and Maron is talking about white privilege, a current topic, and this was written 20 years ago. So, I would say these books are still relevant as we still have the same problems. There are still some glaringly dated turns of phrase, even though the heart of this book is in the right place.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I am reading this series again because I enjoy the main character so much. Deborah Knott is the youngest in a family of twelve and the only girl. She is a respected judge in her small North Carolina town of Dobbs who manages to get involved in the latest crime wave. In this book, the story is again set in Dobbs and involves members of her community. Fires are being set and black churches are burning to the ground. Deborah manages to be in the thick of it and helps solve the crimes. I also want t I am reading this series again because I enjoy the main character so much. Deborah Knott is the youngest in a family of twelve and the only girl. She is a respected judge in her small North Carolina town of Dobbs who manages to get involved in the latest crime wave. In this book, the story is again set in Dobbs and involves members of her community. Fires are being set and black churches are burning to the ground. Deborah manages to be in the thick of it and helps solve the crimes. I also want to mention that the quotes at the start of each chapter are great too.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    While imperfect and tipping a bit into white saviorness (though given Deborah is the MC in the series, bound to happen), I give Maron props for writing about racism, about the layers in black-white friendships. This novel is also a turning point in Maron's style, moving into multiple POV and starting characters who run in the secondary plot and take on more significant roles in the next book in the series. Granted, I've now listened to enough of the series to recognize the subtle clues of who is While imperfect and tipping a bit into white saviorness (though given Deborah is the MC in the series, bound to happen), I give Maron props for writing about racism, about the layers in black-white friendships. This novel is also a turning point in Maron's style, moving into multiple POV and starting characters who run in the secondary plot and take on more significant roles in the next book in the series. Granted, I've now listened to enough of the series to recognize the subtle clues of who is going to be the it person, but I didn't foresee the motive.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    I enjoy every book in this series. the beginning of each chapter of this one highlights the quirky messages of small-town church signs. If you drive on rural roads you will immediately recognize the accuracy and giggle just a little. Since the mystery revolves around church burning, it's a great touch. This is the "food" entry of the series. Almost every chapter highlights another quintessential food of this rural area just outside (SE) of Raleigh NC area. Read for the local flavor! I enjoy every book in this series. the beginning of each chapter of this one highlights the quirky messages of small-town church signs. If you drive on rural roads you will immediately recognize the accuracy and giggle just a little. Since the mystery revolves around church burning, it's a great touch. This is the "food" entry of the series. Almost every chapter highlights another quintessential food of this rural area just outside (SE) of Raleigh NC area. Read for the local flavor!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This mystery finds Judge Deborah Knott close to home, focusing on an outburst of arson at local African-American churches and dealing with family problems. BTW, I’m used to cover illustrations not matching the story, but inaccurate descriptions in the blurb here on Goodreads? — c’mon, publishers, it’s not that hard to get it right, just read the book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Grove

    Think this may be the first Margaret Maron book I read - years ago. It was great to e-read it. The book covers, around the mystery that is, matters of racial tension and violence as well as the stupidity (in the nicest sense) of teenagers. All set around the burning of three churches bearing racist slogans. The denoument was both surprising and sad. Altogether an excellent read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Camilla Harry

    Another great mystery by Margaret Maron, an author I like. I'm sure I'll be sad when I finish this series as I believe she has ended it, but I do have about 10 left to go. I like to read a series in order, but in this one I have already read a few later on in the series. I did not see the ending coming in this one at all either! Another great mystery by Margaret Maron, an author I like. I'm sure I'll be sad when I finish this series as I believe she has ended it, but I do have about 10 left to go. I like to read a series in order, but in this one I have already read a few later on in the series. I did not see the ending coming in this one at all either!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Diane Heath

    I love Deborah Knott's family and her stories. I am filling in the books I have missed. I may be wind up rereading some of them. This one was new to me as Deborah's house is just being finished. She is not yet married to Dwight but is dating a character I don't recognize. I love Deborah Knott's family and her stories. I am filling in the books I have missed. I may be wind up rereading some of them. This one was new to me as Deborah's house is just being finished. She is not yet married to Dwight but is dating a character I don't recognize.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Julia Lee

    Enjoyed it as I usually do with this series. I appreciate her sense of humor along with her attention to the cultural aspects of the place and time. In this book I found it a little harder to keep track of the characters. I listened to it as an audio book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Young

    Debra and Dwight! Yippee!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nita

    good southern influence but i just couldn't get into it good southern influence but i just couldn't get into it

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I had a hard time getting into this book and I am really not sure why. Great writing and characters but the story did not grab me.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    great color. good relationships and history. good read. light on mystery.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Pat

    Very interesting. I enjoy the down home details of Deborah Knott stories.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Barb

    Another good thriller with plenty of twists and interesting characters.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Micheale

    I’m a fan of this series and Margaret Maron’s skillful writing. Home Fires is yet another good read with quirky characters and an unexpected twist.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Camisa

    Another chapter in the life of Judge Knott that was a nice read about important current and on going issues.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    I am on a reading quest to read all of Margaret Maron's Deborah Knott Mystery series. So far I have read Shooting At Loons, Killer Market, Death's Half Acre, and Long Upon the Land. I have just finished Home Fires and it might be the best one yet. The series is about the Knott family of North Carolina. Deborah is a Circuit Court Judge at the start of a reelection campaign. Her father plans a picnic to kick off the start of her campaign with a pig smoked in a cooker, soft drinks iced in big garba I am on a reading quest to read all of Margaret Maron's Deborah Knott Mystery series. So far I have read Shooting At Loons, Killer Market, Death's Half Acre, and Long Upon the Land. I have just finished Home Fires and it might be the best one yet. The series is about the Knott family of North Carolina. Deborah is a Circuit Court Judge at the start of a reelection campaign. Her father plans a picnic to kick off the start of her campaign with a pig smoked in a cooker, soft drinks iced in big garbage pails bought for this purpose, wooden tubs filled with lemonade, roasted pork slathered with a vinegar based sauce, hushpuppies, and slaw. During the celebration her nephew is arrested, with two friends, for desecrating a cemetery. When the same spray painted graffiti shows up at an African American church that's been torched, the young men are suspected of arson. Deborah is determined to help her nephew, but when two more black churches are burned, she is totally blindsided when two bodies are uncovered under one of the churches. Though Deborah is busy with her reelection and building a house at the back of her father's property, she is determined to help a member of her family. The author does an incredible job of making the reader part of the action. She describes two inner voices for her protagonist, "the Preacher" and the "pragmatist" who seem to perch on her shoulder and compete for her main character's decisions. A foil is introduced with the local D. A. who is black, strict, and aloof to Deborah's openness. She routinely deals out harsher recommendations of punishment to the black men, while the judge is far more lenient. A case comes up in Deborah's court involving a black woman charged with writing two cold checks to a local department store. In offering her reason, she claims to have added up wrong and loaned her sister money for her son's glasses. Her sister was supposed to give her the money back but couldn't until she received a check for work she had done. She stated that her sister had the money now, but she needed to get it. Deborah asked where she lived and the woman said in Raleigh. Deborah asked if she had a car and when the woman said she did, Deborah told her to drive to Raleigh, pick up the money and return to court. After the afternoon recess, the Judge saw her sitting in the courtroom and asked if she had the money. She did and paid. The book is a blend of the old south country comfort and New South sophistication. The reader feels at home with the vivid descriptions of the location, customs, food, and love of family. A solid five stars.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

    I really enjoyed this book, Margaret Maron adds alittle bit of history, humor and family in all the books I've read of hers so far...and its a delightful cozy mystery, that keeps you guessing and often surprises you when you find out the culprit. This is book 6. From Amazon: Margaret Maron has brought to life the landscape and people, the history and current concerns of a contemporary South. As akin to Carson McCullers and William Faulkneras she is to her fellow mystery writers, Maron now conti I really enjoyed this book, Margaret Maron adds alittle bit of history, humor and family in all the books I've read of hers so far...and its a delightful cozy mystery, that keeps you guessing and often surprises you when you find out the culprit. This is book 6. From Amazon: Margaret Maron has brought to life the landscape and people, the history and current concerns of a contemporary South. As akin to Carson McCullers and William Faulkneras she is to her fellow mystery writers, Maron now continues her acclaimed series with a chilling story of suspense: a searing crisis of race and region and other burning issues of the heart . . . One place the two Souths—black and white—meet is in Judge Deborah Knott’s courtroom. From the pretty yet aggressive D.A. who requests harsh sentences for her fellow African-Americans to the three white teens caught desecrating a family graveyard with hate slogans, racial bias still tries the soul and tests the sense of justice in Colleton County, North Carolina. Busy with her reelection campaign and building a new house on land that has been in her family for generations, Deborah has both deep roots and a professional stake in her community. She’s shaken when her nephew A.K. is arrested with a group of vandalizing teens at a local cemetery. Torn between her duty as a judge and her loyalty to her large, close-knit family, Deborah has to decide how far she can go to protect him. Then the first black church burns. Determined to investigate the arson in which A.K. has become a suspect, Deborah Knott is quickly swept into the dark undercurrents of prejudice, pain,m and betrayal in this rural Southern county. Add to this the sudden arrival of a 1970s black activist-turned-public-figure, the emerging secrets of an angry young woman and the burning of two more churches, and Deborah faces a crisis that will challenge her political acumen, her detective skills, and her core beliefs. The sins of the past return to forever change the present in Margaret Maron’s most riveting, emotionally moving novel to date, a mystery that involves color and kinship, and the unbreakable bonds of love . . .

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    A cemetary vandalism leads townspeople to believe a pair of teens are burning churches. One of those burnings results in murder, and Judge Deborah Knott is determined to find out the truth. This novel seemed to start off rather slow. Looking back now, I see that it was very strong in character development, not as strong in plot development. The character of Deborah was rather humorous. First of all she is “Judge Knott” in a book with strong religious references and racial issues – a la “Judge not A cemetary vandalism leads townspeople to believe a pair of teens are burning churches. One of those burnings results in murder, and Judge Deborah Knott is determined to find out the truth. This novel seemed to start off rather slow. Looking back now, I see that it was very strong in character development, not as strong in plot development. The character of Deborah was rather humorous. First of all she is “Judge Knott” in a book with strong religious references and racial issues – a la “Judge not lest ye be judged”? I also loved the pragmatist and the preacher. Made me think of movies and television where a little person sits on each shoulder of the character. I enjoyed the way Maron made religious threads weave through the entire novel. Not only does the novel involve burning churches, but each chapter starts out with a church sign. Personally, I get a kick out of reading church signs and the way they make use of the English language and its devices. Then of course there are quite a few Biblical illusions scattered throughout as well. I also found her approach to the racial issues of the book interesting. There are many people out there trying to make a difference – both black and white, but those same people, well-meaning as they are, continue to keep the divide present. There were some small details throughout that seemed to bug me. For example, toward the end, Deborah calls the sheriff to tell him to get a warrant to search a home. Yet, she gives no just cause for the warrant – she simply says “make sure you get [it].” No judge would do that because he/she would know a warrant couldn’t be issued just on say-so; cause is mandatory.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    This is book six in the Knott series. I started with book one and I am reading my way through the series. I was attracted to the series after noting all the various awards it had won such as the Edgar, Macovity and the Anthony awards. In this book Maron incorporates the changes and problems that integration has brought to the New South. She did this most skillfully considering the delicate topic. Judge Deborah Knott, who narrates the story, is at the start of a re-election campaign when a nephew This is book six in the Knott series. I started with book one and I am reading my way through the series. I was attracted to the series after noting all the various awards it had won such as the Edgar, Macovity and the Anthony awards. In this book Maron incorporates the changes and problems that integration has brought to the New South. She did this most skillfully considering the delicate topic. Judge Deborah Knott, who narrates the story, is at the start of a re-election campaign when a nephew is arrested, with two friends, for desecrating a cemetery. Then black churches are torched and two bodies uncovered; the three boys are the prime suspects. In a separate plotline the fate of a young civil rights worker, missing for twenty years is brought to light. Knott has her work cut out for her in this suspenseful story. The book is well written. Maron lays the groundwork with subtlety, however, and she brings much more depth to her portrait of small town doings than do many of the mystery writers. The plot is engrossing and entertaining. I read this as an audiobook downloaded from Audible. The book is an easy read at just over seven hours. C.J. Critt is a magnificent job narrating the series.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Cam

    Judge Knott once again has an amazing ability to overhear just enough conversations to figure things out just before the officials do. Even so, this series is more about the setting, the changing times, and the slow progress in Judge Knott and her extended family. In this one, 3 African-American churches are burned in a short period and one of her nephew's is tied to one for sure and his 2 friends to the others. Lots of musings on race in America and North Carolina and the importance of land and Judge Knott once again has an amazing ability to overhear just enough conversations to figure things out just before the officials do. Even so, this series is more about the setting, the changing times, and the slow progress in Judge Knott and her extended family. In this one, 3 African-American churches are burned in a short period and one of her nephew's is tied to one for sure and his 2 friends to the others. Lots of musings on race in America and North Carolina and the importance of land and kinship to everyone in the area. A subplot involved a former sixties activist, the high-strung assistant DA brings light to the courtroom circles and starts to flesh out what had been a brief sketch of a character. Daddy Knott is still around, keeping his grandchildren in line. Deborah builds a house with a great pier, and hosts a 4th of July party and is keeping her relationship going. Of course, there are a few red herrings and an unexpected suspect and plenty of loose ends to keep it real. These are great light reads; as comforting and entertaining as a favorite t.v. detective or mystery show.

  29. 5 out of 5

    LJ

    HOME FIRES (Traditional Mystery-North Carolina-Cont) - VG Maron, Margaret – 6th in series Mysterious Press, 1998 – Hardcover Judge Deborah Knott’s nephew and his two friends are arrested for damaging gravestones and paint spraying racial slurs and symbols on them. A black church, on which similar symbols have been sprayed, is burned the three are immediate suspects. When a second church is burned and people die, Deborah is determined to find the culprit before racial violence breaks out. *** It had HOME FIRES (Traditional Mystery-North Carolina-Cont) - VG Maron, Margaret – 6th in series Mysterious Press, 1998 – Hardcover Judge Deborah Knott’s nephew and his two friends are arrested for damaging gravestones and paint spraying racial slurs and symbols on them. A black church, on which similar symbols have been sprayed, is burned the three are immediate suspects. When a second church is burned and people die, Deborah is determined to find the culprit before racial violence breaks out. *** It had been awhile since I’d read Maron; I’d forgotten how good she is and what strong, character-driven mysteries she writes. I love Deborah’s relationship with her family and friends. Her observations on society and racism were insightful without being preachy. Deborah’s inner self of The Preacher and the Pragmatist add humor and insight into the character. The story is engrossing and I was surprised by the killer. This was a wonderful, straight-through read and a classic example as to why Ms. Maron is an award-winning author.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    Judge Deborah Knott is once again entangled in a murder and her extended family, friends and co-workers are all out there trying to help her solve it. Three black churches are burned, two completely, one just damaged and in the ashes of the damaged church the body of the sexton is found. Deborah's nephew A.K. is initially a suspect but ends up with an alibi for the 2nd and 3rd church so he is off the hook but his two friends are soon up on murder charges, and because this was a church burning the Judge Deborah Knott is once again entangled in a murder and her extended family, friends and co-workers are all out there trying to help her solve it. Three black churches are burned, two completely, one just damaged and in the ashes of the damaged church the body of the sexton is found. Deborah's nephew A.K. is initially a suspect but ends up with an alibi for the 2nd and 3rd church so he is off the hook but his two friends are soon up on murder charges, and because this was a church burning the charges are federal Of course, there is a lot more going on, one of the ADA's is acting strange, a big-shot black activist comes to town, and Deborah is watching her house be built by family and friends. I enjoy visiting with the Judge and her cast of characters, especially her extended family (somewhere out there is a family tree and if you want to keep people straight you might want to find it). I'll be moving along to the next in the series.

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