counter Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics

Availability: Ready to download


Compare

30 review for Except for Palestine: The Limits of Progressive Politics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sleepless Dreamer

    Marc Lamont Hill's I/P conflict takes are usually tone-deaf so my hopes for this book were low but this wasn’t as bad as other stuff he's said in the past. I'll start off with some general comments before getting into everything, let’s go! Except for Palestine claims that American progressives treat Palestinians exceptionally by allowing unprogressive policy towards them. However, when I think about the entire MENA region and American policy, it seems progressives pay more attention to the I/P c Marc Lamont Hill's I/P conflict takes are usually tone-deaf so my hopes for this book were low but this wasn’t as bad as other stuff he's said in the past. I'll start off with some general comments before getting into everything, let’s go! Except for Palestine claims that American progressives treat Palestinians exceptionally by allowing unprogressive policy towards them. However, when I think about the entire MENA region and American policy, it seems progressives pay more attention to the I/P conflict than to other conflicts. Not updated to 2021, but who's really exceptional here for progressives? Either way, approaching American policy in regards to I/P without discussing American policy in the Middle East seems wrong. America doesn't inherently care about the lives of Palestinians or Israelis. This is about power, it's about Russia and China and Iran. It's about the Cold War and radical Islam and imperialism and oil and capitalism. Which, okay, Israel gains by being "on America's side" in the Middle East but analyzing American foreign policy about I/P without looking at the broader connection to the Middle East seems misleading and methodologically flawed. Why is support for Israel mostly bi-partisan? That can't be answered without looking at American interests in the entire MENA region. Beyond this, it's unclear who’s the target audience. It seems like it's meant for American progressives who don't know much about Palestine but the authors assume much prior knowledge. How many Americans know what big historical event happened in 1973, what the second intifada was and why Oslo failed? Heck, how many know where the Golan is? For those who are familiar with the conflict, this book just doesn't say much. I honestly expected the takes here to be spicier (like Hill’s interviews). This is as bland as Democrat economic policy. My Shabbat dinners have edgier takes. As always, it becomes painfully clear that Israelis weren't really spoken to. So here I am, ready to explain what this book misses, chapter by chapter (there are only four so it’s feasible). Putting it in spoiler tags to make it more organized! Israel's Right to Exist (view spoiler)[Essentially, the argument in this chapter is that Israel's demand of Palestinians to recognize its existence is merely a tool in order to avoid solutions and is unfair towards Palestinians. As they write, we must define what recognizing Israel means. Truly, it's not about recognizing that Israel exists (cause you know, it simply does) or about rights to Israelis. The authors conclude that it's about legitimizing Israel's behavior towards Palestinians. I disagree (of course I do). Take a look at Fatah's insignia or every Palestinian tiktok where they delete Israel off the map. Recognizing Israel means recognizing that Jews have a claim to the land too. It means recognizing that Israel, as a Jewish country, has a right to exist. Not that it exists, but that it should exist. The recognition of Israel is meant to be a promise of coexistence which is essential for a two-state solution. Are there issues with a Jewish country? Sure. Such issues need to be resolved (equal funding, recognition of non-Orthodox Judaism, fighting racism, etc). However, just as America's systematic racism doesn't mean America should cease to exist, the line between criticizing Israel's politics and claiming the country itself isn't legitimate is precisely why this gets spoken about. They ask why Israel is so invested in getting recognition from Palestinians and no one else, almost as if there isn't, you know, a conflict going on. I don't care if Malaysia doesn't recognize Israel because there isn't a conflict. Recognizing Israel's right to exist as a Jewish state doesn't take away the Palestinian right for a Palestinian state to exist. It is through such acknowledgements that some kind of co-living can begin. Which is why Israel recognized the PLO in return for the PLO's recognition of Israel. What were they expecting? For the IDF to disband cause wow, Palestinians recognize Israel? Americans should ask themselves what can be done to further mutual recognition, rather than claim that recognition isn't important. The lack of recognition flows both ways ("Israelis are European colonizers", "Palestinians are just Arabs") and it is equally harmful. If we don't believe the other side deserves to live here, how can we live together? (hide spoiler)] Criminalizing BDS (view spoiler)[I didn't disagree with everything that was written here, it's a miracle! Clearly, the hasbara has stopped working (whoever translated hasbara as propaganda has a very weak grasp on Hebrew and I hate that it's become a given that that's what it means). So this chapter claims that criminalizing BDS is wrong because BDS isn't run by a foreign country but by civil society. Additionally, the authors try to claim that BDS is merely trying to fight for equal rights. Supporters of Israel dislike it because it raises uncomfortable questions. So I fully agree that criminalizing BDS isn't right. As a progressive, I do believe people can do whatever they want with their money- it's not up to the state to decide. Moreover, fighting BDS through the court is not the way to go. We shouldn't silence those who challenge us but face them (I got a BDS supporter the other day to say that she's equally against a Palestinian country so I'm definitely spending my study time right). I have an actually list of reasons why BDS is problematic but the character limit is a thing so I'll sum it up by saying that BDS is problematic because it (1) fails to fight against antisemitism done in its name (2) negatively impacts people living in the land by taking jobs away from Palestinians and hurting the weakest in Israeli society (3) doesn't offer any kind of feasible solution that could work and (4) hurts the ability of Israelis and Palestinians to lead the way together. The authors don't discuss these points because it would force them to acknowledge that BDS isn't black and white. It's not just a civil rights movement and there are valid reasons for Israeli opposition that aren't just "nooo, don't talk about Palestinians". (hide spoiler)] American Policy (view spoiler)[This chapter lacks content the most. The argument is that Trump's Israel/Palestine policy changes weren't a big change from other American politicians, they were just less subtle. From moving the embassy to viewing the Golan as part of Israel, there is bipartisan support. However, this feels like beating around the bush. I don't care where the embassy is (though, ugh, Tel Aviv) or if America recognizes the Golan. This isn't the heart of anything, it’s just pure politics. I don't know what America could actually do to further reconciliation. I'm more of a Politics than an International Relations kind of guy. However, symbolic changes aren't it. At a guess, I'd say putting pressure on Israel and Palestine to get the Palestinian leadership problem solved, furthering Israeli-Palestinian cooperation in civil society (and not just conflict based), letting go of the two-state plan, throwing away the one-state plan and starting new peace talks with new solutions. Heck, more deliberative democracy and power to civilians. Small steps, rather than big grandiose plans. Have a constant back-up plan for when things inevitably go wrong. Accept that trust will have to be built slowly. Get the people of each society on board, rather than the politicians. Recognize that we are traumatized and skeptical of foreign involvement. There is much that can be done. On the Golan, briefly. The Golan is 1,800 square kms, smaller than West Sussex or the Virgin Islands. On the very long list of problems Syria has, is this really the hill American foreign policy should die on? It's like how Assad recently assured Syrians that he won't make peace with Israel or legalize gay marriage, as if that's what Syrians care about right now. Yeah, it sucks that Syria lost wars with Israel but you'll forgive me for not particularly feeling sad that they lost a bit of land and weren't willing to discuss any kind of resolution with Israel (the Wikipedia page for Syria-Israel independent peace efforts include Israel's 2000 Eurovision entry, I kid you not). And a word on UNRWA. I will never ever speak against helping refugees. That said, UNRWA's inability to help refugees get settled seems counteractive. I'd like to believe one day an Israeli leader and a Palestinian leader will sit at the table and talk about the Right of Return but with how things look now, that day seems so far and in the meantime, these people continue to live in refugee camps. It is bizarre that these organizations have a political interest to keep their refugee status as descendants, that finding these people homes isn't a top priority. Everyone is tossing around responsibility and ultimately, UNRWA seems to be keeping things as is, rather than fixing the lives of those they claim to help. Ultimately, Jerusalem, UNRWA, the Golan, they're all just symbolic, it's bandaids on a gun wound. Not giving UNRWA funds won't solve the refugee problem. Moving the embassy won't solve the Jerusalem problem (what can we do, Jerusalem is so great that everyone wants it). Sure, it's for the "Israeli side" but in the long run, it's for no one. Let's stop framing this as "Israel vs Palestine" and start considering what's good for all of us. (hide spoiler)] Gaza (view spoiler)[This chapter is the best written. The authors describe the history of Gaza, from the Egyptian occupation to the disengagement plan to Cast Lead and Protective Edge (all the operation names sound cooler in Hebrew ngl, I would not translate eitan as protective). On a public policy level, this chapter is unfair (look at me talking about public policy instead of writing the report that I very much have to hand in, anyway, don't do internships, kids). When we're discussing policy, analysis can't be so biased. We should separate the facts from their motive and from their various impacts. For example, the Gaza disengagement plan. It is a fact that Israel unilaterally dismantled all settlements and stepped out of the land. Did Sharon do it as a step for peace or because he was setting Palestinians up for failure? That's analyzing the motives and can't be portrayed as a yes or no question, as they do. Was it a good idea? That's a normative question and requires looking at the impact for everyone. Things in Gaza are not good, despite how wild it is to see YouTube videos like this one. However, the issues Gaza faces are beyond the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. If I have to pick a field in Economics, def going with Development Economics to understand how a country gets back on its feet. It's nice to say that if Israel were to open the border, Gaza would be okay but this is naïve. As a side note, why was the great march of return frightening for Israelis? Is it because of Israeli fear of the Right of Return, as they claim? Take a look at the map and you can see that right next to Gaza's border, you have civilians. Now, during those marches, you had as many as 50,000 people. Israel may have used too much force but let's not pretend those 50,000 people weren't any kind of threat. I shudder to think of what would happen if 50,000 Mexicans tried walking towards the US border, even if it was fully peaceful (which the march of return was not). (hide spoiler)] Conclusion (view spoiler)[They sum up the book by saying that it is changing and that Republicans are now more "Pro-Israel" while Democrats are more "Pro-Palestinian". A mere page before the authors point out that Israeli policy in Gaza hasn't been helpful for anyone. Now, if policy making hasn't been good for all of us, not just Palestinians perhaps it's time to let go of "Pro-Palestinian" and "Pro-Israeli" and start adopting the mindset that there can be solutions that are pro-Israeli and pro-Palestinian. Republicans and Democrats turning this into a partisan issue is dangerous for us all. (At this point my Palestinian friends would probably say that no one in the American political scene truly represents their interests, even Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib). To me, it feels like Americans almost turn this into a sporting event, a competition. It is not Israelis who wave the Israeli flag in radical right wing rallies and it is not Palestinians who vandalize synagogues with "Free Palestine". They criticize the idea that Palestinian rights must be defended because it'll be better for Israelis. And yeah, sure, everyone deserves equal rights as a means to its own end but the idea here is that Palestinians and Israelis are intertwined. There is no Palestinian liberation without Israeli liberation. Our economies, our history, the environment, the culture, we share so much so it's in all of our benefits when things improve. Finally, they offer the usual empty ideas. Ending the blockade on Gaza and ceasing settlements. Wow. Insightful. Truly, none of us have thought about this before. Here's my take on this: both the 1947 and the 1967 borders mean nothing. Clearly, both Israelis and Palestinians aren't on board with them. We must acknowledge that there is a Jewish/Israeli claim to Hebron, just like there's a Palestinian claim to Acre. With this in mind, our thinking can't be about drawing borders but rather about building a political system that gives each people sovereignty and allows for people to settle everywhere. Basically, both the one-state and the two-state solution aren't going to be enough. We need to stop fooling ourselves and start looking at reality lucidly. In conclusion, can the British come back? (hide spoiler)] What I'm Taking With Me - they also blame Israel for the bad relations with various Arab countries?? Tell me, what has Israel done to Libya? The Arab League has been boycotting Israel far before the 1967 occupation and frankly, doesn’t care about Palestinians. - Also, it's pretty much a given that Israel cooperates with Egypt and Jordan far more than is publicly known. - I like writing these long reviews cause looking back at this is going to be a lot of fun. Also, way better than doing math. - I suspect Plitnick reined in some of Hill's ideas and added the academic nuances. - I wonder if anyone got through reading the entire review and if one day I'll work in politics and feel everything here is wrong.

  2. 5 out of 5

    BooksAmyRead

    I had the chance to read an advanced copy of this book thanks to #netgalley and I'm so thankful I did. The book is so well researched, straight to the point and asks the most daring of questions; why is it that the liberals of the US, both private citizens and public officials alike, call for justice and peace everywhere in the world "Except for Palestine". Why is it that when it comes to the lives and basic human rights of Palestinians does the world suddenly turn a blind eye? My personal opini I had the chance to read an advanced copy of this book thanks to #netgalley and I'm so thankful I did. The book is so well researched, straight to the point and asks the most daring of questions; why is it that the liberals of the US, both private citizens and public officials alike, call for justice and peace everywhere in the world "Except for Palestine". Why is it that when it comes to the lives and basic human rights of Palestinians does the world suddenly turn a blind eye? My personal opinion is that Israel can give master classes in spinning realities and controlling the public narrative but after reading the book you may have your own opinions on the subject but one thing is for sure, it won't leave you indifferent to the topic. This book forms a bold call to action, a wake up call of sorts, to the realities of people who were made into refugees on their own land. Hats off to Marc and Mitchell on this work!

  3. 4 out of 5

    charlotte (moerreads)

    EXCEPT FOR PALESTINE Thank you to @thenewpress for the #gifted ARC! Whenever someone asks “what’s the deal with Israel & Palestine?” I have always responded (somewhat cheekily) “do you have ten hours?” It’s always felt important to give people the history so they can fully grasp how we got to where we are. & no, not “they’ve been fighting over this for 3,000 years” history (anyone who tells you that the two don’t get along because of ‘ancient religious feuds’ should not be listened to) but rather EXCEPT FOR PALESTINE Thank you to @thenewpress for the #gifted ARC! Whenever someone asks “what’s the deal with Israel & Palestine?” I have always responded (somewhat cheekily) “do you have ten hours?” It’s always felt important to give people the history so they can fully grasp how we got to where we are. & no, not “they’ve been fighting over this for 3,000 years” history (anyone who tells you that the two don’t get along because of ‘ancient religious feuds’ should not be listened to) but rather “we need to go back to 1896, 1917, or at least 1948” history. With this, however, Hill & Plitnick have made my answer a lot simpler. Never, and I mean never, in the seven years I’ve been learning about this topic have I read something as concise & razor-sharp as the scholarship in these 158 pages. The beauty of this book is that you don’t *need* to know about the roots of Zionism or the details of the 1967 & 1973 wars (though it helps for sure) to recognize the single most important fact: Palestinians deserve equal rights & justice because everyone deserves equal rights & justice. & further, it is high time that people who champion these ideals stop pretending that Palestine can be the exception; there is simply no excuse. In a world where the left is fighting for LGBTQ+ rights, Indigenous land, the climate, racial equity & more, we cannot possibly continue to uphold this violent contradiction in leaving out Palestine. This is not a “congrats, you’re liberal” feel-good text. It is a necessary reckoning with US actions & complicity--from leaders & citizens on the right & left--in the protracted suffering of Palestinians.  The book is divided into four highly accessible topics: nationalism & the demand on Palestinians to affirm Israel’s right to exist, the Boycott, Divest & Sanction (BDS) movement & the fight to criminalize it, US policy toward Palestine over time, and the crisis in Gaza.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Isha

    More of a 3.5 for me. Well written and informative, though I would imagine most readers who pick up the book probably already agree with their general thesis. My main criticism is that it isn’t entirely clear to me who the intended audience is or whether the authors contributed anything new to the topic.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sherrie

    ***I won this book in a Goodreads Giveaway*** Marc Lamont Hill has a valuable and timely thesis here. Progressives, as a group, prioritize human rights around the world as fundamental but have been notably quiet when it comes to the human rights of Palestinians. This needs to be understood so we can do better for ALL people. Unfortunately, I don't think this thesis can be properly fleshed out in a book that's only 158 pages. Either Mr. Hill wrote under the assumption that his audience knows the h ***I won this book in a Goodreads Giveaway*** Marc Lamont Hill has a valuable and timely thesis here. Progressives, as a group, prioritize human rights around the world as fundamental but have been notably quiet when it comes to the human rights of Palestinians. This needs to be understood so we can do better for ALL people. Unfortunately, I don't think this thesis can be properly fleshed out in a book that's only 158 pages. Either Mr. Hill wrote under the assumption that his audience knows the history of the region reasonably well or he doesn't find that particularly relevant. I disagree with both of these. To make the case that we aren't doing enough to support the human rights of Palestinian people is easy. To know what to do to generate the most good is much harder and requires a deep understanding of a really complex situation. I think this book fell far short of that.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Abdo

    If you don't follow it, Palestine/Israel can seem like a complex issue. Marc Lamont Hill's book is very short and to the point. Like 150 pages. Four chapters. You can do it. (I mean it's pretty accessible even if you don't regularly submerge yourself in political reading. I think it hits the high points of historical significance too so you won't be in the dark.) He goes into why single Israel out/is it being singled out, what does "right to exist" mean exactly, criminalization of BDS and nonviol If you don't follow it, Palestine/Israel can seem like a complex issue. Marc Lamont Hill's book is very short and to the point. Like 150 pages. Four chapters. You can do it. (I mean it's pretty accessible even if you don't regularly submerge yourself in political reading. I think it hits the high points of historical significance too so you won't be in the dark.) He goes into why single Israel out/is it being singled out, what does "right to exist" mean exactly, criminalization of BDS and nonviolent protest, Trump policy as a continuation of US policy, finally how Gaza got separated and turned into an open air prison. He's honest, unlike many, about conservative (obvi) and especially liberal opposition to applying our stated values of freedom, dignity, safety, and self-determination. This is what i always want to hear from politicians purpoting to espouse these values. Every one of them need to read this book. Liberals need to start advocating for rights consistently across the board. No more exceptions for Palestine. It seems obvious, but it's something that still needs to be said. Like black lives matter and women's rights are human rights. We have to force policy in line with these fundamental rights and beliefs.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Yazeed Shamieh

    The American left claims to champion progressive policies and values but has historically excluded justice for Palestinians from their agenda. When it comes to Israeli oppression, both sides of the American political spectrum move the goalposts, favoring one side at the expense of Palestinian life, land, and liberty. This book covers several American policy decisions over the decades that have curtailed real progress in Palestine, and the irrational rhetoric aimed towards appeasing Israel at any The American left claims to champion progressive policies and values but has historically excluded justice for Palestinians from their agenda. When it comes to Israeli oppression, both sides of the American political spectrum move the goalposts, favoring one side at the expense of Palestinian life, land, and liberty. This book covers several American policy decisions over the decades that have curtailed real progress in Palestine, and the irrational rhetoric aimed towards appeasing Israel at any cost. It’s refreshing to read a sensible explanation of Palestine and the occupation as they relate to American policy. Except for Palestine covers the criminalization of the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement, the precarious humanitarian crisis in Gaza, and the ignorant political plays of Donald Trump in the past 4 years. Will the advent of a Democratic president bring progress? Or does Palestine remain an exception? HIGHLY recommend this read btw. Love to @marclamonthill for his excellent work.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Barghout

    This book is very well thought out and reasoned if short. It comes to this issue from a progressive point of view; meaning that its target audience cares bout BLM, LGBTQ equality, feminism, native American rights and those who live on the margins. It demonstrates precisely the double standards that don't seem to apply to Palestinians. The book is written by an African American and a Jewish person and comes from a place that is loving to both Israelis and Palestinians, while not dodging the injus This book is very well thought out and reasoned if short. It comes to this issue from a progressive point of view; meaning that its target audience cares bout BLM, LGBTQ equality, feminism, native American rights and those who live on the margins. It demonstrates precisely the double standards that don't seem to apply to Palestinians. The book is written by an African American and a Jewish person and comes from a place that is loving to both Israelis and Palestinians, while not dodging the injustices done to Palestinians. It is 158 pages and can be gotten through easily. If you want an exhaustive history or detailed and long winded explanations, this book isn't for you. If you are progressive and really care to bring change to a view that at times doesn't include some on the margins, this is an excellent read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Excellent. Here is a book you will learn from, even if you think you understand the situation in Israel/Palestine and have been following the situation there for years. For example, I always knew the U.S. was not an honest broker and that we were extremely biased in favor of Israel. But I did not--quite--understand the extent to which Trump's disastrous policies merely laid bare longstanding U.S. positions. Nor did I understand why some people of good will consider BDS anti-Semitic. I understand Excellent. Here is a book you will learn from, even if you think you understand the situation in Israel/Palestine and have been following the situation there for years. For example, I always knew the U.S. was not an honest broker and that we were extremely biased in favor of Israel. But I did not--quite--understand the extent to which Trump's disastrous policies merely laid bare longstanding U.S. positions. Nor did I understand why some people of good will consider BDS anti-Semitic. I understand both those things now. What has happened, and continues to happen, to the Palestinians is absolutely tragic. Books like this one offer hope, not only by pointing out facts the world should know, but also by making clear the Palestinians' courage and endurance.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sharon E.

    this book was very well written and covered numerous examples that showed when it comes to Palestine, U.S policy never acts in the same “progressive” ways it does toward other issues/regions. it’s a call to everyone who supports Palestinians and human rights in general to try to hold our leaders accountable and call them out for the complacency that’s happened for decades. As those living in the imperial core it’s our responsibility. Progressive except for Palestine serves as a reminder!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Fatimah Taha

    I really enjoyed tbis book as it does a great overview of US policy on Palestine and Israel in a short read. I really liked how the emphasize the bipartisan support of pro Israel policies and that it’s not just republicans who support Israel behavior toward Palestinians but also Democrats. My only criticism is that I wish they went more into depth of why progressives are silent on Palestine and on their chapter on Gaza.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tamar

    One sided

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kendra

    I received a copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways. I would recommend this book to anyone who considers themselves a political progressive in the US who is not already an expert on Israel/Palestine. Pre-pandemic, I was at my local progressive social justice organization's annual meeting where members voted on the upcoming year's platform. Some members brought up a strong desire to support Palestinians and started off by saying this affects us more than it seems. This book clearly laid out I received a copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways. I would recommend this book to anyone who considers themselves a political progressive in the US who is not already an expert on Israel/Palestine. Pre-pandemic, I was at my local progressive social justice organization's annual meeting where members voted on the upcoming year's platform. Some members brought up a strong desire to support Palestinians and started off by saying this affects us more than it seems. This book clearly laid out why it matters and affects us given how much US money goes to Israel. I did use Google a few times while reading to look up more information on some events and history, but overall I could understand the specific details of what was happening on the ground to Palestinians and how Israel has violated international law several times. I feel it is important to mention here, as the authors mention multiple times with explanation, how critiquing Israel and its human rights violations towards Palestinian people or calling for action on this matter is not anti-semitic, since a cry of anti-semitism is used as the most frequent push-back on any policy aiming to hold Israel accountable for its actions after receiving large portions of US monetary aid. I learned a lot, since I only had basic knowledge of the issue at hand, and I liked how politicians labeled as progressive were called out on their less than progressive attitudes towards Palestine. I also learned the history of US foreign policy regarding Israel and Palestine and how Trump's actions were just following through on policy that's been on the books since the Clinton era. Being able to support Palestinians publicly is becoming less and less of political suicide, and this book seeks to make people more informed of the issues and able to pay more attention politically and put pressure on our elected officials to act in ways that support the human rights of everyone. Essentially everyone has a right to self-determination, both Israelis and Palestinians in this case, but not at the expense of other people.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Matthew McCarthy

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Abukhdair

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elias H Nasser

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amreen

  19. 4 out of 5

    Thursday Simpson

  20. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hans De

  23. 4 out of 5

    Abdelrahman Kotb

  24. 5 out of 5

    Wisam Awadallah

  25. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ronald Readsley

  27. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Flitt

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sameer Taneja

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kianna Notermann

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kris

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.