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In this spellbinding thriller and YA debut from bestselling author Marti Leimbach, Kira Adams has discovered a cure for death—and it may just cost her life. Things aren’t going well for Kira. At home, she cares for her mother and fends off debt collectors. At school, she’s awkward and shy. Plus, she may flunk out if she doesn’t stop obsessing about science, her passion and In this spellbinding thriller and YA debut from bestselling author Marti Leimbach, Kira Adams has discovered a cure for death—and it may just cost her life. Things aren’t going well for Kira. At home, she cares for her mother and fends off debt collectors. At school, she’s awkward and shy. Plus, she may flunk out if she doesn’t stop obsessing about science, her passion and the one thing she’s good at . . . very good at. When she wins a prestigious science contest she draws the attention of the celebrated professor Dr. Gregory Munn (as well as his handsome assistant), leading to a part-time job in a top-secret laboratory.  The job is mostly cleaning floors and equipment, but one night, while running her own experiment, she revives a lab rat that has died in her care.  One minute it is dead, the next it is not. Suddenly she’s the remarkable wunderkind, the girl who can bring back the dead. Everything is going her way. But it turns out that science can be a dangerous business, and Kira is swept up into a world of international rivalry with dark forces that threaten her life. 


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In this spellbinding thriller and YA debut from bestselling author Marti Leimbach, Kira Adams has discovered a cure for death—and it may just cost her life. Things aren’t going well for Kira. At home, she cares for her mother and fends off debt collectors. At school, she’s awkward and shy. Plus, she may flunk out if she doesn’t stop obsessing about science, her passion and In this spellbinding thriller and YA debut from bestselling author Marti Leimbach, Kira Adams has discovered a cure for death—and it may just cost her life. Things aren’t going well for Kira. At home, she cares for her mother and fends off debt collectors. At school, she’s awkward and shy. Plus, she may flunk out if she doesn’t stop obsessing about science, her passion and the one thing she’s good at . . . very good at. When she wins a prestigious science contest she draws the attention of the celebrated professor Dr. Gregory Munn (as well as his handsome assistant), leading to a part-time job in a top-secret laboratory.  The job is mostly cleaning floors and equipment, but one night, while running her own experiment, she revives a lab rat that has died in her care.  One minute it is dead, the next it is not. Suddenly she’s the remarkable wunderkind, the girl who can bring back the dead. Everything is going her way. But it turns out that science can be a dangerous business, and Kira is swept up into a world of international rivalry with dark forces that threaten her life. 

30 review for Dragonfly Girl

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Sutanto

    Dragonfly Girl is unlike any other book I have read. The plot is taut and devilishly cunning, the science behind the story is brilliantly researched, and the writing pulls you in and doesn't let go until the very last page. You'll find yourself aching for the heroine's hardships at first, before suddenly being whisked off into a heart-thumping adventure that will leave you breathless. THIS BOOK SLAPS. Dragonfly Girl is unlike any other book I have read. The plot is taut and devilishly cunning, the science behind the story is brilliantly researched, and the writing pulls you in and doesn't let go until the very last page. You'll find yourself aching for the heroine's hardships at first, before suddenly being whisked off into a heart-thumping adventure that will leave you breathless. THIS BOOK SLAPS.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    The nitty-gritty: A unique blend of YA and adult, sci-fi and spy thriller, I can honestly say I've never read anything quite like Dragonfly Girl. I had a lot of fun with Dragonfly Girl, Marti Leimbach’s well-written YA debut (she has written a bunch of adult titles as well). For readers who are dying to see a female main character who is interested in STEM, this book is a must read. Leimbach goes beyond that though, and infuses her tale with some unexpected international intrigue, a little romanc The nitty-gritty: A unique blend of YA and adult, sci-fi and spy thriller, I can honestly say I've never read anything quite like Dragonfly Girl. I had a lot of fun with Dragonfly Girl, Marti Leimbach’s well-written YA debut (she has written a bunch of adult titles as well). For readers who are dying to see a female main character who is interested in STEM, this book is a must read. Leimbach goes beyond that though, and infuses her tale with some unexpected international intrigue, a little romance, and some edgy sci-fi elements. But while I enjoyed many aspects of this story, I also have some reservations about the overall story arc and the sheer number of things going on with these characters. With an unusual blend of both YA and adult elements, it’s almost as if the book wasn’t sure what it wanted to be. Still, there was never a dull moment, and I had an absolute blast reading it. Kira Adams is a seventeen-year-old high school senior who is brilliant when it comes to math and science, but an utter failure at her other classes. She struggles with fitting in at school, where the other kids tease her for being so smart, but her love of science keeps things bearable. At home, Kira’s mother is dying of cancer, and so her time away from school is filled with caring for and helping her mom with the household bills and chores. Because of the expensive cancer treatments, they are on the brink of financial disaster, and so Kira’s mom has been borrowing money from a shady criminal named Biba in order to pay the bills. But Kira has a secret. She’s written a scientific paper on how dragonflies track their prey and entered it in a prestigious competition. So she fudged the information on the entry form a little—she doesn’t actually have the required PhD, but does anyone really need to know the truth? When Kira wins the prize in her category, she’s invited to Stockholm, Sweden to attend a conference and accept the cash prize. She knows without the prize money, she and her mother will be in trouble, and so she figures out a way to attend. But once she arrives, Kira realizes how tough it’s going to be to fool the other attendees. Even wearing her friend’s borrowed clothes, Kira knows she doesn’t fit in with the other, older, prize winners. And a fellow winner, an unpleasant man named Will, knows something is up and won’t leave Kira alone until he figures out the truth. And that’s where I’ll stop with the story recap, as this is a tough one to sum up in only a couple of paragraphs. Also I want to avoid spoilers as much as possible! I’m going to start this review off with the things I loved about Dragonfly Girl. First, bravo to Marti Leimbach for creating a female STEM character. We definitely need to see more YA stories dealing with STEM, especially those that focus on girls. There are a fair number of well researched science elements in this story, and I was fascinated by the descriptions of the lab work that Kira gets involved in, especially the science behind bringing a dead rat back to life.  And speaking of Kira, I absolutely loved her character. She has a lot to deal with: a sick mother, bad grades in school, and bullying, and yet she follows her passion for science and makes things happen. And despite her age (which I have some opinions about, see below), Kira has a pretty good head on her shoulders and manages to make good decisions, even when things do not go well. But she also lacks self-confidence and has an air of innocence about her, qualities that made her character more believable. I also loved the exotic setting of Stockholm: the crisp, cold snowy landscape, the elegant Grand Hôtel where the conference takes place, and especially Kira’s delight in being in a foreign city for the first time. Leimbach’s descriptions made me want to visit Stockholm myself! The story is divided into three sections, and to be honest, these sections feel completely different from each other. I think this was the book's main weakness, the way the story changes gears so abruptly, which left me with a bit of reader’s whiplash. The first section takes place in Stockholm and follows Kira as she attends the Science of Our Future award banquet and conference. This section goes on for a third of the book, and nothing much happens, except that Kira meets a bunch of other award winners who are all older than her and resent the fact that she’s won such a prestigious award. This section was more of a madcap comedy, as Kira tries desperately to hide her secret. The author does set the stage for the next two sections, when Kira meets a man named Dr. Munn at the conference and ends up working for him when she returns to California.  Which brings us to the second section. Kira is back in school but now works for the Mellin Institute at the same time, learning how to do lab work and struggling under the tutelage of her nemesis Will, who also works there. It is during this section that Kira finally reanimates a lab rat—this is the hook in the blurb that made me want to read this book—and this section was much more serious and has a bit of a sci-fi/Frankenstein vibe to it.  Finally in the third section, we find Kira and Will in yet another country, and due to spoilers I won’t be able to go into details. But this section reads almost like a spy thriller and turns very, very dark. It’s this section in particular that felt out of place with the rest of the book, and although I enjoyed it very much—it’s quite fast-paced and exciting!—I had a hard time believing that any of the events in this section could actually happen to a seventeen-year-old girl from the United States. The other issue I wanted to address is Kira’s age. I’m honestly not sure why the decision was made to make Kira underage. She’s a senior in high school, so the author could have easily made her eighteen, which would have solved a lot of the issues I had. Unfortunately, she’s a minor in the eyes of the law, and yet she jets off to Stockholm on her own (in the middle of the school year), tries to conceal the fact that she’s only seventeen by dressing up in uncomfortable clothes to hide her age, and worst of all, falls for no less than two men in their twenties who don’t realize (at first) that she is only seventeen. The whole thing made me cringe, to be honest. I suppose it could be that the author and publisher felt that a seventeen-year-old character was more marketable as YA. Luckily, the romance is pretty light and definitely isn’t the focus here, but still. But despite these issues, Dragonfly Girl was one of the most unique YA books I’ve ever read and had some truly thrilling moments. The story ends rather abruptly, but I'm hoping there will be more books in this series. Big thanks to the author and publisher for supplying a review copy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lori Kaufmann

    Kira, a social outcast at her high-school, works as many part-time jobs as she can to pay the family’s bills and help her cancer-stricken mother. But she’s also a brilliant scientist more interested in unlocking the mystery of life and death than the social code to popularity. Her life changes overnight when she wins a prestigious science contest and is swept up into an international intrigue (sorry, can’t reveal more, don’t want to spoil the fun!) And it is fun as Leimbach takes us on a wild ri Kira, a social outcast at her high-school, works as many part-time jobs as she can to pay the family’s bills and help her cancer-stricken mother. But she’s also a brilliant scientist more interested in unlocking the mystery of life and death than the social code to popularity. Her life changes overnight when she wins a prestigious science contest and is swept up into an international intrigue (sorry, can’t reveal more, don’t want to spoil the fun!) And it is fun as Leimbach takes us on a wild ride to European capitals, underground labs, elegant ballrooms and even to the Hall of Mirrors where the first Nobel Prize was awarded. It’s clear that Leimbach has done her homework as the descriptions are so vivid that you feel like you’re there. Kira is a complex and compelling character (she reminded me of Beth, the chess prodigy in The Queen’s Gambit). You can’t help but fall in love with her as she desperately tries to do the right thing but is thwarted at every turn. I felt like shouting at her as I read the pages, “No! Don’t trust him! He’s lying!!” You root for her, you cry with her and you hold your breath as she runs from danger. If you don’t want to get emotionally involved, don’t pick this one up. There was so much I loved about the book. The wonderful characters (in addition to Kira, there’s a cast of well-developed secondary figures) and the propulsive plot. But what really sets this YA thriller apart is Leimbach’s skillful integration of real science into the story world. Leimbach’s explanations of lab protocols, animal experimentation, brain research, etc. were fascinating and were seamlessly woven into the action. Leimbach is an established adult author so no surprise that she nailed this one, her first foray into YA fiction. A previous book was made into a movie. No doubt this one will too. Definitely 5 stars! Thank you to Netgalley for providing me with this advanced reader's copy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shelley

    *Source* Publisher *Genre* Young Adult / Thriller *Rating* 3.5 *Thoughts* Dragonfly, by author Marti Leimbach, is not a standalone. From what the author has posted, it is the first installment in a trilogy. This story follows Kira Adams. While Kira may be a scientific genius, she’s awkward and shy and a social outcast at school. She's only good in two subjects: math and science and has only one real friend in Lauren. Kira works as many part-time jobs as she can to help her cancer-stricken mother. Bu *Source* Publisher *Genre* Young Adult / Thriller *Rating* 3.5 *Thoughts* Dragonfly, by author Marti Leimbach, is not a standalone. From what the author has posted, it is the first installment in a trilogy. This story follows Kira Adams. While Kira may be a scientific genius, she’s awkward and shy and a social outcast at school. She's only good in two subjects: math and science and has only one real friend in Lauren. Kira works as many part-time jobs as she can to help her cancer-stricken mother. But things are about to change. After entering into a science essay contest, Kira shockingly wins. Winning means that Kira can pay off the loan shark that has been hounding her and her mother. *Full Review @ Gizmos Reviews* https://gizmosreviews.blogspot.com/20...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Thrilling and surprising. Science really shines in this story - you can tell how much research has gone into the story to make it believable (which it definitely is). I wished for a little more romance (but I always wish that), and some slightly more upbeat moments. Kira’s life is sparse, and her connections thin. The book has an intensity to it that never lets up, so a few more light moments would have been nice. But, the pacing and revelations were timed just right. I’m hoping for a second book Thrilling and surprising. Science really shines in this story - you can tell how much research has gone into the story to make it believable (which it definitely is). I wished for a little more romance (but I always wish that), and some slightly more upbeat moments. Kira’s life is sparse, and her connections thin. The book has an intensity to it that never lets up, so a few more light moments would have been nice. But, the pacing and revelations were timed just right. I’m hoping for a second book because there’s still so much for Kira to do!!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Martin

    Kira Adams is a High School Junior and a scientific genius. She is also the main caretaker for her mother who has cancer. They are deeply in debt to the local loan shark. But Kira has taken to entering scientific contests which offer cash prizes to supplement the family income. Things change a lot when she wins a very prestigious contest which requires her to travel from her home in California to Stockholm, Sweden, to pick up her prize. The only problem is that she has entered the contest fraudu Kira Adams is a High School Junior and a scientific genius. She is also the main caretaker for her mother who has cancer. They are deeply in debt to the local loan shark. But Kira has taken to entering scientific contests which offer cash prizes to supplement the family income. Things change a lot when she wins a very prestigious contest which requires her to travel from her home in California to Stockholm, Sweden, to pick up her prize. The only problem is that she has entered the contest fraudulently. One of the requirements is that she bas a Ph.D. that she earned no more than a year earlier. She didn't lie; she left the line indicating when and where she got her Ph.D. blank. But another of the award winners is suspicious and really causes her trouble. However, she has done her own research and has written a brilliant paper which draws the attention of Dr. Gregory Munn who runs a prestigious lab in Oakland which is near her home. He offers her a job working in his lab. Unfortunately, her supervisor is the same jerk who caused her problems in Stockholm and who seems determined to teach her nothing and force her to quit. Luckily, she does make friends with some of the other scientists and she also finds a home that fits her much better than trying to fit in at her High School. When she discovers a procedure that brings a rat back to life, she quickly learns that science can be a cutthroat sort of game. Everyone wants her discovery. She's kidnapped along with her nemesis Will and taken to Russia where she is forced to share her procedure and pressured to join a rich man's stable of young scientific geniuses. Until she manages to escape... This was an exciting thriller. filled with all kinds of action and lots of tension. I really liked Kira in all her brilliance and social awkwardness. The story had a nice group of supporting characters including her best-and-only friend Lauren and the many young scientists at Dr. Munn's lab.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Natasha Lefler

    I loved this book. Please tell me this is going to be a series, I want more!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I needed this yesterday

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristi

    “𝘐 𝘬𝘯𝘰𝘸 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘭𝘪𝘧𝘦 𝘥𝘰𝘦𝘴𝘯’𝘵 𝘮𝘢𝘬𝘦 𝘢𝘯 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘯 𝘥𝘪𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘪𝘣𝘶𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘰𝘧 𝘢𝘯𝘺𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨; 𝘯𝘰𝘵 𝘮𝘰𝘯𝘦𝘺 𝘰𝘳 𝘭𝘶𝘤𝘬 𝘰𝘳 𝘭𝘰𝘰𝘬𝘴 𝘰𝘳 𝘵𝘢𝘭𝘦𝘯𝘵. 𝘓𝘰𝘯𝘨 𝘢𝘨𝘰, 𝘮𝘺 𝘮𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘵𝘰𝘭𝘥 𝘮𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘦 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘮𝘦𝘢𝘯𝘵 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘮𝘦, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘯𝘰𝘵” YA books are on of my favorite genres but add in a thrilling plot, international intrigue, edge of your seat action and a main character who could literally be my soul sister – Well, I’ll just eat that up and lick the spoon! Kira is still in high school and she excels at science, like scientific gen “𝘐 𝘬𝘯𝘰𝘸 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘭𝘪𝘧𝘦 𝘥𝘰𝘦𝘴𝘯’𝘵 𝘮𝘢𝘬𝘦 𝘢𝘯 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘯 𝘥𝘪𝘴𝘵𝘳𝘪𝘣𝘶𝘵𝘪𝘰𝘯 𝘰𝘧 𝘢𝘯𝘺𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨; 𝘯𝘰𝘵 𝘮𝘰𝘯𝘦𝘺 𝘰𝘳 𝘭𝘶𝘤𝘬 𝘰𝘳 𝘭𝘰𝘰𝘬𝘴 𝘰𝘳 𝘵𝘢𝘭𝘦𝘯𝘵. 𝘓𝘰𝘯𝘨 𝘢𝘨𝘰, 𝘮𝘺 𝘮𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘵𝘰𝘭𝘥 𝘮𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳𝘦 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘮𝘦𝘢𝘯𝘵 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘮𝘦, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘯𝘰𝘵” YA books are on of my favorite genres but add in a thrilling plot, international intrigue, edge of your seat action and a main character who could literally be my soul sister – Well, I’ll just eat that up and lick the spoon! Kira is still in high school and she excels at science, like scientific genius excel. She has a fairly tough home life; her mother is gravely ill and borrows money from the local loan shark, Biba, who thinks nothing of threatening Kira on the daily until he gets paid back. Kira wins a highly esteemed Science for Our Future award based on her Dragonfly research and it comes with a trip to Stockholm along with a hefty cash prize; enough to get Biba off their back. After a few ‘minor’ problems at the conference, doors open up for Kira; she’s offered a job in the acclaimed Mellen Institute by the brilliant Dr. Munn, where she makes a discovery that will change her life drastically because along with the good comes a hella bunch of bad. Things have gone from dreamy to scheme-y in the deadly high-stake game that comes with scientific discovery. There’s a lot of things to love about this book but the MC, Kira, is one of the biggest. She’s naïve yet has complexity, she is intelligent and driven but most of all, she is trying her absolute best to do what she thinks is the right thing even at great personal cost. The science is fascinating and enthralling, I highly recommend reading the authors note at the back. Truly mind-blowing! There’s no lack of action and intrigue all skillfully woven into a richly described world. This is a must read for any fan of badass smart girls in STEM, thrilling plots, nail-biting action and intrigue!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Brown

    I devoured this book in just a few sittings, and I didn't want it to end. Martin Leimbach's debut YA thriller novel is everything I hoped for and more. I was drawn in the minute I opened the book. Kira Adams is a high school science prodigy and she is as unique as they come. A social outcast at school who wants nothing more then to get away but she and her mother are constantly struggling to make ends meet. Her mother resorts to a loan shark for everything and the debt is adding up and the loan I devoured this book in just a few sittings, and I didn't want it to end. Martin Leimbach's debut YA thriller novel is everything I hoped for and more. I was drawn in the minute I opened the book. Kira Adams is a high school science prodigy and she is as unique as they come. A social outcast at school who wants nothing more then to get away but she and her mother are constantly struggling to make ends meet. Her mother resorts to a loan shark for everything and the debt is adding up and the loan shark is looking for his money. All Kira wants is to pay off their debt and forget about the man. She works part time but to get ahead Kira enters a prestigious international science contest and finds out she is a winner with a cash prize. A whirlwind trip to Sweden for the conference and claim her prize changes everything. Kira the main character is very complex. You can't help but fall in love with her. There were several parts of the book that transported me back to high school and the moments that teenagers could be so cruel I actually teared up making me think about my own experiences growing up and being teased and bullied in school. The book is beautifully researched, there is a seamless transition between the books fiction and the science research that plays such a huge part including lab equipment and protocols. Major plus for women in science with this story as well! Who doesn't love a young female heroine who dominates in science?! I am so glad there will be a sequel.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Vitalis

    This book was well outside my normal wheelhouse, but I have to admit that it pulled me in immediately. The main character, Kira, is a high school genius, who longs to attend college but knows that with a sick mother and bills piling up, those dreams are out of reach. When she's recognized internationally for a scientific discovery, she's invited to work at a prestigious lab. She jumps at the chance and finds herself navigating an adult world while simultaneously trying to deal with the very real This book was well outside my normal wheelhouse, but I have to admit that it pulled me in immediately. The main character, Kira, is a high school genius, who longs to attend college but knows that with a sick mother and bills piling up, those dreams are out of reach. When she's recognized internationally for a scientific discovery, she's invited to work at a prestigious lab. She jumps at the chance and finds herself navigating an adult world while simultaneously trying to deal with the very real emotions of a teenage girl on the verge of adulthood (including complicated relationships with three young men she works with at the lab). But then she discovers the "cure" for death, is kidnapped, and ... well, I don't want to give any spoilers, but suffice to say she ends up in the very last place on earth she ever expected and must rely on her smarts to keep herself alive. This book is fast-paced, full of STEM, and a great read!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alastair

    Kira Adams, the heroine of Dragonfly Girl, is a 17-year old science genius, bullied at school and having to work a job to help pay for her mother's medical treatment and keep the loan sharks at bay. A lucky break wins her acclaim and a chance to work in a prestigious lab that does secret government research. She makes a major discovery and becomes feted, but then things go quickly downhill. I don't want to spoil the story, but the unexpected twists and turns will keep you riveted. Beautifully ju Kira Adams, the heroine of Dragonfly Girl, is a 17-year old science genius, bullied at school and having to work a job to help pay for her mother's medical treatment and keep the loan sharks at bay. A lucky break wins her acclaim and a chance to work in a prestigious lab that does secret government research. She makes a major discovery and becomes feted, but then things go quickly downhill. I don't want to spoil the story, but the unexpected twists and turns will keep you riveted. Beautifully judged characters, excellent dialog, and a great story with plenty of suspense which leaves you desperate for the sequel. For all those trying to encourage more girls into STEM subjects, here's a role model!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kal ★ Reader Voracious

    "When a high school student discovers how to cure death, she learns how that knowledge will change her life—or end it—in this propulsive and spellbinding thriller and YA debut from bestselling author Marti Leimbach."> I'm genuinely flabbergasted that 1) I only just now heard of this book when going through upcoming releases on Edelweiss, and 2) I'm the only one to have this book shelved? Coming out on February 23, 2021! "When a high school student discovers how to cure death, she learns how that knowledge will change her life—or end it—in this propulsive and spellbinding thriller and YA debut from bestselling author Marti Leimbach."> I'm genuinely flabbergasted that 1) I only just now heard of this book when going through upcoming releases on Edelweiss, and 2) I'm the only one to have this book shelved? Coming out on February 23, 2021!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brianna Bourne

    I LOVED being immersed in this high-stakes science world with main character Kira Adams - a brilliant teenage scientist (Girls in STEM yesss!) and struggling social outcast. Kira moves amongst science's elite at a fancy awards ceremony in Scandinavia, joins other brilliant minds at work in an incredibly cool underground lab, and some other mind-blowing locations that I can't say because of spoilers! Supporting characters and fellow scientists were well-rendered and loveable - I even found myself I LOVED being immersed in this high-stakes science world with main character Kira Adams - a brilliant teenage scientist (Girls in STEM yesss!) and struggling social outcast. Kira moves amongst science's elite at a fancy awards ceremony in Scandinavia, joins other brilliant minds at work in an incredibly cool underground lab, and some other mind-blowing locations that I can't say because of spoilers! Supporting characters and fellow scientists were well-rendered and loveable - I even found myself wanting to hang out with the lab rats! What starts as a well-researched, absorbing introduction into the world of science soon turns into a heart-pounding, global action adventure with a few incredible twists that knocked me for six. The ending ends on a perfect, not-too-cliffy note, opening a wide path for an awesome sequel. Leimbach is an enormously talented writer - I'll be snapping Book 2 up as soon as it is available!

  15. 5 out of 5

    April

    I thought that Dragonfly Girl was a really quick read. One of the things I liked was that Kira wasn’t wealthy or upper middle class. Her financial situation was precarious and college was not a done deal for her. Plus, she’s not a genius at everything – just science. I enjoyed the intrigue and puzzling out the relationships between characters. However, I do wish that certain things were explored with more depth and felt like parts of this book just barely skim the surface. Like, the romance did I thought that Dragonfly Girl was a really quick read. One of the things I liked was that Kira wasn’t wealthy or upper middle class. Her financial situation was precarious and college was not a done deal for her. Plus, she’s not a genius at everything – just science. I enjoyed the intrigue and puzzling out the relationships between characters. However, I do wish that certain things were explored with more depth and felt like parts of this book just barely skim the surface. Like, the romance did not seem super developed. Also, there’s definitely a story there with Kira’s dad. Plus, the ending seems like there’s more to resolve and a lot of loose threads. Still, this is an enjoyable fast paced read and one that I would definitely recommend. Read my full review here link goes live 2/23/2021

  16. 4 out of 5

    G.F. Miller

    Whatever I thought Dragonfly Girl would be, I was way off. It's about a high school girl who struggles to fit in, a genius scientist on the cusp of a world-changing medical discovery, and a girl trapped in the terrifying underworld of Russian organized crime... and those are ALL THE SAME GIRL. I *hope* this is the first of a duology because, although it wraps up well, it feels like there's more story to tell. I recommend this book if you like smart protagonists, science, nerdy love interests, an Whatever I thought Dragonfly Girl would be, I was way off. It's about a high school girl who struggles to fit in, a genius scientist on the cusp of a world-changing medical discovery, and a girl trapped in the terrifying underworld of Russian organized crime... and those are ALL THE SAME GIRL. I *hope* this is the first of a duology because, although it wraps up well, it feels like there's more story to tell. I recommend this book if you like smart protagonists, science, nerdy love interests, and a little mystery and peril.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bridget Arsenault

    Dragonfly Girl is brilliant. This is exactly what the YA genre needs - it's smart, beautifully written, funny and engaging. The protagonist is such a readable character. It reminds me a bit of the Queen's Gambit. Every teenage girl and guy should read this book. Dragonfly Girl is brilliant. This is exactly what the YA genre needs - it's smart, beautifully written, funny and engaging. The protagonist is such a readable character. It reminds me a bit of the Queen's Gambit. Every teenage girl and guy should read this book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eliza

    A book about a girl who doesn't fit in and is great at math and science in EUROPE and is a mystery?? Sign me up! A book about a girl who doesn't fit in and is great at math and science in EUROPE and is a mystery?? Sign me up!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jennie Wexler

    Kira’s life changes overnight when she wins a prestigious science contest. Marti Leimbach seamlessly integrates science into a well thought out and propulsive story. This book is very well researched and a fascinating read. Kira’s initial goal is to help her struggling family, but she gets much more than she bargained for. I’m not going to go too much into the plot, as I don’t want to give anything away! I absolutely loved seeing a female STEM protagonist in YA, especially one you can’t help but Kira’s life changes overnight when she wins a prestigious science contest. Marti Leimbach seamlessly integrates science into a well thought out and propulsive story. This book is very well researched and a fascinating read. Kira’s initial goal is to help her struggling family, but she gets much more than she bargained for. I’m not going to go too much into the plot, as I don’t want to give anything away! I absolutely loved seeing a female STEM protagonist in YA, especially one you can’t help but root for. This book is a breath of fresh air in the YA space and I can’t wait to see what Leimbach writes next!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Scott

    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... This is my first time reading the author. I thought this was a terrific read. It’s a very different book than other stuff I usually read. I thought it was a terrific book. I loved the fact the book uses a first person narrator from Kira’s POV. I loved being inside her head, expiring everything from behind her eyes. She’s a great character. I wasn’t sure where the book would go and had no idea what would happen to Kira, but I loved taking the journey with h https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... This is my first time reading the author. I thought this was a terrific read. It’s a very different book than other stuff I usually read. I thought it was a terrific book. I loved the fact the book uses a first person narrator from Kira’s POV. I loved being inside her head, expiring everything from behind her eyes. She’s a great character. I wasn’t sure where the book would go and had no idea what would happen to Kira, but I loved taking the journey with her. The book went to places I really wasn’t expecting. This is a terrific, original read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anya Josephs

    This is a fabulous YA debut, and in a genre I don't see often! It's hard sci-fi, which isn't necessarily always to my taste (I read mostly soft sci-fi or fantasy), but the science focus is "softened" by richly human and believable characters. The characterization was my favorite part of this book. I particularly loved Kira, who I found enormously likable and relatable in spite of the very unusual circumstances she finds herself in. The author does a masterful job of depicting Kira's teen angst al This is a fabulous YA debut, and in a genre I don't see often! It's hard sci-fi, which isn't necessarily always to my taste (I read mostly soft sci-fi or fantasy), but the science focus is "softened" by richly human and believable characters. The characterization was my favorite part of this book. I particularly loved Kira, who I found enormously likable and relatable in spite of the very unusual circumstances she finds herself in. The author does a masterful job of depicting Kira's teen angst alongside the serious issues she faces. I was also very compelled by the plot! I've never encountered a concept quite like this one, and it was a real page-turner. I read the whole thing in one sititng. I very much hope there will be more in this series!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bex

    I absolutely loved this book. Such a great mix of science, drama and action. Kira is a high school girl with a phenomenal scientific mind who becomes embroiled in a world she doesn't fully understand and takes a dark turn that she is unprepared for. Winning a scientific prize for her essay about Dragonflies Kira is transported into a world unknown to her. In normal life she is an awkward teenage girl, struggling through school and almost failing every class except science. She looks after her ill I absolutely loved this book. Such a great mix of science, drama and action. Kira is a high school girl with a phenomenal scientific mind who becomes embroiled in a world she doesn't fully understand and takes a dark turn that she is unprepared for. Winning a scientific prize for her essay about Dragonflies Kira is transported into a world unknown to her. In normal life she is an awkward teenage girl, struggling through school and almost failing every class except science. She looks after her ill mom and works a number of jobs to pay their debts and keep them afloat. Suddenly her work is being discussed by important people in science and not all of them are what they seem. There was a good amount of scientific knowledge in this story, as well as a great amount of intrigue and some twists and turns along the way. Some great characters- I loved the friendship between Kira and Dmitry and the character of Will was loathsome from the get go. I love when a book makes you have strong feelings towards a character even when they might not be positive ones! I truly enjoyed the book and I really hope there is a sequel on its way! I want to see how Kiras journey continues!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Inkslinger

    ARC provided by Katherine Tegen Books and Marti Leimbach via Random Things Tours. All opinions are mine and freely given. Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | BookBub "Science is about finding better ways of being wrong." 03-04: ​'Dragonfly Girl' is the YA debut from Marti Leimbach, the bestselling author of titles such as 'The Man from Saigon,' 'Daniel Isn't Talking,' and 'Dying Young,' the latter of which was her first book.. made into a film starring Julia Roberts. What a way to s ARC provided by Katherine Tegen Books and Marti Leimbach via Random Things Tours. All opinions are mine and freely given. Blog | Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | BookBub "Science is about finding better ways of being wrong." 03-04: ​'Dragonfly Girl' is the YA debut from Marti Leimbach, the bestselling author of titles such as 'The Man from Saigon,' 'Daniel Isn't Talking,' and 'Dying Young,' the latter of which was her first book.. made into a film starring Julia Roberts. What a way to start a career in writing! While 'Dragonfly Girl' is her first YA novel, due to her experienced hand in the industry, it's absolutely fluid. A science-based thriller, the story focuses on a brilliant teen named Kira Adams. Though she struggles with some school subjects, her mind works like a well-oiled machine when she has equations in front of her. At home, her widowed mom is very ill.. and that leaves Kira trying to manage the household and their ever-crushing debts. At school, she's awkward and shy, bullied by other students, and just trying to keep her head down as much as possible. When she wins an international science award, she draws the attention of a number of powerful people both in and out of the science community. But some of those people are incredibly dangerous and caught up in the spotlight of acclaim, Kira may discover too slowly which she can trust. Admittedly, in the first two-thirds of the novel, I have never been so engaged in a story. This was a girl I could relate to in a unique way. She's able to rise through the ranks of her chosen profession with ease, despite lacking certain things that are expected. Those around her are baffled, even jealous.. at how easily she succeeds without the experience they have worked for years to gain. Actually, that's my favorite part of this story. Leimbach somehow manages to capture and convey a meteoric rise that society says shouldn't be possible. Kira thinks little of what she lacks at first, she just gives it a try. Only after winning the contest, does that doubt begin to creep in.. and even then, it's not about her abilities.. it's about the reactions those around her may have upon realizing. In truth, I wish the story had continued along this trajectory for my personal taste, but I recognize that such a move would have limited the scope far too much. While I felt like the turns taken were unnecessary and even a bit over the top for me, not because they're unreasonable possibilities.. but rather because everything combined together felt extremely unlikely, the plot twists did take it to new dimensions. As for the characters, Kira is kind of adorable and Lauren is a really good, loyal friend. Again, tying together everything about Lauren makes her seem a bit out of this world, but suspension of disbelief engaged.. she's amazing. Dmitry was probably my favorite. Quite quickly his voice and his mannerisms developed in my mind as I read him. He was the most visceral for me and as such, I couldn't get enough of his appearances.. disheveled as they may be. Plenty of intrigue and surprises make the book a page-turner. Overall, though Kira swings through a somewhat unlikely social learning curve very quickly toward the end, I still deeply enjoyed the journey and couldn't recommend the book highly enough. PURCHASE LINKS: AMAZON | BARNES & NOBLE | BOOK DEPOSITORY | BOOKSAMILLION | GOOGLEPLAY BOOKS | INDIEBOUND | INDIGO | KOBO

  24. 5 out of 5

    Isabel

    It shocks me how many people are completely disregarding the appalling inappropriate relationships that this book so casually displays. Within this book, a seventeen year old girl ends up caught in a love triangle between two twenty+ year old men. I repeat. A seventeen year old high schooler is in love with twenty year old men. I don't care how good a book is. This was an instant one-star. I mean, even without taking into account the atrocious age gaps, the romance doesn't even have the decency to It shocks me how many people are completely disregarding the appalling inappropriate relationships that this book so casually displays. Within this book, a seventeen year old girl ends up caught in a love triangle between two twenty+ year old men. I repeat. A seventeen year old high schooler is in love with twenty year old men. I don't care how good a book is. This was an instant one-star. I mean, even without taking into account the atrocious age gaps, the romance doesn't even have the decency to be good. It's a clear page filler, and is lazily written while laced with every cliche a standard YA book has to offer. None of it is necessary to the plot or character development and is simply there because heaven forbid a teenage girl doesn't fall madly in love when surrounded by men with such chiseled jawlines. If the book at least had a part where the problematic underage romance was properly acknowledged, I guess that would make it better, but it doesn't. This behavior from Kira is even frequently encouraged, by her mother and especially her friend Lauren, who is constantly making remarks about how perfect Rik (one of the love interests) is and how he and Kira should go out. She even talks about how she thinks another character, Will, secretly loves Kira WHEN WILL IS TWENTY-THREE YEARS OLD. But not only is Kira pining after Rik, who I'm convinced has no other character traits than his "long eyelashes" that were mentioned literally every single time he appeared, but there's ANOTHER twenty or more year old guy who is hopelessly in love with her. I'm not going to mention his name because of spoilers, but come on. This is absurd. I cannot believe that this was approved to be published and advertised to teenagers, who might now think that dating a guy who may have literally graduated from college is acceptable. To quote my friend when I told them about this love triangle; "That triangle better straighten to bars." I couldn't put it better myself. Age may be just a number, folks, but then again, jail is just a room. Anyways, I feel obligated to review the rest of the novel now that I'm putting the time to rant about the underage atrocities. It's not that great. For starters, it literally took until PAGE 192 UNTIL THE REASON I PICKED UP THE BOOK IN THE FIRST PLACE ACTUALLY HAPPENED. By which I mean, (and this isn't even a spoiler because it's literally in the synopsis) Kira FINALLY forms the cure for death WHEN THE BOOK IS OVER HALFWAY OVER. The pacing is just horrific. The entire first half of the book is attempted buildup to Kira's big discovery, but since I already knew what the discovery was before I even opened the book, there was simply no point in the intro being so gosh darn long. And then from there, the book goes 0 to 100 so fast it just felt jarring. All of this, combined with the previously mentioned sprinkles of insanely creepy romance made for what I consider a highly unpleasant reading. However, credit were credit is due, some things in the book weren't all that bad. Minus the romantic sideplot with Kira, I actually didn't mind her as a character. I thought she had a strong and likable personality, and it's nice to read about girls in STEM for a change. I also thought her backstory and life outside of science with her sick mother and lack of money was also well-written and believable. When she was bullied at school, I felt sorry for her. Honestly, if it weren't for the romance, I probably would've given this book at least two stars, maybe even three. But no matter the positives of the book, I simply cannot get over the fact that they felt that a seventeen year old lusting after twenty year olds was considered acceptable. Even the 5 star reviews mention their discomfort at the relationships, one even mentioning physically cringing when it was brought up over and over again, and I don't blame them, as I had the urge to gorge out my eyeballs every time Rik's stupid long eyelashes were mentioned. Needless to say, this book gets a no from me.

  25. 5 out of 5

    C.G. Drews

    This is an absolutely spellbinding book, unique and thrilling and suspenseful. I flew through it without wanting to pause and honestly the ending leaves you really breathless. You will not predict what’s going to happen 😩🙌🏻in this book of science and the genius high school student who accidentally reverses death. [WHAT GOES DOWN] The story is about Kira, who is a science genius and….struggling. Her home life is stressful, her mother is sick and in deep debt, Kira feels alone and isolated at school This is an absolutely spellbinding book, unique and thrilling and suspenseful. I flew through it without wanting to pause and honestly the ending leaves you really breathless. You will not predict what’s going to happen 😩🙌🏻in this book of science and the genius high school student who accidentally reverses death. [WHAT GOES DOWN] The story is about Kira, who is a science genius and….struggling. Her home life is stressful, her mother is sick and in deep debt, Kira feels alone and isolated at school due to being brilliant in some areas and failing in others. She’s misunderstood and weary trying to make ends meet. But then she wins a contest for her paper on dragonflies and flies to Sweden to receive the award. And this honestly catapults her life into TURMOIL, but also brilliance. No one knows she’s a high school student, but when the truth explodes out — they want her. The world is noticing her. Add in science labs and secret experiments and Russians and academic rivalry (and harassment), and Dragonfly will literally send you spinning. It feels like a contemporary to start but quickly turns into the nail-biting thriller. I really loved the writing! It was so easy to fall into and very compelling. While there’s a lot of scientific passages and some jargon and I am…honestly clueless in that aspect 😂…I really enjoyed the science! Getting a peak in Kira’s genius mind was amazing. Also can we talk about Kira 🥺👌🏻I loved her. She’s so anxious and timid at first, especially receiving her first award and feeling wrecked with terror that she’ll be busted as a precocious high school student. But the way her arc is full of power, or cleverness, of Kira surviving by sheer grit and wiles. She’s an easy protagonist to love — vulnerable but never arrogant, naive but never helpless. I also really loved the side characters! Lauren, her BFF, who is fabulous and a fashionista and also a huge science geek. Dmitry, the chaotic genius science Kira meets while working for Munn, and he’s so lovely and sweet, but also dangerously clever. April, who loves the lab rats and cares for them. I won’t say I loved Munn (the old scientist with many secrets, but who believes in Kira from the start) but his character is fascinating. And omg I hate Will. He’s probably a very good representation of arrogant, manipulative young men in academia who believe “little girls” don’t belong there, and he so tactically bullied Kira the whole time. I was terrified he’d steal her work. He is so very complex though, so I did appreciate that. I don’t want to say too much about where the plot goes, because the twists are fantastic and best to dive into alone so you get the full hit of the ending. It’s an addictive page-turner of teen geniuses and twisted morales and miracles and a girl who chooses strength.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline Firkins

    This was a fascinating read and a really hard one to categorize. Off the top, I have to say I'm thrilled that publishers are willing to take chances on books that don't fit tightly into a single genre, and it looks like readers of this one feel the same! Hooray for that! Dragonfly Girl is a tautly written novel that read to me like 3 linked novellas (the book is even visually designed to support this structure), and the differences between the 3 sections will potentially be the driving force behi This was a fascinating read and a really hard one to categorize. Off the top, I have to say I'm thrilled that publishers are willing to take chances on books that don't fit tightly into a single genre, and it looks like readers of this one feel the same! Hooray for that! Dragonfly Girl is a tautly written novel that read to me like 3 linked novellas (the book is even visually designed to support this structure), and the differences between the 3 sections will potentially be the driving force behind whether or not other readers love the book. The first part is a story about a 17-year-old science genius who tells a lie in order to enter a prestigious international research competition. This section of the book is filled with interesting scientific details and character development as we wait to find out if the heroine will get caught in her lie or if the system will open up to embrace her for her mind alone. It's a sweet underdog/fish out of water story. The second section is a coming of age/found family story. Due to the events of the first section, the heroine finds herself working in a university research lab and forming the kinds of relationships she hasn't been able to forge at her high school. She builds confidence. She makes friends. She figures out which cute boy she likes. She also makes some remarkable scientific discoveries, but more by chance than by a powerful drive to discover. The focus here is on her relationships with the people around her, and those relationships are layered in some lovely ways we don't always see in YA. The third section drops us into a full-on Bourne Identity-esque thriller. Espionage! Kidnapping! Torture! Coercion! International intrigue! Imprisonment and drug induced comas! The heroine in this section is no longer the insecure girl in part 1 or the girl figuring out who she is in part 2. Despite some initial trepidation for her circumstances, she acts quickly, shrewdly, and decisively at every turn. We watch a kind of mastermind at work, no longer focused on science, but on how to take control when immersed in complicated international power games. Those who pick up the book for the brilliant science girl comes of age story might be less interested in thriller section. Those who pick up the book expecting a thriller might be less interested in the fish out of water and coming of age stories. Those who aren't fussed about genre and simply enjoy quality writing and interesting scientific facts worked into their character studies, this one's for you!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I picked this up from the library on recommendation. CONS OF DRAGONFLY GIRL Some cursing. I did not like the one character, Rik. (view spoiler)[He appeared to like her when he thought she was some important scientist, then barely paid her any attention when he found out the truth, then started acting all like he liked her again once she became important for real. He totally seemed to be playing her, and I actually really disliked him. (hide spoiler)] That one weird sauna scene?? PROS OF DRAGONFLY GIR I picked this up from the library on recommendation. CONS OF DRAGONFLY GIRL Some cursing. I did not like the one character, Rik. (view spoiler)[He appeared to like her when he thought she was some important scientist, then barely paid her any attention when he found out the truth, then started acting all like he liked her again once she became important for real. He totally seemed to be playing her, and I actually really disliked him. (hide spoiler)] That one weird sauna scene?? PROS OF DRAGONFLY GIRL I really felt for the protagonist, Kira. So many crappy things keep happening to the poor girl. (view spoiler)[Especially the whole thing about her hiding that she didn't have a PhD at the beginning, and then being kidnapped at the end. (hide spoiler)] All the science in it! That was pretty fascinating. Excuse me but those rats were cute. (view spoiler)[Dragonfly is a cool code name. (hide spoiler)] The characters were all so complex. I loved Dmitri, hated Will for most of it (view spoiler)[yet the author was still able to make me like - and even feel for - him at the end (hide spoiler)] , got pretty suspicious of Munn, and adored her friend, Lauren, who was both super fashionable and also a science geek. Also, just Kira's motivations were so clear, and as a writer, that deserves a mention. You can see her, always always trying to help her mother, trying to get enough money, willing to do whatever it takes. There's a quiet strength to Kira, even if she constantly doubts herself and doesn't know what she's doing: she still stands firm in what she believes is the right thing to do. Um also hello the cover is cool. OVERALL An interesting story! I got worried closer to the end because so much needed to get wrapped up; that always seems to happen to me. I forget - or don't realize - that stories are part of a series, rather than being a standalone, and then only realize it by the time I'm done the book. I suppose I'll just have to wait for the next book to come out to find out what happens to Kira.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Becca ♥︎ PrettyLittleMemoirs.com

    Kira is pretty much a social outcast, feeling so different from her classmates (only having one true friend), and feels peculiar to basically everyone. At her roots, she’s a caring and devoted daughter, looking after her sick mother and trying hard to pay off their debts. That results in her entering a contest for one of her scientific discoveries that pays, and although her application isn’t entirely truthful, she still wins. And after a fierce few nights with other winners that turns sour, it Kira is pretty much a social outcast, feeling so different from her classmates (only having one true friend), and feels peculiar to basically everyone. At her roots, she’s a caring and devoted daughter, looking after her sick mother and trying hard to pay off their debts. That results in her entering a contest for one of her scientific discoveries that pays, and although her application isn’t entirely truthful, she still wins. And after a fierce few nights with other winners that turns sour, it still results in Kira’s life changing when she’s offered a chance to work with the prestigious Dr. Munn. Not to mention the perk of being around his attractive assistant who seems to get Kira on her level. Despite the job initially not being very exciting, cleaning up and helping assistants, one night changes everything that Kira knows to be true. She’s suddenly thrust into uncharted territory that beckons the attention of others, and whilst trudging through the unknown, she discovers that this new world is dark and dangerous. Forced to dabble in works that she never thought were possible, Kira knows she’s in way too deep. Overall, Dragonfly Girl swept me off my feet and into a world of intrigue and enchantingly researched science through the eyes of a poignant and like-minded main character that spoke to my introverted ways on a deep level. The writing, seemingly poetic to me, kept me turning pages until late at night. I have never been so captivated by a mystery that kept me on my toes, learning new ways that characters could evolve. I was surprised at just how much I fell in love with this book and how desperately I didn’t want it to end. It’s absolutely no surprise that this was by far a five-star read that I cannot fault, incredibly written, imaginative and in a league of it’s own.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Kira Adams is smart. Science smart, that is. Real world stuff and even high school English sometimes seem to be beyond her. But when she wins a prize that takes her to Sweden, everything starts to turn around. She catches the attention of one of the scientists at a prestigious research facility and lands a job there in spite of the fact that she's still only a junior in high school. And it's there that she makes a literally life-changing discovery. But Kira's work has been noticed by others as w Kira Adams is smart. Science smart, that is. Real world stuff and even high school English sometimes seem to be beyond her. But when she wins a prize that takes her to Sweden, everything starts to turn around. She catches the attention of one of the scientists at a prestigious research facility and lands a job there in spite of the fact that she's still only a junior in high school. And it's there that she makes a literally life-changing discovery. But Kira's work has been noticed by others as well and it's not necessarily the kind of notice one would consider healthy. Wow! I really loved this book! Dragonfly Girl is a quick read with a main character who immediately drew me in. Kira is gifted, so much so that she's able to place in a competition meant for those who've already earned their PhDs. So, professional scientists who work in professional labs and have traditional, professional training. Kira is only in high school. But even though she's that gifted, Kira's prospects aren't great. Her mom is sick and has racked up debt with a local loan shark—debt Kira planned to use her prize money to pay off. So college isn't exactly in her immediate plans. And unfortunately for Kira, she's outed at the competition. But, it kind of works in her favor as well considering she leaves with two different job offers. One kind of shady and one very appealing. You can probably guess which offer she takes, but it doesn't keep her out of trouble. That and the science involved in the book, along with Kira, of course, make this a truly page-turning read with massive cross-over appeal! Dragonfly Girl has everything you want in a great read—action and suspense, a heroine you can root for, and, on you might not think of, science that doesn't entirely go over the reader's head!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Traveling Cloak

    Dragonfly Girl is a really interesting story that combines elements of science with political intrigue along with really good character development. As I mentioned, there is a lot to like about this book. The science-y elements bring a lot to the story. It is not hard science, but there is enough talk about what is being done in this lab regarding life vs death to make one think about the possibilities. Cell regeneration, gene stimulation, neuron reactivation, nerve revitalization, organ regenera Dragonfly Girl is a really interesting story that combines elements of science with political intrigue along with really good character development. As I mentioned, there is a lot to like about this book. The science-y elements bring a lot to the story. It is not hard science, but there is enough talk about what is being done in this lab regarding life vs death to make one think about the possibilities. Cell regeneration, gene stimulation, neuron reactivation, nerve revitalization, organ regeneration, etc. With a book like this it would have been unfeasible to go into more detail for something that is not scientifically possible right now, but I enjoyed reading about it to the extent that it could. The best part of the book for me was the character development. The story is told from Kira’s perspective, and being able to experience the ins and outs of things from her point of view allows the reader to get to know Kira really intimately. That is really important for a book like this because the narrative not only focuses on scientific events surrounding her, but also how she feels about them. For that to work the reader has to care about Kira, and Leimbach does a great job of that. There are not a lot of characters, though, with most of the secondary being people Kira works with in the lab and the scientific community (along with Kira’s mom, who also has a presence). As supporting cast each one of them plays their role well and fill out the character card successfully. One aspect I want to bring up is that I think the story has a little bit of an identity problem. Is it science-y science fiction or is it a political spy novel? I do like the involvement of the international community in the story because it brings an element of depth (and a bit of realism), but I think this part of the story was taken too far toward the end. It almost felt as if the author was pulled in two different directions and tried to split the baby. I would encourage the author to pick a side on this one. That being said, Dragonfly Girl is a good read. The science talk and character interactions are what kept my interest and make this book worth a read. I recommend for fans of science fiction written in YA style

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