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In this brilliant sequel to The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.—an enthralling, history-bending adventure traversing time and space, fact and fiction, magic and science co-written with #1 New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson—a daring young time traveler must return to Jacobean England to save the modern world. This fast-paced sequel to the New York Times bestselling In this brilliant sequel to The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.—an enthralling, history-bending adventure traversing time and space, fact and fiction, magic and science co-written with #1 New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson—a daring young time traveler must return to Jacobean England to save the modern world. This fast-paced sequel to the New York Times bestselling near-future adventure The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. picks up where the original left off, as Tristan Lyons, Mel Stokes, and their fellow outcasts from the Department of Diachronic Operations (D.O.D.O.) fight to stop the powerful Irish witch Gráinne from using time travel to reverse the evolution of all modern technology.  Chief amongst Gráinne’s plots: to encrypt cataclysmic spells into Shakespeare’s “cursed” play, Macbeth. When her fellow rogue agents fall victim to Gráinne’s schemes, Melisande Stokes is forced to send Tristan’s untested, wayward sister Robin back in time to 1606 London, where Edmund Tilney, the king’s Master of Revels, controls all staged performances in London. And now Gráinne controls Tilney.  While Robin poses as an apprentice in Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, Mel travels to the ancient Roman Empire and, with the help of double-agent Chira in Renaissance Florence, untangles the knotted threads of history while the diabolical Gráinne jumps from timeline to timeline, always staying frustratingly one stop ahead—or is it behind? Historical objects disappear, cities literally rise and fall, and nothing less than the fate of humanity is at stake. As Gráinne sows chaos across time and space, the ragtag team of ex-D.O.D.O. agents must fix the past—in order to save the future. Critically acclaimed author Nicole Galland brings her deep knowledge of history and signature wit to this gripping romantic adventure.


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In this brilliant sequel to The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.—an enthralling, history-bending adventure traversing time and space, fact and fiction, magic and science co-written with #1 New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson—a daring young time traveler must return to Jacobean England to save the modern world. This fast-paced sequel to the New York Times bestselling In this brilliant sequel to The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.—an enthralling, history-bending adventure traversing time and space, fact and fiction, magic and science co-written with #1 New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson—a daring young time traveler must return to Jacobean England to save the modern world. This fast-paced sequel to the New York Times bestselling near-future adventure The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. picks up where the original left off, as Tristan Lyons, Mel Stokes, and their fellow outcasts from the Department of Diachronic Operations (D.O.D.O.) fight to stop the powerful Irish witch Gráinne from using time travel to reverse the evolution of all modern technology.  Chief amongst Gráinne’s plots: to encrypt cataclysmic spells into Shakespeare’s “cursed” play, Macbeth. When her fellow rogue agents fall victim to Gráinne’s schemes, Melisande Stokes is forced to send Tristan’s untested, wayward sister Robin back in time to 1606 London, where Edmund Tilney, the king’s Master of Revels, controls all staged performances in London. And now Gráinne controls Tilney.  While Robin poses as an apprentice in Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, Mel travels to the ancient Roman Empire and, with the help of double-agent Chira in Renaissance Florence, untangles the knotted threads of history while the diabolical Gráinne jumps from timeline to timeline, always staying frustratingly one stop ahead—or is it behind? Historical objects disappear, cities literally rise and fall, and nothing less than the fate of humanity is at stake. As Gráinne sows chaos across time and space, the ragtag team of ex-D.O.D.O. agents must fix the past—in order to save the future. Critically acclaimed author Nicole Galland brings her deep knowledge of history and signature wit to this gripping romantic adventure.

30 review for Master of the Revels

  1. 5 out of 5

    Joanna

    I sincerely hope this book has all the things I loved about the first one (time travel and fun characters and scheming witches) and none of the machinations of DODO and the gimmicky presentation. Give me straight up narrative!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Loring Wirbel

    Who would have dreamed that when historical-fiction prankster Nicole Galland teamed up with Neal Stephenson for the original D.O.D.O. novel, she'd plan for a sequel set in Shakespeare's Jacobean England within a matter of months? Indeed, judging by the cliffhanger on which this book ends, who'd guess that this would turn into a multi-volume franchise about time-traveling witches working with U.S. intelligence agencies? The fact that Stephenson is not involved in this novel means that there is ju Who would have dreamed that when historical-fiction prankster Nicole Galland teamed up with Neal Stephenson for the original D.O.D.O. novel, she'd plan for a sequel set in Shakespeare's Jacobean England within a matter of months? Indeed, judging by the cliffhanger on which this book ends, who'd guess that this would turn into a multi-volume franchise about time-traveling witches working with U.S. intelligence agencies? The fact that Stephenson is not involved in this novel means that there is just a hint of his leavening missing, and the fact that this will soon turn into a rough-and-tumble series requiring a certain commitment to witches toying with multiverse collapses of probability waves means that one must be prepared for a series of paradoxical traps at times (even dreaded "diachronous shears," and one doesn't want that). But that's only enough cautionary flags to take this second D.O.D.O. volume to a high four-star ranking. In the end, who could resist a tense and horror-filled story told in slapstick Monty Python fashion? If Galland wants to keep this up for a while, she can count me in! It's hard to talk a lot about this book without revealing spoilers, so I'll use some of the substitution ciphers employed in the Byzantine mosaics featured in the book to explain something of what's going on. In the original Stephenson/Galland collaboration, the reader was introduced to the Department of Diachronous Operations, or D.O.D.O., a US intelligence agency that learned how to revive a forgotten art of time travel. Through accidental encounters with witches, the agents within this bureaucracy learned that it is possible to make very small changes (butterfly-wing-effect sort of stuff) to history by going back in time and monkeying with small details. One mustn't go for too large an effect, however, or large disruptions in the space-time continuum known as diachronous shears result. The purpose of the intelligence agency is to make tiny changes to Earth that serve U.S. imperial interests. Or at least that was the original D.O.D.O. charter. The modern time travelers learn that witches in a variety of cultures use a calculating device that is something like a mashup between an abacus, a cat-o'-nine-tails, and a macrame candleholder, to determine how to change a probability wave from one possible universe (a "strand") to another. What we interpret as witches "casting spells" is the simple re-orientation of probability-wave collapse so that one thing happens instead of another. A painting might be subtly changed, for example, or a family tree might be altered to allow for another daughter. One wouldn't want Christopher Marlowe to die at a different point than his formerly dedicated fate, however, or diachronous shear would result -- and not even witches want that. At the end of the first book, we learn that many of the witches of past centuries are pretty pissed off because magic essentially died in 1851 as photography was perfected. It was not until the advances of technology allowed for different types of time travel that the two worlds of witchcraft and spycraft come together. At the first novel's end, one particular Irish witch, Grianne, has put it upon herself to destroy the advancements of technology so that witchcraft might survive in the 21st century. Because of her methods, she is cast as the evil one throughout the first two books. But you can almost hear Galland asking the reader which side is really evil -- though she doesn't come to her own conclusions, even as she paints Grianne as quite the nasty character. As in the first novel, Galland uses a fragmentary writing style using diary entries, government documents, handwritten letters and the like to weave a story in a disjointed and multimedia way. I happen to love the technique, and find that she uses it effectively. Others may find it off-putting, and decide that the D.O.D.O. series is not for them. The warning I would provide is that if they can't handle Galland's methodology, they'll be lost in wilder multimedia speculative-fiction experiments like Mark Danielewski's Familiar series. Master of the Revels centers on the weeks in which William Shakespeare is preparing an initial production of Macbeth, initially for the Globe Theater, but later for a more intimate premiere of the play in the court of King James. The protagonists in the first book have all left D.O.D.O. because the director of the agency has fallen under the spell of the witch Grianne, and fails to realize that placing her in charge of missions could endanger all post-19th-century technologies on the planet. Thus, the founding members of the intelligence agency are operating in amateur rogue fashion using DIY technologies and alliances of witches who remain uncertain which visitors from the future they should aid or hinder. The critical ur-text for Shakespeare is the spell of the three witches in Macbeth, and the person responsible for approval of the text of Shakespeare plays is not the bard himself, but the Globe Theater's Master of Revels Edmund Tilney, a man who is part special-effect production manager and part censor. As various time travelers try to monkey with Shakespeare's texts across centuries, modern folios of Shakespeare's work suddenly become fuzzy or illegible right around that "Double double toil and trouble" line. As if this isn't enough to simultaneously befuddle and amaze the reader, there are subplots involving mosaics being placed on the floor of a Roman villa in the fourth-century era of Constantine, the appearance of a "Schrodinger's Cat" lacquer box in Kyoto in 1450 A.D., and the possible kidnapping or rescue of a Tartar slave in Florence in 1397. And did I mention the notorious Fugger banking family? They figure prominently here as well. Of course, no one but a history buff like Galland could pull this off, particularly in the salty and ribald way in which she tells the tale. Another caution -- if a fragmentary tale of time-travelers wasn't enough to confuse some readers, it's important to mention that reading this novel without its predecessor would increase the confusion exponentially. Galland has given readers a prologue and plenty of clues throughout the book, but D.O.D.O. is meant to be read from its first book, as a fantasy series still in gestation. Installment 2 is wild, fast-paced, scary, and ridiculous, all at once, and Galland has made clear that she can handle the ongoing epic without the continued help of Neal Stephenson.

  3. 4 out of 5

    whitney ༅:*・゚

    ꧁ 3.5 stars ꧂ ok look: this book met all my expectations, and i was invested in the plot. however, it was so long. the format and writing style just made it drone on and on and i spent weeks trying to get through the first 10%. even though it's only 560 pages long, it felt so much longer. HOWEVER: if you enjoy semi-accurate shakespearean self-insert stories, i think you would love this series! there's a lot of time travel (they give an explanation in quantum physics, but i didn't understand most o ꧁ 3.5 stars ꧂ ok look: this book met all my expectations, and i was invested in the plot. however, it was so long. the format and writing style just made it drone on and on and i spent weeks trying to get through the first 10%. even though it's only 560 pages long, it felt so much longer. HOWEVER: if you enjoy semi-accurate shakespearean self-insert stories, i think you would love this series! there's a lot of time travel (they give an explanation in quantum physics, but i didn't understand most of it) and some witchy things. there's a lot of terms, people and acronyms to remember, so it's definitely a time investment. also, for any DODO newbies, it's completely written in diary entries, after-action reports, random pieces of writing, emails, etc. i found the format really interesting when it's from people i liked reading about, but it gets boring if it's from the pov of someone random. so this book takes place mainly in shakespearean london (a whole lot goes down there) and partially in ancient rome. the "present day" parts are mostly wholesome found family moments (with a group of 30-somethings and an elderly couple so... not my typical demographic but it's fine cuz i love them) and some povs from the antagonists. GRAINNE NEEDS TO GO TF AWAY. SOMEONE TRIGGER DIACHRONIC SHEAR ON HER PLEASE :) the romance is pretty scarce and far between, but mel and tristan are ADORABLE TOGETHER and also i lowkey love (view spoiler)[robin and ned... but also can we talk about how ned casually threw himself into the river and i'm pretty sure nobody found him by the end of the book. so did he just dIE and robin decided "yknow what, nobody cares enough to go rescue ned"??? i need clarification! (hide spoiler)] so in summary: i liked most of the book. the plot and the characters were interesting, but the pacing was too slow for my taste. erzsébet deserved a bigger role in this, and also (view spoiler)[frank (hide spoiler)] died for nO REASON. I AM SALTY. ok thanks for reading my review. it was a bit all over the place but i hope you got the gist! also, thank you morrow group for the eARC; all thoughts and opinions are my own. ꧁ find me at my socials ꧂ insta | tiktok | youtube | twitter | blog (from february:) there's a book 2?? february just got 100% better!! i adored DODO so much, and i'm super excited to read about the next part of tristan, mel and gráinne's journey!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    TL;DR Master of the Revels by Nicole Galland is a welcome return to the world of D.O.D.O. This fun story recaptured all the joy D.O.D.O. brought us. New missions, new characters, and more Erzsébet Karpathy make this a must read for D.O.D.O. fans. Highly recommended. Disclaimer: I was provided an eARC of this book by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. < a href=https://primmlife.com/2021/02/09/revi... this and more reviews, please visit my blog at Primmlife.com Review: Master o TL;DR Master of the Revels by Nicole Galland is a welcome return to the world of D.O.D.O. This fun story recaptured all the joy D.O.D.O. brought us. New missions, new characters, and more Erzsébet Karpathy make this a must read for D.O.D.O. fans. Highly recommended. Disclaimer: I was provided an eARC of this book by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. < a href=https://primmlife.com/2021/02/09/revi... this and more reviews, please visit my blog at Primmlife.com Review: Master of the Revels by Nicole Galland Time travel is a staple of speculative fiction. When done wrong, it’s infuriating. When done right, it’s fun, and I’m all in. When I first picked up The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O., I didn’t know what to expect. But soon I was all in for the ride. It’s focus on office mundanity, mixing witchcraft with science, and a distinct cast of characters won me over as a fan. So when I saw that its sequel, Master of the Revels by Nicole Galland, was coming out. I had to get it into my hands as fast as possible. Galland succeeded in furthering the adventures of the time traveling team. Master of the Revels puts D.O.D.O. operatives on the path to fixing the changes in reality their meddling caused. Master of the Revels picks up soon after Tristan Lyons, Melisande Stokes, Frank Oda, Rebecca East-Oda, Erzsébet Karpathy and Mortimer Shore leave the official D.O.D.O. This small resistance group creates a rogue D.O.D.O. to thwart Gráinne’s plans. The main plot of the story is a battle between Gráinne and rogue D.O.D.O. to influence the creation of William Shakespeare’s MacBeth. Tristan’s sister, Robin, is brought into replace him when he goes missing. Her knowledge of theater and its history make her an apt, if untested, agent. Her role is to befriend William Shakespeare and seek employment with the master of revels, Edmund Tilney. But Gráinne has multiple plots going. One involves a tiled floor in a Roman city, and another takes place in 1397 Florence around the freeing of a Tartan slave. I loved The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. It was a solid story told in a unique way. It took the form of epistolary fiction, i.e. diary notes, emails, and persistent chat logs. Master of the Revels keeps up this same form, and it worked just as well for me this time. The history suffuses the plots but doesn’t over shadow the action. In fact, I’d say this book was a bit more focused than its predecessor. The Shakespeare mission receives most of the page time, and it was fun. The other two missions were a little more straight forward but went off the rails more quickly than the Shakespeare mission. I thought there was good balance between the three; the mix kept me turning the pages. Characters Master of the Revels maintains the same strength that I loved in The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O., the characters. Erzsébet is my favorite character hands down, and she gets a little page time here, not enough, but I really enjoyed her few moments. In addition to the carryover characters, we get new D.O.D.O. operatives, new historical characters, and the bard, himself, William Shakespeare. Master of the Revels has a broad cast of characters that all seem distinct. Whether its Roman sisters or a Florentine wagoner, even the minor characters are distinct and memorable. Too often, minor characters can fade into the background, but in Master of the Revels, they stand out without overshadowing the plot. History Much of Master of the Revels takes place in the past. There is a lot of excellent historical detail in here. How much is real and how much is made up for the story? I have no idea, and I think that’s great for alternate history fiction. I loved the settings, but of the three, the England of King James felt the most flushed out. Florence and Sicily had enough details to satisfy but not enough to be immersive. Robin Master of the Revels succeeds or fails based upon a new character, Robin Lyons. Robin is Tristan’s sister. She’s a theatre nerd who likes the history of English theatre. While she is different than Tristan in many ways, she has his same determination and quickness of thought. Seeing her go through Elizabethan England, we learn that she’s as much a survivor as Tristan. Her transition from innocent theatre nerd to Rogue D.O.D.O. operative is quick but enjoyable. Frankly, she was the more interesting choice to follow through the staging of MacBeth. I don’t think Tristan would have had as many adventures as his sister. Master of the Revels succeeds because Robin is likable, smart, and able to navigate a world foreign to our own. Gráinne In this book, we get a number of letters from Gráinne to a potential ally, who happens to be in the employ of the Fuggers. I loved this insight into Gráinne and her plans. Throughout much of the book, she seems like an extremely powerful force, and yet she’s not all powerful. Her advantage of initiative is countered by D.O.D.O.’s ability to operate as a team. Where Gráinne has to ensure the main D.O.D.O. branch and their operations conform to her plans, Rogue D.O.D.O. is able to dedicate multiple minds to various plans, which gives them better solutions and better operational work. Gráinne is an excellent villain because we understand – though don’t agree with – her reasoning for sabotaging technology. Her letters might be my favorite, non-Erszebet parts of the book. Part of it is the view into her process, but part of it is her reaching out to a fellow witch, seeking one of her kind in a foreign world. Those letters made her seem isolated in a way that I don’t think I got from the first book. Fuggers I love the Fuggers. They are so mysterious, and they are playing some sort of hand in the background that we don’t get to see. This multi-generational banking company is somehow the mediating force in present day Boston between Rogue and Gráinne’s D.O.D.O. operations. We got some explanation in the last book, but I feel like there’s more there. I’d love to know more about the Fuggers. Are they witches? Do they have some sort of magical role to play? Or are they just like other bankers, controlling the flow of information in order to profit? Hopefully, if there’s more books, we learn more about this organization and how they’re able to enforce a neutrality in Boston’s present. Conclusion Nicole Galland’s Master of the Revels is a fun and welcome return to the odd world of D.O.D.O. The lovable cast of characters gets expanded in a book that heavily features historical missions. Master of the Revels left me wanting more D.O.D.O. Master of the Revels by Nicole Galland is available from William Morrow on February 23rd, 2021. 7.5 out of 10!

  5. 5 out of 5

    L

    This was a lot of fun. Compared to The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O., which Nicole Galland coauthored with Neal Stephenson, Master of the Revels is much more playful. I think it's fair to say that's a difference between Galland and Stephenson. Stephenson has a sense of humor, but he is apt to leap into a 50-page treatise on orbital mechanics on any plausible provocation. That's OK -- I enjoy it -- but Galland's "We're just having fun!" attitude is refreshing. You will notice that the story here is a This was a lot of fun. Compared to The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O., which Nicole Galland coauthored with Neal Stephenson, Master of the Revels is much more playful. I think it's fair to say that's a difference between Galland and Stephenson. Stephenson has a sense of humor, but he is apt to leap into a 50-page treatise on orbital mechanics on any plausible provocation. That's OK -- I enjoy it -- but Galland's "We're just having fun!" attitude is refreshing. You will notice that the story here is about women and told by women. Two important male characters from the first book, Frank Oda and Tristan Lyons, are shuffled off the stage almost immediately and remain so for most of the book. The main characters are Melisande, Gráinne, Chira, and Tristan's sister Robin Lyons. The first three appeared in The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O., but Robin, the real star, is new. Chira and Mel also have adventurous stories in past times. Gráinne surreptitiously (and sometimes openly) causes trouble for everyone. There are two more important male characters. Robin spends most of the novel in early 17th century England, where she interacts with two historical Edmunds: Edmund (Ned) Shakespeare, William Shakespeare's younger brother, and the man who lends the novel its title, Edmund Tilney, who holds the title of Master of the Revels under King James. Despite his star billing, Tilney is a second-tier character. Ned Shakespeare becomes Robin's main squeeze in the 17th century. Ned is a lot of fun. He writes a post-action report on one of Robin's missions in poetry. It is called “The Song of Edmund and Robin; or, Mend Thy Words”, and is a delight.

  6. 4 out of 5

    April Gray

    Time travel is always a tricky thing to write. This book, a continuation of The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O, is the story of two factions fighting it out along the strands of time. One side is working for the government, the other has gone rogue. Each is trying to undo the others work in the past. The narrative is told through communications, letters, after action reports and other means through the voices of multiple characters. That combined with the nature of time travel writing can be a bit har Time travel is always a tricky thing to write. This book, a continuation of The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O, is the story of two factions fighting it out along the strands of time. One side is working for the government, the other has gone rogue. Each is trying to undo the others work in the past. The narrative is told through communications, letters, after action reports and other means through the voices of multiple characters. That combined with the nature of time travel writing can be a bit hard to follow until you get used to it but overall it was an interesting read that leaves the reader what could possibly happen next.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Bode

    Another "Master"ful tale I absolutely loved this book, the wait was worth it. I've subtitled it in my library as "The Further Adventures of Tristan and Mel" this time joined by Tristan's sister Robin, who is an interesting and fun character to read. As expected, the mix of reports, letters and diary style entries is a refreshing change from the standard narrative style, all in first person or conversation mode, and as in the first book, gives the reader an amusing and complex experience while kee Another "Master"ful tale I absolutely loved this book, the wait was worth it. I've subtitled it in my library as "The Further Adventures of Tristan and Mel" this time joined by Tristan's sister Robin, who is an interesting and fun character to read. As expected, the mix of reports, letters and diary style entries is a refreshing change from the standard narrative style, all in first person or conversation mode, and as in the first book, gives the reader an amusing and complex experience while keeping up with what is a fast paced story. Now I want another one, surely the story can't be left there? Seriously, Gráinne can't be allowed to get away with it, we readers want to see her get her comeuppance. Over to you Nicole (pretty please)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Margot

    D.O.D.O. (Well, sorta- no spoilers, you will see) goes to Shakespeare’s London to save the future! If you liked the first book and are a Bard nerd like me, you’re gonna get a kick out of this book as well. Time travel continues to be nowhere as straightforward as it seems, fortunately, and hijinks ensue when not one but two top-secret agencies battle for control of our timeline while managing funding, paperwork, and their office crush. Enjoyable reading.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ron Frampton

    A book about time travel

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    3.5 stars This review is based on an ARC book received for free from Goodreads. I am not being paid to review this book and what I write here is my own opinion. My rating scale is below. review Master of the Revels is by no means a bad book, and on its own, without the specter of its predecessor, The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. (written with Neal Stephenson), it would even be a quite good book. Unfortunately, there would be too much for it to explain and unpack for it to stand alone, and so it is ove 3.5 stars This review is based on an ARC book received for free from Goodreads. I am not being paid to review this book and what I write here is my own opinion. My rating scale is below. review Master of the Revels is by no means a bad book, and on its own, without the specter of its predecessor, The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. (written with Neal Stephenson), it would even be a quite good book. Unfortunately, there would be too much for it to explain and unpack for it to stand alone, and so it is overshadowed in several ways. The story is told the same way as the first book, which is to say journals, transcripts, letters, and the like, but more than a hundred pages in (in fact, after two hundred pages, as well) there are still giant infodumps catching the reader up on the first book. Honestly, it would be simpler to have a disclaimer saying that this book is not meant to be read on its own than to force readers through multiple catch-up sessions. I rather expected there to be less science fictional cleverness and more interpersonal focus in this book, with the loss of Stephenson as a collaborator, but I do find myself disappointed by it. Likewise, there was more humor in the first book, but this book is not without its humor. Clearly heaps of historical research went into the writing of this book, particularly about Shakespearean theatre, but I would have liked to read more detail about more varied eras and locales (yes, we also catch the tiniest glimpse of Sicily in the 1400s and a slightly broader glimpse of Rome, but there is significantly less historical detail). The shifts of narrative perspective make me wonder if, in the previous book, there were characters Galland did not quite get a feel for, and so has chosen to neglect in order to lean more heavily on more easily-written characters. For example: D.O.D.O. opens with the mystery of how Mel ended up trapped writing her memoirs in 1851 and Revels opens with a terrible tragedy, but there is no mystery to the tragedy, and so the book loses a good deal of urgency. There is no mystery to how things come to this point, nor apparent effort made to prevent its occurrence, which makes the whole affair seem like an unnecessary tragedy. If it seems like I am constantly comparing this book to its prequel and finding it wanting, well, that is so, but it can hardly be helped when one is reading the second book in a series that is really far too complicated to stand on its own (excessive catch-up explanatory sections notwithstanding). I have no doubt that Galland intends there to be a sequel, and I shall probably read it, but Stephenson’s wit is noticeably absent from this book, and I confess that I hope the third book will be the last. rating scale 1 star - I was barely able to finish it. I didn't like it. 2 stars - It was okay. I didn't dislike it. 3 stars - It was interesting. I liked it. 4 stars - It was excellent. I really liked it. 5 stars - It was extraordinary. I really hope the author wrote more things.

  11. 5 out of 5

    John

    Super, I won the book, really excited to start reading this one

  12. 5 out of 5

    Allison Denny

    I'm going to pull a Cursed Child and just mentally disregard this. I didn't think it was very good! Here are the narrative choices I did not enjoy. (No spoilers beyond what's on the front flap and the prologue, which was released as promo material.) - Lots of focus on new characters and not enough on the characters we already knew from the first book. I was here for more personal development and relationship growth among the existing crew. I wanted to see people grow and change as part of shadow I'm going to pull a Cursed Child and just mentally disregard this. I didn't think it was very good! Here are the narrative choices I did not enjoy. (No spoilers beyond what's on the front flap and the prologue, which was released as promo material.) - Lots of focus on new characters and not enough on the characters we already knew from the first book. I was here for more personal development and relationship growth among the existing crew. I wanted to see people grow and change as part of shadow DODO. There was little of this. - Lots of weirdly abandoned character arcs at the end of the book. Several characters, I'm not sure about their mental state or allegiance anymore--or even if they're alive at all. Maybe this is setting up a third book. I don't care for it. - Ironically, here's a complaint I normally have about Stephenson's works, which is that you can tell what's been obsessing him during the writing process. Memes (Snow Crash), orbital mechanics and epigenetics (Seveneves), code breaking (Cryptonomicon), the entire multiverse and everything in it (Anathem), etc. Research isn't bad, of course, but each of these books have moments where the plot lags so Stephenson can make a point about his current topic. Galland gets pointlessly obsessed about a topic in this book, and that topic is Shakespearean London. - A callous disregard for supposedly beloved characters, shown by both the characters and Galland herself. I'm talking about the Frank subplot, the total lack of urgency in helping him the same way other characters were helped in both this book and DODO, and the fairly stupid setup for splintering Rebecca into her own course of action. (Although Tristan and Chira were both treated pretty poorly as well, in their own ways.) It felt out of character all around, Rebecca maybe excluded. - Somehow, the story just felt smaller and less fun. DODO was witty, sarcastic, leveraged each communication form to do things that couldn't be said in any other way, and had a broad reach. This felt claustrophobic. All that said, if you're into historical fiction about Shakespeare and court intrigue, you might like this. If you wanted a DODO sequel to see Mel, Tristan, and the rest of the gang on the offensive, learning new things about the world, and getting to know each other better, maybe skip it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    James Baker

    Second in the “DODO” series, and whilst this is a solid 4 star read, it suffer from the classic “difficult second album” issues that prevent it from being excellent. The expository dump required to update the reader on the events depicted in the first book of the series seemed to drag on far longer than required, largely due to the fragmentary nature of the writing (through collated “found” documents): it seemed as if I were still getting info dumps halfway through. Having recently re-read the fi Second in the “DODO” series, and whilst this is a solid 4 star read, it suffer from the classic “difficult second album” issues that prevent it from being excellent. The expository dump required to update the reader on the events depicted in the first book of the series seemed to drag on far longer than required, largely due to the fragmentary nature of the writing (through collated “found” documents): it seemed as if I were still getting info dumps halfway through. Having recently re-read the first book, however, it is possible that I am being unduly harsh on the exposition as the story was already fresh in my mind. Whilst the new characters introduced were interesting, I felt disappointed at the lack of time given to one of the POV characters from the first book. Whilst this absence provided a focal point to drive the story forward, it had the effect of leaving much of the book without some of the sparky, humorous, character interaction that elevated the previous book in the series. In comparison to its predecessor in the DODO series, this book appeared to spend much more time fleshing out the minutiae of the adventures in the historical settings, at the cost of developing the ongoing plot points in the “present”. It was as if there was a much more exciting story going on, but that a lot of groundwork needed to be put in place first before we would be allowed to see it. The ending of the first book in the series felt complete, whilst also leaving the door wide open for a sequel. In contrast, this story ends surprisingly abruptly with so many open plot threads that I almost felt like the author got edited down into a compact word count leaving a half finished volume 3 sitting on her desk and a treatment for an 8 book series with a single overarching story. Hopefully that is the case and a third instalment can be published quickly (I would happily pre-order today). I listened to the Audible version, narrated by Laurence Bouvard et al. Narration was excellent.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Willard

    I had been anticipating this sequel for the past two years, as, while The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. was a little up and down, it had some excellent characters, interesting plots, and Neal Stephenson's characteristic mockery of bureaucracy. His tendency to go off entirely into only vaguely interesting weeds seemed to be tempered by Galland's own comedic and narrative voice. The sequel was a bit of a different genre, with basically none of the sci-fi/technofantasy elements of the first book (not en I had been anticipating this sequel for the past two years, as, while The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. was a little up and down, it had some excellent characters, interesting plots, and Neal Stephenson's characteristic mockery of bureaucracy. His tendency to go off entirely into only vaguely interesting weeds seemed to be tempered by Galland's own comedic and narrative voice. The sequel was a bit of a different genre, with basically none of the sci-fi/technofantasy elements of the first book (not entirely unexpected, given Stephenson's singular voice in that sphere, though leaving two characters driving those elements of the original story offscreen for the entire novel was). The novel bogged down heavily for me in the extensive "what you really want is an in-depth explanation of Elizabethan/early Jacobean theatre" plotline, while I missed the learning and character growth, as well as some of the comedic elements, of the first novel. All in all, I felt like the friends and compatriots I'd come to know in the first novel had gone, and their replacements were less interesting and compelling. I hadn't read a paper copy of the first novel, so I don't know if the poor simulation of manuscripts were in that print edition, but reading bad cursive fonts (or other) fonts on dark grey background was fairly irritating and gimmicky. I stayed engaged in the plot to the end, though the deus ex machina introduced at the beginning of the novel made little sense at any point in the context of the world, and led to a conclusion that was, at best, anticlimactic. Fun. Don't expect it to make too much sense. I'm not really interested in the next chapter, and wish some of the theater descriptions had been thrown overboard and replaced with some deeper interactions between the main characters in the present.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alecia

    I was really excited to dive into this because I remember the first book being such a fun ride. The first few pages made me put this down and move to another book first because I realized that as much as I enjoyed the first book, I barely remembered any of the specifics (and there are A LOT of acronyms here). For those of you in the same position, don't worry because the authors catch you up and you get all the background you need when it's pertinent. This started off fun and fast paced but lost I was really excited to dive into this because I remember the first book being such a fun ride. The first few pages made me put this down and move to another book first because I realized that as much as I enjoyed the first book, I barely remembered any of the specifics (and there are A LOT of acronyms here). For those of you in the same position, don't worry because the authors catch you up and you get all the background you need when it's pertinent. This started off fun and fast paced but lost steam around the middle and limped to a finish. I was very disappointed by the treatment of character deaths; the sidelining of all the characters we were familiar with; and the decision to set things almost entirely in Shakespeare's London. The setting made senses and there were a lot of fun bits, but it felt like the book gave short shrift to the political intrigue of Rogue D.O.D.O. Major spoilers under the tag. (view spoiler)[This is super spoilery but I warned you. Frank Oda gets killed in the first chapter and nobody finds out until the last chapter, so we don't deal with it AT ALL. However, we do find out that Tristan gets killed on his mission to stop Grainne from burying a deadly spell in the script for Macbeth. Enter his sister Robin, who is conveniently a theater nerd who loves Shakespeare. She saves him, but only kinda. "Our" Tristan can't be saved from the total annihilation spell which wipe out him and all his parallel selves. But another witch kills him first, and because he didn't die from the spell, she transports an alt-Tristan who also would have died from the annihiliation spell to get sent back. Weirdly, he's exactly the same person and there is seemingly no awkwardness with him re-integrating with the team. It's the definition of a deus ex machina, and while these books rather rely on them, this one felt particularly egregious. (hide spoiler)] Despite my complaints, this was mostly enjoyable and I'll be waiting on the conclusion.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ted Goldstein

    I enjoyed the first book in this series and was excited to be a lucky winner of an ARC of this release from Goodreads. I like the whole time traveling witches pretense and the idea of the subtle manipulation of history though very small changes at just the right time and place reminded me of the Poul Anderson Time Patrol series. The rich historical details were excellent. I do not think I would like to be dropped into Shakespearian England. The operatives are truly a hardy bunch. For me, there wer I enjoyed the first book in this series and was excited to be a lucky winner of an ARC of this release from Goodreads. I like the whole time traveling witches pretense and the idea of the subtle manipulation of history though very small changes at just the right time and place reminded me of the Poul Anderson Time Patrol series. The rich historical details were excellent. I do not think I would like to be dropped into Shakespearian England. The operatives are truly a hardy bunch. For me, there were also some challenging aspects to this book. As in the first novel, this book uses a fragmentary writing style with diary entries, government documents, handwritten letters and the like to weave a story in a disjointed and multimedia way. I happen to find this technique difficult and struggled at points to piece together the threads of the story, especially early on. I understand others find this style enjoyable. The story is quite slow to get going, and there is a needlessly huge cast of characters which were difficult for me to keep track of. A rather long beginning portion of the book was spent trying to catch up the reader on the events in the first book. These things really made me work to keep pushing forward in the beginning. It might have been better to have a disclaimer saying that readers should read the first book, or weave in the recaps more subtlety throughout the story and drop 100 pages out of this large tome. When the story finally got going and narrowed its focus down to a handful of meaningful characters, I was hooked by the complex time travel machinations and the rich, detailed portrayal of the historical settings.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nacho A. A.

    Honest: being a serial time-travel reader, the DODO undertake indeed goes far beyond all those self-conscious, pretentious, take-me-too-seriously-please efforts... Don't get misled by the apparent slicing in parts and approach the story from an overall perspective rather than in chapters. Dude, 'The DODO Chronicles' (1 and 2, as yet) are well researched, nicely and crisply plotted, packed with fun+mood+strealth+action+literacy+adventure, filled with savoury characters+delicate language puns/meta Honest: being a serial time-travel reader, the DODO undertake indeed goes far beyond all those self-conscious, pretentious, take-me-too-seriously-please efforts... Don't get misled by the apparent slicing in parts and approach the story from an overall perspective rather than in chapters. Dude, 'The DODO Chronicles' (1 and 2, as yet) are well researched, nicely and crisply plotted, packed with fun+mood+strealth+action+literacy+adventure, filled with savoury characters+delicate language puns/metaphors/'devices'+sooooo-well-reported-epoch-related-obscenity... Don't let the paralysis by analysis syndrome take control and get into DODO with your openest will to enjoy the ride. You will. These are not your regular airport paperbacks. Get into it and have fun! PS: You have never met such a citric character as Erszebet is. I miss more of her bitchy tongue! PS (2): The Shakespeare plot is, oh, soooo much fun, mind-bending, entertaining. Being a language and literature scholar myself, I just wish i'd have an ODEC in my own basement to go along to the original Globe with Robin myself! PS (3): If neither Stephenson nor Galland are afraid of it, ¿why should you refrain from getting into this delicious absurdity? GO GET IT NOW! PS (4): If you're in for time-travel stuff in a more conventional narrative style, you will want to read C. R. Berry's Million Eyes. Superb narrative and intricate plot.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Batgirl13

    I spotted this the day it came in as an advanced reader copy at work and I got SO excited! I loved The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O and always hoped there would be a sequel. Apparently, my wishes came true! I am always a bit nervous with sequels and was a little worried since Stephenson was not co-writing this one that it would read too differently or lose something. It did not. The ragtag original crew of D.O.D.O from the first book now must work as outcasts on their own to stop a powerful witch Gr I spotted this the day it came in as an advanced reader copy at work and I got SO excited! I loved The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O and always hoped there would be a sequel. Apparently, my wishes came true! I am always a bit nervous with sequels and was a little worried since Stephenson was not co-writing this one that it would read too differently or lose something. It did not. The ragtag original crew of D.O.D.O from the first book now must work as outcasts on their own to stop a powerful witch Grainne (still employed at D.O.D.O) from changing the course of history. Grainne is trying to insert dark magical spells into Shakespeare's Macbeth and everyone must work together to stop her before she alters things too much. The story is told (as it was in the first book) in snippets of letters, work memos, and from all different points of view. I really enjoy reading a story from that perspective. It feels like historical research or something instead of just a novel. I lost so much sleep the week I was reading this because I did not want to stop reading each night. It definitely has that unputdownable quality. I highly recommend checking this one out if you are a sci-fi/fantasy fan, enjoy thinking about time travel, are annoyed at crazy government bureaucracy, or really like Shakespeare. I know I will be recommending this to customers at work when it comes out. It ends on a bit of a cliffhanger so now I am cautiously hoping for a Book #3 in the series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dan Trefethen

    This sequel to “The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.” by Nicole Galland and Neal Stephenson is written solely by Galland, but still has Stephenson's name on the cover. Despite some 'nudging' that Galland cites in the acknowledgements, it appears that Stephenson was not a participant. Having said that, this is a perfectly acceptable time travel romp, sequencing through multiple strands of history: Ancient Sicily, Japan, but especially Elizabethan England in the time of Shakespeare. Specifically, 1606 and This sequel to “The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.” by Nicole Galland and Neal Stephenson is written solely by Galland, but still has Stephenson's name on the cover. Despite some 'nudging' that Galland cites in the acknowledgements, it appears that Stephenson was not a participant. Having said that, this is a perfectly acceptable time travel romp, sequencing through multiple strands of history: Ancient Sicily, Japan, but especially Elizabethan England in the time of Shakespeare. Specifically, 1606 and the staging of “Macbeth”. Galland is a Shakespeare nerd, and it shows, with most of the text immersed in that time and place. The narrative is driven by the machinations of a witch (bad witch!) to subvert the rise of technology and bring magic back to the modern world by causing various butterfly effects in the past. She is opposed by a group of ragtag time travelers and their own witch (good witch!). People bounce back and forth through time to figure out what the bad witch is doing and how to sabotage it. The more you know and care about Shakespeare and that time period, the more you will enjoy this book. I would come close to describing this as historical fiction, since so much time is spent there. And of course there are little Easter eggs for Shakespeare fans spread throughout. In the famous lyrics from the musical “Kiss Me, Kate”: “Brush up your Shakespeare” to maximize your enjoyment of this romp.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Duffy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Almost gave up on this, kind of a big ask to sideline so many of the previous characters we had gotten to know and bring in a completely new one who took up the majority of the story. Grainne is a difficult character, at once extremely powerful and devious and at the same time somewhat fey and incompetent. She rather easily takes out Ken and Tristan and gets Blevins and Tilney to more or less to do what she wants without even enchanting them, while also managing to affect several side strands wit Almost gave up on this, kind of a big ask to sideline so many of the previous characters we had gotten to know and bring in a completely new one who took up the majority of the story. Grainne is a difficult character, at once extremely powerful and devious and at the same time somewhat fey and incompetent. She rather easily takes out Ken and Tristan and gets Blevins and Tilney to more or less to do what she wants without even enchanting them, while also managing to affect several side strands with DODO agents, yet her ability to handle Robin is nonexistent. I feel like she's almost too powerful, with no check by any others as all the witches seem to have a convenient "don't meddle with another witches business" ethos. Plus she gets a lot of diary time, and who doesn't write pages and pages of notes to potentiial allies you've met only a few times? And reading that in her dialect got a bit tiresome. Chira having to deal with the exploitive beauracracy of Blevins got a little repetitive after a bit, and I was a little relieved when it finished up. Overall I just did not care for the story, had to spend too much time with characters I didn't find that compelling, and I can't help but think that Grainne's task is self defeating, how do you use a technological marvel to make sure that there are no technological marvels, wouldn't that in itself create diachronic shear, or would it just make a strand, hard to keep track of the time travel rules.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Edgar Guedez

    D.O.D.O.'s Sequel: not as good as the first book I knew it. I knew a second book was coming after the first book ended in a stalemate. But the problem with sequels is that it is difficult to keep the same standard. Several things come into attention: 1.- The narrative is unconventional, it is delivered in a series of documents, emails, after-action reports, entries in personal diaries, and letters 2.- It's a long book, more than500 pages, as long as the first one. 3.- it takes several repetitions D.O.D.O.'s Sequel: not as good as the first book I knew it. I knew a second book was coming after the first book ended in a stalemate. But the problem with sequels is that it is difficult to keep the same standard. Several things come into attention: 1.- The narrative is unconventional, it is delivered in a series of documents, emails, after-action reports, entries in personal diaries, and letters 2.- It's a long book, more than500 pages, as long as the first one. 3.- it takes several repetitions of the same mission in different time strands to accomplish something. Then, it gets repetitive, sometimes dull, and boring. 4.- There are flaws in the plow. After 500 pages, the plot is still left inconclusive, although the wicked witch Greinne didn't accomplish her goal to undo technology to perpetuate magic. Greinne did some damage to the good guys and the fate of one of them is compromised at the end, although, it looks that Grainne induced a catastrophic event ( a diachronic sheer) while interfering in one of the strands she's trying to change. If the author is thinking about a third book, it better be a good one.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I'm of two minds about this. On the one hand, it's captured the energy and tone from the first book fairly closely for in my opinion (so, as a corollary, if you didn't like the first one, you won't like this one either) and it also accomplishes the "remind readers what happened in book 1" task fairly skillfully at the beginning of the novel without being annoying. It's just as fun to read as the first one was and feels a little bit like you're watching a TV show about time travel. On the other ha I'm of two minds about this. On the one hand, it's captured the energy and tone from the first book fairly closely for in my opinion (so, as a corollary, if you didn't like the first one, you won't like this one either) and it also accomplishes the "remind readers what happened in book 1" task fairly skillfully at the beginning of the novel without being annoying. It's just as fun to read as the first one was and feels a little bit like you're watching a TV show about time travel. On the other hand, it was overlong (it felt like you could have cut 50-100 pages or so from the plot easily) and it felt as if there was relatively little plot development, or tension, for such a long book. When the denouement happens it doesn't feel very organic, it feels like we just decided to wrap it up at that point, but it could have been at any point. Basically there are strong "middle book of a trilogy" vibes, but even for middle books of a trilogy I expect slightly more to happen. (Also, finally, if you are not passionate about Shakespeare or Shakespearean London, which is the case for me, buckle up because there's a lot of both in this book.)

  23. 4 out of 5

    TK

    I so enjoyed this time travel novel, in which Diachronic Operatives (DOers) are sent back in time by witches to subtly alter history to the advantage of the USA. It's a marvelously complicated plot involving different Strands of time and a rouge group of DOers who time travel to thwart the efforts of an evil witch, who is trying to undo the progress of technology for her own purposes. The thing I liked the most about this novel is one of the DOers, Dr. Melisande Stokes. She is such a wonderful c I so enjoyed this time travel novel, in which Diachronic Operatives (DOers) are sent back in time by witches to subtly alter history to the advantage of the USA. It's a marvelously complicated plot involving different Strands of time and a rouge group of DOers who time travel to thwart the efforts of an evil witch, who is trying to undo the progress of technology for her own purposes. The thing I liked the most about this novel is one of the DOers, Dr. Melisande Stokes. She is such a wonderful character - smart (actually, brilliant), droll, affectionate, honest, resourceful. The book is written in a series of documents - work reports, diary entries, letters, transcripts, emails, historical documents, and academic papers. It's a clever way to tell a story from different points of view and in different voices. It took me about 50 pages to get used to it, but since that's less than 10% of the book (!!!!!), I didn't mind. P.S. this book is the sequel to The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. by Neal Stephenson and Nicole Galland.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    3.5 stars. I didn't find this quite as ridiculously fresh and fun as the first book, but how much of that is "second book slump" and how much is the absence of Neal Stephenson I can't tell. I definitely noticed much less science in this one; that could be explained by the fact that in book two, the technology has already been developed, so it's the people we're concerned with. I think it suffered a bit for the absence of the developmental excitement that fills book 1. That said, it was a very fu 3.5 stars. I didn't find this quite as ridiculously fresh and fun as the first book, but how much of that is "second book slump" and how much is the absence of Neal Stephenson I can't tell. I definitely noticed much less science in this one; that could be explained by the fact that in book two, the technology has already been developed, so it's the people we're concerned with. I think it suffered a bit for the absence of the developmental excitement that fills book 1. That said, it was a very fun book, and the cast of the audiobook continued to do an excellent job. Robin was a nice addition, but I missed hearing from Tristan for much of the book while he was...elsewhen/where. Some of the character deaths (no spoilers here) were very upsetting and I have doubts about the dynamic of the series without one person in particular. Continued huge overlap with Jody Taylor's time travel series, and to a lesser extent, with Connie Willis.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    I was a bit wary of reading this continuation of the DODO cycle when I saw Neil Stephenson was not more than 'inspirationally' involved. But that was wrong. This is a delightful continuation with interweaving threads--literally in the case of the DEDEs. The battles are the continued attempt of the witches to bring magic back to the modern world. If you like Shakespearean England and ancient Sicily (and I had been reading about both prior to this novel!) you are in for a treat. And if those aren' I was a bit wary of reading this continuation of the DODO cycle when I saw Neil Stephenson was not more than 'inspirationally' involved. But that was wrong. This is a delightful continuation with interweaving threads--literally in the case of the DEDEs. The battles are the continued attempt of the witches to bring magic back to the modern world. If you like Shakespearean England and ancient Sicily (and I had been reading about both prior to this novel!) you are in for a treat. And if those aren't anywhere near your wheelhouse, don't despair, the author is quite able to fill in all of the historic blanks. My only gripe is with the typefaces and layouts of the pages, which all too often where hard for these 71-year old eyes to read. In particular, the use of the cursive font (by someone who lived long before such writing existed) on a gray page was quite irritating. Nevertheless, this is a fine and highly entertaining read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christian Millikin

    Thank you to Goodreads for providing me an ARC in exchange for an honest review. This was an honest surprise to see a sequel to "The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O." and having read this sequel, I can safely say it was worth the wait. New characters, new locales in time, and a surprising rise in stakes this time around, all deftly handled by Nicole Galland, going solo on this venture. Still formatted in the style of government reports, letters, email exchanges, and various forms of pen and paper, it de Thank you to Goodreads for providing me an ARC in exchange for an honest review. This was an honest surprise to see a sequel to "The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O." and having read this sequel, I can safely say it was worth the wait. New characters, new locales in time, and a surprising rise in stakes this time around, all deftly handled by Nicole Galland, going solo on this venture. Still formatted in the style of government reports, letters, email exchanges, and various forms of pen and paper, it details an expanse of scope in various locales to try and prevent the undoing of technology while the main area of focus is to de-magicfy Shakespeare's "Macbeth". Loved every bit of it, just wish there was more after that ending, the tease for more oh so tantalizing. But, I can safely say that I'll be looking forward to the next installment when it's announced.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marsha Valance

    Galland's sequel to "The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O", which she coauthored with Neal Stephenson in 2017, blends sf and fantasy to explore the conflict between magic and science. An 16th century Irish witch named Gráinne is at war with agents of the Department of Diachronic Operations (D.O.D.O.), a future black ops agency that possesses the secret of time travel. Magic was essentially eliminated from the world in 1851 by the development of photography, and Gráinne's goal is to restore the primacy o Galland's sequel to "The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O", which she coauthored with Neal Stephenson in 2017, blends sf and fantasy to explore the conflict between magic and science. An 16th century Irish witch named Gráinne is at war with agents of the Department of Diachronic Operations (D.O.D.O.), a future black ops agency that possesses the secret of time travel. Magic was essentially eliminated from the world in 1851 by the development of photography, and Gráinne's goal is to restore the primacy of magic by whatever means necessary. D.O.D.O., however, is attempting to subtly manipulate history to preserve the supremacy of science. The war is fought through various ages of history--Sicily in the 3rd century AD, Jacobean London, 16th century Kyoto)--where the combatants strive to kill (or protect) such influential figures as William Shakespeare and Leonardo da Vinci.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kelley Cook

    It was a decent novel all set in the D.O.D.O. world. See The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. This is a welcome change from almost all of the Neal Stephenson books as the cool world he built is actually continued in a followup novel. Of course, it only his former co-author, Ms. Galland continuing a world this time, but such is life with fans of Neal. The alternative was nothing. So this was not an A, but it was a decent read. Almost nothing new was introduced except an evil new witch power which is the b It was a decent novel all set in the D.O.D.O. world. See The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. This is a welcome change from almost all of the Neal Stephenson books as the cool world he built is actually continued in a followup novel. Of course, it only his former co-author, Ms. Galland continuing a world this time, but such is life with fans of Neal. The alternative was nothing. So this was not an A, but it was a decent read. Almost nothing new was introduced except an evil new witch power which is the basis of the book. Book certainly skews female as half-dozen or so interwoven narratives that occur all are from the female characters.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Aisling

    Wow Nicole Galland is a great writer! This book had me time travelling, believing in witches (good and bad), pondering anachronisms and parallel universes, rooting for the good guys and trying to outfox the bad. The English major in me loved the Shakespearean world and ancient Italy was equally enthralling. I loved the variations in storytelling: sometimes straight narrative (from different characters), sometimes letters, diary entries, work logs, transcripts of conversations...it never got old. Wow Nicole Galland is a great writer! This book had me time travelling, believing in witches (good and bad), pondering anachronisms and parallel universes, rooting for the good guys and trying to outfox the bad. The English major in me loved the Shakespearean world and ancient Italy was equally enthralling. I loved the variations in storytelling: sometimes straight narrative (from different characters), sometimes letters, diary entries, work logs, transcripts of conversations...it never got old. I never read The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. but never felt confused. The author brings you into that world and up to speed effortlessly. Not only were plot and technique terrific, Galland's writing is really a joy to read. If you enjoy time travel or Shakespeare this is really a 'do-not-miss' book!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kibi

    A worthy sequel, needs another sequel... I was a little worried that Neal Stephenson wasn't on the byline, since he is the reason I read DODO in the first place, but on the other hand, I felt his last book, Fall, was such a drop in quality that it might be better to continue this story without him. Very pleasantly surprised to find that Nicole Garmand has everything well in hand. The snappy epistolary style is spot on, and the story advances well on several fronts. The new character Robin is grea A worthy sequel, needs another sequel... I was a little worried that Neal Stephenson wasn't on the byline, since he is the reason I read DODO in the first place, but on the other hand, I felt his last book, Fall, was such a drop in quality that it might be better to continue this story without him. Very pleasantly surprised to find that Nicole Garmand has everything well in hand. The snappy epistolary style is spot on, and the story advances well on several fronts. The new character Robin is great, just sorry we didn't see more of Tristran. Hopefully further books (which seem eminently possible) will redress that lack. One very sad death which I was hoping time travel shenanigans might fix, but didn't - well, that's how stakes work. Looking forward to rereading this on paper. DODO was much improved IRL as opposed to Kindle

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