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An award-winning journalist investigates Amazon’s impact on the wealth and poverty of towns and cities across the United States. In 1937, the famed writer and activist Upton Sinclair published a novel bearing the subtitle A Story of Ford-America. He blasted the callousness of a company worth “a billion dollars” that underpaid its workers while forcing them to engage in repe An award-winning journalist investigates Amazon’s impact on the wealth and poverty of towns and cities across the United States. In 1937, the famed writer and activist Upton Sinclair published a novel bearing the subtitle A Story of Ford-America. He blasted the callousness of a company worth “a billion dollars” that underpaid its workers while forcing them to engage in repetitive and sometimes dangerous assembly line labor. Eighty-three years later, the market capitalization of Amazon.com has exceeded one trillion dollars, while the value of the Ford Motor Company hovers around thirty billion. We have, it seems, entered the age of one-click America—and as the coronavirus makes Americans more dependent on online shopping, its sway will only intensify. Alec MacGillis’s Fulfillment is not another inside account or exposé of our most conspicuously dominant company. Rather, it is a literary investigation of the America that falls within that company’s growing shadow. As MacGillis shows, Amazon’s sprawling network of delivery hubs, data centers, and corporate campuses epitomizes a land where winner and loser cities and regions are drifting steadily apart, the civic fabric is unraveling, and work has become increasingly rudimentary and isolated. Ranging across the country, MacGillis tells the stories of those who’ve thrived and struggled to thrive in this rapidly changing environment. In Seattle, high-paid workers in new office towers displace a historic black neighborhood. In suburban Virginia, homeowners try to protect their neighborhood from the environmental impact of a new data center. Meanwhile, in El Paso, small office supply firms seek to weather Amazon’s takeover of government procurement, and in Baltimore a warehouse supplants a fabled steel plant. Fulfillment also shows how Amazon has become a force in Washington, D.C., ushering readers through a revolving door for lobbyists and government contractors and into CEO Jeff Bezos’s lavish Kalorama mansion. With empathy and breadth, MacGillis demonstrates the hidden human costs of the other inequality—not the growing gap between rich and poor, but the gap between the country’s winning and losing regions. The result is an intimate account of contemporary capitalism: its drive to innovate, its dark, pitiless magic, its remaking of America with every click.


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An award-winning journalist investigates Amazon’s impact on the wealth and poverty of towns and cities across the United States. In 1937, the famed writer and activist Upton Sinclair published a novel bearing the subtitle A Story of Ford-America. He blasted the callousness of a company worth “a billion dollars” that underpaid its workers while forcing them to engage in repe An award-winning journalist investigates Amazon’s impact on the wealth and poverty of towns and cities across the United States. In 1937, the famed writer and activist Upton Sinclair published a novel bearing the subtitle A Story of Ford-America. He blasted the callousness of a company worth “a billion dollars” that underpaid its workers while forcing them to engage in repetitive and sometimes dangerous assembly line labor. Eighty-three years later, the market capitalization of Amazon.com has exceeded one trillion dollars, while the value of the Ford Motor Company hovers around thirty billion. We have, it seems, entered the age of one-click America—and as the coronavirus makes Americans more dependent on online shopping, its sway will only intensify. Alec MacGillis’s Fulfillment is not another inside account or exposé of our most conspicuously dominant company. Rather, it is a literary investigation of the America that falls within that company’s growing shadow. As MacGillis shows, Amazon’s sprawling network of delivery hubs, data centers, and corporate campuses epitomizes a land where winner and loser cities and regions are drifting steadily apart, the civic fabric is unraveling, and work has become increasingly rudimentary and isolated. Ranging across the country, MacGillis tells the stories of those who’ve thrived and struggled to thrive in this rapidly changing environment. In Seattle, high-paid workers in new office towers displace a historic black neighborhood. In suburban Virginia, homeowners try to protect their neighborhood from the environmental impact of a new data center. Meanwhile, in El Paso, small office supply firms seek to weather Amazon’s takeover of government procurement, and in Baltimore a warehouse supplants a fabled steel plant. Fulfillment also shows how Amazon has become a force in Washington, D.C., ushering readers through a revolving door for lobbyists and government contractors and into CEO Jeff Bezos’s lavish Kalorama mansion. With empathy and breadth, MacGillis demonstrates the hidden human costs of the other inequality—not the growing gap between rich and poor, but the gap between the country’s winning and losing regions. The result is an intimate account of contemporary capitalism: its drive to innovate, its dark, pitiless magic, its remaking of America with every click.

30 review for Fulfillment: Winning and Losing in One-Click America

  1. 4 out of 5

    David Wineberg

    Amazon is a monster, if only just in size. There are numerous books and papers examining its labor practices, union bashing, seller abuses, platform monopoly tactics, and its effects on all other retail. Alec Macgillis’ book Fulfillment is different. It follows the lives of a handful of Americans, mostly working class, some of whom never intersect Amazon at all. But readers won’t know that until they’ve read their whole life story. One or two come back a hundred pages later – to work at an Amazo Amazon is a monster, if only just in size. There are numerous books and papers examining its labor practices, union bashing, seller abuses, platform monopoly tactics, and its effects on all other retail. Alec Macgillis’ book Fulfillment is different. It follows the lives of a handful of Americans, mostly working class, some of whom never intersect Amazon at all. But readers won’t know that until they’ve read their whole life story. One or two come back a hundred pages later – to work at an Amazon warehouse that has changed the face of their community. But some don’t. I can’t really say what the point of it is. Throughout the book, there are droppings of dramatic facts, but they are usually not explored beyond the simple statement of them: -Sellers on Amazon had great difficulty paying 15% for the privilege. That 15% was usually more than their entire profit margin. Today, Amazon’s fees amount to more like 27%. -Amazon has a code of Leadership Principles. Prominent among them: “Leaders are tenacious and have conviction. They do not compromise for the sake of social cohesion.” -One Amazon warehouse worker in 10 in Ohio is on food stamps, and Amazon ranks in the top five of employers whose staff is on food stamps in at least five states. -Amazon is responsible for the destruction of about 76,000 retail jobs – every year. -Warehouse accidents at Amazon are twice the national average. But Macgillis doesn’t weigh those statements. That’s not what the book is about. Macgillis barely mentions antitrust, Congressional hearings, union organizing, copying hot selling products and selling them itself, or putting “interior competitors” (outside sellers on the site) out of business. It is instead a series of biographies, down to extraordinary personal and trivial detail, almost none of which is relevant to working at Amazon. Their jobs are unsatisfying, short term, and low-paying. It’s no different at Amazon warehouses. People in dire straits have difficulties in relationships, difficulties with their health, and of course difficulties with money. Amazon has little or nothing to do with it. There is a puzzling amount of nostalgia for the good days of Bethlehem Steel’s operations in the Baltimore area (now occupied by Amazon operations). There is a great deal of nostalgia for working at family-owned department stores, (now history). Readers might to connect that to Amazon employment conditions today, but really, there is no connection. Macgillis doesn’t force the connection either. Times are different. Working conditions are different, and not just at Amazon warehouses. The purpose it serves in the book is never clear. The title, Fulfillment, has many meanings in this context. Fulfilled orders, fulfilled lives, or even a fulfilled dump of the evidence condemning Amazon. But the book doesn’t fulfill any of them. At this level, it is too clever by half. It isn’t fulfilling. The book concludes with a Baltimore drug dealer taking a job at an Amazon warehouse, because the pandemic closed the stores his customers used to steal things from. At the age of 33, this was his first real job. The end. David Wineberg

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Amazon's Long Shadow. This book seeks to show the America that was, and the America that is in the Age of Amazon and how the former became the latter. And in that goal, it actually does remarkably well. Sprinkling case study after case study after case study with history, political science, and social science, this book truly does a remarkable job of showing the changing reality of living and working in an America that has gone from hyper local business to one of hyper global - and the giant blu Amazon's Long Shadow. This book seeks to show the America that was, and the America that is in the Age of Amazon and how the former became the latter. And in that goal, it actually does remarkably well. Sprinkling case study after case study after case study with history, political science, and social science, this book truly does a remarkable job of showing the changing reality of living and working in an America that has gone from hyper local business to one of hyper global - and the giant blue smiley swoosh that has accompanied much of this transition over the last 2o years in particular. Very much a literary style work, this perhaps won't work for those looking for a more in-depth attack on Amazon, nor will it really work for those looking for a true in-depth look at Amazon's specific practices. But it does serve as a solid work of showing many of Amazon's overall tactics and how they are both the result of change and the precipice of other change. Very much recommended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Dayen

    I've probably read most of Alec MacGillis' work for the past decade, and much of what's here feels familiar, with the Amazon throughline layered on. In a way the book is a victim of the author's success - his deep reporting in Baltimore and Dayton was already known to me. The uninitiated reader will get a lot more out of the project to locate Amazon within the trend of regional inequality in the United States. It fits together well, and while sometimes the book is a bit too sprawling in its effo I've probably read most of Alec MacGillis' work for the past decade, and much of what's here feels familiar, with the Amazon throughline layered on. In a way the book is a victim of the author's success - his deep reporting in Baltimore and Dayton was already known to me. The uninitiated reader will get a lot more out of the project to locate Amazon within the trend of regional inequality in the United States. It fits together well, and while sometimes the book is a bit too sprawling in its effort to connect everything back to the Amazon story, for the most part the connections are warranted and clear. This is quite an achievement and something policymakers should internalize.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ula

    A devastating account of the labor market in America. There was a time when a job could give fulfillment - but for more and more people this word is associated only with huge warehouses, not personal happiness. And in no small part, the responsibility for this situation bears one company. It may seem easy to unjustly vilify the Big Tech, but Alec MacGillis doesn't rely on bias or prejudice: he gives us terrifying stats and numbers, as well as personal stories of ordinary, hard-working people who A devastating account of the labor market in America. There was a time when a job could give fulfillment - but for more and more people this word is associated only with huge warehouses, not personal happiness. And in no small part, the responsibility for this situation bears one company. It may seem easy to unjustly vilify the Big Tech, but Alec MacGillis doesn't rely on bias or prejudice: he gives us terrifying stats and numbers, as well as personal stories of ordinary, hard-working people who suffer from the long shadow of Amazon. It is great non-fiction, full of painstakingly accumulated details and impressive research, but beautifully written and engaging like a novel. Highly recommended! Thanks to the publisher, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, and NetGalley for the advance copy of this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Buchdoktor

    Alec MacGillis Aufruf zum Innehalten ist sehr viel mehr als die Kritik an einem Monopolisten, der gemeinsam mit drei weiteren Riesenkonzernen (Google, Facebook und Microsoft) in den letzten 10 Jahren die Weltherrschaft übernommen zu haben scheint. Der Autor verbindet Einzelschicksale, die wohl kaum einen Leser unberührt lassen werden, mit der Wirtschafts-und Sozialgeschichte ausgewählter Regionen, in denen der Amazon-Konzern sich niedergelassen hat, und einer kritischen, höchst aktuellen Bestand Alec MacGillis Aufruf zum Innehalten ist sehr viel mehr als die Kritik an einem Monopolisten, der gemeinsam mit drei weiteren Riesenkonzernen (Google, Facebook und Microsoft) in den letzten 10 Jahren die Weltherrschaft übernommen zu haben scheint. Der Autor verbindet Einzelschicksale, die wohl kaum einen Leser unberührt lassen werden, mit der Wirtschafts-und Sozialgeschichte ausgewählter Regionen, in denen der Amazon-Konzern sich niedergelassen hat, und einer kritischen, höchst aktuellen Bestandsaufnahme, wie die Corona-Pandemie die Macht der vier Konzerne weiter gefestigt hat. Wie der Niedergang der amerikanischen Provinz, der Aufstieg weniger wohlhabender Speckgürtel, der boomende Onlinehandel und das Zerbrechen des Landes in Arm und Reich sich in den letzten 10 Jahren weiter vertiefen konnte, das sind komplexe Zusammenhänge, die der amerikanische Journalist äußerst spannend schildert. Am Beispiel der Region Seattle zeigt McGillis zunächst, wie in der Folge von Strukturwandel ganze Regionen kippten, weil in wenigen Metropolen Fachkräfte in großer Zahl auf den Wohnungsmarkt drängten, in der Folge Miet- und Grundstückspreise sich in schwindelnde Höhen schraubten und sich normale Arbeitnehmer die Mieten nicht mehr leisten konnten. Im Gegensatz zur häufig vertretenen Annahme, dass Wirtschaftswachstum der gesamten Bevölkerung nützt, zeigt MacGillis, das hochqualifizierte Jobs selten weitere gut bezahlte Jobs generieren, sondern zumeist unsichere Jobs im Niedriglohnsektor, die kaum für den Lebensunterhalt ausreichen. Hoch interessant fand ich die Wirtschaftsgeschichte Baltimores, wo der Niedergang der Stahlindustrie dem Amazon-Konzern praktisch den Weg bereitete, auf den Trümmern eines ganzen Stadtteils ein gigantisches Logistikzentrum zu errichten. Hochinteressant deshalb, weil ich mich angesichts dramatischer Einzelschicksale fragte, wie es die amerikanische Nation eigentlich mit dem Respekt vor ihren Stahlwerkern und Soldaten hält, deren Berufskrankheiten und traumatische Kriegserlebnisse samt dafür zu bezahlenden Arztrechnungen offenbar zum privaten Risiko erklärt wurden. Auf Managerebene von Beth Steel konnten kurz vor dem Bankrott noch flink fette Gewinne gebunkert werden, während die Arbeiter ihre sauer verdiente Altersversorgung einbüßten und die Umweltschäden der Allgemeinheit überlassen blieben. Ein weiteres eindringliches Beispiel bringt MacGillis mit einer Entscheidung für die Region El Paso. Hier zeigten sich die politisch Verantwortlichen unfähig zu erkennen, dass es bei der Materialbeschaffung für Schulen und Behörden nicht zuerst um den Preis geht, sondern Groß- und Einzelhandel über Fachkenntnisse verfügen, die mit dem Sterben des lokalen Handels für immer verloren sind. An anderer Stelle vermittelt MacGillis ebenso eindringlich, wie der Niedergang des Einzelhandels in der amerikanischen Provinz zum Zeitungssterben (durch fehlende Anzeigenkunden) und weiter direkt zur Wahl Donald Trumps führte, weil die auf Washington zentrierte Berichterstattung offenbar ein schiefes Bild erzeugte. Hochaktuell (mit Hinweis auf Stellungnahmen von Khan 2017 und Mitchell 2020) weist MacGillis nach, wie die amerikanische Kartellbehörde versagte, indem sie sich allein auf das Thema Preisabsprachen konzentrierte und die gesellschaftlichen Auswirkungen von Megakonzernen ignorierte. Im Jahr nach dem Ausbruch der Corona-Pandemie wirkt seine Darstellung des „Winner-Takes-All“-Effekts auf ausgewählte Personen und Regionen natürlich besonders makaber. Berechtigte Kritik an Amazons Monopolstellung, die der Autor überzeugend begründet, sollte nicht aus dem Blick verlieren, dass erst die Überzeugung, der freie Markt würde es schon richten, dem rücksichtslosen Raubtierkapitalismus die Loipe spurte, der er nur zu folgen brauchte. Nicht glücklich bin ich mit dem deutschen Titel des Buches, der der Bedeutungsvielfalt des Begriffs „Fulfillment“ nicht gerecht wird und m. A. die psychologische Seite der Macht des Olinehandels außerachtlässt. Meine Erwartungen an amerikanische Sachbuchautoren ist eher gering, weil mir bei ihnen oft der Blick über den nationalen Tellerrand fehlt. Alec MacGillis hat mich positiv überrascht, weil seine Dramaturgie aus Einzelschicksalen, Wirtschaftsgeschichte und sein Bogen in die unmittelbare Gegenwart sich ausgesprochen spannend wegliest.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Mckay

    31st book of 2021: Unfulfilled The American model of technology innovation undoubtedly has created winners and losers. Hearing the stories of folks that are part of the 800,000 strong army powering prime delivery is a compelling premise, and I'm excited to go beyond a NYT article into what it means to work in a semi-automated warehouse, the likely future of low-skill work in America and eventually the world. In the introduction, it MacGillis takes an odd form of make-warehousing-great-again st 31st book of 2021: Unfulfilled The American model of technology innovation undoubtedly has created winners and losers. Hearing the stories of folks that are part of the 800,000 strong army powering prime delivery is a compelling premise, and I'm excited to go beyond a NYT article into what it means to work in a semi-automated warehouse, the likely future of low-skill work in America and eventually the world. In the introduction, it MacGillis takes an odd form of make-warehousing-great-again style nostalgia that uses big tech as a synonym for everything wrong with inequality today. MacGillis claims that the issue of geographic inequality, or the effects of low income jobs remain unexamined, but I beg to differ: Deaths of Despair and the Future of Capitalism is a cogent account of the trends from those falling from working class to destitute class. The New Geography of Jobs makes a compelling case about how geographic inequality is bad for the country. Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City is a more sympathetic and engaging view of what it means to live on the edge when the cost of everything essential is rising. Macgillis' accounts of cities he's clearly never lived in are not compelling. His dramatization rather than humanization of individual narratives, and inability to tie statistics into a story beyond factoids means I'm still waiting for a good book on this important topic.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Viola

    https://portside.org/2021-02-08/union... LABOR Union Solidarity on Eve of Historic Amazon Warehouse Election In Alabama, unions gather to support workers seeking union recognition from the Earth’s largest non-union company. February 8, 2021 by Luis Feliz Leon The #Amazon fulfillment center in Bessemer, Alabama., Michael Wade/ICON Sporstwire via AP Images BESSEMER, ALABAMA – On Saturday, February 6, two days before the start of a decisive unionization vote, representatives from various unions across https://portside.org/2021-02-08/union... LABOR Union Solidarity on Eve of Historic Amazon Warehouse Election In Alabama, unions gather to support workers seeking union recognition from the Earth’s largest non-union company. February 8, 2021 by Luis Feliz Leon The #Amazon fulfillment center in Bessemer, Alabama., Michael Wade/ICON Sporstwire via AP Images BESSEMER, ALABAMA – On Saturday, February 6, two days before the start of a decisive unionization vote, representatives from various unions across the country and @Amazon employees gathered in the rain on a green field. Despite the weather, they made a show of unity with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union (RWDSU), which is leading a unionizing campaign to represent about 5,800 workers who toil in Amazon’s enormous warehouse. A day earlier, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) ruled that RWDSU’s union ballots can be mailed out on Monday, February 8, rejecting Amazon’s objections and calls for an in-person vote. Leading up to the vote, Amazon has thrown all its might behind efforts to throttle the union election. Now, with the NLRB’s decision clearing the way, RWDSU and a united labor movement are pushing ahead in the hope of coming out victorious against Amazon. Amid fluttering American flags and the sweet sounds of favorites on the union rally playlist like Irving Berlin’s “God Bless America” and Montell Jordan’s “This Is How We Do It,” RWDSU organizers busied themselves plunking yard signs into the muddy earth: Vote Union Yes. Don’t Back Down. Remember Mail Your Yes Ballot. The RWDSU’s leading campaign organizer, Joshua Brewer, spoke with passion and determination. Holding a microphone in one hand and a coffee cup on the other, he highlighted the obstacles they’ve braved to get to this point, not least the rain showering down on him. “We started with a dozen workers in Bessemer, and we grew to thousands. And it happened fast, and it happened because of people like you who supported them,” Brewer said. More than 100 supporters held up soggy placards. They included union members from the Communications Workers of America Local 3902, the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 136, the United Mine Workers of America, the Iron Workers Local 92, United Auto Workers Local 2083, and the American Federation of Teachers. “This could be the difference between Amazon being what it is, corporate greed, and a provider of working-class jobs,” says Thomas Morrissey of Teamsters Local 25, who came down from Boston for the rally. Last month, Morrissey, a trainer for drivers of tractor trailers, joined his fellow Local 25 members at the Hunts Point Produce Market picket line in the Bronx. The Hunts Point strike, at the largest food wholesaler in the world, was about specific demands for higher wages and better benefits, and it ended with workers winning their largest pay raise in decades. By contrast, successfully forming a union at an Amazon warehouse, Morrissey says, would be a “spark” that “could literally take off across the country.” Morrissey says he makes these trips to create the kind of world he wants his kids to live in. Tears welling in his eyes, he tells me, “Sending pictures to my son down here in the rain is a big deal.” Amazon workers from other states joined the rally too. “We can only be as good as how we treat our lowest-paid workers,” says Zach, an Amazon driver from Louisiana. He lost his previous job due to the pandemic and has been on Amazon’s payroll since August of 2020. He earns $15.50 hourly and works an average of 30 hours a week. Amazon “kind of benefited from the capture of lots of people losing their jobs and being desperate for income,” said Zach. “I’m so used to people telling me that it’s impossible to form a union in the South. It’s impossible to form a union in Louisiana. But these guys are fighting, and if they can win this union here in Alabama, it means much better things for workers throughout the South.” Mail-in ballots began to go out on Monday to an estimated 5,800 members of the bargaining unit. Brewer says many of these workers come from union households, where their relatives are beseeching them to vote yes for the union. “This is a union town,” said Brewer of Bessemer, located just outside of Birmingham, Alabama’s biggest city. “It’s long been a union town. It’s gonna continue to be a union town.” Alabama has one of the highest union densities in the South, with an estimated 180,000 unionized workers, about 8 percent of the workforce. While quite low historically, that’s higher than in neighboring states like Georgia and Tennessee. Bessemer is a small industrial city of 27,000 residents founded in 1887 by coal magnate Henry DeBardeleben and nicknamed “The Marvel City,” described on the town’s website as an “economic engine driving development in the Birmingham-Hoover Metropolitan area.” “If you dig deep into Alabama’s history, it has such a strong union history with the steelworkers,” said Jason Kobielus, co-chair of Birmingham Democratic Socialists of America (DSA). “Unions are standing up for things that are bigger than them.” Sen. Bernie Sanders: “It cannot be overstated how powerful it will be if Amazon workers in Alabama vote to form a union.” In the 1930s, Birmingham’s Mine Mill union went on strike against steel companies over union recognition, including Tennessee Coal and Iron (TCI), one of the biggest steel companies of its time, and incubator of the Jefferson County Ku Klux Klan. Mine Mill represented a multiracial workforce of iron ore miners that was about 80 percent African American. Mine Mill’s president was white, while its vice president was Black. The multiracial union inspired future generations of civil rights leaders and workers, as it served up a radical example of militancy and chutzpah. Armed with the knowledge of these past struggles, members of the St. Louis and Birmingham chapters of DSA have been supporting the Amazon workers since the organizing campaign began in October. They turned out for the rally clad in signature red sweaters and holding handmade signs with the emblem of the rose. Amazon has been working to discourage workers from joining the union. Early on Saturday, I saw a woman in her early twenties filling up her car at a nearby gas station while wearing a lanyard with an Amazon pin, showing a smiling face spelling out “VOTE NO” in white letters against a red background. She says, “Amazon put it on us.” All newly hired workers got the pin when they started on the job, says the woman. She’s only been at the Bessemer warehouse for a month and tells me that she loves it in comparison to her last job at Walmart. Even though she’s not included in the bargaining unit for the upcoming election, she’s attended the company’s mandatory “captive audience” meetings, where she says Amazon “educates” workers with anti-union messages. “If it’s anything that can help us, I’m for it,” says another worker when asked about the union. She’s been on the job for over six months, so she is eligible to vote. Before Amazon, she worked as a production operator at a non-union auto plant. Amazon is telling her to vote no and that the workers “can do it without dues,” she says, referring to the name of Amazon’s union-busting website. But she’s also spoken with a friend’s husband who has a union job that provides retirement benefits and health insurance. Through Amazon, she has a 401(k) and health insurance. But she says, the union has “kinda some positive stuff.” Jennifer Bates, a union supporter, has been at Amazon since May 2020. She started as a stower, someone who packs and sorts bins of various sizes for delivery, but is now a “learning ambassador,” Amazon’s term for a trainer. Bates says one of her trainees was so excited about the union that she tried to sign up her father, a former union worker. “Well, honey, you can’t sign your father up because he don’t work here,” Bates told the trainee. Other workers, Bates says, went home and asked their parents about signing a union card. One parent, Bates says, answered, “Sign that card, honey, and take it back down there, you need it.” “I believe we will make history,” she adds. As the rally neared its end, people wearing hats and heavy coats milled about in the cold, biting wind, their masks wet and loose on their faces, their shoes sinking into the dried grass turned to mud, umbrellas raised to the gray skies. People were still whispering about how Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) sent union supporters and workers 40 pizzas earlier in the day. Later that night, Sanders tweeted his support: “It cannot be overstated how powerful it will be if Amazon workers in Alabama vote to form a union. They are taking on powerful anti-union forces in a strong anti-union state, but their victory will benefit every worker in America.” Sanders’s words—“their victory will benefit every worker in America”—catch a theme of the rally, the idea that labor unions provide generational stewardship for future workers. Randy Hadley, president of the RWDSU’s Mid-South Council, tells the crowd of the precedent a unionized Amazon would set. “Let’s make a difference in our future,” Hadley says. “Our children, our grandchildren are going to end up working one day at a place like Amazon, and we need to fix it and make it better.” [Luis Feliz Leon is an organizer, journalist, and independent scholar in social-movement history making good trouble in New York City.] See Also Amazon Union Busting video: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AQeGBHx... ++++++ https://portside.org/2021-02-13/amazo... Amazon Files Preemptive Suit Over Covid-19 Worker Safety "This action by Amazon is nothing more than a sad attempt to distract from the facts and shirk accountability for its failures to protect hardworking employees from a deadly virus." February 13, 2021 by Jessica Corbett Amazon workers and community allies demonstrate during a protest organized by New York Communities for Change and Make the Road New York in front of the Jeff Bezos' Manhattan residence in New York on December 2, 2020. , Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images New York Attorney General Letitia James responded forcefully on Friday to Amazon's preemptive lawsuit intended to block her from taking legal action against the behemoth corporation over workplace safety during the coronavirus pandemic and the firing of warehouse workers involved in a walkout last spring. "We remain undeterred in our efforts to protect workers from exploitation." —New York Attorney General Letitia James "Throughout this pandemic, Amazon employees have been forced to work in unsafe conditions, all while the company and its CEO made billions off of their backs," James said in a statement about the suit. "This action by Amazon is nothing more than a sad attempt to distract from the facts and shirk accountability for its failures to protect hardworking employees from a deadly virus." "Let me be clear: We will not be intimidated by anyone, especially corporate bullies that put profits over the health and safety of working people," the state attorney general added. "We remain undeterred in our efforts to protect workers from exploitation and will continue to review all of our legal options." Amazon on Friday filed a federal suit in the Eastern District Court of New York. The complaint, according to Bloomberg, says James' office "has threatened to sue if the retail giant doesn't comply with a list of demands, which include subsidizing public bus service and reducing production targets required of workers in its warehouses." As Bloomberg reports: The company's complaint also amounts to a lengthy and detailed defense of its actions to protect employees, including a day-by-day chronicle of safety measures it rolled out as the respiratory virus spread around the U.S. in March and April. "Amazon has been intensely focused on Covid-19 safety and has taken extraordinary, industry-leading measures grounded in science, above and beyond government guidance and requirements, to protect its associates from Covid-19," the company said in its complaint. James launched an investigation into Amazon after workers—including organizer Chris Smalls, who was later fired—protested conditions at a Staten Island warehouse. The state AG said at the time that "it is disgraceful that Amazon would terminate an employee who bravely stood up to protect himself and his colleagues." Reporting on the company's move Friday, the New York Daily News noted that "Smalls says that he and another employee, Derrick Palmer, were terminated in retaliation for starting the protests. Amazon has argued that the two employees were terminated for their own failure to comply with health regulations." The Seattle-based company was founded by the world's richest person, Jeff Bezos, whose wealth has surged during the pandemic. Bezos, who announced this month that he will step down as Amazon's CEO later this year and transition to the role of executive chair, had a net worth of $189.5 billion as of Friday, according to Forbes. In December 2020, shortly after a global coalition of workers and activists took to the streets on Black Friday to launch the #MakeAmazonPaycampaign, 401 lawmakers from 34 countries endorsed the effort with an open letter to Bezos, putting him "on notice that Amazon's days of impunity are over."

  8. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    This book is excellent. It’s the matching piece to all of the political analyses of a very split American electorate. The authors do an amazing job of picking locations in the US and weaving personal stories into a pattern of exploitation, class struggle and small town loss. I was glued to every page and struggled to justify my own shopping choices. Or my enjoyment of Goodreads, where I spend a lot of time, another Amazon tentacle. I don’t have an answer but this book presents alarming and fasci This book is excellent. It’s the matching piece to all of the political analyses of a very split American electorate. The authors do an amazing job of picking locations in the US and weaving personal stories into a pattern of exploitation, class struggle and small town loss. I was glued to every page and struggled to justify my own shopping choices. Or my enjoyment of Goodreads, where I spend a lot of time, another Amazon tentacle. I don’t have an answer but this book presents alarming and fascinating information.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Filed under my new "What's Wrong with America?" shelf. Disturbing and depressing look at how Amazon is contributing to the economic decline of towns and small cities while making large cities unaffordable to all but the wealthy. The larger Amazon gets, the more it can bully local, state, and federal governments into giving it huge tax breaks and looking the other way as Jeff Bezos and Co. ignore health and safety regulations, force small businesses to use their Marketplace platform, and squash a Filed under my new "What's Wrong with America?" shelf. Disturbing and depressing look at how Amazon is contributing to the economic decline of towns and small cities while making large cities unaffordable to all but the wealthy. The larger Amazon gets, the more it can bully local, state, and federal governments into giving it huge tax breaks and looking the other way as Jeff Bezos and Co. ignore health and safety regulations, force small businesses to use their Marketplace platform, and squash any attempts at unionizing. All of this was before COVID-19 came along and accelerated everything, as Amazon became the sole source of most items for people stuck at home, and the dominant employer for those who lost their jobs. And the income/wealth gap in our country continues to grow... Numerous "victims" of Amazon's growth are profiled, but the saddest one to me was the Baby Boomer who had worked most of his life in Baltimore's steel industry, only to see the factories torn down and replaced by Amazon warehouses, where he now earns a fraction of his former salary and can't even take bathroom breaks without being written up for lack of productivity. After reading the book, you may decide to boycott Amazon products, but you can't possibly avoid Amazon Web Services, whose cloud servers host many of the most commonly used websites. So what can you do to fight back? Unfortunately MacGillis doesn't provide any potential solutions, only a bleak vision of a monopoly/monopsony (look it up) run by the richest man on the planet.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

    A very good and important book about where we are and how we got here. Sadly, the book doesn’t leave me hopeful about where we’re going since the regional inequality the book portrays so devastatingly falls within the blind spot of the people most able to do anything about it — the winners in the winning areas of a winner-take-all economy.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Theo

    Fulfillment: Winning and Losing in One-Click America was ultimately (ironically) not what I expected or hoped. I wanted to read more about the Amazonification phenomenon--labor policy, worker exploitation and injury, lost tax revenue, the wealth gap growing exponentially at an alarming pace, dystopian corporate ethics, the proliferation/encouragement of counterfeit and copied products, etc. And many of these issues were touched on...briefly, in between long personal profiles of various workers a Fulfillment: Winning and Losing in One-Click America was ultimately (ironically) not what I expected or hoped. I wanted to read more about the Amazonification phenomenon--labor policy, worker exploitation and injury, lost tax revenue, the wealth gap growing exponentially at an alarming pace, dystopian corporate ethics, the proliferation/encouragement of counterfeit and copied products, etc. And many of these issues were touched on...briefly, in between long personal profiles of various workers and business owners across the United States. There was a great deal of unrelated backstory for each person/group of people covered in the text, information that is of course of great importance in the context of these peoples' personal lives but that rarely contributed to any understanding of MacGillis's larger point (?) about how Amazon's devastating effect on the American economy. An aspect of the book of great personal interest for me was the coverage of The Bon-Ton's takeover of Elder-Beerman, as one of my parents was employed at the Dayton, Ohio location for many years, including during this transitional time. MacGillis presents The Bon-Ton as a small, benevolent, worker-friendly company unfairly run into the ground by bigger fish. The author's description did not match my childhood memories of that time period--not necessarily surprising, since I was (as I said) a child, and my experience of the buyout was filtered through my dad's more direct experience and the many tense conversations between my parents, but still of note.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alex Kantrowitz

    A must-read about Amazon and ourselves

  13. 5 out of 5

    FRANCES L RABIDOU

    Pretty good This book was well researched and very interesting. It however was not what I was expecting, which was a book entirely on the operations of Amazon, so I found myself skipping some pages because the extensive background information was just too much in some instances.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marks54

    Alec MacGillis is a journalist who has written a new book on Amazon.com. The book presents a series of chapters about different part of the US, ranging from Seattle to Dayton to Central Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, to Washington, D.C. and suburban Virginia, to metro New York. All of the chapters present a view of late 20th century and early 21st century America and all have in common a focus of the role of Amazon in the current economic and social trajectory of the area profiled in the chapter. E Alec MacGillis is a journalist who has written a new book on Amazon.com. The book presents a series of chapters about different part of the US, ranging from Seattle to Dayton to Central Pennsylvania, to Baltimore, to Washington, D.C. and suburban Virginia, to metro New York. All of the chapters present a view of late 20th century and early 21st century America and all have in common a focus of the role of Amazon in the current economic and social trajectory of the area profiled in the chapter. Each chapter is a case study in which MacGillis follows the life stories and work careers of a number of parties in the area. We come back to them in subsequent chapters so that the book presents a composite picture of American economic life in the age of Amazon. The timing of the book is interesting. Most of the book covers up through 2019 but not the COVID-19 pandemic, The book was being finalized and edited into 2020, so that there are some references to COVID and there is some sustained treatment of the pandemic in a final chapter. A good portion of the book covers some well traveled territory in the deindustrialization of America and the hollowing out of the middle class as high paying and protected union jobs evaporated or went overseas and were replaced by temporary work, precarious contractor work, low level service work, big box retail work, and working for Amazon.com. The fall of the middle class from grace is clearly documented. This is part and parcel of the narrative that has dominated the trade books about the US economy since the crash of 2008 and more intensively since the 2016 election. There were also winners to these changes and it is the usual culprits of the economic elites and the enabling classes of highly educated professionals. These have all gravitated towards large central city complexes on the coasts along with some inland exceptions like Chicago. Life in these cities has been booming for some and good enough for others. Middle size cities and smaller towns have fared worse leading to political divisiveness and two different countries that do not seem to fit together well. Again, this is not new either and fits right in with books based on the outbreak of economic inequality since the Reagan years and the popularity of Springsteen songs. So is Fulfillment just a rehash bashing of Amazon? No, it is not. To start with, MacGillis brings the story up to date for Amazon and does a nice job explaining the growth of Amazon’s huge expansion of fulfillment centers and its AWS data centers. These two businesses are critical for examining recent developments and also for understanding why Amazon appears to have prospered during COIVID-19. Yes, it is a “winner take all” economy but Amazon made some big bets that served it extremely well as the global pandemic unfolded last year. The other point to note, and some may disagree, is that Amazon is not the clear villain of this story. The economic trends behind deindustrialization predated the dominance of Amazon. That Amazon figured out how to build its massive supply chain and data behemoth to take advantage of these trends is a fact and hardly a crime. Jobs are jobs, the checks cash, and customers are happy. There is no need to push a strong morality tale. Are there things about Amazon for critics to note? Sure. But Amazon’s role in this story is more mixed. That Amazon’s rise seems associated with middle America’s fall is unfortunate but correlation is not causation and there is lots of blame to go around for US economic woes. As for me, I have shopped at Amazon for a long time and have no apologies to makes, but MacGillis’s book is very good at informing the business logic behind some of Amazon’s business lines, for example in the chapter on Amazon getting small businesses to sell their wares on Amazon’s platform but then competing against these same small businesses. The growth of big business in US history has always featured these dynamics and MacGillis is good at describing them. Several of the chapters have substantial back stories, for which cites are provided for those interested. The chapters on Baltimore and neighboring industrial plants are especially good. The book is well written and easy to follow. It reads like a journalist account - which it is - and readers wanting more detailed analyses will need to go elsewhere. As these books go - and there are lots of books on Amazon - this is a nice piece of work and well worth reading.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jimgosailing

    So I probably would have read this anyway, but reading it now was prompted by a conversation with my daughter who pointed out that I don’t shop Walmart because of worker issues, so why would I continue to use Amazon? This book reiterated some of what I knew about Amazon’s treatment of its workers - the pressures to keep up with metrics; lack of bathroom breaks (more of that in the news just recently- peeing into bottles); and the churn of turnover. The book addresses Amazon’s extreme strategies So I probably would have read this anyway, but reading it now was prompted by a conversation with my daughter who pointed out that I don’t shop Walmart because of worker issues, so why would I continue to use Amazon? This book reiterated some of what I knew about Amazon’s treatment of its workers - the pressures to keep up with metrics; lack of bathroom breaks (more of that in the news just recently- peeing into bottles); and the churn of turnover. The book addresses Amazon’s extreme strategies and negotiations to avoid paying taxes (while reaping the benefits of, for example, local EMTs to provide aid to workers overcome by heat exhaustion)[there is a reason why the company whose origins were in California decided to move to Seattle- to avoid having charge state sales tax on what it projected to be its largest customer base] And points out that while Amazon touts that it pays its employees $15, it is silent on the fact that so many (hundreds of thousands?) of its workers are contractors who don’t get paid this much. An incident of an unmarked Amazon delivery truck fatally hitting a young child is provided as an example of the lack of liability on Amazon’s part in such a situation, but I don’t think MacGillis spends enough time exploring the ramifications of having so many workers who appear to be employees but who aren’t; he touches in one sentence on their not getting the same benefits as actual employees - but doesn’t explore lack of overtime, workers compensation, or unemployment benefits such contractors do not receive; and as far as accident liability, they and not Amazon are on the hook. I like how he drew comparisons of the site in Baltimore where Beth Steel had once been and the wages, working conditions, and camaraderie that existed then versus the new Amazon facility now occupying that site, but this is part of a larger issue of loss of manufacturing jobs and what is now available to job seekers. I like the vignettes of tying his reporting to individuals - it humanizes what would otherwise be facts and figures (and I’m still trying to decide if some of his examples had too much of their own baggage that maybe undercut his argument of the impact Amazon was having.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael Martz

    'Fulfillment' wasn't particularly fulfilling, but if you're unfamiliar with the effects of Amazon's growth (I'm not sure who would be, but nonetheless....) you might get more out of it that I did. The author, Alec MacGillis, uses mostly anecdotes peppered with a little hard data to paint a picture of a behemoth that is threatening the basic fabric of this country. 'Fulfillment' is organized in chapters based on a curious mixture of subject matter: Community, Cardboard, Security, Dignity, etc. Mac 'Fulfillment' wasn't particularly fulfilling, but if you're unfamiliar with the effects of Amazon's growth (I'm not sure who would be, but nonetheless....) you might get more out of it that I did. The author, Alec MacGillis, uses mostly anecdotes peppered with a little hard data to paint a picture of a behemoth that is threatening the basic fabric of this country. 'Fulfillment' is organized in chapters based on a curious mixture of subject matter: Community, Cardboard, Security, Dignity, etc. MacGillis typically begins each with a story or stories about the human side and follows with the business side of the topic. For example. one of the most startling combinations to me was about a preservationist who developed a business selling bricks from torn down decrepit Baltimore buildings who happens to spot his product in $500K 700s.f. apartments being sold to people drawn to the DC area due to the decision to build the new Amazon HQ2 nearby. His approach is effective in some cases, but in others he spends far too much time providing background history that doesn't really contribute to the story. Personally, I was an 'early adopter' with Amazon and a long time fan of its founder, Jeff Bezos. However, Fulfillment paints a picture of a company and leader who aren't necessarily interested in playing fair with its employees and the tax code. It's a tough situation that likely can only be addressed through some sort of government intervention. If you're a consumer of business news and publications, Fulfillment may not break new ground for yo. However, it does pull information about the company together in a unique way that paints a pretty bleak picture overall.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shirl Kennedy

    I have a love/hate relationship with Amazon, which I suspect is not uncommon. I don't think it's entirely fair to hold it so heavily responsible for the economic demise of small towns in rural America; trends have been moving in that direction for a long time. The globalization genie is well out of the bottle at this point. Economic inequality has reached absurd proportions. One thing that would help is universal access to health care. Free community college is another thing. Investment in affor I have a love/hate relationship with Amazon, which I suspect is not uncommon. I don't think it's entirely fair to hold it so heavily responsible for the economic demise of small towns in rural America; trends have been moving in that direction for a long time. The globalization genie is well out of the bottle at this point. Economic inequality has reached absurd proportions. One thing that would help is universal access to health care. Free community college is another thing. Investment in affordable housing would be a plus. Things will never go back to "the good old days" (which were not universally "good"). I do think there are antitrust issues here that need legal scrutiny. Not just Amazon, but Google and Facebook as well. The digression into the minutia of the BonTon stores rise and fall didn't really add anything to the narrative here. Telling the story of rural/small town devastation through the experiences of individual people helped to humanize the story; it's not news that Amazon exploits its lowest-wage workforce, but seeing how it actually affects people on an individual level makes it vivid.

  18. 4 out of 5

    David

    MacGillis takes an in-depth look at the state of the economy focusing on Amazon’s growth and business practices. This book is not an analysis of how Amazon does things but, rather, the impact of Amazon’s presence in communities across the land. Amazon is certainly the headliner of the many changes in our economy: technology, consolidation, winner-take-all cities, etc. Like many books of this type, the reporting is quite good, the story is easy to follow, but the end result is dire. No jobs in sm MacGillis takes an in-depth look at the state of the economy focusing on Amazon’s growth and business practices. This book is not an analysis of how Amazon does things but, rather, the impact of Amazon’s presence in communities across the land. Amazon is certainly the headliner of the many changes in our economy: technology, consolidation, winner-take-all cities, etc. Like many books of this type, the reporting is quite good, the story is easy to follow, but the end result is dire. No jobs in smaller cities, too expensive to live in the successful cities, cities giving away tax breaks to lure companies to town, and on and on. Yet Amazon focuses on customers and makes it very easy to shop at home for just about anything. Consumers win, competitors are overwhelmed, workers are in a tough spot.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Jehlik

    It's ironic that I finished this book just as Mitch McConnell was telling businesses that they shouldn't get political. Much of MacGillis' research shows how political business is behind the scenes with both past and present case histories. Although Amazon is featured, this book is less about their operations and practices (well-documented by others) and more about the cities and regions that are winning and losing in an economy currently dominated by Amazon, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft. Us It's ironic that I finished this book just as Mitch McConnell was telling businesses that they shouldn't get political. Much of MacGillis' research shows how political business is behind the scenes with both past and present case histories. Although Amazon is featured, this book is less about their operations and practices (well-documented by others) and more about the cities and regions that are winning and losing in an economy currently dominated by Amazon, Facebook, Google, and Microsoft. Using case histories (past and present), the author explores the costs of being a "winner city" on either coast and a "loser city" everywhere else in America. MacGillis also details how America's addiction to online shopping has devastating economic consequences for local and state governments and the climate.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Richard Blackmore

    DNF at 1%. I’m sorry, I can’t do it. I can’t tolerate the author’s apparent first attempt (I hope this is) at writing book length material, for the sake of reading yet another account of how horrible Amazon is. MacGillis seems to be having a love affair with the comma. If only he were good at writing long sentences. He is no Charles Dickens. His sentences are bland and boring and rather than gluing the reader to the page they repel the reader. Or at least this one. Also, if you want to build symp DNF at 1%. I’m sorry, I can’t do it. I can’t tolerate the author’s apparent first attempt (I hope this is) at writing book length material, for the sake of reading yet another account of how horrible Amazon is. MacGillis seems to be having a love affair with the comma. If only he were good at writing long sentences. He is no Charles Dickens. His sentences are bland and boring and rather than gluing the reader to the page they repel the reader. Or at least this one. Also, if you want to build sympathy with the reader, don’t begin your book with the story of a Latin American former tech worker who loses his $100,000 + job in the recession...and his first thought after months of depression, and being kicked out of the house, is to work at Amazon? What the? No other job was good enough? It was either a tech job or worst job imaginable? Really? Sorry, not for me.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dustin

    Full review to come. I’m a fiction guy, but every once in a while I get a craving for some nonfiction and this book was so important to me. Fulfillment tells the story of how wealth and power in America has accumulated in a few “winner takes all” cities including my home, and the home of Amazon, Seattle. The book argues convincingly that swift antitrust rulings and action are needed not just to spread economic opportunity to more places in the US, but to preserve our democracy. I’ll update this re Full review to come. I’m a fiction guy, but every once in a while I get a craving for some nonfiction and this book was so important to me. Fulfillment tells the story of how wealth and power in America has accumulated in a few “winner takes all” cities including my home, and the home of Amazon, Seattle. The book argues convincingly that swift antitrust rulings and action are needed not just to spread economic opportunity to more places in the US, but to preserve our democracy. I’ll update this review with some of the mind boggling facts spread throughout. For example: - Amazon was responsible for 30% of all jobs added in Seattle from 2010-2019. - Amazon owns or leases 1/5 of all office space in Seattle, the highest proportion of any company in any city in the country.

  22. 4 out of 5

    James Beggarly

    Thanks to Netgalley and FSG for the ebook. This is an amazing book about Amazon that tells its story from over a dozen characters all across the country. And it also comes at it from over a dozen angles, diving deep into the history of workers in warehouses, political lobbying, the growth of Mom and Pop stores to giant companies and so much more. But the heart of the story is really the everyday characters who populate so much of the book: People working at Amazon, mostly in the warehouses, peop Thanks to Netgalley and FSG for the ebook. This is an amazing book about Amazon that tells its story from over a dozen characters all across the country. And it also comes at it from over a dozen angles, diving deep into the history of workers in warehouses, political lobbying, the growth of Mom and Pop stores to giant companies and so much more. But the heart of the story is really the everyday characters who populate so much of the book: People working at Amazon, mostly in the warehouses, people trying to compete against them and people trying to take them on politically. Truly fascinating and well researched.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dimas

    In a couple of weeks, Nomadland — a decent but spineless film — will probably win Best Picture at the Oscars. After watching that film you should then read Fulfillment, a thorough and acidic look at how one company wrecked a nation. (Over 100 million people have Amazon Prime and I would garner that a large majority don't consider the amount of damage this one relatively small move of convenience is doing.) This thing is a reporting tour de force, with really unique storytelling that merges intim In a couple of weeks, Nomadland — a decent but spineless film — will probably win Best Picture at the Oscars. After watching that film you should then read Fulfillment, a thorough and acidic look at how one company wrecked a nation. (Over 100 million people have Amazon Prime and I would garner that a large majority don't consider the amount of damage this one relatively small move of convenience is doing.) This thing is a reporting tour de force, with really unique storytelling that merges intimate personal narratives, broad historical context, and analysis.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Colin Thomas

    A solid handful of interesting tidbits about Amazon scattered throughout, but largely the flow of the book is from This American Life-style anecdote to anecdote. The stories and characters in them are never all that compelling and fail to weave much of a broader argument about Amazon. So much of the book is “look at this generic middle class decay, it’s kinda sorta Amazon’s fault.” I’m more interested right now on actual reporting and research on Amazon itself and how it’s practices bear out dir A solid handful of interesting tidbits about Amazon scattered throughout, but largely the flow of the book is from This American Life-style anecdote to anecdote. The stories and characters in them are never all that compelling and fail to weave much of a broader argument about Amazon. So much of the book is “look at this generic middle class decay, it’s kinda sorta Amazon’s fault.” I’m more interested right now on actual reporting and research on Amazon itself and how it’s practices bear out directly.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Megan Quinn

    I thought this was well done. I agree with others that at times there’s too much delving into the personal lives of those affected rather than pursuing more on Amazon’s operations. However, I liked MacGillis’s descriptions of changes in big cities like Seattle, due in large part to the influx of employees and money from the tech industry. Reminded me of Anna Wiener’s look at the changes and gentrification of San Francisco in Uncanny Valley. After reading this, I’m really interested to see how th I thought this was well done. I agree with others that at times there’s too much delving into the personal lives of those affected rather than pursuing more on Amazon’s operations. However, I liked MacGillis’s descriptions of changes in big cities like Seattle, due in large part to the influx of employees and money from the tech industry. Reminded me of Anna Wiener’s look at the changes and gentrification of San Francisco in Uncanny Valley. After reading this, I’m really interested to see how the union fight amongst Alabama Amazon employees will turn out.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Miguel

    Quite the indictment of Amazon here ranging from the mistreated workers in the Orwellian named fulfillment centers up to Bezos and documents in depth the chicanery involved in their warehouse and of course 2nd headquarters site selections. The standout is the story of the worker near Baltimore – working almost more to recapture life at the mill as opposed to needing the position – it captured so much that is wrong with the tech giants and should be a clarion call for their breakup.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Scott Browne

    Good ideas and stories. Just lacking more cohesion more analysis and better editing.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joey

  29. 5 out of 5

    John

  30. 5 out of 5

    TEELOCK Mithilesh

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