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ADHD 2.0: New Science and Essential Strategies for Thriving with Distraction--From Childhood Through Adulthood

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A revolutionary new approach to ADD/ADHD featuring cutting-edge research and strategies to help readers thrive, by the bestselling authors of the seminal books Driven to Distraction and Delivered from Distraction "An inspired road map for living with a distractible brain . . . If you or your child suffer from ADHD, this book should be on your shelf. It will give you courage A revolutionary new approach to ADD/ADHD featuring cutting-edge research and strategies to help readers thrive, by the bestselling authors of the seminal books Driven to Distraction and Delivered from Distraction "An inspired road map for living with a distractible brain . . . If you or your child suffer from ADHD, this book should be on your shelf. It will give you courage and hope."--Michael Thompson, Ph.D., New York Times bestselling co-author of Raising Cain World-renowned authors Dr. Edward M. Hallowell and Dr. John J. Ratey literally "wrote the book" on ADD/ADHD more than two decades ago. Their bestseller, Driven to Distraction, largely introduced this diagnosis to the public and sold more than a million copies along the way. Now, most people have heard of ADHD and know someone who may have it. But lost in the discussion of both childhood and adult diagnosis of ADHD is the potential upside: Many hugely successful entrepreneurs and highly creative people attribute their achievements to ADHD. Also unknown to most are the recent research developments, including innovations that give a clearer understanding of the ADHD brain in action. In ADHD 2.0, Drs. Hallowell and Ratey, both of whom have this "variable attention trait," draw on the latest science to provide both parents and adults with ADHD a plan for minimizing the downside and maximizing the benefits of ADHD at any age. They offer an arsenal of new strategies and lifestyle hacks for thriving with ADHD, including - Find the right kind of difficult. Use these behavior assessments to discover the work, activity, or creative outlet best suited to an individual's unique strengths. - Reimagine environment. What specific elements to look for--at home, at school, or in the workplace--to enhance the creativity and entrepreneurial spirit inherent in the ADHD mind. - Embrace innate neurological tendencies. Take advantage of new findings about the brain's default mode network and cerebellum, which confer major benefits for people with ADHD. - Tap into the healing power of connection. Tips for establishing and maintaining positive connection "the other Vitamind C" and the best antidote to the negativity that plagues so many people with ADHD. - Consider medication. Gets the facts about the underlying chemistry, side effects, and proven benefits of all the pharmaceutical options. As inspiring as it is practical, ADHD 2.0 will help you tap into the power of this mercurial condition and find the key that unlocks potential.


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A revolutionary new approach to ADD/ADHD featuring cutting-edge research and strategies to help readers thrive, by the bestselling authors of the seminal books Driven to Distraction and Delivered from Distraction "An inspired road map for living with a distractible brain . . . If you or your child suffer from ADHD, this book should be on your shelf. It will give you courage A revolutionary new approach to ADD/ADHD featuring cutting-edge research and strategies to help readers thrive, by the bestselling authors of the seminal books Driven to Distraction and Delivered from Distraction "An inspired road map for living with a distractible brain . . . If you or your child suffer from ADHD, this book should be on your shelf. It will give you courage and hope."--Michael Thompson, Ph.D., New York Times bestselling co-author of Raising Cain World-renowned authors Dr. Edward M. Hallowell and Dr. John J. Ratey literally "wrote the book" on ADD/ADHD more than two decades ago. Their bestseller, Driven to Distraction, largely introduced this diagnosis to the public and sold more than a million copies along the way. Now, most people have heard of ADHD and know someone who may have it. But lost in the discussion of both childhood and adult diagnosis of ADHD is the potential upside: Many hugely successful entrepreneurs and highly creative people attribute their achievements to ADHD. Also unknown to most are the recent research developments, including innovations that give a clearer understanding of the ADHD brain in action. In ADHD 2.0, Drs. Hallowell and Ratey, both of whom have this "variable attention trait," draw on the latest science to provide both parents and adults with ADHD a plan for minimizing the downside and maximizing the benefits of ADHD at any age. They offer an arsenal of new strategies and lifestyle hacks for thriving with ADHD, including - Find the right kind of difficult. Use these behavior assessments to discover the work, activity, or creative outlet best suited to an individual's unique strengths. - Reimagine environment. What specific elements to look for--at home, at school, or in the workplace--to enhance the creativity and entrepreneurial spirit inherent in the ADHD mind. - Embrace innate neurological tendencies. Take advantage of new findings about the brain's default mode network and cerebellum, which confer major benefits for people with ADHD. - Tap into the healing power of connection. Tips for establishing and maintaining positive connection "the other Vitamind C" and the best antidote to the negativity that plagues so many people with ADHD. - Consider medication. Gets the facts about the underlying chemistry, side effects, and proven benefits of all the pharmaceutical options. As inspiring as it is practical, ADHD 2.0 will help you tap into the power of this mercurial condition and find the key that unlocks potential.

30 review for ADHD 2.0: New Science and Essential Strategies for Thriving with Distraction--From Childhood Through Adulthood

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Bayer

    This was a helpful book, though I expected it to be a little more helpful. The authors literally "wrote the book" on what was then known as ADD (they point out that it's now referred to as ADHD whether there is hyperactivity or not, and ADD is no longer a current term). My 13 y/o has a lot of trouble struggling with issues that are probably ADHD and most of my other kids (or all of them) would probably qualify as well. As homeschoolers, we've been able to adapt their environment to meet their ne This was a helpful book, though I expected it to be a little more helpful. The authors literally "wrote the book" on what was then known as ADD (they point out that it's now referred to as ADHD whether there is hyperactivity or not, and ADD is no longer a current term). My 13 y/o has a lot of trouble struggling with issues that are probably ADHD and most of my other kids (or all of them) would probably qualify as well. As homeschoolers, we've been able to adapt their environment to meet their needs so it hasn't been as much of an issue, but Alex has been specifically asking me for tools to help him sit still and concentrate better during things like books and movies. This had some good information for him, though I was hoping for a bit more. I do love that the authors tell kids that their brains are basically "race car engines with bicycle brakes" and the book is very reassuring about how intelligent, creative, driven, etc. people with ADHD are. It focuses on the positives and how to bring them out. There's also a lot of science about what's going on, and it was helpful to read about things like the sense of balance and how working that helps with focus. He talks a little bit about issues like sleep, time in nature and foods, more about the importance of exercise, and some about medications. There's a helpful chart of every kind of med that's reprinted from ADDitude magazine, with columns listing how long each one lasts, side effects, etc. We're not really interested in medications but the book recommends them and the authors both use them. I also appreciate that the book focuses on connecting with kids, encouraging them, supporting them, giving them enough love, etc. It really hammers in that these kids need love and connection above all else to thrive. I was hoping for more tips, I suppose, along the lines of the Sensory Integration tips I used to use to help my kids concentrate when they were little (give them weighted stuffed animals to hold, give them something to fidget with, do specific exercises before you need them to focus, chew something sour....) but this is more along the lines of the big picture and big steps to implement. It's still a great book, and it contains the most up to date research, resources and lots more. I read a digital ARC of this book for review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brad Bowman

    I spent 30 years of my life unaware that people don’t vacillate wildly between chaos and order from the moment they wake up until they go to bed. And then I got diagnosed with ADHD - which has been the most healing aspect of my current health and wellness thus far because of books like this. (Side note: this diagnosis is still new so the amount of “AH-HA moments” and times I literally uttered “wow same” in this book was both illuminating and also daunting) The second chapter alone on “connectome I spent 30 years of my life unaware that people don’t vacillate wildly between chaos and order from the moment they wake up until they go to bed. And then I got diagnosed with ADHD - which has been the most healing aspect of my current health and wellness thus far because of books like this. (Side note: this diagnosis is still new so the amount of “AH-HA moments” and times I literally uttered “wow same” in this book was both illuminating and also daunting) The second chapter alone on “connectomes”, TPN, DMN, etc. is such a valuable explanation of something I have always experienced but could never articulate how it felt. For me it always felt like I could define a concept or idea by what it wasn’t instead of just remembering what it was. It’s a wildly chaotic process in my brain to maneuver but it’s also served to make so many connections and relationships between things. These dualities and paradoxes exist concurrently and now we can identify how to toggle between them. (It’s actually easier than we think) It also of course helps explain how even neuro typical individuals to identify the behaviors and associated thought processes that are involved in productivity, motivation, creativity, and more. I could go on about how incredible all this science is but the most important thing I got out of this book is the reassurance that I’m not alone and that there are therapies, behavioral shifts, and medications to help us break free of the dissonance within the many brain symphonies we conduct at once and finally find some agency and empowerment in how wildly wonderful our brains are.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Christina

    I was really excited to have the chance to read this latest book by Drs. Hallowell and Ratey. These doctors literally wrote the book when it comes to ADD - their first book, Driven to Distraction, came out in the early 90s, and was not only the first book to introduce ADD to the world, but also the Bible of ADD treatment and diagnosis. As the first book on ADD and also still the best book, Driven to Distraction was a huge help to my family and millions of others. So it is no surprise that ADD 2.0 I was really excited to have the chance to read this latest book by Drs. Hallowell and Ratey. These doctors literally wrote the book when it comes to ADD - their first book, Driven to Distraction, came out in the early 90s, and was not only the first book to introduce ADD to the world, but also the Bible of ADD treatment and diagnosis. As the first book on ADD and also still the best book, Driven to Distraction was a huge help to my family and millions of others. So it is no surprise that ADD 2.0 is equally helpful, and can serve as the ADD Bible 2.0 for the 2020s and beyond. In this book, Drs. Ratey and Hallowell discuss cultural ADD as well as medically diagnosed ADD, and suggest that a better name for ADD-like traits would be VAST, or “Variable Attention Stimulus Trait.” This is a much-appreciated effort to take ADD out of the realm of “deficit” or “disease” and place it more on the larger spectrum of neurodiversity. This book provides advice not only for ADDers but for everyone living in our increasingly short-attention spanned culture. There is a lot of info packed into this book, and, knowing that science and brain stuff might be hard for an ADD audience to focus on, the authors pepper this dense information with patient stories, analogies and many other interesting things to help the reader commit the useful information to memory. There is a lot of great information here too about the increased creativity and intelligence that exists in most ADD folks, which is always helpful to identify and emphasize. I was particularly appreciative of the chapter discussing ADD medications, calling out the panic that has arisen over the use of stimulants to treat ADD in recent years. Though the book thoroughly discusses non-medication treatment options, it also discusses both stimulant and non-stimulant medication for ADD in a responsible and compelling way. In addition to describing how these meds work on the ADD brain, the doctors make a compelling case that these meds actually DECREASE addiction for properly diagnosed ADDers, who otherwise tend to seek stimulation and self-medication in unhealthy and unscientific ways. There is just a ton of additional useful information here on brain research, neuroplasticity, behavioral research, and more, making this book a thorough update on VAST/ADHD for modern times. If you have an ADD person in your life, or are driven to distraction yourself, this book provides concrete tools based in science for working within that brain framework, and also for appreciating the creativity and other actual benefits it may also bring. This book is equally great whether you have/are a child with ADD, or an adult. Three cheers again for Drs. Hallowell and Ratey for continuing to demystify and destigmatize the ADD brain. Our world is better because of their work. And many thanks to Ballantine, NetGalley and the authors for the advance copy allowing me to get a jump start on all this new and valuable information.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    A long-awaited but ultimately disappointing follow on to the seminal Driven to Distraction, ADHD 2.0 reads like little more than a collection of blog posts heavily laden with affiliate links. Here, the authors hawk everything from balance boards and CBD oil to genetic testing services they acknowledge don’t quite deliver the goods. As an adult with ADHD who has read nearly a dozen books on the disorder in the past 18 months, many of them originally published at least a decade ago, I was hoping t A long-awaited but ultimately disappointing follow on to the seminal Driven to Distraction, ADHD 2.0 reads like little more than a collection of blog posts heavily laden with affiliate links. Here, the authors hawk everything from balance boards and CBD oil to genetic testing services they acknowledge don’t quite deliver the goods. As an adult with ADHD who has read nearly a dozen books on the disorder in the past 18 months, many of them originally published at least a decade ago, I was hoping to learn something new from ADHD 2.0. But with the exception of a short section on the task positive network and default mode network, and a welcome handful of pages on rejection sensitivity dysphoria, the authors broke little new ground here. The book is a scant 132 pages plus 55 pages of end notes, reenforcing the impression that this is more a collection of repurposed blog articles than a major new entry in the ADHD literature. The short chapter on medications was especially disappointing. Extremely thin, with nothing here you can’t readily find on thE ADDitude or CHAAD websites. If you are new to ADHD 2.0, this could be a decent place to start. It’s a short, up-to-date overview of the disorder and available treatments. But if you’re already well versed in ADHD, there are better books out there. Among the best I’ve read is Gabor Maté’s Scattered: How Attention Deficit Disorder Originates and What You Can Do About It.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Swiers

    Excellent, insightful, scientific book for newer diagnosed ADHD adult The book makes me feel like ADHD should be seen as a positive super power me strength instead of a negative thing. I understand the science behind ADHD now better than I did before and how our brains work. The authors did an excellent job making the book relatable to us who are not doctors or primarily interested in the chemical components of ADHD and our brains.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    As someone who has read several other books about ADHD, works in the field, lives with ADHD, has joined support groups, and has a DSM on their shelf, this still taught me a TON of information I never knew about the science and strategies. I recommend this so so highly for anyone looking to learn more.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Mcdonald

    MIND BLOWING and LIFE CHANGING!! I learned so much about myself through this book it felt like a biography on my life. I am going to buy the book and a 5 pack of highlighters and most likely use all that ink up highlighting the plethora of knowledge nuggets. Anyone with ADHD must read this!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Useful but not as insightful as Driven to Distraction was. This felt like a quick update. I also could have done without the V.A.S.T. info since it’s not a medical condition. There were areas that felt like they needed better scientific support as well.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Nick Seeger

    Reading this book helped me to put into words some critical aspects of the way my VAST brain works. ADHD 2.0 is a follow up to the earlier book by Drs Hallowell and Ratey which probably informed the approach taken by educators throughout my own childhood. Having been diagnosed with ADHD as both a child and as an adult, my official diagnosis at the time was ADHD-PI, although I much prefer the variable attention stimulus trait (VAST) nomenclature because it emphasizes how the symptoms stem from var Reading this book helped me to put into words some critical aspects of the way my VAST brain works. ADHD 2.0 is a follow up to the earlier book by Drs Hallowell and Ratey which probably informed the approach taken by educators throughout my own childhood. Having been diagnosed with ADHD as both a child and as an adult, my official diagnosis at the time was ADHD-PI, although I much prefer the variable attention stimulus trait (VAST) nomenclature because it emphasizes how the symptoms stem from variations in attention, rather than treating it as a deficit which I can confirm from personal experience. If anything I would say that suffer from an excess of the wrong kind of attention, rather than any sort of lack thereof. Working in a creative career, I have learned to see the positive aspects of these differences in attention regulation, but as I get older I am noticing more of the emotional disregulation which was likely masked earlier on by my lack of executive function which took priority at the time. Anyways, back to the book. What I learned first and foremost was the difference in cognitive functions between the Task Positive Network and the Default Mode Network. The former is more present in task based activity, often leading to periods of hyper focus, the latter is responsible for “brooding” introspection. For most (“neurotypical”) people, these two networks are better regulated such that when one switches on the other is suppressed. For those with ADHD, the two systems overlap and compete for attention. The Authors repeatedly emphasize that learning to function with ADHD isn’t a matter of overcoming laziness by stimulating action, since the ADHD brain is already over-active, it’s about learning to better employ the brakes by training the brain in various ways. Focusing on single tasks for prolonged periods of time, and short circuiting negative rumination with breathing exercises (among other coping skills) can go a long way to helping regulate the two systems. It has also been discovered that the cerebellum is underdeveloped in the ADHD brain. Given that balance-centric exercise is key to promoting healthy cerebellum function it is presumed that these kinds of exercises can be of great help in managing the symptoms of ADHD. This is what I think the biggest revelation was for me, that the brain can be physically trained through exercise to improve it’s function. I’ve heard for years that physical exercise was good for managing ADHD symptoms, but this book put it into context in terms of the neuroscience as to why that is the case. Excercise promotes the release of BDNF which provides a fertile ground for brain growth. The more we move the more nerve cells are active, which when they are firing more rapidly release more neurotransmitters which in turn creates a boost in dopamine and norepinephrine which play a major role in regulating our attention system. Lastly, This book clarified the relationship between mindfulness meditation and it’s function in managing VAST/ADHD symptoms. The targeted attention in this form of meditation practice has a number of advantages for the VAST brain. Breathing exercises in particular encourage continually returning to the breath and letting go of momentary thoughts to achieve what is referred to as “Teflon mind” which strengthens the Task Positive Network. MBSR also aids in suppressing or “dialling down” the Default Mode Network which is responsible for distracting ruminations known as “monkey-mind” in meditation circles. Having taken the 8 week MBSR course, I wasn’t aware that studies have found that this exact practice led to an increase of cortical thickness in the hippocampus which oversees our learning, memory and emotional regulation. I am personally very wary when it comes to self-help books, having been burned by “You mean I’m not Lazy, Stupid or Crazy?” Which had a negative impact on me early on. Some books lean too heavily on the negative aspects of the problem they are trying to solve, but ADHD 2.0 is steadfastly tuned in to the strengths of the ADHD brain, rather than it’s weaknesses, and delivers on the latest scientific knowledge on the subject which is exactly what I was looking for. As the author says, learning about yourself is the first step to loving yourself, and in the immortal words of RuPaul “if you cant love yourself how in the hell are you going to love somebody else?”, so can I get an Amen?

  10. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    So this is a partial review as I have only dived into the first 25% of the book. First, a little back story. When I was a child, I was diagnosed with ADHD. I was very intelligent but was rambunctious. My parents did what they could. Ritalin was prescribed and honestly, I do not remember much about it other than the fact I know that my grades improved and I was getting in less trouble in school. In High School, I started taking the medication again and and again, was aware of the same results: le So this is a partial review as I have only dived into the first 25% of the book. First, a little back story. When I was a child, I was diagnosed with ADHD. I was very intelligent but was rambunctious. My parents did what they could. Ritalin was prescribed and honestly, I do not remember much about it other than the fact I know that my grades improved and I was getting in less trouble in school. In High School, I started taking the medication again and and again, was aware of the same results: less distractive, more focused and improved grades. However, I joined the military and due to the stigma of ADHD in the military, I had to hide my diagnosis and stop taking the medication. Fast forward 20 years and now as a mid-30s adult with a wife and a job and all of the other stresses that are involved, I have battled with never resolving the issues of my ADHD. It has come more apparent that in previous jobs there were some that facilitated my ADHD and then the jobs that were not conducive, I failed at. I have a great job now that I really enjoy, but it does not sit well with my ADHD due to the fact I do not know how to direct my focus. I bought this book in hopes of doing such. In the process of just reading the first 50-60 pages, I have had several HOLY CRAP, THAT'S ME!, " moments. I am excited that the book has done a good job of laying out the tendencies of what an ADHD brain looks like. However, like other reviews, I do see a lot of "plugs" and advertisements on behalf of the authors. If anything, this book as revealed a starting point to hopefully retake control of my life and how to deal with ADHD. I am hoping the rest of the book will have more information on the processes and training to guide me back on a path.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Heather Wu

    I was not the target audience for this book and found it to be minimally helpful. I am already well educated about ADHD and its symptoms and I do not personally have ADHD. I do have a spouse and child with ADHD. This book is hyper focused on being a cheerleader for people who have ADHD (Don’t get down on yourself; you can’t help it! kind of stuff) If you need that kind of reassurance and validation of your experience, this book might be for you. It also bothered me that the book, with the goal o I was not the target audience for this book and found it to be minimally helpful. I am already well educated about ADHD and its symptoms and I do not personally have ADHD. I do have a spouse and child with ADHD. This book is hyper focused on being a cheerleader for people who have ADHD (Don’t get down on yourself; you can’t help it! kind of stuff) If you need that kind of reassurance and validation of your experience, this book might be for you. It also bothered me that the book, with the goal of helping people with ADHD recognize their unique strengths, over generalized all people with ADHD as creative. Having a brain that works differently does not automatically make you creative; just like neurotypical people, some people who have ADHD are creative, others are not. I would have appreciated less cheerleading and more concrete strategies to help people with ADHD manage their symptoms. Exercise I already knew about, but this book did teach me that specifically focusing on balance is helpful for strengthening important connections in the ADHD brain. If nothing else, I recommend reading Chapter 3: The Cerebellum Connection. I also appreciate the many resources printed at the back of the book. Were it not for these, I may have given the book two stars. I would only recommend this book if you are relatively uneducated about ADHD (it is a decent primer) and you know or suspect that you may have ADHD and could use some validation of your experience. This is not a good book for parents or partners of people with ADHD.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brandi

    I have been a long-time fan and follower of Dr. Hallowell. As the only non-ADHD member in my household, I have often turned to his insights and teachings to explain that which I truly cannot relate. I first started readings his works many years ago when my kids were little, and I was looking for tools to help them succeed at school and set some semblance of normalcy in our home. I was so focused on my littles, I did not fully appreciate the wisdom to be gained for my spouse. When I saw ADHD 2.0, I have been a long-time fan and follower of Dr. Hallowell. As the only non-ADHD member in my household, I have often turned to his insights and teachings to explain that which I truly cannot relate. I first started readings his works many years ago when my kids were little, and I was looking for tools to help them succeed at school and set some semblance of normalcy in our home. I was so focused on my littles, I did not fully appreciate the wisdom to be gained for my spouse. When I saw ADHD 2.0, I knew I had to read this! There is so much still to be learned and understood, especially as the littles are not so little, and my spouse is thriving in a world of technology and multi-tasking. Once again, my mind was truly expanded as I could see why things happen the way they do with the people I love and care about. I understand that they truly think, process, and progress very differently than I do and there is room to appreciate these differences. I am deeply grateful and thankful for the work and research that continues to be done for people with ADD/ADHD and that it is so freely shared. I highly recommend this book for anyone who has ADD/ADHD or lives with anyone else who does. It will reset your understanding of so many things and provide space for grace where there has previously been frustration and misunderstanding. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley and all opinions expressed are my own and freely given.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I loved this approach to ADHD in this book. I learned so much, and I'm working toward better habits with myself and my kids. I am almost certainly an adult with ADHD or VAST, though I haven't been tested but I have struggled my entire life with executive functions and this book was honestly a revelation for me. A couple of chapters on understanding what's going on in the brain, followed by chapters with different types of strategies to help with ADHD, such as balance exercise (cerebellum strengt I loved this approach to ADHD in this book. I learned so much, and I'm working toward better habits with myself and my kids. I am almost certainly an adult with ADHD or VAST, though I haven't been tested but I have struggled my entire life with executive functions and this book was honestly a revelation for me. A couple of chapters on understanding what's going on in the brain, followed by chapters with different types of strategies to help with ADHD, such as balance exercise (cerebellum strengthening), strengthening connections with others, creating environments that are helpful, the power of exercise, and medications, going through all the medications and how they can help different people with different types of ADHD. It makes complete sense that my son's psychiatrist put him on the medication he is on because of his rejection sensitive dysphoria. Overall very informative, my biggest complaint is that it seems like the authors are teamed up with several companies throughout the book selling expensive treatments and therapies which was a turnoff and which is what is preventing me from giving this 5 stars.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Caren Johnson

    ADHD 2.0 by Edward M. Hallowell, M.D.; John J. Ratey, M.D. was a comprehensive read; it focuses on explaining ADHD (beyond what we see in movies and tv shows) and provides examples of how to treat it. Both of the authors have real-world experience recognizing and treating ADHD and that stood out since they could speak from positions of authority. They were able to not only focus on middle and upper-middle-class families who needed to recognize different symptoms, but there was some reflection on ADHD 2.0 by Edward M. Hallowell, M.D.; John J. Ratey, M.D. was a comprehensive read; it focuses on explaining ADHD (beyond what we see in movies and tv shows) and provides examples of how to treat it. Both of the authors have real-world experience recognizing and treating ADHD and that stood out since they could speak from positions of authority. They were able to not only focus on middle and upper-middle-class families who needed to recognize different symptoms, but there was some reflection on LMI families with may not be as primed to recognize symptoms as more than behavioral issues. The most interesting part of the book was the look at the current medications for treating ADHD but I wonder if that will quickly make the book need updates. There is a ton of information on support groups as well as ways to get tested to get that diagnosis. The book was organized in a way that makes it possible to read cover-to-cover or to dip in at different points for the specific information that a reader is looking for, making this a great resource to read multiple times.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Patsye

    If you have ADHD, read this book. If you have a child with ADHD, read this book. If you have a friend with ADHD, buy them this book! It is the best compilation of explanations and advice that I have seen, and will be a valuable life tool for those who follow the advice. And it isn’t specifically a fix-it book - it just offers valid explanations of how the ADHD brain works, and gives many tools to take advantage of its strengths and help with its weaknesses. The authors explore a variety of sugge If you have ADHD, read this book. If you have a child with ADHD, read this book. If you have a friend with ADHD, buy them this book! It is the best compilation of explanations and advice that I have seen, and will be a valuable life tool for those who follow the advice. And it isn’t specifically a fix-it book - it just offers valid explanations of how the ADHD brain works, and gives many tools to take advantage of its strengths and help with its weaknesses. The authors explore a variety of suggestions that are reasonable to put into practice, but I thought an outstanding aspect of the book was the easy to understand explanation of the ADHD brain’s inner workings. ADHD is presented not as a weakness or a terrible thing to have, but as something that can be turned to one’s advantage. And what a lovely change that is from authors who view it as something to subdue. I recommend this book most highly. Many thanks to Netgalley and the Ballantine for an ARC of this book in exchange for a fair review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    D R

    I certainly learned some things from this book. I listened to it as an audiobook and was called out as a listener for probably not paying attention for parts of the book. haha I've been reading things online about adhd, and this is the first full book I've read on the topic. Certainly learned about some methods of coping and non-medical treatment options. It speaks about the brain science part of adhd as well. Overall, just okay. Maybe because I felt like I had actually learned a lot of what was I certainly learned some things from this book. I listened to it as an audiobook and was called out as a listener for probably not paying attention for parts of the book. haha I've been reading things online about adhd, and this is the first full book I've read on the topic. Certainly learned about some methods of coping and non-medical treatment options. It speaks about the brain science part of adhd as well. Overall, just okay. Maybe because I felt like I had actually learned a lot of what was in this book on tiktok (lol). Some of the perspectives were very much from white male perspective, and there is a lot to be said on how people assigned female at birth present/cope with the disorder. And this book didn't give that much attention at all. Just felt outdated? And I've barely started learning about this stuff in the past year.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    This book was woven through with grace and kindness. The overall message is "You have been gifted with an incredible race car for a brain, with bicycle brakes..let's learn the MANY exciting ways to beef those up so you can win!" I found it to be educational as to the blessings and challenges inherent in ADHD. It stressed positivity, structured schedules, exercise, and overall a focus on how to bring out strengths in a neuro-atypical brain. I learned about new discoveries in other fields that hav This book was woven through with grace and kindness. The overall message is "You have been gifted with an incredible race car for a brain, with bicycle brakes..let's learn the MANY exciting ways to beef those up so you can win!" I found it to be educational as to the blessings and challenges inherent in ADHD. It stressed positivity, structured schedules, exercise, and overall a focus on how to bring out strengths in a neuro-atypical brain. I learned about new discoveries in other fields that have revolutionized ADHD treatments, what a huge role the cerebellum plays, and studies in the works right now that look promising. Lastly, there is a chapter about the role of medication as well as a breakdown of what each one does. Fantastic book!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

    My son and I both have ADHD, which is the main reason I picked up ADHD 2.0. I've read the authors' other work and found it helpful. There were several big lightbulb moments for me while reading this, most particularly the idea of ADHD brains being race cars with bicycle brakes. That being said, when I finished it I still felt like I wanted more, though I couldn't come up with anything particular that was missing. I certainly recommend it for anyone with ADHD themselves or in their families. **I r My son and I both have ADHD, which is the main reason I picked up ADHD 2.0. I've read the authors' other work and found it helpful. There were several big lightbulb moments for me while reading this, most particularly the idea of ADHD brains being race cars with bicycle brakes. That being said, when I finished it I still felt like I wanted more, though I couldn't come up with anything particular that was missing. I certainly recommend it for anyone with ADHD themselves or in their families. **I received an electronic ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.**

  19. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    I received a free copy via a giveaway. My opinions are my own. I finished this book with mixed feelings as I could not tell who the targeted audience was, the general public or practioners. Yes, we should all thank their editor for cutting approximately half of the original manuscript. There were some very helpful practical suggestions but I found what to be appear to be some conflicts of interest a bit off putting even though the affiliations were footnoted. All in all, there were some good tak I received a free copy via a giveaway. My opinions are my own. I finished this book with mixed feelings as I could not tell who the targeted audience was, the general public or practioners. Yes, we should all thank their editor for cutting approximately half of the original manuscript. There were some very helpful practical suggestions but I found what to be appear to be some conflicts of interest a bit off putting even though the affiliations were footnoted. All in all, there were some good takeaways from this publication.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    If you have or live closely with someone with ADHD, you know how difficult this rather common condition can be. This book nicely explains the symptoms and science behind the diagnosis. It also gives some practical advice on how to create a life for living with this frustrating situation and, best of all, gives encouragement that life can be manageable. I also appreciate the resource list in the appendix. This could be quite helpful. I won a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway for this hones If you have or live closely with someone with ADHD, you know how difficult this rather common condition can be. This book nicely explains the symptoms and science behind the diagnosis. It also gives some practical advice on how to create a life for living with this frustrating situation and, best of all, gives encouragement that life can be manageable. I also appreciate the resource list in the appendix. This could be quite helpful. I won a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway for this honest review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elena

    The good: • This book is written by 2 psychiatrists who themselves have ADHD, • It address both sides of the ADHD coin (positive/challenging, superpower/need for accommodations, attention deficit/hyperfocus etc.) • This is a good book for those who just started exploring and learning about ADHD. The bad: ▪︎one of the chapters gives legitimacy to ABA therapy, which is extremely harmful to autistic people. ▪︎some nutrition, parenting and supplememt advice didn't seem to be evidence based practice. The good: • This book is written by 2 psychiatrists who themselves have ADHD, • It address both sides of the ADHD coin (positive/challenging, superpower/need for accommodations, attention deficit/hyperfocus etc.) • This is a good book for those who just started exploring and learning about ADHD. The bad: ▪︎one of the chapters gives legitimacy to ABA therapy, which is extremely harmful to autistic people. ▪︎some nutrition, parenting and supplememt advice didn't seem to be evidence based practice.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    I found this very helpful. I don't have ADHD and I can't understand what it feels like to have it. But I see my son struggle and I want to help him develop tools to succeed. Especially in this time of remote learning when he is not getting any support in school from trained professionals. I found this book to be written in language I could understand and translate into useful action items. I particularly found the information about the balance exercises to be helpful and we've started to work on I found this very helpful. I don't have ADHD and I can't understand what it feels like to have it. But I see my son struggle and I want to help him develop tools to succeed. Especially in this time of remote learning when he is not getting any support in school from trained professionals. I found this book to be written in language I could understand and translate into useful action items. I particularly found the information about the balance exercises to be helpful and we've started to work on some in-home "games" to practice balance several times a week.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Marta

    Solid and compassionate, this book has a tone that I think would read well to both people dealing with ADHD and to their loved ones. The title is a bit misleading- there really is not a ton of new or cutting edge treatment information, unless the balance work turns out to be the answer they hope it might be down the road. It's still a good place to come for consolidated information and a great place to learn how to be a loving, kind, helpful presence to your child, yourself or your partner. Solid and compassionate, this book has a tone that I think would read well to both people dealing with ADHD and to their loved ones. The title is a bit misleading- there really is not a ton of new or cutting edge treatment information, unless the balance work turns out to be the answer they hope it might be down the road. It's still a good place to come for consolidated information and a great place to learn how to be a loving, kind, helpful presence to your child, yourself or your partner.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    If you have ADHD or think you might, this is a very helpful and quick read. Excellent overview on the current state of scientific brain understanding and ADHD strengths and drawbacks. The tools for managing both with and without medication are top notch and allow for independent followup research. My only regret is that so many of the most efficacious diagnostics and therapies remain prohibitively expensive.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    4.5 Stars. A fabulous review of all the most important sides of ADHD, including myths, medication, latest science, strategies, nutrition, exercise, relationships, etc. The authors have written multiple books and there are countless other resources, so this shouldn't be seen as an exhaustive take. This is a brief overview of all of the important areas to consider. I see this as not quite a parent's guide, but more an overall approach to the latest and greatest for ADHD. 4.5 Stars. A fabulous review of all the most important sides of ADHD, including myths, medication, latest science, strategies, nutrition, exercise, relationships, etc. The authors have written multiple books and there are countless other resources, so this shouldn't be seen as an exhaustive take. This is a brief overview of all of the important areas to consider. I see this as not quite a parent's guide, but more an overall approach to the latest and greatest for ADHD.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Holly Ann

    Was actually a pretty fast read, only took me longer as I was trying to not read too much at once for better retention. Definitely a better read if you are looking for a starting place and haven’t done much research or found other informative adhd content on your own. I did still find value in learning about the Default Mode Network and Task Positive network in the brain, as well as the benefits of exercise. I am giving this book to my mom to read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    I appreciate having found this book when I did. I believe this will benefit myself and someone very close to me and our relationship. The variety of examples, medical information, medicinal, non traditional/medicinal benefits were all great to learn about as well. Thank you for writing this book! Thank YOU for reading this review and I wish you well.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Charlene Van Ooyen

    I feel like I'm the only person who was less than impressed with this book. I will say that I listened to this as an audiobook and part of the issue may have been the narrator's monotone droning, but I just couldn't get into it. It was extremely difficult to listen to and stay engaged. I only made it about a third of the way through the audiobook before I decided I needed to return it. I feel like I'm the only person who was less than impressed with this book. I will say that I listened to this as an audiobook and part of the issue may have been the narrator's monotone droning, but I just couldn't get into it. It was extremely difficult to listen to and stay engaged. I only made it about a third of the way through the audiobook before I decided I needed to return it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    BDC

    A great collection of updated info written both for adults with ADHD as well as parents of children with ADHD. A helpful collection of what brain science and other research is telling us about healthy habits and activities for those with ADHD. I found it helpful but not particularly enjoyable to read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nate Gadzhi

    It’s a nice overview for those curious or those who work or live with people with ADHD. However it’s shallow and concise. If you think you’re ADHD and you already work with a psychiatrist, this book might give you an overview of strategies worth trying and discussing with your doctor, or, at least validate your work and thoughts on ADHD.

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