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https://www.bitchute.com/video/2aF0ge... Dr. Heidegger's Experiment is a short story by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, about a doctor who claims to have been sent water from the Fountain of Youth. Originally published anonymously in 1837, it was later published in Hawthorne's collection Twice-Told Tales, also in 1837. Dr. Heidegger - An aged and wise physician who is t https://www.bitchute.com/video/2aF0ge... Dr. Heidegger's Experiment is a short story by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, about a doctor who claims to have been sent water from the Fountain of Youth. Originally published anonymously in 1837, it was later published in Hawthorne's collection Twice-Told Tales, also in 1837. Dr. Heidegger - An aged and wise physician who is the protagonist of the story. Colonel Killigrew - A man who, throughout his life, has had many self-indulgent, sinful pleasures.(lust) Mr. Medbourne - A once-rich merchant who lost most of his fortune in speculation. Mr. Gascoigne - A politician whose career was ruined by his corruption. Widow Wycherley - A formerly beautiful woman loved by the three gentlemen (Colonel Killigrew, Mr. Medbourne, Mr. Gascoigne).(vanity) Sylvia Ward - A youthful woman whose portrait hangs upon a wall in the study. She was supposed to marry Dr. Heidegger but died the day before their marriage. The rose Dr. Heidegger uses in his experiment is one he received from Sylvia for their wedding.


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https://www.bitchute.com/video/2aF0ge... Dr. Heidegger's Experiment is a short story by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, about a doctor who claims to have been sent water from the Fountain of Youth. Originally published anonymously in 1837, it was later published in Hawthorne's collection Twice-Told Tales, also in 1837. Dr. Heidegger - An aged and wise physician who is t https://www.bitchute.com/video/2aF0ge... Dr. Heidegger's Experiment is a short story by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, about a doctor who claims to have been sent water from the Fountain of Youth. Originally published anonymously in 1837, it was later published in Hawthorne's collection Twice-Told Tales, also in 1837. Dr. Heidegger - An aged and wise physician who is the protagonist of the story. Colonel Killigrew - A man who, throughout his life, has had many self-indulgent, sinful pleasures.(lust) Mr. Medbourne - A once-rich merchant who lost most of his fortune in speculation. Mr. Gascoigne - A politician whose career was ruined by his corruption. Widow Wycherley - A formerly beautiful woman loved by the three gentlemen (Colonel Killigrew, Mr. Medbourne, Mr. Gascoigne).(vanity) Sylvia Ward - A youthful woman whose portrait hangs upon a wall in the study. She was supposed to marry Dr. Heidegger but died the day before their marriage. The rose Dr. Heidegger uses in his experiment is one he received from Sylvia for their wedding.

30 review for DR HEIDEGGER'S EXPERIMENT - AUDIOBOOK

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bill Kerwin

    First published anonymously as “The Fountain of Youth” in the Knickerbocker or New York Monthly Magazine (1837), this story tells us of an experiment involving the effects of water obtained from the fabled fountain. Dr. Heidegger invites four superannuated acquaintances (Colonel Pettigrew the gouty roue, Mr. Medbourne the failed merchant/speculator, Mr Gascoigne the disgraced politician, and the Widow Wycherly, a once-celebrated beauty tarnished by scandal). The experiment? Offering all three th First published anonymously as “The Fountain of Youth” in the Knickerbocker or New York Monthly Magazine (1837), this story tells us of an experiment involving the effects of water obtained from the fabled fountain. Dr. Heidegger invites four superannuated acquaintances (Colonel Pettigrew the gouty roue, Mr. Medbourne the failed merchant/speculator, Mr Gascoigne the disgraced politician, and the Widow Wycherly, a once-celebrated beauty tarnished by scandal). The experiment? Offering all three the water of youth, and observing what effects it has upon them. Superficially, this piece is not much different from any of Hawthorne’s early moral tales, but the precision with which the behavior of the four experimental subjects is described is memorable, and even more so is this wonderful gothic description of the old physician's study: It was a dim, old-fashioned chamber, festooned with cobwebs, and besprinkled with antique dust. Around the walls stood several oaken bookcases, the lower shelves of which were filled with rows of gigantic folios and black-letter quartos, and the upper with little parchment-covered duodecimos. Over the central bookcase was a bronze bust of Hippocrates, with which, according to some authorities, Dr. Heidegger was accustomed to hold consultations in all difficult cases of his practice. In the obscurest corner of the room stood a tall and narrow oaken closet, with its door ajar, within which doubtfully appeared a skeleton. Between two of the bookcases hung a looking-glass, presenting its high and dusty plate within a tarnished gilt frame. Among many wonderful stories related of this mirror, it was fabled that the spirits of all the doctor's deceased patients dwelt within its verge, and would stare him in the face whenever he looked thitherward. The opposite side of the chamber was ornamented with the full-length portrait of a young lady, arrayed in the faded magnificence of silk, satin, and brocade, and with a visage as faded as her dress. Above half a century ago, Dr. Heidegger had been on the point of marriage with this young lady; but, being affected with some slight disorder, she had swallowed one of her lover's prescriptions, and died on the bridal evening. The greatest curiosity of the study remains to be mentioned; it was a ponderous folio volume, bound in black leather, with massive silver clasps. There were no letters on the back, and nobody could tell the title of the book. But it was well known to be a book of magic; and once, when a chambermaid had lifted it, merely to brush away the dust, the skeleton had rattled in its closet, the picture of the young lady had stepped one foot upon the floor, and several ghastly faces had peeped forth from the mirror; while the brazen head of Hippocrates frowned, and said--"Forbear!" Edgar Allan Poe liked this story, observing that it was "exceedingly well imagined and executed with surpassing ability" and that "the artist breathes in every line of it." No doubt the passage quoted above earned his most sincere admiration.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Brilliant classic! Eccentric Dr Heidegger assembles four old friends (look at their names) and is inviting them to a very special experiment. At first he shows how a 55 year old rose of his deceased former soon-to-be wife flourishes up again and tells his friends about the Fountain of Youth. But what about the elderly peoply when they drink from the water the rose got in touch with? What happens with the precious water itself and what is Dr Heidegger's reaction to the change of his friends? Mast Brilliant classic! Eccentric Dr Heidegger assembles four old friends (look at their names) and is inviting them to a very special experiment. At first he shows how a 55 year old rose of his deceased former soon-to-be wife flourishes up again and tells his friends about the Fountain of Youth. But what about the elderly peoply when they drink from the water the rose got in touch with? What happens with the precious water itself and what is Dr Heidegger's reaction to the change of his friends? Masterly classic and philosophical tale that let's you think about getting old and what a switch back to youth might bring. Will the effect of youth last? I really liked the twist at the end on the plans of the doctor's friends. Absolutely recommended. This is a story with a great moral!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mir

    Hawthorne wrote this when he was 30-ish; I wonder if it would have been a different story a couple decades later.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Vaishali

    The Fountain of Youth - still one of western literature's fave fables ! - gets a neato twist in Hawthorne's marvelous hands. Witty, mysterious, even erotic.... a great trip. The Fountain of Youth - still one of western literature's fave fables ! - gets a neato twist in Hawthorne's marvelous hands. Witty, mysterious, even erotic.... a great trip.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    I really liked this deep story of returning to the past. He discovered an equivocal truth in saying that going back into the past to change terrible future events cannot be made because they are inevitable. In this way, it superbly permeates throughout the story that reflection on the past too long is also useless because the past can never change. I love the use of allegory – Hawthorne’s use of objects standing in the way of Hope, Shame, Faith, and Vice. These reveal some eternal passions that I really liked this deep story of returning to the past. He discovered an equivocal truth in saying that going back into the past to change terrible future events cannot be made because they are inevitable. In this way, it superbly permeates throughout the story that reflection on the past too long is also useless because the past can never change. I love the use of allegory – Hawthorne’s use of objects standing in the way of Hope, Shame, Faith, and Vice. These reveal some eternal passions that lie at the heart of people. Well done.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Badseedgirl

    Less of a horror story, and more of a cautionary tale.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ευθυμία Δεσποτάκη

    Too old for my tastes. Too slow, to judgemental. Saved by the quirk that is its last sentence.

  8. 4 out of 5

    James

    Dr. Heidegger's Experiment isn't to test the water from the Fountain of Youth. The old flower blooming into life again has already proven that the water works and restores youth and vitality to old, withered things. His true experiment was to see how his "friends" reacted to becoming young again, and to make them as bitter as he is in his old age. Hawthorne displays the ugly side of youth and human nature here. The three friends become hostile, fighting over the widow and demanding more and more Dr. Heidegger's Experiment isn't to test the water from the Fountain of Youth. The old flower blooming into life again has already proven that the water works and restores youth and vitality to old, withered things. His true experiment was to see how his "friends" reacted to becoming young again, and to make them as bitter as he is in his old age. Hawthorne displays the ugly side of youth and human nature here. The three friends become hostile, fighting over the widow and demanding more and more of the water. They have an obsession with youth, not happiness. After this water wears off, his friends become old again, joining Heidegger in bitterness and regret. The true lesson here is not about how science or magic is dangerous. It's a warning against humanity's greedy nature.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Adina

    The experiment is about restoring youth ( with an Elixir from the Fountain of Youth) to some old people that have acted foolish in the past and spent their old age regretting the days long gone. With their youth restored they start acting the same as when they were young although they should have known better. It seems experience does not change people. At least that's what the author is trying to say in my opinion. The experiment is about restoring youth ( with an Elixir from the Fountain of Youth) to some old people that have acted foolish in the past and spent their old age regretting the days long gone. With their youth restored they start acting the same as when they were young although they should have known better. It seems experience does not change people. At least that's what the author is trying to say in my opinion.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    I liked the idea of it, and it was easy to read, but it didnt really go anywhere

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    Read for a course in sci-fi/fantasy literature. A brilliant short story that certainly makes me want to read more stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tam

    Great way to explain how people don’t learn from their mistakes.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey Lynn (thepagemistress)

    One of my favorite short stories I have ever read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Penny

    (Audible) First published in 1837, this is Nathaniel Hawthorne's spin on The Fountain of Youth. Dr. Heidegger invites 4 elderly friends over to his house to show them a miraculous experiment. Using water from a special lake in Florida, he revives a dead rose to lush beauty. The four friends are entranced. Oh! To be young again, to live life over free of the mistakes that you've made--they eagerly partake of the water and return to their youthful appearances. (Or do they? Hawthorne tells us that a (Audible) First published in 1837, this is Nathaniel Hawthorne's spin on The Fountain of Youth. Dr. Heidegger invites 4 elderly friends over to his house to show them a miraculous experiment. Using water from a special lake in Florida, he revives a dead rose to lush beauty. The four friends are entranced. Oh! To be young again, to live life over free of the mistakes that you've made--they eagerly partake of the water and return to their youthful appearances. (Or do they? Hawthorne tells us that a mirror in the room reflects their aged appearances.) Returned to youth, they immediately begin repeating the same behavior and mistakes that they committed in there youth. There's a tussle, a fight, and then the vessel of water is broken and the water gone. The effects of the magical water isn't permanent. The guests return to their elderly forms. Desperate, they plan to head to Florida to find that lake! Hawthorne raises the moral dilemma, if you had a chance to do things over, would you really change your choices? RECOMMEND

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alyx

    Read for a book club. Hawthorne includes some of his favorite themes in this story much a like in "Rappaccini's Daughter" which I read a while ago, again for a book club. Experimentation, questionable ethics and the effects of youth. A nice story, with a clear message. However, I enjoyed "Rappaccini's Daughter" more. Read for a book club. Hawthorne includes some of his favorite themes in this story much a like in "Rappaccini's Daughter" which I read a while ago, again for a book club. Experimentation, questionable ethics and the effects of youth. A nice story, with a clear message. However, I enjoyed "Rappaccini's Daughter" more.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    A pretty good, and very well written, short story for the time period - like so many short stories from the time period there's about the same amount of time spent on the set up than on the actual plot. I got this from a "sci-fi" selection, but it's definitely more fantasy than sci-fi. A pretty good, and very well written, short story for the time period - like so many short stories from the time period there's about the same amount of time spent on the set up than on the actual plot. I got this from a "sci-fi" selection, but it's definitely more fantasy than sci-fi.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Melanti

    Meh.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pritam Chattopadhyay

    The tale, depicting the follies of mankind, commences with Dr. Heidegger inviting his four elderly friends to aid him "in performing an exceedingly curious experiment." Dr. Heidegger's guests are three white-bearded gentlemen: Mr. Medbourne, Colonel Killigrew and Mr. Gascoigne; the fourth, a withered gentlewoman, the Widow Clara Wycherly. Dr. Heidegger's study: Dr. Heidegger's study is a dim, untidy, old-fashioned chamber replete with cobwebs, "oaken" bookcases, books, a bust of Hippocrates. Bes The tale, depicting the follies of mankind, commences with Dr. Heidegger inviting his four elderly friends to aid him "in performing an exceedingly curious experiment." Dr. Heidegger's guests are three white-bearded gentlemen: Mr. Medbourne, Colonel Killigrew and Mr. Gascoigne; the fourth, a withered gentlewoman, the Widow Clara Wycherly. Dr. Heidegger's study: Dr. Heidegger's study is a dim, untidy, old-fashioned chamber replete with cobwebs, "oaken" bookcases, books, a bust of Hippocrates. Besides, the room had a looking-glass with a "tarnished gilt frame" and a portrait of Sylvia Ward. Many years ago, Dr. Heidegger was about to tie the knot with Sylvia Ward but unfortunately, she died unexpectedly after swallowing one of his prescriptions. There was a huge book on magic and it was said that once a maid had lifted the book to dust it when the skeleton had rattled, the lady in the portrait had put one step on the floor and Hippocrates had warned 'Forbear'. Dr. Heidegger acquaints his guests with the purpose of his invitation to them. Before telling the details of the experiment, Dr. Heidegger shows his guests a "withered and crumbling" rose flower. It was given to him by Sylvia Ward fifty five years ago. Dr. Heidegger dips the flower in a vase containing some fluid. Surprisingly, the rose revives and looks fresh. To Dr. Heidegger's elderly guests it seems "a very pretty deception". On that, Dr. Heidegger tells them about the famous Fountain of Youth, situated in the southern part of the Floridian peninsula. He claims before his guests that this precious elixir may restore the "bloom of youth" to them. To substantiate his claim, Dr. Heidegger invites his four guests to drink the admirable fluid. However, he warns his venerable friends before drinking, that they should allow the experience they have gathered in their lives to direct and guide them "when passing a second time through the perils of youth." He suggests them to recall all the sins they had committed and the repentance they had craved for before they should ever go astray again. As expected, the four elderly guests drink the fluid and the signs of old age start vanishing from their faces. Their souls and bodies seem to be animated with a new life and energy. As they drink, they forget their virtues and wisdom and enjoy the "lightsome dizziness" caused by the sudden shedding of years. Colonel Killigrew flirts with the Widow Wycherly; Mr. Gascoigne speaks eloquently like politicians; Mr. Medbourne suggests a plan for supplying ice to East Indies. The Widow Wycherly stands before the mirror courtesying and simpering to her own image, and greeting it as the friend whom she loved better than all the world beside. She thrusts her face close to the glass, to see whether some long-remembered wrinkle has indeed vanished. She examined whether the snow has so entirely melted from her hair that the venerable cap could be safely thrown aside. Dr. Heidegger closely observes the activities and behaviour of his four guests. Charmed by youth again, they mock the infirmity of old age. They all start dancing in exhilaration. The Widow invites Dr. Heidegger for dance. But he declines the offer pleading of his old age and rheumatism. Dr. Heidegger's guests show age again: Inflamed by the desire to dance and flirt with the Widow, the three gentlemen begin to interchange threatening glances and involve themselves in a physical combat. This physical riot overturns the table, the vase breaks and the precious water of youth flows across the floor. The liquid touches a dying butterfly and revives it. However, the alluring deception of spring lasts momentarily and the rose fades again; the guests show signs of age again. Dr. Heidegger feels happy that he is not deceived by this passing and unnatural return to youth as the spell does not stay longer. However, his guests still unaffected by the transient nature of youth and beauty resolve to go to Florida in search of the Fountain of Youth in order to drink it greedily thrice a day. Nathaniel Hawthorne, has satirised the youthful follies of human beings and their eternal desire for everlasting youth. Hawthorne has amusingly concluded a moral lesson that man is not only flawed. but for most of the time unable to change for the better.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ana

    'Age is deformed, youth unkind,. We scorn their bodies, they our mind.' - Thomas Bastard(1566-1618) This short story reminded me of this quote. It probably surprises no one that few understand the importance of acting ones age and appreciating life in all its stages. 'Age is deformed, youth unkind,. We scorn their bodies, they our mind.' - Thomas Bastard(1566-1618) This short story reminded me of this quote. It probably surprises no one that few understand the importance of acting ones age and appreciating life in all its stages.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lizzi

    I've probably read this story a couple dozen times since I read it in 8th grade. It just continually makes me think about life and getting older, and it has a different meaning every time I read it. I've probably read this story a couple dozen times since I read it in 8th grade. It just continually makes me think about life and getting older, and it has a different meaning every time I read it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    It's a decent story which offers the suggestion that the needs of youth will always trump wisdom and experience. It's a decent story which offers the suggestion that the needs of youth will always trump wisdom and experience.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin Uke

    Dr. Heidegger’s seemingly innocent experiment, he restores the youth of several people to explore how they will have changed to have gained young bodies but the wisdom of age. Our obsession with youthfulness and appearance seems only to have increased throughout the twentieth century and into the twenty-first, even as members of the baby boomer generation enter older adulthood in record numbers. Are Americans willing to undergo experimental procedures for the chance to look and feel younger agai Dr. Heidegger’s seemingly innocent experiment, he restores the youth of several people to explore how they will have changed to have gained young bodies but the wisdom of age. Our obsession with youthfulness and appearance seems only to have increased throughout the twentieth century and into the twenty-first, even as members of the baby boomer generation enter older adulthood in record numbers. Are Americans willing to undergo experimental procedures for the chance to look and feel younger again? What can we learn about ourselves by studying a group of characters who were willing, almost two centuries ago, to take that chance? Even if we were to get it back, would those who could afford such a thing deserve such a gift? Or just keep making the same mistakes?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Glen Engel-Cox

    Another morality tale, but a slightly more clever premise: give four old people who were all horrible in their youths and middle age the chance to turn back the years with a drink from the Fountain of Youth, and will they have learned their lesson and decide to do better the second time around? That’s the experiment, and whether the water is an actual elixir or simply a delusional drug isn’t the issue, it’s the reaction by these four and Heidegger’s interpretation of the results. The style is no Another morality tale, but a slightly more clever premise: give four old people who were all horrible in their youths and middle age the chance to turn back the years with a drink from the Fountain of Youth, and will they have learned their lesson and decide to do better the second time around? That’s the experiment, and whether the water is an actual elixir or simply a delusional drug isn’t the issue, it’s the reaction by these four and Heidegger’s interpretation of the results. The style is not the fashion of today, but the story is well done and amusing.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sunreeta Bhattacharya

    The language and style of story telling takes me back to my school days because that's when I used to enjoy reading this kind of Victorian English: the style is quite like the rose in the story that once bloomed alright, but now appears old and much like a skeleton. A dedicated reader will of course cruise past the slightly difficult tone, because certain lines and the theme play out so well to make it a memorable short story. The language and style of story telling takes me back to my school days because that's when I used to enjoy reading this kind of Victorian English: the style is quite like the rose in the story that once bloomed alright, but now appears old and much like a skeleton. A dedicated reader will of course cruise past the slightly difficult tone, because certain lines and the theme play out so well to make it a memorable short story.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    A story of aged people who haven't aged all that well, and weren't so great to begin with. They get a unique opportunity. The description of the lab is wonderful. The descriptions of the 'old friends' and their antics is also nicely done. A story of aged people who haven't aged all that well, and weren't so great to begin with. They get a unique opportunity. The description of the lab is wonderful. The descriptions of the 'old friends' and their antics is also nicely done.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Marshall Wayne Lee

    Frist time read for me. Hawthorne's writing can read slowly, and this is no exception. He enjoys description and symbols. I found the story to be rich and worth a few reads. Frist time read for me. Hawthorne's writing can read slowly, and this is no exception. He enjoys description and symbols. I found the story to be rich and worth a few reads.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    Great!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Anne

    This one was a trip. As read by Public Domain Theater

  29. 5 out of 5

    juveria

    Read for school!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Arya

    Creepy and funny—a very clever narrator.

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