counter A Shot at Normal - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

A Shot at Normal

Availability: Ready to download

Dr. Villapando told me to get a good attorney. He wasn't serious. But I am. I'm going to sue my parents. Juniper Jade's parents are hippies. They didn’t attend the first Woodstock, but they were there for the second one. The Jade family lives an all-organic homeschool lifestyle that means no plastics, no cell phones, and no vaccines. It isn’t exactly normal, but it’s the on Dr. Villapando told me to get a good attorney. He wasn't serious. But I am. I'm going to sue my parents. Juniper Jade's parents are hippies. They didn’t attend the first Woodstock, but they were there for the second one. The Jade family lives an all-organic homeschool lifestyle that means no plastics, no cell phones, and no vaccines. It isn’t exactly normal, but it’s the only thing Juniper has ever known. She doesn’t agree with her parents on everything, but she knows that to be in this family, you've got to stick to the rules. That is, until the unthinkable happens. Juniper contracts the measles and unknowingly passes the disease along, with tragic consequences. She is shell-shocked. Juniper knows she is responsible and feels simultaneously helpless and furious at her parents, and herself. Now, with the help of Nico, the boy who works at the library and loves movies and may just be more than a friend, Juniper comes to a decision: she is going to get vaccinated. Her parents refuse so Juniper arms herself with a lawyer and prepares for battle. But is waging war for her autonomy worth losing her family? How much is Juniper willing to risk for a shot at normal? Marisa Reichardt's A Shot at Normal is a powerful and timely novel about justice, agency, family, and taking your shot, even when it seems impossible.


Compare

Dr. Villapando told me to get a good attorney. He wasn't serious. But I am. I'm going to sue my parents. Juniper Jade's parents are hippies. They didn’t attend the first Woodstock, but they were there for the second one. The Jade family lives an all-organic homeschool lifestyle that means no plastics, no cell phones, and no vaccines. It isn’t exactly normal, but it’s the on Dr. Villapando told me to get a good attorney. He wasn't serious. But I am. I'm going to sue my parents. Juniper Jade's parents are hippies. They didn’t attend the first Woodstock, but they were there for the second one. The Jade family lives an all-organic homeschool lifestyle that means no plastics, no cell phones, and no vaccines. It isn’t exactly normal, but it’s the only thing Juniper has ever known. She doesn’t agree with her parents on everything, but she knows that to be in this family, you've got to stick to the rules. That is, until the unthinkable happens. Juniper contracts the measles and unknowingly passes the disease along, with tragic consequences. She is shell-shocked. Juniper knows she is responsible and feels simultaneously helpless and furious at her parents, and herself. Now, with the help of Nico, the boy who works at the library and loves movies and may just be more than a friend, Juniper comes to a decision: she is going to get vaccinated. Her parents refuse so Juniper arms herself with a lawyer and prepares for battle. But is waging war for her autonomy worth losing her family? How much is Juniper willing to risk for a shot at normal? Marisa Reichardt's A Shot at Normal is a powerful and timely novel about justice, agency, family, and taking your shot, even when it seems impossible.

30 review for A Shot at Normal

  1. 5 out of 5

    jessica

    this book reminded me of ‘my sisters keeper’ in a lot of ways. but instead of organ/tissue harvesting, its the right to vaccinations. which is so relevant nowadays. i appreciate how juniper is written. i like how invested she is making a change and doesnt take her decisions lightly. she does research, stays well-informed, so that she can make educated choices. i also like how her choosing to get vaccinated and loving her parents arent mutually exclusive things. and i really like how things ended this book reminded me of ‘my sisters keeper’ in a lot of ways. but instead of organ/tissue harvesting, its the right to vaccinations. which is so relevant nowadays. i appreciate how juniper is written. i like how invested she is making a change and doesnt take her decisions lightly. she does research, stays well-informed, so that she can make educated choices. i also like how her choosing to get vaccinated and loving her parents arent mutually exclusive things. and i really like how things ended for her journey for body autonomy. my only critique would be how junipers parents are portrayed. they are a stereotype and one that could potentially be harmful. i have met anti-vaxxers who are not hippie vegan anti-public schoolers. i feel like these views are meant to show the parents in a somewhat backwards light, and i wasnt really a fan. but overall, this is a very topical and important story which will lead to some great discussion among teens. ↠ 3.5 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eva B.

    3.5 This is a hard book to review because this is a Very Important Book, especially given, uh, our current circumstances. I have a feeling that in the near future, the right for children to decide their right to be vaccinated with end up becoming a big thing. That being said, parts of this book just felt cartoonish; namely (view spoiler)[ someone spraypainting a red A and then ANTIVAXXER onto Juniper's home and yard right after she'd been discussing The Crucible with a friend (hide spoiler)] 3.5 This is a hard book to review because this is a Very Important Book, especially given, uh, our current circumstances. I have a feeling that in the near future, the right for children to decide their right to be vaccinated with end up becoming a big thing. That being said, parts of this book just felt cartoonish; namely (view spoiler)[ someone spraypainting a red A and then ANTIVAXXER onto Juniper's home and yard right after she'd been discussing The Crucible with a friend (hide spoiler)] or just...literally everything about the parents. Also, I feel a bit misled. I was expecting this to focus more heavily on Juniper's quest to sue her parents, but it often felt like that took a backseat to the instalove-y romance and Juniper's general desire to live a "normal life". I liked both Juniper and Nico, and though the romance was instalove-y, it was cute enough. They were pretty much the only characters I liked, though. I loathed the parents, Mary, and even Poppy, and I really couldn't feel too bad for the parents when their own asinine decision got their family ostracized. Like I don't support the (view spoiler)[ vandalism or the stalker blog (hide spoiler)] , but people have a right not to associate with you if your actions led to the death of a baby and your kids could potentially give others fatal diseases. I also felt like the parents just stayed the same cartoonish caricatures of hippies throughout the book, and while people like this do exist, it just felt...difficult to believe? I'm unfortunately aware of the existence of anti-vaxxers like them but there were times where I put the book down and went "this isn't satire, right?". It also felt like they didn't change at all by the end, and that no one but Juniper had any sort of arc. Anyways, this was still a solid book and I'd recommend it, but it requires some suspension of disbelief.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Works a lot better as a novel for a YA audience than as one read by an adult who likes YA. I wanted to read this based on the back cover copy, where a teenager with new age, organic, hippie parents catches measles and goes on a battle for medical emancipation. There's not much legal battle here, it focuses much more on her meeting a boy and forming a relationship with him and friendships amongst a peer group, while also exploring the tension of what Juniper wants for herself versus what her pare Works a lot better as a novel for a YA audience than as one read by an adult who likes YA. I wanted to read this based on the back cover copy, where a teenager with new age, organic, hippie parents catches measles and goes on a battle for medical emancipation. There's not much legal battle here, it focuses much more on her meeting a boy and forming a relationship with him and friendships amongst a peer group, while also exploring the tension of what Juniper wants for herself versus what her parents want for her. All great YA novel stuff. For me, the first hurdle is right on the back of the book, that she catches measles and there are disastrous consequences. (view spoiler)[ So there is an infant death pretty quickly in the book, and once I realized it was the baby, like the moment the baby was introduced, I read quickly through that because I am just not emotionally set for that. (hide spoiler)] Then, I truly have an issue with how the parents were portrayed. They are extremely sympathetic. Like, even for parents in a YA book, where often reasonable parenting is treated as draconian. In some circumstances, it would be considered skillful for an author to make us sympathize with characters who are villains, but here it feels sort of irresponsible? Sadly, in the US today there are more and more people who agree with the Jade's viewpoints and this "both sides" stuff is dangerous. The criticism of Juniper's parents is pretty much confined to being stubborn and not listening to their kids. Not even a discussion of how they want the kids to "think for themselves" and then throw tantrums as soon as Juniper has differing opinions than them. Criticizing mob mentality, especially against children, is important, but this is a YA novel that could reach so many suburban children whose parents sell MLM essential oils and diffuse in a dangerous way around pets and babies, who put oils directly on skin without a carrier oil, and even ingest them (because MLM oils are "so pure!" they think this is safe, despite the medical evidence otherwise) and they really could use something that says parents are not infallible and them doing things because they love you and want to protect you doesn't make them automatically right. Nico's peanut allergy and bee sting allergy are slightly interesting because Juniper recognizes how wonderful the medical technology of an epipen is, but I wonder what the story would look like if there was a cancer survivor in the film club, so she couldn't be welcomed in as easily? Or someone who had a rare vaccine reaction and couldn't be up to date and truly needed herd immunity to protect them? The book ends pretty abruptly, with the court decision, and the promise that there will be ramifications in Juniper's relationships, but then the consequences don't get to be explored. The toddler-like tantrums of her parents ignoring her and not speaking to her and not setting a place at the dinner table for her is straight up emotional abuse and I found it difficult for the book to not have a hard stance that this is wrong, even if it is mostly from Juniper's point of view. This all could make for some great discussion in a teen book group, but I'm wary of a teen reading it on their own without someone to discuss it critically with.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Flynn

    Marisa Reinhardt does it again. A brilliant, sharp, evocative story of a girl fighting for control over her body. Complex and emotionally nuanced, just like Marisa's other work. So timely and relevant and an absolute must-read. Marisa Reinhardt does it again. A brilliant, sharp, evocative story of a girl fighting for control over her body. Complex and emotionally nuanced, just like Marisa's other work. So timely and relevant and an absolute must-read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps

    5 VACCINATED STARS When Juniper June contracts measles because her hippy parents are anti vaxxers, she decides to take them to court for medical emancipation. A SHOT AT NORMAL is about as perfect a book as Marisa Reinhardt could have written. Juniper longs to be a normal teenager, to go to the high school with other kids, have a cell phone and drink Starbucks. Her parents prefer their hippy ways. Juniper’s parents are among the worst and most realistically bad parents I’ve ever read. They felt aut 5 VACCINATED STARS When Juniper June contracts measles because her hippy parents are anti vaxxers, she decides to take them to court for medical emancipation. A SHOT AT NORMAL is about as perfect a book as Marisa Reinhardt could have written. Juniper longs to be a normal teenager, to go to the high school with other kids, have a cell phone and drink Starbucks. Her parents prefer their hippy ways. Juniper’s parents are among the worst and most realistically bad parents I’ve ever read. They felt authentic and realistic. I wanted to jump through my kindle screen and throttle them. Juniper was such a well-rounded character. She doesn’t plan on being a hero, but measles makes her realize she has responsibility not just to herself, but also to her community. Her parents weren’t traditional villains, they made their decisions out of what they considered love, but those decisions were also selfish, controlling and uneducated. I would love to see a sequel to find out Juniper’s next steps in life and how her family accepted or didn’t accept her. Reinhardt couldn’t have predicted the book she wrote would be so applicable to the days of COVID and vaccinations. Today news reported a preacher claimed the COVID vaccine turns people gay (insert eye roll icon). I recommend this to everyone.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    A SHOT AT NORMAL is a heartbreaking, page-turning, important novel I stayed up all night to finish. Marisa Reichardt delivers Juniper Jade’s fight to get vaccinated against her parents’ with compelling, breathtaking prose.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gina Adams

    Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for an early copy! I really like Marisa Reichardt’s writing style - it’s so fast-paced and to the point. A Shot at Normal is a story with a pretty to-the-point kinda plot - Juniper and her siblings have super organic, homeschool, and essential oil type parents who did not vaccinate them. Juniper contracts the measles at 16, with pretty devastating results. After the ordeal, Juniper decides she wants her vaccinations, but everyone keeps saying she has to wait Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for an early copy! I really like Marisa Reichardt’s writing style - it’s so fast-paced and to the point. A Shot at Normal is a story with a pretty to-the-point kinda plot - Juniper and her siblings have super organic, homeschool, and essential oil type parents who did not vaccinate them. Juniper contracts the measles at 16, with pretty devastating results. After the ordeal, Juniper decides she wants her vaccinations, but everyone keeps saying she has to wait until she’s 18. But does she? She begins pursuing a way to fight for her vaccinations in court. (Can I mention I love this title? It’s a little cheesy but it fits the story SO well.) The story is definitely interesting and opens me up to the kind of thing I would never have had to worry about at 16. As someone who is probably just about as close in age to Juniper’s parents as to Juniper herself, I just wanted to choke her parents out. They honestly are everything I hate in adults - unwilling to listen to children - especially their own, selfish, conspiracy theorists, and just bullheaded as hell. But the thing is, they’re still the people that raised Juniper. So she sees all that, but also knows the sides of them that make them lovable, because they’re her family. And I think that really thin line between disagreeing with your parents on something so colossal but still loving them as family was really portrayed well. The pacing and stakes were just a little weird in this story. Something bad happened when Juniper had the measles, and it somehow was covered too frequently but also not deeply enough at any point. The townsfolk also begin to shun and harass the family as their anti-vaxxer stance comes to light, and there’s never much follow-up on that. Did it just stop? It seems tough to live in a small town and that kind of thing just go away. There’s a romance in this story that is really sweet, but also I’m not sure that it really fit in the story. I get that Juniper was making her own way in the world and branching out but it just seemed like a conveniently high amount of change at once. She actually seemed to have plenty of conviction on the subject before she had any outside support. Nico’s opinions on the whole anti-vax thing were a little muddy at times which was sorta weird. He’s a really supportive and kind love interest, though, even if we probably could have done without him. I think teens will like this quick and relatively simple story, especially because it’s about knowing what’s best for yourself even if your parents don’t agree. Not in the typically rebellious way, but the thinking-of-your-future kind of way. Sort of like when kids in novels tell their parents they want a different college major. But Juniper just didn’t want to get rubella. Ya know?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    2 Stars Note: I was provided with a free ARC by the publisher through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions here are my own. Though this is the best "topic" book I have reviewed in 2021 so far, it still falls short quite short of my hopes. This book unfortunately falls into the trap that many books revolving around a controversial topic do: it gets too involved in its agenda. And, amazingly, this book manages to swerve away from taking any sort of strong stance at the same time, 2 Stars Note: I was provided with a free ARC by the publisher through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions here are my own. Though this is the best "topic" book I have reviewed in 2021 so far, it still falls short quite short of my hopes. This book unfortunately falls into the trap that many books revolving around a controversial topic do: it gets too involved in its agenda. And, amazingly, this book manages to swerve away from taking any sort of strong stance at the same time, which is boggling to me. A full review of what went just about right and what else failed to meet the mark will be published in February 2021 on my blog. LINK: https://gatewaybookreviews.blogspot.c...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Netgalley **Slight spoiler** Juniper's parents have an alternative lifestyle that involves organic food, selling herbs at the local farmers' market, and homeschooling. Before moving to Playa Bonita, Juniper was fine with it, because she had a group of friends and wasn't so isolated. Now, with the high school right across the street, she's tired of her parents convictions interfering with her life. She can't go to school because she hasn't been vaccinated, and they won't even let E ARC provided by Netgalley **Slight spoiler** Juniper's parents have an alternative lifestyle that involves organic food, selling herbs at the local farmers' market, and homeschooling. Before moving to Playa Bonita, Juniper was fine with it, because she had a group of friends and wasn't so isolated. Now, with the high school right across the street, she's tired of her parents convictions interfering with her life. She can't go to school because she hasn't been vaccinated, and they won't even let her get a job at a mainstream coffee shop where she might actually meet some people. When Juniper gets ill with a fever, her mother thinks it is just flu, but as she worsens and ends up in the hospital, it turns out to be the measles. Since she had been at the farmers' market with her mother when she was exhibiting symptoms, she has seen lots of people. Unfortunately, this leads to a tragic death, and Juniper decides she needs to be vaccinated. A local walk in clinic refuses, and advises her to get a lawyer. Researching at the local library, Juniper meets Nico. The two take to each other, and he invites her to go to his school's film club with him. This is a pleasant distraction at a time of growing tensions between her and her parents. Her parents acknowledge that the local death is bad, but staunchly maintain that they have to do the best for their own children, even though Juniper's siblings have also become ill. Eventually, Juniper's identity becomes known in the small community, and the family is on the receiving end of threats and vandalism. All the while, her relationship with Nico progresses in a charming way, with him showing her his geeky treehouse, asking her to a school dance, and going hiking, which leads to an unfortunate incident where he is stung by a bee. Since he is very allergic, he ends up in the hospital but is fine. Juniper has confided in Nico about her parents and vaccinations, and his mother has a friend who is a lawyer who offers to help. Juniper loves her family, and usually is okay with their lifestyle, so she doesn't want to be emancipated. She just wants to be able to control her health. Will Juniper be able to win her case, and how will her parents react? Strengths: I've had an increasing number of readers looking for high school romances, and I adored this one. The portrayal of an alternative lifestyle was fun, and Juniper's reaction to being homeschooled in the kitchen was perfect. The progress of her measles was realistic, and the tragedy fell within the bounds of possibility. The way she dealt with it also seemed realistic. Having the younger brother and sister was a good device, since they didn't struggle with "being normal" the way Juniper did. Nico is a great guy, and it's sweet how he invites Juniper into his geekdom. They get along so well, and there is no huge misunderstanding that puts them at odds for most of the book. I love the portrayal of his peanut and bee allergy-- it was a bit odd that he didn't show Juniper how to use his EpiPen right away. I've been at lunch with a total stranger (Hi, Matthew Winner!) who put his EpiPen on the table and asked the whole group if we knew what to do if he had a reaction! The grandparents are fantastic as well. I've been struggling to find motivation to read, but I finished this one right away. I'll have to investigate other titles by this author! Weaknesses: There is one f-bomb, but it occurs when Nico is stung by a bee, and only once. This falls within my parameters of acceptable profanity for middle grade! The parents are absolutely horrible, but this also makes sense given the teen protagonist. I doubt that Juniper could have attended school events without permission slips being involved, and the legal events probably would have taken longer, but middle grade readers won't care too much. What I really think: I feel like I should really break down all of the science about vaccines more carefully with this book, but honestly-- I just enjoyed it. (Some other reviewers on Goodreads did a great job, even mentioning some problems with the oils the mother sells being problematic.) Juniper and Nico were very sweet, Juniper's reaction to her parents in her teen years was very realistic, and I just appreciated that it was very clear that Vaccines Are Good and not getting vaccines is bad for society. Some people will not like this stance, and we are not allowed to call them idiots. I'm definitely purchasing.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jenny4moore

    An absolute must-read for 2021. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has made us not only keenly aware of our own and family members’ sniffles and coughs, but it has also tasked us with greater responsibility for protecting the health of others, including strangers on the streets and in grocery stores. The emerging availability of vaccines represents a new and hopeful chapter in our shared saga, but how we respond to these fast-tracked immunizations, as well as the challenge of balancing our own health An absolute must-read for 2021. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has made us not only keenly aware of our own and family members’ sniffles and coughs, but it has also tasked us with greater responsibility for protecting the health of others, including strangers on the streets and in grocery stores. The emerging availability of vaccines represents a new and hopeful chapter in our shared saga, but how we respond to these fast-tracked immunizations, as well as the challenge of balancing our own health and rights with the health and rights of others, depends on our unique circumstances and the impact the virus has had on us and our loved ones. Into these “unprecedented times” drops my CHS classmate Marisa Reichardt’s eerily prescient third novel, A Shot at Normal, releasing on February 16. Reichardt chronicles how individual choices impact public health through teen protagonist Juniper Jade, who launches a legal fight against her neo-hippie, anti-vaccinationist parents for her right to access immunizations after she contracts a serious case of the measles and unwittingly spreads it. In 2018 and 2019, when she first conceived the idea and wrote her next book, Reichardt could not imagine just how relevant the themes and conflicts faced by Juniper, her family, and her community would be. But she intuitively captures the skepticism, fear, vulnerability, loss, anger, and guilt so many of us have felt and expressed during this time of heightened powerlessness. Where this book hits a particular and timeless sweet spot is in its poignant and empathetic exploration of the differences in how risk is perceived, calculated, weighed, and then responded to among members of one family.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Timely and well researched. Reviewed at Reading Rants: http://www.readingrants.org/2021/03/2... Timely and well researched. Reviewed at Reading Rants: http://www.readingrants.org/2021/03/2...

  12. 5 out of 5

    S.M. Parker

    I had the opportunity to read this one early and it is All That. Any book that deals with a girl fighting for control over her body has my vote, and I couldn't stop rooting for Juniper. Plus, there's swoon. I had the opportunity to read this one early and it is All That. Any book that deals with a girl fighting for control over her body has my vote, and I couldn't stop rooting for Juniper. Plus, there's swoon.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Marci Curtis

    Okay, so everyone knows I'm a huge Marisa Reinhardt fan. Her stories are always the perfect mix of brilliant, thought-provoking, and relevant. This one COMPLETELY captured my heart. Timely and gorgeously written (HELLO, swoon!), A Shot at Normal is an absolute must-read! Okay, so everyone knows I'm a huge Marisa Reinhardt fan. Her stories are always the perfect mix of brilliant, thought-provoking, and relevant. This one COMPLETELY captured my heart. Timely and gorgeously written (HELLO, swoon!), A Shot at Normal is an absolute must-read!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I was really interested in this one from the time it was announced. I had no idea that I would be in the midst of a global pandemic when I got to read it, or that we'd be in the middle of a major vaccine....issue. So, circumstances considered, this is a really interesting book to pick up right now. There's a lot of back and forth about vaccines and the pros and cons. The public reaction to not being vaccinated was uh....really interesting to me, in light of current events. All that said, this was I was really interested in this one from the time it was announced. I had no idea that I would be in the midst of a global pandemic when I got to read it, or that we'd be in the middle of a major vaccine....issue. So, circumstances considered, this is a really interesting book to pick up right now. There's a lot of back and forth about vaccines and the pros and cons. The public reaction to not being vaccinated was uh....really interesting to me, in light of current events. All that said, this was a quick read - I flew through it in a day when I couldn't really sit up or get out of bed much. There's a lot of telling, which gets a little annoying, but not enough to make me not want to read it. The ending's a little anticlimactic and I think it'll be divisive. Overall, a pretty average book for me, but reading it when I'm literally in between doses of a controversial vaccine probably had me more invested than I would've been otherwise.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Pam Page

    Marisa Reichardt presents a topic that will create a lot of conversation but it is also so timely with the COVID vaccine rolling out. We meet Juniper, a 16 year old whose parents have chosen not to vaccinate their children. But what happens when a child becomes a teen? A very thought-provoking look at anti-vaxers and one that generated good discussion in groups where I shared this book!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Caitie

    This plot was somewhat interesting, but it was executed super poorly. All the characters were incredibly one dimensional and were like stereotypes. Juniper’s parents were like hippies, or the ideal of what a hippie would be. I have to believe that many other people in that situation would behave, most people do in fact get their children vaccinated. They just kept repeating their talking points (vaccines have bad things in them, they cause more problems, etc), because we the readers had the he This plot was somewhat interesting, but it was executed super poorly. All the characters were incredibly one dimensional and were like stereotypes. Juniper’s parents were like hippies, or the ideal of what a hippie would be. I have to believe that many other people in that situation would behave, most people do in fact get their children vaccinated. They just kept repeating their talking points (vaccines have bad things in them, they cause more problems, etc), because we the readers had the hear about it again and again. I was just bored by their naivety. Also, I feel like Juniper’s court case was super rushed, with no real fallout. I wanted some more consequences for their actions.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Cresse

    A controversial topic/story written well. All sides are portrayed respectfully through endearing characters. A timely and recommended read for 7th grade and up.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Elise

    I've known families like Juniper's, and I loved how this push and pull between Juniper and her family was handled with such respect and grace. Juniper just wants to be a normal teenager-someone who learns what they like and don't like, figures out what's important and what isn't, makes mistakes and scores huge triumphs, and falls in love along the way. Juniper stole my heart. I've known families like Juniper's, and I loved how this push and pull between Juniper and her family was handled with such respect and grace. Juniper just wants to be a normal teenager-someone who learns what they like and don't like, figures out what's important and what isn't, makes mistakes and scores huge triumphs, and falls in love along the way. Juniper stole my heart.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brianna Bourne

    Marisa Reichardt is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors. She tackles unusual and deeply emotional situations with a grounded, realistic subtlety that reads so easily. This story in particular - Juniper Jade’s story about standing up to parents who won’t let her get vaccinated even after a horrific tragedy strikes - is SO, so timely. The plot is expertly executed, and tension was high throughout and kept me hooked. This isn’t an in-your-face “lesson” book - it’s truly an emotional, charac Marisa Reichardt is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors. She tackles unusual and deeply emotional situations with a grounded, realistic subtlety that reads so easily. This story in particular - Juniper Jade’s story about standing up to parents who won’t let her get vaccinated even after a horrific tragedy strikes - is SO, so timely. The plot is expertly executed, and tension was high throughout and kept me hooked. This isn’t an in-your-face “lesson” book - it’s truly an emotional, character-driven story. No soapboxes here, just real feelings, and real consequences. I'm going to give this one to every teenager I know, because I'm hoping it will spark open, honest conversations, and it just might change the world.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Carpenter

    I was going to wait and write this review Monday morning, but I literally could not wait to share this book with people. A Shot at Normal by Marisa Reichardt is one of my new favorite books. It is so poignant during this uncertain time in our lives. This book does not come out until February of 2021 and I cannot wait- like publishers, get this out AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. It is that good- lighthearted, romantic, and important to understanding each other during a time like COVID-19. Juniper James has I was going to wait and write this review Monday morning, but I literally could not wait to share this book with people. A Shot at Normal by Marisa Reichardt is one of my new favorite books. It is so poignant during this uncertain time in our lives. This book does not come out until February of 2021 and I cannot wait- like publishers, get this out AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. It is that good- lighthearted, romantic, and important to understanding each other during a time like COVID-19. Juniper James has always known she was different and just wanted to be normal. The problem was that she was born to some "hippies" who went to the 'wannabe Woodstock'. Her parents have very important moral convictions- no sugar, all organic, reuse, recycle, life and experience is the best educator. So as a sixteen year old you would expect some teenage rebellion from Juniper, but it is focused on the fact that her parents are anti-vaxxers. She and her siblings are not vaccinated. After Juniper and her siblings get sick with the Measles and Juniper ends up in the hospital, she realizes how dire her situation is. There are a lot of key factors in this- similar to My Sisters Keeper- she is going to have to go through the legal system to get rights that should automatically be hers in the first place. She struggles with family issues as her parents do not listen to her very reasonable arguments because they do not align with their views. This story is very timely- focusing on how vaccines protect her, but more importantly protect others who are more at risk. I loved Juniper, Nico (her love interest who always supports her needs), and her family. The ending is open enough that Marisa could even follow up with a sequel, if she wanted or there was enough demand for it. There will definitely be demand for this book!. A Shot at Normal by Marisa Reichardt is available February 2021. I know it will be in my library as son as I can get a physical copy. http://kaitlynrcarpenter.weebly.com/b...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Wood

    "I'd never thought about it before because I'd never gotten sick. But after this, if it were up to me, I'd choose the shot. Why can't it be up to me?" Juniper Jade knows her family is weird. Her parents went to Woodstock '94 (or as she calls it, Wannabe Woodstock, the one with Green Day, not Jimi Hendrix). They use organic everything and homemade deodorant. Juniper and her siblings attend homeschool in the kitchen, taught by their dad. Now that she's 16 and in their new home in Playa Bonita, some "I'd never thought about it before because I'd never gotten sick. But after this, if it were up to me, I'd choose the shot. Why can't it be up to me?" Juniper Jade knows her family is weird. Her parents went to Woodstock '94 (or as she calls it, Wannabe Woodstock, the one with Green Day, not Jimi Hendrix). They use organic everything and homemade deodorant. Juniper and her siblings attend homeschool in the kitchen, taught by their dad. Now that she's 16 and in their new home in Playa Bonita, some of her family's choices are starting to grate. Juniper wants a normal teen life. She wants to attend high school across the street, eating lunch in the cafeteria. She wants to get a job that isn't helping her mom sell herbs and essential oils on Mondays. Her parents aren't giving; it will continue to be kitchen school and the farmers market for Juniper. Then one afternoon after returning from the market booth, Juniper starts to feel sick. Fever, aches, lethargy, a cough, and then a few days later - the rash. Her parents finally admit they don't know what she has and take her to the urgent care. The doctor takes one look and sends them away; he can't have everyone in the clinic exposed to the measles. That's another thing about the Jade family - they're unvaccinated. Juniper has to be quarantined in the hospital with a 103.6 degree fever and pneumonia, and after her release, their whole family has to self-quarantine at home for 21 days. Maybe she got the virus on the train after visiting her grandparents, but however it started, the effects don't stop with Juniper's illness. Others are infected. Rumors spread around Playa Bonita about the measles and where it started. And Juniper starts to look into how she can be vaccinated against other diseases so this can't happen again - and what her options are as she opposes her parents on the issue. What a unique storyline - I was interested as soon as I heard the synopsis. I don't know of (and couldn't find after some light investigation) any other books about teens looking to get vaccinated against their parents wishes. I'd be interested to know of real-life examples of children of anti-vaxxers being immunized and how their minds were changed from their parents' beliefs, as well as what their path looked like compared to Juniper's. Some bits struck me as unrealistic. Reactions from a few people seemed more theatrical than I would expect, and two lines of dialogue really stuck out to me - "Well, I'm concerned about my child and my child only." (Juniper's mom to a doctor asking why she wasn't vaccinated) and "I think I'm smarter than my parents." (Juniper to a doctor, asking to receive vaccines). I think both of these lines get at the emotions/thought processes of the characters, but neither really seem like something someone would actually say out loud. As I write this, I'm thinking it might have been nice to list some reputable resources at the back of the book for those interested in learning more about vaccinations. The book several times mentions the link with autism has been thoroughly debunked, etc., but if someone reading this book wants to know more, it would be a good idea to point them in the right direction. I would include in such a list MedlinePlus (where I start with all consumer health questions), teenshealth.org (run by Nemours for a teen audience), and vaccines.gov. Readers interested in this topic might also enjoy On Immunity: An Inoculation by Eula Biss. I'm hard-pressed to name another YA novel that hits the same notes. As I was looking over other books I've read in the recent past, I can make a loose connection with Brittney Morris' Slay, as both books feature a teen girl with initiative, going after what she needs, but that's a real wobbly rec. Thank you to Macmillan and NetGalley for the eARC. A Shot at Normal will be published February 16 2021.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Starr ❇✌❇

    I received an ARC from Edelweiss TW: infant death 3.3 Juniper Jade never cared much more about her parents' anti-vaxxer beliefs than their beliefs about home schooling, living fully organic, and not watching TV- which is to say, she didn't always agree completely, but it wasn't worth fighting over. That is, until her parents' decision not to get her vaccinated causes the death of a 6 week old baby. Now Juniper's desperation to get vaccinated against her family's will, the town's retaliation aga I received an ARC from Edelweiss TW: infant death 3.3 Juniper Jade never cared much more about her parents' anti-vaxxer beliefs than their beliefs about home schooling, living fully organic, and not watching TV- which is to say, she didn't always agree completely, but it wasn't worth fighting over. That is, until her parents' decision not to get her vaccinated causes the death of a 6 week old baby. Now Juniper's desperation to get vaccinated against her family's will, the town's retaliation against them, and her growing connections to the world outside her family is threatening to rip them apart. This is an important topic- anti-vaxxers are something I haven't seen explored in YA yet, and especially not from the point of view of someone whose bodily autonomy is subject to their parent's anti-vaccination stance. I honestly wanted to liked this book a lot more for that alone. The concept is good, definitely. In some ways it isn't all that new- girl discovers a world outside of how she was raised, immediately finds a love interest, makes decisions about who she wants to be. But the social justice aspect to it adds something and makes the whole thing weightier. I especially like that Juniper's family, including her parents, aren't painted as awful over all. There are good things to how she was raised, and being in her family is not a bad thing. However, there are glaring problems here that make things complicated. This isn't a "you're bad, I'm good" argument over all, it's more nuanced. Though I wish Juniper's social justice ideas had come out stronger in the beginning, instead of feeling more like they were newly discovered (since we're more told about her issues and arguments than shown, excluding the argument about public school), I do like the idea of her. She has a sort of flat, sarcastic sense of humor without being mean, she's got that romanticization of regular things that comes from being held apart from them. And, of course, she does absolutely go after what she wants. Mostly, though, I feel confused about what this book is supposed to be doing. First off, from the synopsis promoting the book I thought this was going to be a far more legal story, but it really isn't. It's much more about Juniper's internal decisions and the family, so more down to earth and low. With that realized, I figured the point of this story would be one of two things (or maybe even both if you're lucky)- education, or, at the very least, catharsis. However, you really don't get much of either. There's a little education here- there has to be, for the story to succeed at all- but it's regulated to Juniper's legal hurdles and the arguments her parents' have. There isn't much brought up that isn't just Juniper saying "no!" when her parents' say something wrong- not alternative answers, facts that prove Juniper right, not even a better look at the whole autism angle, which I was dying for. As for catharsis, this book gets a bit over the top by the halfway point, so I thought it was gearing up for either an "everyone clapped" ending, which could have been a feel good conclusion at least, or a dramatic explosion of Juniper's. But instead of ever having Juniper get the chance to fully, angrily speak her mind and prove herself, the book ends with an uncertain, far more bitter than sweet, no-one-wins feeling. Juniper spends 95% of the book just questioning if things are worth it, and the answer the whole thing is built up to is a shrug. I just really don't get the point- it's such a lukewarm ending it makes me wish I hadn't read the story, because all I feel is unsatisfied. I think this is a topic that should be written about, and I'm glad it's being explored, but there isn't much unique here and it never really goes anywhere.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Madison

    A Shot At Normal is a really intriguing novel and totally thought-provoking. It raises the issue of vaccinations, anti-vaccinations and the teenagers caught in the middle. Set against the backdrop of a loving family and a new and sweet romance, A Shot At Normal is a story about growing up, learning to make tough decisions and standing up for what you believe in. Juniper wants to be normal. She’d give anything to attend high school like normal teens instead of being homeschooled with her younger s A Shot At Normal is a really intriguing novel and totally thought-provoking. It raises the issue of vaccinations, anti-vaccinations and the teenagers caught in the middle. Set against the backdrop of a loving family and a new and sweet romance, A Shot At Normal is a story about growing up, learning to make tough decisions and standing up for what you believe in. Juniper wants to be normal. She’d give anything to attend high school like normal teens instead of being homeschooled with her younger siblings. She’d love to join a school team, make friends or get a job. None of that is possible, as she has never had the required vaccinations. Not that her alternative parents would every let her. When Juniper contracts the measles, she realises the consequences for not being vaccinated are far more serious than not being allowed to attend school and she must decide how far she wants to go to fight for her right to have the immunisation injections. This novel is presented as clearly pro vaccinations. I thought maybe there would be more deliberating and weighing backwards and forwards, but once Juniper learns about the consequences of not being vaccinated, she very firmly becomes pro vaccinations. As a result of her contracting and spreading the measles, Juniper is faced with a whole lot of guilt and grief, as well as the negative response from the towns people. This novel also doesn’t delve too deeply into the arguments for and against. Some are mentioned, others are cited or referred to being debunked, but really this book is about the consequences of the decisions made, rather than focusing on the decision making and research itself. It is also about Juniper standing up for what she believes in. It is a huge risk for her to take on her parents. As she learns, she stands to lose everyone she loves and life as she knows it, yet she believes the benefits far outweigh these risks. The ending is clear in some ways but also left a little open. What will happen to Juniper in the future? Did her relationship with her parents survive? The reader is only given hints. It makes it the perfect topic for discussion - do you think she made the right decision? Do you think she thinks she made the right decision? Another excellent decision made by the author was to contrast the vaccination decisions and consequences against a really beautiful and loving family. Juniper may not agree with her parents, but she loves them. And she agrees with them on other issues. This makes her decision to sue them so much harder and more complicated. It also raises another great discussion point - should she have waited until she was older or was it right for her to take on her parents? There is a sweet romance story that sits in the background of the book, but what I really loved was the focus on Juniper learning to use her voice and stand up for her rights. This compelling book was easy to read and easy to thoroughly enjoy. It would make for a perfect book club title and provoke much discussion, especially given the current climate around immunisation and vaccines. The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own. Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library

  24. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I received a free e-ARC of A Shot At Normal thanks to NetGalley and Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR) in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed are solely my own. The synopsis for this book hooked me the very first time I read it. This book is very timely and poignant. The subject matter of the book, to vaccinate or not vaccinate, is considered controversial, but I think if it’s executed well, it can make for good discussion and thought. As a mom, I read this with a different perspect I received a free e-ARC of A Shot At Normal thanks to NetGalley and Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR) in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed are solely my own. The synopsis for this book hooked me the very first time I read it. This book is very timely and poignant. The subject matter of the book, to vaccinate or not vaccinate, is considered controversial, but I think if it’s executed well, it can make for good discussion and thought. As a mom, I read this with a different perspective because I was able to think about myself in Juniper’s position, as well as her parents’s position. Because of this, I think this personal experience made the reading experience more unique. A Shot at Normal: My Take I liked how Reichardt showed the internal struggle that Juniper was dealing with. We know how badly Juniper feels about the measles and the outcome of that, and her vehemence on wanting to be vaccinated. But we also see her grappling with the possible consequences of getting vaccinated and what that would mean for her relationship with her family. There were a few things that I thought could have been executed better. The relationships in the book all felt like insta-love. Her relationship with Nico, her friendship with Tess, etc. They met Juniper and instantly they were best friends or perfect for each other. It just didn’t feel authentic for me. I also wish the behavior of Juniper’s parents was discussed. They ignored Juniper when they found out she was petitioning them for vaccine rights. I just wish that the behavior had been discussed with perhaps Nico’s mom or Mimi or someone. It was unhealthy. One aspect of the book that was challenging and I think could potentially be problematic for younger readers (I’m an adult reading YA) was that the argument Juniper’s parents made against vaccines evoked too much sympathy and it did make you feel like maybe it wasn’t so bad. Overall this was an interesting read. I enjoy reading about controversial subjects and I got that with A Shot At Normal. If you’re looking for a book that touches on the vaccine vs anti-vaccine debate, this is for you! Original Review Posted on The Book Nerd Mom

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chris G.

    Inheriting a family home is a great opportunity for Juniper’s family, but it’s tough to move when you are sixteen. Even though her hippie parents have always homeschooled Juniper and her younger siblings Poppy and Sequoia, the kids miss their old homeschool friends and Juniper wishes she could attend the high school that is across the street from their new house. Juniper has a brief interaction with a month old baby at the outdoor market where she helps her mom sell herbs. Soon after, Juniper com Inheriting a family home is a great opportunity for Juniper’s family, but it’s tough to move when you are sixteen. Even though her hippie parents have always homeschooled Juniper and her younger siblings Poppy and Sequoia, the kids miss their old homeschool friends and Juniper wishes she could attend the high school that is across the street from their new house. Juniper has a brief interaction with a month old baby at the outdoor market where she helps her mom sell herbs. Soon after, Juniper comes down with a fever and breaks out in spots; when her folks take her to Urgent Care, she is diagnosed with measles. Juniper is briefly hospitalized while Poppy and Sequoia are also infected but can recover at home. When Juniper reads in the paper about the death of the month old baby who she touched at the market has died of measles, she is filled with guilt, as well as anger at her parents for refusing to have any of their children vaccinated. As a result, Juniper tries to get her vaccinations but learns that she cannot make that choice for herself until she is eighteen. While researching her options at the library, Juniper meets Nico, who attends the high school across the street; and after a lot of dead ends, it is through Nico that she meets a family friend of his who is a lawyer and who takes Juniper’s case as she sue’s her parents for the right to choose to be vaccinated. Juniper’s family are well drawn, fiercely loving and providing many benefits for their children. Conflict with paternal grandparents over the way their grandkids are being raised is realistic and provides insight into family dynamics. Big questions around what are individual rights and what are our responsibilities around public health are perfectly timed for this pandemic year. EARC from Edelweiss.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Carin

    Juniper Jade has been homeschooled her whole life and she's extra annoyed at the beginning of 11th grade when her family has moved across the street from the local high school. But she couldn't go even if her parents would allow it (they won't) because she doesn't have any vaccinations. Her parents won't allow that either. Her parents are hippies who went to the second Woodstock and make their own shampoo and deodorant. Her mother sells bundles of herbs at the farmer's market and Juniper has no Juniper Jade has been homeschooled her whole life and she's extra annoyed at the beginning of 11th grade when her family has moved across the street from the local high school. But she couldn't go even if her parents would allow it (they won't) because she doesn't have any vaccinations. Her parents won't allow that either. Her parents are hippies who went to the second Woodstock and make their own shampoo and deodorant. Her mother sells bundles of herbs at the farmer's market and Juniper has no hope of having a normal teenage experience. Everything she's read and heard about--proms, football games, even cafeterias--remains tantalizingly out of reach. One day after working with her mom at the farmer's market, she feels sick. It turns out she has the measles. It's very bad and she ends up at the hospital with pneumonia. Her younger siblings get it as well but they don't have it quite as bad. And it seems like things are getting back to normal as she is recovered and makes her way to the library. There, she finds out someone else also died of the measles--an infant who she saw at the farmer's market and whose fingers she disentangled from her hair. Suddenly Juniper knows--she killed that baby. Or, well, her parents' decision to not vaccinate her did. And now she wants to get her vaccinations. But in California, that means she'd have to sue her parents. How would she even begin? Meanwhile the town has figured out who it was who brought the measles and her family is outed and ostracized. But she's also met a nice boy at the library who invites her to the high school's film club night. How will she manage first love amidst the raging crises in the town and in her own home?

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    I thought maybe I had only like Reichardt's previous book Underwater so much because I totally identified with Morgan, the main character. But considering how much I loved A Shot At Normal (even more than Underwater) while having nothing in common with Juniper, I guess it's just Marisa Reichhardt's writing and characterization that are THAT good. I've noticed some reviews saying June's parents are too caricatural and OTT and well, I must say I envy those people's optimism... unfortunately I thoug I thought maybe I had only like Reichardt's previous book Underwater so much because I totally identified with Morgan, the main character. But considering how much I loved A Shot At Normal (even more than Underwater) while having nothing in common with Juniper, I guess it's just Marisa Reichhardt's writing and characterization that are THAT good. I've noticed some reviews saying June's parents are too caricatural and OTT and well, I must say I envy those people's optimism... unfortunately I thought June's parents were true to life to a fault : when you spend quite a lot of time in hippie, new agey, natural living circles, you are bound to meet a few people who are just like Melinda and Russ. Another complaint about this book was the instalove and I can only admit it, yes, there's instalove but I don't mind it as much as many people do and in here, it was so well done, so cute and charming, with Nico sounding like a close-to-perfect teenage boy but still a more-or-less realistic one, I really enjoyed the romance part of the story. Plus, it remains very secondary compared to the whole antivaxx thing and June's fight for her bodily autonomy. The one thing that felt a bit unlikey was how June has all the counterarguments to her parents' antivaxx stance from the start. I mean, yes, she's smart and she's been taught to think for herself, but still how does she know all those facts (without regular access to the Internet, to make things worse)? But I was willing to suspend disbelief for this because it helped the story move faster which I always appreciate. It's an important book and I really hope it will help even a handful of teenagers when they read it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tween 2 Teen Book Reviews

    TW: infant death (off page), anti-vax parents (and their horrible arguments) I was only about a day post-surgery when I got the chance to read an ARC of A Shot at Normal, but despite the brain fog I immediately jumped on the chance! My brain is complete mush, so I apologize if this makes no sense. I plan to write a longer review for a blog post (and hopefully do something with the author)! Long story short, I really enjoyed the book! There were a few ideas/subplots that I think could have been ex TW: infant death (off page), anti-vax parents (and their horrible arguments) I was only about a day post-surgery when I got the chance to read an ARC of A Shot at Normal, but despite the brain fog I immediately jumped on the chance! My brain is complete mush, so I apologize if this makes no sense. I plan to write a longer review for a blog post (and hopefully do something with the author)! Long story short, I really enjoyed the book! There were a few ideas/subplots that I think could have been explored more, but it was a solid contemporary dealing with important issues (vaccines). This book will be incredibly timely when it releases. Right around when it comes out in February more and more people will be getting their COVID-19 vaccines. A Shot at Normal explores the experience of one teen girl who decides to go against her anti-vaccine parents in an effort to get vaccinated. In some ways I was surprised at how Juniper does and doesn't react to her parents. It creates an interesting tension that could have been expanded on. While the book is a whole story, I felt like it left the door open enough to have a sequel, possibly exploring the consequences of Juniper's actions farther down the line (especially in regards to her siblings). A Shot at Normal depicts the harrowing reality of many teens who come to realize their parents are wrong. While this deals specifically with the recent issue of vaccination, any teen will relate to the frustration of arguing with a parent who is determined to be right, at any cost.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    A fantastic read, with a couple of caveats. Vaccination is, for some reason, a huge issue. I'm firmly on the side of 'yay vaccines' and I genuinely don't understand people who refuse to vaccinate. I have honestly seen a facebook post saying 'my child died of (preventable disease) and some people are saying I should have vaccinated them but I'm glad I didn't because that only would have made things worse!' Although I absolutely believe in bodily autonomy, I also don't believe there's a question ab A fantastic read, with a couple of caveats. Vaccination is, for some reason, a huge issue. I'm firmly on the side of 'yay vaccines' and I genuinely don't understand people who refuse to vaccinate. I have honestly seen a facebook post saying 'my child died of (preventable disease) and some people are saying I should have vaccinated them but I'm glad I didn't because that only would have made things worse!' Although I absolutely believe in bodily autonomy, I also don't believe there's a question about the results of wide scale vaccines. Long winded, my apologies, but I'm meandering towards; I really enjoyed this read. Although it wasn't as much about the actual issues as I'd hoped, I'm still really glad it's been written. I strongly disliked June's parents, who claimed to be trying to raise free thinkers but absolutely refused to listen to any point of view that didn't match theirs. Although I was vaguely sympathetic towards them when the notice for court arrived with no warning, but then again they probably wouldn't have listened to a warning... SPOILERS I did think it ended very abruptly. After all that build up, the story just ended without us seeing how June's family reacted to anything. I'd have liked to see what they thought and whether the siblings came around. END OF SPOILERS Overall, I really enjoyed this read and I think it'll lead to some very valuable discussions. Definitely worth reading.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)

    Thanks to Farrar, Straus, and Giroux and NetGalley for providing me an advanced copy of this to review! Maris Reichardt is an author who has been on my radar, but I’ve never read anything by her. I was excited to get the chance, and the story line sounded unique and interesting! At the start, I did enjoy the conversations Juniper has with her parents when she disagrees with their beliefs. They felt like real conversations, and Juniper brought up good points. However, her parents were extremely st Thanks to Farrar, Straus, and Giroux and NetGalley for providing me an advanced copy of this to review! Maris Reichardt is an author who has been on my radar, but I’ve never read anything by her. I was excited to get the chance, and the story line sounded unique and interesting! At the start, I did enjoy the conversations Juniper has with her parents when she disagrees with their beliefs. They felt like real conversations, and Juniper brought up good points. However, her parents were extremely stubborn and frustrating, which is part of the point of the story. A lot of people who are anti-vaxxers are very, very grounded in their beliefs, and Reichardt portrayed this well in the book. For me, none of the characters in this book were particularly likeable. I just don’t think they were quite fleshed out enough. A lot of the book is focused on Juniper trying things out for the first time and getting outside of her bubble, being able to find her own voice. Which is great! But it meant that some of the character development fell to the wayside. I would have liked to see some of the side characters developed a bit more, as some of them felt quite one-sided. All in all, this is an enjoyable book that gives power to teens who just want to make their own choices when it comes to their bodies. Maybe not all teens will relate to Juniper’s specific situation, but there’s some level of it that will feel relatable to them. A quick read that’s sure to leave you thinking.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.