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From everyday staples like miso soup to takeout favorites like sushi, ramen, and beyond, Japanese food has long been enjoyed the world over. Now, with the Japanese Cookbook for Beginners, the incredible tastes and unique techniques of Japanese cooking can be mastered in your own kitchen with ease. You’ll find an introductory guide to Japanese culinary basics, plus dozens o From everyday staples like miso soup to takeout favorites like sushi, ramen, and beyond, Japanese food has long been enjoyed the world over. Now, with the Japanese Cookbook for Beginners, the incredible tastes and unique techniques of Japanese cooking can be mastered in your own kitchen with ease. You’ll find an introductory guide to Japanese culinary basics, plus dozens of quick, weeknight-friendly meals packed full of flavor. With this unique Japanese cookbook, you can try simple dishes like Green Beans with Sesame, as well as mouthwatering meals like Japanese “Fried” Chicken. Discover helpful ingredient tips: substitutions to make recipes even easier or allergen-friendly, pointers for prepping more efficiently, and tricks to get the most out of a particular recipe. This Japanese cookbook includes: - Japanese kitchen essentials―Find a comprehensive guide to stocking your kitchen, with information on everything from fresh produce and fermented foods to must-have tools and utensils. - Prep and cooking techniques―Explore traditional preparation and cooking methods, like itameni (braising), itameru (stir-frying), and iru (dry-frying/pan-roasting), in this beginner-friendly Japanese cookbook. 70+ tasty recipes―Create delicious dishes like Bacon Fried Rice, Panko Fried -- -- Shrimp, and Sweet and Savory Chicken and Egg Bowl―many of which take 30 minutes or less to make and serve. If you’ve been looking for a Japanese cookbook that simplifies complex cooking techniques without sacrificing flavor, the Japanese Cookbook for Beginners has you covered.


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From everyday staples like miso soup to takeout favorites like sushi, ramen, and beyond, Japanese food has long been enjoyed the world over. Now, with the Japanese Cookbook for Beginners, the incredible tastes and unique techniques of Japanese cooking can be mastered in your own kitchen with ease. You’ll find an introductory guide to Japanese culinary basics, plus dozens o From everyday staples like miso soup to takeout favorites like sushi, ramen, and beyond, Japanese food has long been enjoyed the world over. Now, with the Japanese Cookbook for Beginners, the incredible tastes and unique techniques of Japanese cooking can be mastered in your own kitchen with ease. You’ll find an introductory guide to Japanese culinary basics, plus dozens of quick, weeknight-friendly meals packed full of flavor. With this unique Japanese cookbook, you can try simple dishes like Green Beans with Sesame, as well as mouthwatering meals like Japanese “Fried” Chicken. Discover helpful ingredient tips: substitutions to make recipes even easier or allergen-friendly, pointers for prepping more efficiently, and tricks to get the most out of a particular recipe. This Japanese cookbook includes: - Japanese kitchen essentials―Find a comprehensive guide to stocking your kitchen, with information on everything from fresh produce and fermented foods to must-have tools and utensils. - Prep and cooking techniques―Explore traditional preparation and cooking methods, like itameni (braising), itameru (stir-frying), and iru (dry-frying/pan-roasting), in this beginner-friendly Japanese cookbook. 70+ tasty recipes―Create delicious dishes like Bacon Fried Rice, Panko Fried -- -- Shrimp, and Sweet and Savory Chicken and Egg Bowl―many of which take 30 minutes or less to make and serve. If you’ve been looking for a Japanese cookbook that simplifies complex cooking techniques without sacrificing flavor, the Japanese Cookbook for Beginners has you covered.

30 review for Japanese Cookbook for Beginners: Classic and Modern Recipes Made Easy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Erika ♥OwlwaysReading♥

    Looking at social media posts during this COVID-19 pandemic, you’ve probably observed many families using their time at home to improve and expand upon their cooking skills. Little girl pretending to like mommy’s cooking Twitter video link Some of us are gifted, some of us... not so much. 😖 Gender doesn't determine ones competency in the kitchen, so we have cookbooks to make up the difference 😅 This Japanese Cookbook for Beginners: Classic and Modern Recipes Made Easy has been a great way to implem Looking at social media posts during this COVID-19 pandemic, you’ve probably observed many families using their time at home to improve and expand upon their cooking skills. Little girl pretending to like mommy’s cooking Twitter video link Some of us are gifted, some of us... not so much. 😖 Gender doesn't determine ones competency in the kitchen, so we have cookbooks to make up the difference 😅 This Japanese Cookbook for Beginners: Classic and Modern Recipes Made Easy has been a great way to implement new recipes into my families rather routine dinner pallet. Being Hapa and having been raised in a Japanese household part-time, many of these recipes were close to home and inspired many wonderful childhood memories to reappear. Luckily I store rice like a typical Japanese person on a regular basis. 😅 Meaning...I buy the BIG bag! We are natural hoarders when it comes to our rice. I'm good until 2021 😉. And because people seem to be buying frozen pizza, Twinkies, canned food, TV dinners, beans, pasta, and cereal, many of these Asian ingredients are still available. This cookbook inspired me to cook an old family recipe (some kind of Tonkatsu veggie soup). Comfort food on a rainy day. 😋 Disregard the photo quality... I don't know how to take instagram worthy food pics 😝 Ingredients: * Miso (akamiso or "red miso") * HonDashi (Bonito soup stock) * Gobo * Daikon * Konnyaku * Bamboo Shoots * Carrots * dried shiitake mushroom * pork marrow or pork bone * Pork Not only did I remember some old family recipes, but this book also introduced me to new faves including... Furikake Popcorn From Azusa Oda's Blog "Furikake Popcorn Makes 2 servings (Honestly, I can finish this off myself. Don’t judge.) 1/8 cup canola oil 1/4 cup popcorn kernels olive oil furikake In a 3 qt. pot with lid, heat the canola oil and 1 popcorn kernel over medium-high heat. When the oil is ready, the kernel will pop. Add the rest of the kernels and cover with the lid. Once the kernels start to pop, shake the pot, but keep the lid secure. You don’t want any of the steam to escape. Keep hovering the pot over the stove and shaking until the popping slows. Turn off the heat and empty the popcorn into a large bowl. Lightly drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle some furikake. Toss to combine and repeat a couple more times until the popcorn is adequately coated with furikake." Many Japanese basics can be found here like how to cook rice. FACT! This book (for me) was more of a walk along memory lane, but still enjoyable. Many helpful tips and trick can be found when trying to cook Japanese food using American grocery store chains. My only complaint is that there are little to no pictures. When it comes to my "brain candy" fiction, I want ZERO pictures, but when it comes to my cookbooks, give me food porn!!! (I think that is the only safe time you can type the word "porn" in the image tab and get the above pics^^^) THAT'S RIGHT! GIMME GIMME GIMME😋😍 I want my mouth to be salivating🤤. I need that type of Pavlov Bell reaction in order to motivate my lazy a$$ to stand in the kitchen. And when it comes to imagining dishes in my head, my creativity is stunted. Unlike my husband who will throw anything together (ex. hot Cheetos & Tilapia) and call it delicious while devouring his own oddly edible monstrosity. THERE WERE ONLY 8 PICTURES! EIGHT!!! And many were boring pictures like Miso Soup & Rice Balls. I KNOW WHAT THAT LOOKS LIKE! It's boring, and does nothing to motivate me. SEE... BORING! OK. Rant over Despite my little personal vexation... overall, a good book. Many Japanese basics with contemporary variations to make Japanese food relatively easy to make, even if you don't have all of the typical ingredients. ***Special thanks to NetGalley, Callisto Media, and Tara Adams for sharing this ARC COPY with me in exchange for my honest review*** Overall Rating → 3.5 STARS Price is Right? → Maybe... If you don't mind a cookbook w/o pictures. Kindle version $6.99 RN on Amazon. Would I recommend? → If your a beginner in Japanese cooking. Would I re-read? → There are more recipes I plan on trying so.... yes 😉 Would I read more from this author? → maybe Just some funny quarantine cooking memes for ur enjoyment 😉

  2. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Borsey

    My son and I love Japanese cooking so when I was offered the opportunity to read and review this cookbook from Callisto Publisher's Group I grabbed it. This is a great cookbook that allows the average cook to make Japanese cuisine at home with simple step by step instructions. Highly recommend! My son and I love Japanese cooking so when I was offered the opportunity to read and review this cookbook from Callisto Publisher's Group I grabbed it. This is a great cookbook that allows the average cook to make Japanese cuisine at home with simple step by step instructions. Highly recommend!

  3. 5 out of 5

    April Sarah

    *ARC received from Netgalley in return for an honest review* Recently I have found I really enjoy Asian cooking, so when I saw this cookbook, I had to pick it up. The recipes are broken down into measurements that are easy to understand and instructions that are blocked in reasonable groupings. The only issue I had was in parts it would have been nice to have pictures or illustrations to help walk through some of the instructions. The major on that comes to mind is the bonito rice balls and the ex *ARC received from Netgalley in return for an honest review* Recently I have found I really enjoy Asian cooking, so when I saw this cookbook, I had to pick it up. The recipes are broken down into measurements that are easy to understand and instructions that are blocked in reasonable groupings. The only issue I had was in parts it would have been nice to have pictures or illustrations to help walk through some of the instructions. The major on that comes to mind is the bonito rice balls and the explanation of how to form them with your hands. That would have been nice to have a visual aid.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Thank you to NetGalley for and advance copy of this to review. So, I'm no beginner in Japanese cooking. I've even attended cooking school in Tokyo. I don't really need a cookbook for beginners, but despite that I really am enjoying this cookbook. I like the author's tone, innovations, suggestions, and the conversational nature of the book as she presents her recipes, how she uses them, and what she knows about the ingredients or what they go well with. The instructions with each dish are crystal c Thank you to NetGalley for and advance copy of this to review. So, I'm no beginner in Japanese cooking. I've even attended cooking school in Tokyo. I don't really need a cookbook for beginners, but despite that I really am enjoying this cookbook. I like the author's tone, innovations, suggestions, and the conversational nature of the book as she presents her recipes, how she uses them, and what she knows about the ingredients or what they go well with. The instructions with each dish are crystal clear and provide enough detail for a beginner to tackle them with confidence. The chapters on setting up a Japanese kitchen, Japanese ingredients, and even the glossary are excellent. It's also a real pleasure to see a cookbook without Japanese language mistakes. I'd easily recommend this to anyone who wants to expand their skills in Japanese cooking.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    I received a complimentary print copy of this book from Callisto Publishing. My review of this book is voluntary and unbiased. This book is a well organized cookbook beginning with the concepts of the Japanese kitchen including the staples needed for your pantry. It is important to not skip over the introductions in ethnic centered cookbooks. I find that is where you will find the most essential information for your culinary adventure. Different cultures utilize different spices, herbs and vegeta I received a complimentary print copy of this book from Callisto Publishing. My review of this book is voluntary and unbiased. This book is a well organized cookbook beginning with the concepts of the Japanese kitchen including the staples needed for your pantry. It is important to not skip over the introductions in ethnic centered cookbooks. I find that is where you will find the most essential information for your culinary adventure. Different cultures utilize different spices, herbs and vegetables which may not be in a typical pantry. Japanese cooking includes staples such as basic dashi, short-grain rice, miso and soy. The recipes are conveniently labeled: nut free, gluten free, vegetarian, vegan, one pot and under 30-mins. The recipes are easy to follow and also include variations or substitutions to assist when cooking. A great start for beginner wanting to learn Japanese cooking.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    Originally published on my blog: Nonstop Reader. Japanese Cookbook for Beginners is a tutorial guide and recipe collection for Japanese cuisine using (mostly) authentic ingredients. Due out 17th March 2020 from Callisto on their Rockridge Press imprint, it's 146 pages and will be available in paperback and ebook formats (ebook available now). It's worth noting that the ebook format has a handy interactive table of contents as well as interactive links. I've really become enamored of ebooks wi Originally published on my blog: Nonstop Reader. Japanese Cookbook for Beginners is a tutorial guide and recipe collection for Japanese cuisine using (mostly) authentic ingredients. Due out 17th March 2020 from Callisto on their Rockridge Press imprint, it's 146 pages and will be available in paperback and ebook formats (ebook available now). It's worth noting that the ebook format has a handy interactive table of contents as well as interactive links. I've really become enamored of ebooks with interactive formats lately. The book has a logical and easy to follow format. Chapter 1 covers the background meal planning and ingredient buying (including a general overview over pantry staples lists and tools and supplies in the Japanese kitchen) as well as a very general beginner-accessible discussion of the time-saving and streamlining techniques. The author also includes some logical pointers about containers, ingredients, and supplies. The recipe chapters are arranged thematically: staples, snacks and salads, vegetarian, rice and noodles, seafood, and meat and poultry. There is no included nutritional information, although special dietary information is included (gluten-free, nut-free, dairy, etc). Prep and variation tips are included in a footer at the bottom of each recipe. The recipes have their ingredients listed bullet style in a sidebar. Measurements are given in US standard only. Special tools and ingredients are also listed, along with yields and cooking directions. Most of the ingredients are easily sourced at any moderately well stocked grocery store but some will need to be acquired at an Asian specialty grocer. The book also includes a short author bio, a glossary, and a metric conversion chart, but lacks any index or general ingredients index. My one small quibble with the book is that the recipes are mostly not photographed. There are some photos, and they're clear and attractive, but they only represent about 5% of the recipes included in the book. There are a number of fusion cuisine items (Japanese Mexican for example), so for purists, this is a much more general 'everyday' cookbook. Four stars. Disclosure: I received an ARC at no cost from the author/publisher for review purposes.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    I was given an opportunity via the publisher to read the Japanese Cookbook for Beginners: Classic and Modern Recipes Made Easy. I chose to review this cookbook and my opinion is freely given. This is a great cookbook for beginners, as the author gives a great introduction to the cuisine, with references to ingredients, tools, and techniques. I particularly liked the tip box with the allergy free alternatives, as this information will be handy for those with dietary restrictions. There are other t I was given an opportunity via the publisher to read the Japanese Cookbook for Beginners: Classic and Modern Recipes Made Easy. I chose to review this cookbook and my opinion is freely given. This is a great cookbook for beginners, as the author gives a great introduction to the cuisine, with references to ingredients, tools, and techniques. I particularly liked the tip box with the allergy free alternatives, as this information will be handy for those with dietary restrictions. There are other tip boxes scattered throughout, delineated by a colorful pink section on the page. I found this extra information to be exceedingly helpful for a novice, such as myself. The recipe sections of the cookbook are logical and I have listed them below, along with some of my favorite recipes. Staples: Basic Short-Grain Rice; Dashi; Homemade Soys (various) Snacks and Salads: Easy Cucumber Pickles; Green Salad with Sesame-Miso Dressing; Japanese Potato Salad Vegetarian Dishes: Stir-fried Broccoli with Crispy Garlic; Roasted Peppers in Dashi Sauce Rice and Noodles: Mixed Rice with Pork and Bamboo Shoots; Tuna Chirashi with Snow Peas; Super Simple Ramen Seafood: Miso-Marinated Salmon; Hot Pot with Black Cod and Mushrooms; Panko Fried Shrimp Meat and Poultry: Classic Teriyaki Chicken; Ginger Pork with Green Cabbage and Rice; Slow Cooker Shoyu Chicken; Braised Potatoes with Beef There is also a glossary at the end that contains key terms, for which some readers may be unfamiliar. Overall, the author does a really good job of detailing the recipes step-by-step. I do wish there were photographs of the finished dishes, as I would have found them to be completely inspiring. I really enjoyed Japanese Cookbook for Beginners: Classic and Modern Recipes Made Easy and I look forward to making many of the dishes in the coming days.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Masters

    Many, many years ago, when I went off to college, we were served Teriyaki Chicken, my first time, and I went back for three helpings. Little did I know my love affair with Japanese culture had just been ignited. That same year, I received a Japanese wind chime as a gift from a Japanese student on campus, worked a job by a place that served pork potstickers, and was naive about what lie ahead. After many years of diving into Asian movie culture, I noted to a friend, “did you ever notice that Amer Many, many years ago, when I went off to college, we were served Teriyaki Chicken, my first time, and I went back for three helpings. Little did I know my love affair with Japanese culture had just been ignited. That same year, I received a Japanese wind chime as a gift from a Japanese student on campus, worked a job by a place that served pork potstickers, and was naive about what lie ahead. After many years of diving into Asian movie culture, I noted to a friend, “did you ever notice that Americans never eat in movies, but Asian movies always contain a meal, at least once?” This lead my to “Tampico” (exceptional) and eventually “Midnight Diner”. First the movies, then the show, it is simply masterful in demonstrating how food connects people to one another; to life; to history. I decided it was time. I tried some things. Made my first homemade ramen 🤩, pickled some cucumbers, 😍, and ordered this book. There are number of things about this book that I love. It is not just recipes. There is a section on “balance”. A concept that doesn’t play really into the consciousness of American cuisine. And it’s sensical and subtly powerful. There is also a section in aesthetics; something Americans rarely consider unless they’re a Michelin chef or it’s a holiday. But the author makes a great point; “These visual considerations make a meal appetizing to the eyes well before you take the first bite.”. And she’s right. My only criticism is, for a “beginners” cookbook, pictures always help. No we’re not children; but we are childlike in this topic area. I was moving back and forth between the book and online to see what things should look like. It’s an easier measure of success and a way to gauge progress along the way. Otherwise, I am stocking up for the new year, highlighted some “must try” recipes, and can’t wait to get started!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Johanna Sawyer

    Thanks to the publisher for an ARC to read and offer my opinion. This cookbook offers traditional style Japanese recipes with an authentic ingredient list. From Pot stickers to Miso soup the book lists cooking tips, and an occasional variation. What did I like? While the cookbook is simplistic in nature, I found I didn’t really recognize a lot of the recipes but that didn’t stop me from looking them over. The author tries to stick as close to traditional authentic recipes which cuts out a lot o Thanks to the publisher for an ARC to read and offer my opinion. This cookbook offers traditional style Japanese recipes with an authentic ingredient list. From Pot stickers to Miso soup the book lists cooking tips, and an occasional variation. What did I like? While the cookbook is simplistic in nature, I found I didn’t really recognize a lot of the recipes but that didn’t stop me from looking them over. The author tries to stick as close to traditional authentic recipes which cuts out a lot of the variations I like to see in a cookbook. I’m one of those people who always seem to leave something off the list, so for a beginner book, it seems to be a tough method. Would I buy or recommend? I’m a huge lover of cookbooks, and between the miso soup and pot stickers I could definitely see this on my shelf. It also carries a few vegetarian and tofu recipes for a healthy lifestyle if that is your thing. This cookbook looks hard at the authentic cuisine of Japanese food for beginners. Thoughts for the author? Congratulations on your new release! I’m sure the recipes are all authentic tasting, but I really wish it had come with more pictures.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Edwards

    I don't know a lot about Japanese cooking, I have tried a few different things when at restaurants but that is it. I thought this book would be interesting to look through, and while there is a lot in here that I wouldn't eat there is just as much that I cant wait to try. The first two chapters talk about “The Japanese Kitchen” and “ Staples”. They go over stocking your kitchen, Allergen-Free Alternatives, Prep and cooking techniques after that it begins listing the recipes for items you will ne I don't know a lot about Japanese cooking, I have tried a few different things when at restaurants but that is it. I thought this book would be interesting to look through, and while there is a lot in here that I wouldn't eat there is just as much that I cant wait to try. The first two chapters talk about “The Japanese Kitchen” and “ Staples”. They go over stocking your kitchen, Allergen-Free Alternatives, Prep and cooking techniques after that it begins listing the recipes for items you will need in order to cook you Japanese recipes. After these two chapters you get into the recipes, which are divided into 5 chapter: Snacks & Salads Vegetarian Dishes Rice & Noodles Seafood Meat & Poultry Overall Id say that this is the perfect book for someone leaning how to prepare Japanese cuisine. I received a free copy of this product from Callisto Publishers in exchange for my honest review. I was not required to write a positive review nor was I compensated in any other way.

  11. 4 out of 5

    roxi Net

    Part of my love of reading is that sometimes a book finds you at just the right moment. Japanese Cookbook for Beginners comes just as I finished one of the best shows I've seen: Midnight Diner. There is just something absolutely beautiful and whole as Japanese food, and that's only the visual aspect. The recipes on Azusa Oda's book are easy to follow, yet I may have to be on the hunt for some of the ingredients. Luckily, I live in a pretty diverse city, so it might be easier for me to find than Part of my love of reading is that sometimes a book finds you at just the right moment. Japanese Cookbook for Beginners comes just as I finished one of the best shows I've seen: Midnight Diner. There is just something absolutely beautiful and whole as Japanese food, and that's only the visual aspect. The recipes on Azusa Oda's book are easy to follow, yet I may have to be on the hunt for some of the ingredients. Luckily, I live in a pretty diverse city, so it might be easier for me to find than for those in more rural areas. Some dishes are so simple that I can't wait to try (buttery sweet potatoes here I come). I only wish there were more photos so that I can drool over them and compare my finished recipes to their respective photos. #JapaneseCookbookforBeginners #NetGalley

  12. 5 out of 5

    roxi Net

    Part of my love of reading is that sometimes a book finds you at just the right moment. Japanese Cookbook for Beginners comes just as I finished one of the best shows I've seen: Midnight Diner. There is just something absolutely beautiful and whole as Japanese food, and that's only the visual aspect. The recipes on Azusa Oda's book are easy to follow, yet I may have to be on the hunt for some of the ingredients. Luckily, I live in a pretty diverse city, so it might be easier for me to find than Part of my love of reading is that sometimes a book finds you at just the right moment. Japanese Cookbook for Beginners comes just as I finished one of the best shows I've seen: Midnight Diner. There is just something absolutely beautiful and whole as Japanese food, and that's only the visual aspect. The recipes on Azusa Oda's book are easy to follow, yet I may have to be on the hunt for some of the ingredients. Luckily, I live in a pretty diverse city, so it might be easier for me to find than for those in more rural areas. Some dishes are so simple that I can't wait to try (buttery sweet potatoes here I come). I only wish there were more photos so that I can drool over them and compare my finished recipes to their respective photos. #JapaneseCookbookforBeginners #NetGalley

  13. 4 out of 5

    Weslyn

    The only Japanese food I’m fairly familiar with is sushi rice, sushi bowls, and, of course, sushi itself. I am very much looking forward to trying the recipes in this book. I enjoyed the inclusion of the traditional names for these dishes as well as variations for ingredients. My only qualm with this cookbook (and all the others from Rockridge Press) is that there aren’t enough pictures. That’s obviously how they’re able to cut down the cost of the book, but anyone that has a difficult time visu The only Japanese food I’m fairly familiar with is sushi rice, sushi bowls, and, of course, sushi itself. I am very much looking forward to trying the recipes in this book. I enjoyed the inclusion of the traditional names for these dishes as well as variations for ingredients. My only qualm with this cookbook (and all the others from Rockridge Press) is that there aren’t enough pictures. That’s obviously how they’re able to cut down the cost of the book, but anyone that has a difficult time visualizing food might not be as enthralled with their cookbooks as I usually am. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kristine

    Japanese Cookbook for Beginners by Azusa Oda is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in mid-March. Recipes for the basics, snacks, veg, starch, seafood, and meat is presented in (roughly) a 10pt. font and, even so, with the way the ingredients and paragraphed instructions are spaced, each recipe takes about 1 ½ to 2 pages. Unfortunately, it’s within the paragraphs that it’s clear that Japanese cooking techniques haven’t been pared down for beginners.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ro Scott

    This book will show you how to make some of the most popular Japanese dishes and bowls, but not many pictures to show you what the dishes should look like when finished. You will also learn what the staples to have are and why you need them in order to make these dishes. My favorite part was the recipes for the sauces.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    As a basic stick, your toe in the waters cookbook this hit the spot. It has a nice sustainability bent, includes a primer not usually seen, on making dashi, katsu sauce and many of the condiments you need for making Japanese food. Good chatty style makes for an easy read. Informative and well written.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rosanna1

    Very informative cookbook. I loved the recipes that I made . Fairly easy instructions. Very tasty meals.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lupine Smile

    Good, but a little more advanced than beginner. Not much, but a little.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Anjalica

    Great recipes thank you and they taste awesome.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Autumn Jean

    I’ve tried 9 of the recipes and they were great - I only wish there were pictures to go alongside recipes.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Carol

  22. 4 out of 5

    John

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kiralibris

  24. 4 out of 5

    Janet

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Parker

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nick Branigan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gary A LaChance

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kelley Montz

  29. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Tomlin

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jean MacLeod

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