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Murder on the Rocks

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Natalie Barnes buys the Gray Whale Inn, a bed and breakfast in Maine, and publicly opposes Bernard Katz's proposed resort development, which threatens a colony of black-chinned terns, and when Katz is found dead, Natalie must find the true killer in order to clear her own name.


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Natalie Barnes buys the Gray Whale Inn, a bed and breakfast in Maine, and publicly opposes Bernard Katz's proposed resort development, which threatens a colony of black-chinned terns, and when Katz is found dead, Natalie must find the true killer in order to clear her own name.

30 review for Murder on the Rocks

  1. 5 out of 5

    Erin *Proud Book Hoarder*

    The bird standing on the dead guy's foot cracks me up. It's like a morbid art piece I can't look away from. Cozy mysteries has some of the funniest, most morbid cover art.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Scot

    This is the first book in a cozy mystery series built around the life of the heroine, Natalie, running an idyllic bed n' breakfast, The Gray Whale Inn, on fictional Cranberry Island off the coast of Maine. I am definitely not the target audience for this book, but once I started reading it the setting soothed me and I became interested in seeing what sort of fantasy escapism it offered mature women, whom I am guessing are the target demographic. It made me think of that old commercial catch phra This is the first book in a cozy mystery series built around the life of the heroine, Natalie, running an idyllic bed n' breakfast, The Gray Whale Inn, on fictional Cranberry Island off the coast of Maine. I am definitely not the target audience for this book, but once I started reading it the setting soothed me and I became interested in seeing what sort of fantasy escapism it offered mature women, whom I am guessing are the target demographic. It made me think of that old commercial catch phrase: "Calgon, take me away!" I say that because this is, if you will excuse the analogy, soft porn for women. I don't mean porn in a sexual sense, but for them the fantasy lure of just moving to a scenic island where you run a cute and quaint inn, where you bake fattening snacks and desserts constantly and everybody loves you for it. The fantasy includes a hunky handyman who keeps dropping strong hints that he desires the heroine (substitute yourself, lady readers) and conveniently lives in the carriage house nearby (you're his landlady, ladies, and he drops by whenever you need help or attention but sensibly makes himself scarce before he becomes irritating). Sure, there's a murder, and a series of increasingly troubling attempts on the heroine, but it never gets too scary because there's always a best friend forever with a cup of tea and those yummy cookies, and the serenity the Gray Whale Inn evokes overpowers all the nasties. A series of recipes based on delightful (and high calorie--and sugar) desserts mentioned in the tale follows the text itself. Well to be fair, there might be a fruit composte recipe too, but overall, say goodbye to dieting concerns if you check into the Gray Whale Inn.

  3. 5 out of 5

    KarenF

    This one was just OK for me. The protagonist and setting were likable enough, which is important to me in a cozy, but it all felt remarkably inconsistent. For example, in the beginning Natalie is set up as a fairly mature, professional character who's willing to work hard to make her B&B a success. But then you find out she doesn't have a website, maybe it's just me but that seems like the first thing you'd set up if your business is dependent on people from out of the area, even if it was just This one was just OK for me. The protagonist and setting were likable enough, which is important to me in a cozy, but it all felt remarkably inconsistent. For example, in the beginning Natalie is set up as a fairly mature, professional character who's willing to work hard to make her B&B a success. But then you find out she doesn't have a website, maybe it's just me but that seems like the first thing you'd set up if your business is dependent on people from out of the area, even if it was just very basic, and even in 2006. Then when there's a storm and the power goes out she gives the guests candles, no flashlights, and leaves the inn. I realize that she was worried about a personal situation, but really, no telling the guests what's going on? Just leave them with flammable objects? And then there was a cat who appeared in the first couple of chapters, and was mentioned by name a number of times, who is then never mentioned again. Maybe it's because I'm an animal lover but I'd think if bad things started happening around your home and that home contained a pet you'd worry about it and mention it. But he (or she) was never mentioned again, like the author just forgot about it. For all that, I didn't dislike the book, I liked the characters and the setting. But I've definitely read better cozies as well.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tari

    I remembered reading this before but somehow I missed reviewing it or even marking it as read. The story was familiar as I read it this time. Luckily I'd forgotten who the killer was! Natalie Barnes bought an old bed and breakfast on Cranberry Island but soon found out that a developer named Bernard Katz was planning a huge resort for the area. This would be competition for her B&B, so it was no surprise that when Nat found Katz dead on the rocks, she was the primary suspect. Her friend and neig I remembered reading this before but somehow I missed reviewing it or even marking it as read. The story was familiar as I read it this time. Luckily I'd forgotten who the killer was! Natalie Barnes bought an old bed and breakfast on Cranberry Island but soon found out that a developer named Bernard Katz was planning a huge resort for the area. This would be competition for her B&B, so it was no surprise that when Nat found Katz dead on the rocks, she was the primary suspect. Her friend and neighbor John who was also the island deputy tried to give her as much help and support as he could, but he still didn't approve when Nat and her friend Charlene decided to investigate. I had no idea who the killer would be since it didn't seem directly related to the guy who was killed but it all wrapped up and made total sense later. I hope that Natalie and John have a nice future ahead of them, but they're just starting out liking each other. I really liked Nat's friend Charlene. She was funny but really helpful and a loyal friend to Nat. Nat's niece Gwen who was staying at the B&B while she took art classes also turned out to be a really nice girl. She surprised her aunt sometimes by cleaning the rooms or doing little things without her asking. I loved the setting of this book since it was an island with mainly one store and restaurant--and one B&B. At the end of the book you'll find some of the yummy-sounding recipes that Natalie made. The Acknowledgements section is interesting too since it points out that while the Cranberry Isles are real, everything else, including the type of tern mentioned was part of the author's imagination. Yes, I'm an acknowledgements nerd!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

    Murder on the Rocks is the first book I have read written by Karen MacInerney. It was a cute little book that I enjoyed. I was totally in the mood to read something light. I really liked the characters and the locale. Maine seems like a perfect place for a bed and breakfast. I will read more of the series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dagny

    Exceptionally good for a first novel in a series. Likeable characters.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

    A third of the way through the book I'm telling our heroine to call the police. "Call the police you stupid get!" A little later I'm wondering why in the world she's not telling her niece, supposedly there for the summer to help her run the inn, to stop flouncing about looking gorgeous and eating everything in sight and straighten the guest rooms. What is this trend for cozy heroines to be so prone to injury, so determined to solve it before the police, and stupid enough to walk into dark places a A third of the way through the book I'm telling our heroine to call the police. "Call the police you stupid get!" A little later I'm wondering why in the world she's not telling her niece, supposedly there for the summer to help her run the inn, to stop flouncing about looking gorgeous and eating everything in sight and straighten the guest rooms. What is this trend for cozy heroines to be so prone to injury, so determined to solve it before the police, and stupid enough to walk into dark places alone when they hear a bump in the night? Take a tip from Marple, ladies. Almost done and I'm thinking "And thus stupidity reigns." Our heroine needs a sidekick. Or commonsense. Injury tally: Fall down a cliff, hit over the head by an intruder, foot cut on glass from window broken when rock tossed through, bicycle accident, hit with a shovel deep enough to cut an artery, nearly drowned. Number of times called the police: Zero. Zip. Zilch. Despite the extremely stupid actions of the heroine, I loved the descriptions of the Maine coastal island area. I've been in love with the area since spending a wonderful Thanksgiving weekend with a boyfriend's family in Kennebunkport, ME in the early 80's. It's a shame to see what development has done, so this book really hit home for me in that area. I would hope that Natalie smartens up a bit.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Diane ~Firefly~

    Cranberry Island sounds like a nice place to visit and based on the food descriptions, I certainly wouldn't mind staying at the Gray Whale Inn. I like Natalie for the most part, but I think she got beat up even more than Harry Dresden does in one of his books and she just kept on going. What I enjoyed: * The food sounded heavenly and I was happy there were some recipes included. * The islanders seem interesting. * The mystery was decent. I didn't guess all the motive. What could have been better: * S Cranberry Island sounds like a nice place to visit and based on the food descriptions, I certainly wouldn't mind staying at the Gray Whale Inn. I like Natalie for the most part, but I think she got beat up even more than Harry Dresden does in one of his books and she just kept on going. What I enjoyed: * The food sounded heavenly and I was happy there were some recipes included. * The islanders seem interesting. * The mystery was decent. I didn't guess all the motive. What could have been better: * Some of Natalie's action were a bit stupid. (view spoiler)[Someone cut her brake lines on her bike, she had a bad accident that could have been fatal, yet when she gets back to the inn, so goes out in her new boat? Really? Or the fact she took the boat out by herself after she'd only been out once and warned to take someone experienced with her. It was just unrealistic. (hide spoiler)] * (view spoiler)[The whole Portland girlfriend thing was ridiculous (hide spoiler)]

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lark of The Bookwyrm's Hoard

    Adapted from a review originally published at The Bookwyrm's Hoard. Murder on the Rocks, the first in Karen MacInerney's "Gray Whale Inn Mystery" series, should have a lot going for it. MacInerney's writing is competent, if not inspired, and all the necessary elements are in place for a typical cozy mystery, including several delicious-sounding recipes in the back of the book. Sadly, it ultimately proves a disappointment. The heroine/amateur sleuth, Natalie Barnes, is the new owner of a bed-and-br Adapted from a review originally published at The Bookwyrm's Hoard. Murder on the Rocks, the first in Karen MacInerney's "Gray Whale Inn Mystery" series, should have a lot going for it. MacInerney's writing is competent, if not inspired, and all the necessary elements are in place for a typical cozy mystery, including several delicious-sounding recipes in the back of the book. Sadly, it ultimately proves a disappointment. The heroine/amateur sleuth, Natalie Barnes, is the new owner of a bed-and-breakfast in Maine's Cranberry Islands. Her handsome, charming neighbor (and tenant) carves toy sailboats and driftwood artwork while serving as the island's deputy. The cast of characters also includes a bevy of likable-but-eccentric and not-so-likable island residents, Natalie's close friend and her college-age niece, and, of course, the inn's current residents. The inevitable threat to both the island and Nat's inn surfaces immediately, in the form of an obnoxious developer with plans to build a glitzy golf resort regardless of the impact on the island's character or its endangered terns. I'm sure you can figure out what happens next. So why did I find the book disappointing -- no, to be completely honest, annoying? Chiefly because there's no way an intelligent woman would act as stupidly as Natalie does. [several sentences removed to avoid spoilers] It's true that the investigating officer has it in for her, but Nat keeps digging herself a deeper and deeper hole, with no apparent sense of self-preservation. She makes one poor decision after another. Of course, I also couldn't figure out why the investigating officer didn't just arrest her for tampering with evidence; he believes her guilty of murder, and he certainly had the evidence to prove the lesser charge. In other words, the characters' actions simply don't ring true, given who and what they are. I realize that a certain suspension of disbelief is required for most cozies, which inherently lack realism to begin with. In real life the police usually do a decent job of investigating crimes, and amateurs are rarely in a position to solve one, let alone a string of them. Then there's the alarming frequency with which dead bodies turn up in a small community, often discovered by the same person. (Seriously, would you want to live in St. Mary Mead, or in any of the small towns featured in American cozies? Or be friends with the amateur sleuth? I used to think that if I saw Jessica Fletcher coming, I'd run for the hills. As soon as she showed up, someone would drop dead within hours, and I would much rather it wasn't me.*) What distinguishes a good cozy mystery from a merely mediocre one stems in part from how well the author handles that dichotomy by providing enough believability to buoy up that suspension of disbelief. Unfortunately, MacInerney falls short on that front in this novel. * I'm showing my age a bit. Murder, She Wrote was quite popular when I was young. FCC disclosure: I borrowed this from the public library. You can read more of my reviews at The Bookwyrm’s Hoard.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin Copp

    Let me start by saying I love all books Maine and this was no exception. Natalie has relocated from Texas to Maine and is now running The Gray Whale Inn, a small B&B on the small Cranberry Island. She has only been going for a couple months when a big developer named Bernard Katz shows up on the island wanting to build a massive resort which will put the Gray Whale out of business. Natalie is heading up the committee to stop Katz so when he is found dead on the island Natalie becomes the prime s Let me start by saying I love all books Maine and this was no exception. Natalie has relocated from Texas to Maine and is now running The Gray Whale Inn, a small B&B on the small Cranberry Island. She has only been going for a couple months when a big developer named Bernard Katz shows up on the island wanting to build a massive resort which will put the Gray Whale out of business. Natalie is heading up the committee to stop Katz so when he is found dead on the island Natalie becomes the prime suspect. Since the primary detective on the case has it out for her and refuses to check out any clues that may prove her innocence, Natalie sets out to prove her own!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lady Delacour

    Murder at the B&B on Cranberry Island. Fast paced, full of action and mouth watering descriptions of good food. Listened with TTS. Clean with just a few mild bad words. Murder at the B&B on Cranberry Island. Fast paced, full of action and mouth watering descriptions of good food. Listened with TTS. Clean with just a few mild bad words.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rbucci

    Very fun to read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sabine

    Since I am a big fan of Karen MacInerney's Dewberry Farm series I had to give her older Gray Whale Inn series a try....and boy am I glad that I did! Even though the characters are not quite as vivid and I didn't get sucked in quite as much as in her new series I thoroughly enjoyed Murder on the Rocks. Natalie Barnes the owner of the inn and murder suspect number one makes a few unwise decisions in investigating and trying to clear her name but who makes always the smartest decisions if they find Since I am a big fan of Karen MacInerney's Dewberry Farm series I had to give her older Gray Whale Inn series a try....and boy am I glad that I did! Even though the characters are not quite as vivid and I didn't get sucked in quite as much as in her new series I thoroughly enjoyed Murder on the Rocks. Natalie Barnes the owner of the inn and murder suspect number one makes a few unwise decisions in investigating and trying to clear her name but who makes always the smartest decisions if they find themselves suddenly between a rock and a hard place. Loved her friends and the people living in the village. It will be fun coming back and visiting with everyone.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Moondance

    The alarm rang at 6 am, jolting me out from under my down comforter and into a pair of slippers. Natalie Barnes has moved from Texas to Cranberry Island, Maine to run a bed and breakfast. Just before her third month in business a real estate tycoon is trying to buy the land near the B&B to put in a high end resort. The land happens to be the breeding ground of a protected sea tern and some of the village is up in arms about the possibility of destroying the bird nests. Natalie misses her footing The alarm rang at 6 am, jolting me out from under my down comforter and into a pair of slippers. Natalie Barnes has moved from Texas to Cranberry Island, Maine to run a bed and breakfast. Just before her third month in business a real estate tycoon is trying to buy the land near the B&B to put in a high end resort. The land happens to be the breeding ground of a protected sea tern and some of the village is up in arms about the possibility of destroying the bird nests. Natalie misses her footing near a dangerous cliff one morning and discovers the body of the obnoxious businessman, Bernard Katz. Mainland police immediately peg her as the murderer and don't do a very good job of following up leads. I'm not sure why it took me so long to start this series. The first book is engaging and the characters are well thought out. The descriptions of locations were so real that I was freaking out being on the cliff with Natalie. I really enjoyed getting to know the residents of Cranberry Island. The recipes alone are worth the cost of the book! I found myself drooling as I read the scenes in the kitchen. Natalie thinks well on her feet and was able to overcome a variety of shortages of food. The mystery had twists and turns that kept providing new information about Bernard's family. I enjoyed the book so much that I read it in one sitting starting around midnight. I look forward to visiting the Gray Whale Inn again soon.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    I did enjoy this book. First in the series and I read the subsequent books before this one. It seemed a bit familiar at first, like I read it a long time ago. I'm not sure, though that I ever read this, as much as it is similar to another series located in Maine that I started. As much as I enjoy these cozy mysteries, I do really get tired of plot devices at times. Some are starting to become almost cliches - like developers/large development on small islands or communities. I don't mean to make I did enjoy this book. First in the series and I read the subsequent books before this one. It seemed a bit familiar at first, like I read it a long time ago. I'm not sure, though that I ever read this, as much as it is similar to another series located in Maine that I started. As much as I enjoy these cozy mysteries, I do really get tired of plot devices at times. Some are starting to become almost cliches - like developers/large development on small islands or communities. I don't mean to make light of this. I realize this goes on in the real world. While progress and development can be good; unchecked and rampant development is not good. So, we have a new owners of an inn on an island off Maine, threatened by a resort development that is threatening to go through right next to her inn and destroying habitat breeding grounds for terns. Of course, the new inn owner, the main character, becomes the lead suspect for the death of the developer; and we have a chief investigator, also a bit of a cliche, that focuses solely on the heroine and refuses to consider anyone else. I do get tired of these plot devices, but the heroine is human, believable and likable, which makes up for the tired devices. Also, I just love mysteries - a beginning, a middle, an end an solution. If the story is good, the character believable and likable, I can get over cliches.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tiffeny

    This was a fun read. It was a Culinary Mystery (though it isn't really advertised as such). A lady from Texas buys an Inn in Maine and is trying to keep it afloat. Unfortunate events keep occurring though, which are threatening her livelihood. A luxury resort threatening to build next door, dead bodies, vandalism to the Inn. There's also a mix of romance and recipes. I've read culinary mysteries before, like the ones with Goldie of Goldilocks Catering (by Dianne Mott Davidson), and I thought the This was a fun read. It was a Culinary Mystery (though it isn't really advertised as such). A lady from Texas buys an Inn in Maine and is trying to keep it afloat. Unfortunate events keep occurring though, which are threatening her livelihood. A luxury resort threatening to build next door, dead bodies, vandalism to the Inn. There's also a mix of romance and recipes. I've read culinary mysteries before, like the ones with Goldie of Goldilocks Catering (by Dianne Mott Davidson), and I thought they were kind of silly. This one wasn't though. The main character, Natalie, was (mostly)sensible acting and very likable. Very clean too. No sex or language. A warning though, Do Not Read if You're Trying to Diet. I couldn't stop thinking about Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies or Cranberry Walnut Scones, the whole time I read. I'm totally serious. In fact, I think I'm heading in to make cookies right now. : )

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Fischman

    What I liked about this book: the setting, the observations about running a bed and breakfast, the main character, Natalie (who moved from working in the Texas Department of Parks and Wildlife to being her own boss on the rocky coast of Maine) and her niece Gwen. Yes, they both make bad decisions, but they show promise. What I tolerated: the pedestrian whodunit and the irregular pace of the quest to figure it out. What I disliked: the stereotyping. MacInerney has to make the murder victim and his What I liked about this book: the setting, the observations about running a bed and breakfast, the main character, Natalie (who moved from working in the Texas Department of Parks and Wildlife to being her own boss on the rocky coast of Maine) and her niece Gwen. Yes, they both make bad decisions, but they show promise. What I tolerated: the pedestrian whodunit and the irregular pace of the quest to figure it out. What I disliked: the stereotyping. MacInerney has to make the murder victim and his immediate family unlikeable, so she takes the easy way out for a Yankee and makes them rich New York Jews. (view spoiler)[ The murderer and his lover are gay men, one prissy, one epicene. (hide spoiler)] Meanwhile, the love interest is a hunk out of a middle-aged woman's romance novel. I will probably read more of this series, but I hope she can do better than that!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Mensing

    First (and only at this point) Fray Whale Inn Mystery. Set on an island in Maine. It was a quick diversion. Neither particularly well nor particularly poorly written. It did have a good sense of location, but the characters were more caricatures. I’d read another, mainly to see if the author gets better at characterization. The mystery itself was pretty formulaic.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    Inn keeper finds herself accused of murder when one of her patrons is murdered.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Karen Hollins-Stallman

    This is the first in the Gray Whale Inn series by Karen MacInerney , I have read books of Karen's before but not this series. It was chosen for our book discussion and I'm so glad as I loved it! The protagonist Natalie is a strong, intelligent, and likeable. The characters are well developed with some quirkiness thrown in. The setting of Cranberry Island was perfect and the descriptions made you feel like you were there. Not to mention the breakfast food described in the book was mouth watering, This is the first in the Gray Whale Inn series by Karen MacInerney , I have read books of Karen's before but not this series. It was chosen for our book discussion and I'm so glad as I loved it! The protagonist Natalie is a strong, intelligent, and likeable. The characters are well developed with some quirkiness thrown in. The setting of Cranberry Island was perfect and the descriptions made you feel like you were there. Not to mention the breakfast food described in the book was mouth watering, good thing there's a recipe for the blueberry coffee cake. I enjoyed the pace thought it moved along at a steadily. I was so engrossed that I read it practically in one sitting and want more! I did think I knew who was the killer early on and ended up being correct. The were lots of twists and turns and few red herrings to keep you guessing. Great start to a wonderful cozy mystery series!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Brown

    I think listening to this book helped me get through it easier. It was so slow at parts that I would've definitely given up. Some scenes were dragged out and I would look at my husband and ask him if he thought the scene would ever progress!! There was one thing about the son that was a little obvious so I wasn't shocked when it came out. The reason for the murder was a little surprising though. I felt like this was a typical first in a series and am curious to see if the others get better. If I I think listening to this book helped me get through it easier. It was so slow at parts that I would've definitely given up. Some scenes were dragged out and I would look at my husband and ask him if he thought the scene would ever progress!! There was one thing about the son that was a little obvious so I wasn't shocked when it came out. The reason for the murder was a little surprising though. I felt like this was a typical first in a series and am curious to see if the others get better. If I find them on audio, I will continue with the series.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Barb

    Natalie Barnes buys the Gray Whale Inn, a bed and breakfast in Maine, and publicly opposes Bernard Katz's proposed resort development, which threatens a colony of black-chinned terns, and when Katz is found dead, Natalie is falsely accused of murder. Now she must find the true killer in order to clear her own name before its too late. A real winner. Keeps you guessing, just like mysteries should. 5 stars.

  23. 5 out of 5

    James Elliott

    Fairly good mystery with one of my favorite settings -- a New England island community! Engaging, well-written, good character development, but the usual complaints with Cozies: sometimes the main characters are a bit -- stupid, but redeem themselves in the end; and it could have used a bit more back story (i.e., how did she end up moving to the island; why is her niece staying with her, etc). I'm looking forward to reading more in this series, so maybe those questions will be answered as it goe Fairly good mystery with one of my favorite settings -- a New England island community! Engaging, well-written, good character development, but the usual complaints with Cozies: sometimes the main characters are a bit -- stupid, but redeem themselves in the end; and it could have used a bit more back story (i.e., how did she end up moving to the island; why is her niece staying with her, etc). I'm looking forward to reading more in this series, so maybe those questions will be answered as it goes on.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    This book has pretty much everything I like in a cozy mystery, and yet I struggled to finish it. The setting (a B&B on an island off the coast of Maine) was good, the characters were generally likable, the plot was fine. But there was something about it that failed to draw me back in when I put it down. I think partly it was the 1st person narration - the protagonist seems to go out of her way to make less than wise decisions - like going into a room in the B&B that has been declared a crime sce This book has pretty much everything I like in a cozy mystery, and yet I struggled to finish it. The setting (a B&B on an island off the coast of Maine) was good, the characters were generally likable, the plot was fine. But there was something about it that failed to draw me back in when I put it down. I think partly it was the 1st person narration - the protagonist seems to go out of her way to make less than wise decisions - like going into a room in the B&B that has been declared a crime scene. Despite putting herself into peril multiple times she comes out totally unscathed - at one point she crashes her bicycle on a hill, and there seem to be no injuries. Because the main law enforcement officer is unlikable she seems to equate that with incompetent, and that she somehow can do a better job. Amateur investigators are legion in the mystery genre but this one seemed particularly naive and overconfident at the same time. The setting itself is probably enough to bring me back to Cranberry Island one more time, but I hope the whole is the sum of its parts in the next one because they, unfortunately, were not here.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christine Mulligan

    Simple mystery novel that is set on cranberry island

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eileen Lynx

    Good story. Makes me want to visit Maine

  27. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    This was a fun and easy to read book. The main character bothered me at some points with her decision making skills... but it didn’t detract from the story!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    It's competently written, the plot is good, and the setting lovely. It's just that the protagonist is so stupid, she caused me actual physical pain. There is no physical evidence she doesn't deliberately touch, no lie she doesn't tell. And then I'm supposed to feel sorry for her because a cop is targeting her? No. Just no. For example, at one point, she sees what she thinks is the murder weapon, so what does she do? She grabs it, looks at it, then puts it down again. ACTUAL PHYSICAL PAIN.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Neilson

    I serial read all the books in this series, happily. I had run out of engaging mystery writers. Too many authors, especially in the "amateur sleuth" category, beat to death their ruminations about whodunnit. In Karen MacInerney's books, the main character, Nat, does not. Sure, she thinks about it, but for the most part the plot carries the mystery, not the list of potential villains as seen through the eyes of the main character. Over and over again, as in many series. Not only are the mysteries I serial read all the books in this series, happily. I had run out of engaging mystery writers. Too many authors, especially in the "amateur sleuth" category, beat to death their ruminations about whodunnit. In Karen MacInerney's books, the main character, Nat, does not. Sure, she thinks about it, but for the most part the plot carries the mystery, not the list of potential villains as seen through the eyes of the main character. Over and over again, as in many series. Not only are the mysteries engaging, but also the descriptive narrative of lobstering for a living in Maine is excellent, as are the descriptions of the setting, the details and intricacies of running a B&B, and the other key characters, throughout the series. And the bonus? Some quite wonderful sounding recipes, lots having to do with breakfast since initially the Gray Whale Inn is a B&B. Hot tip, Karen MacInerney did publish a cookbook with the recipes from the first six books. Her cookbook is only for Kindle, and somehow I can't cook from my Kindle. It turns out if you sign up for her newsletter, she sends you the cookbook as a thank-you and from that I can copy and paste the recipes into a Word document and therefore file the recipes by category in my computer recipe files and print them out individually. Just a thought. Anyway, recommend almost all the Gray Whale Inn books as entertaining and intriguing mysteries!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Murder on the Rocks by Karen MacInerney This is an amazing first whodunit novel where you truly do not know whodunit until Ms. MacInerney lets you in on it. The story takes place on the peaceful Cranberry Island, though as the author states, “Those familiar with the Cranberry Isles will…fail to recognize many of the nautical features surrounding the Cranberry Island; that is because they are figments of the author’s imagination.” Ms. MacInerney’s vivid descriptions of the Gray Whale Inn and all t Murder on the Rocks by Karen MacInerney This is an amazing first whodunit novel where you truly do not know whodunit until Ms. MacInerney lets you in on it. The story takes place on the peaceful Cranberry Island, though as the author states, “Those familiar with the Cranberry Isles will…fail to recognize many of the nautical features surrounding the Cranberry Island; that is because they are figments of the author’s imagination.” Ms. MacInerney’s vivid descriptions of the Gray Whale Inn and all the delicious foods that Natalie (Nat), the innkeeper and main character, creates makes me want to hop on a plane and get myself to Cranberry Island. The attention to detail lets you fully appreciate the characters for who they are and why they act the way they do. From the first introduction of Bernard Katz and his son and daughter-in-law I knew they were people I would not like and from the first death I knew who I wanted to be the guilty party. In some “fluff” novels the main character gets involved in solving a murder and you wonder why and what she could possibly offer in solving a crime. Not so in Murder on the Rocks. Nat is in the right place and the right time and it makes perfect sense for her to get involved even when she is “warned” not to. I was bothered at times by some of Natalie’s actions. She defied instructions from the police and she does not make an immediate call to them after there is an intruder at the Inn and she is knocked out. This does not make sense. Naturally the reader wants some romance and Ms. MacInerney does not disappoint in this area. Not only does Nat get involved with a dashing man, so does her niece, who is visiting for the summer. I hope Gwen returns in future novels as I liked her. Murder on the Rocks is a page turner; from the moment I started it I did not want to stop reading until I finished the book. Fortunately for me, I was able to do it. I hope you can too.

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