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As a new era dawns, the Batman is facing the most dangerous threat of his career! The Arkham Knight has arrived in Gotham City with an entire round table of deadly allies, and their first encounter will leave Batman shaken to his core. After Batman's brutal battle with the Arkham Knight, things only get worse when one of his most important allies jumps into the fray, and en As a new era dawns, the Batman is facing the most dangerous threat of his career! The Arkham Knight has arrived in Gotham City with an entire round table of deadly allies, and their first encounter will leave Batman shaken to his core. After Batman's brutal battle with the Arkham Knight, things only get worse when one of his most important allies jumps into the fray, and ends up in way over their head! Damian was so certain he could succeed against the Arkham Knight where his father failed--and not only was he wrong, but as it turns out, the Knight has a surprising plan for the son of Batman! But when the face behind the mask is finally revealed, we'll learn who's taken up the mantle of the Arkham Knight. What's their endgame? And what's the shocking secret that Batman never knew about a part of his life he'd taken for granted? Don't miss this thrill-ride for Batman, as Peter J. Tomasi and artist Brad Walker continue the Detective Comics saga following the historic 1000th issue of the longest running comic book in North America. Collects Detective Comics #1001-1005 and a story from Detective Comics #1000


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As a new era dawns, the Batman is facing the most dangerous threat of his career! The Arkham Knight has arrived in Gotham City with an entire round table of deadly allies, and their first encounter will leave Batman shaken to his core. After Batman's brutal battle with the Arkham Knight, things only get worse when one of his most important allies jumps into the fray, and en As a new era dawns, the Batman is facing the most dangerous threat of his career! The Arkham Knight has arrived in Gotham City with an entire round table of deadly allies, and their first encounter will leave Batman shaken to his core. After Batman's brutal battle with the Arkham Knight, things only get worse when one of his most important allies jumps into the fray, and ends up in way over their head! Damian was so certain he could succeed against the Arkham Knight where his father failed--and not only was he wrong, but as it turns out, the Knight has a surprising plan for the son of Batman! But when the face behind the mask is finally revealed, we'll learn who's taken up the mantle of the Arkham Knight. What's their endgame? And what's the shocking secret that Batman never knew about a part of his life he'd taken for granted? Don't miss this thrill-ride for Batman, as Peter J. Tomasi and artist Brad Walker continue the Detective Comics saga following the historic 1000th issue of the longest running comic book in North America. Collects Detective Comics #1001-1005 and a story from Detective Comics #1000

30 review for Batman: Detective Comics Volume 2: Arkham Knight

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    This is something of a strange book. Tomasi establishes the Arkham Knight character in the core DC universe. However, they have absolutely nothing to do with the video game version. It's not even the same character. What's strange about this is that Tomasi also wrote the various Arkham Knight comics that spawned from the video game. This is not a very compelling arc. Arkham Knight is kind of boring, talking nonsense as if they are a knight of old. It's a character I hope is quickly forgotten. Br This is something of a strange book. Tomasi establishes the Arkham Knight character in the core DC universe. However, they have absolutely nothing to do with the video game version. It's not even the same character. What's strange about this is that Tomasi also wrote the various Arkham Knight comics that spawned from the video game. This is not a very compelling arc. Arkham Knight is kind of boring, talking nonsense as if they are a knight of old. It's a character I hope is quickly forgotten. Brad Walker's art though is great. A little overly busy but sharp and crisp. Also included is an annual that is better than the main story with art by Travis Moore and Max Raynor. It's a sequel to Batman: Year Two featuring the return of the Reaper. I like how it tied into Grant Morrison's work as well with the Black Casefile and Batman, Incorporated. I have to say Tomasi's return to Batman has been a bit of a disappointment so far. I absolutely loved the run he put together with Pat Gleason on Batman & Robin during the New 52 era.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Now teamed up with artist Brad Walker, writer Peter J. Tomasi continues his saga within the Detective Comics series following its 1000th issue as he brings into play a brand-new character to Gotham City who was only ever been introduced in the critically-acclaimed video game developed by Rocksteady Studios called Batman: Arkham Knight. This mysterious character looks to put an end to Batman while somehow knowing everything about him and his way You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Now teamed up with artist Brad Walker, writer Peter J. Tomasi continues his saga within the Detective Comics series following its 1000th issue as he brings into play a brand-new character to Gotham City who was only ever been introduced in the critically-acclaimed video game developed by Rocksteady Studios called Batman: Arkham Knight. This mysterious character looks to put an end to Batman while somehow knowing everything about him and his way of life—from his tactical in-combat strategies to his most secret personal relationships. While the original identity of the Arkham Knight would’ve needed comic book writers to retcon certain character arcs, writer Peter J. Tomasi looks to introduce a twist in his interpretation as he attempts to turn the character canonical. What is Batman: Detective Comics: Arkham Knight about? On a solemn night, bats fall from the sky and send Gotham’s greatest detectives on an expedition for answers. Bruce Wayne’s first hypothesis lies in the only doctor who developed a bat serum but his visit sends him flying straight into the grasp of the mysterious Arkham Knight. Unable to identify the person behind the armour, the Arkham Knight continues their plan to purge the city of Gotham of its darkness by taking down the Dark Knight. Although they are driven with a knightly purpose bound to wreak havoc on Gotham, only Batman and his son can put an end to their round table of disillusioned villains. What a ludicrous and mediocre attempt to introduce the Arkham Knight into the Detective Comics series. The only upside to this mess is that other writers can now work with something in the future and try to not only fix this mess but also offer the character some amount of relevancy in the grand scheme of things. Where writer Peter J. Tomasi mostly embraces failure is in the plot itself, worsened by ridiculous pacing and unexplainable character demeanors. Granted that he might have had a select few ideas that merit some form of appreciation, the rest tends to prompt undesired shock and incredulity. Amongst these oddities, I believe that a particular important sequence in the Arkham Knight’s origin story halfway through the story, regarding villains and their out-of-the-blue instinct for motherhood (this includes the Joker) sealed the deal for me and sent this volume into a dark alley of no return. On top of collecting issues #1001-1005 of the Detective Comics series, this volume also includes the Annual #2 and a story contained within the celebratory #1000 issue. While it is enthralling and pays tribute to Grant Morrison’s Batman comic book run by referencing several of his work, including Batman: The Black Casebook and Batman Incorporated, this second-take on Batman: Year Two looks to also give another origin story of the infamous Reaper as Batman goes international to battle villainy. Ultimately bland and open-ended with no closure whatsoever, the only consistent element within the entire volume remains the artwork as artist Brad Walker does an impressive job in illustrating the main story arc while artists Travis Moore and Max Raynor simulate a similar style for the Annual #2 issue. The colouring is also great with thick colours and impressive contrasts to accommodate the action-heavy arc. But you know what they say: even solid artwork can’t always save poor story-telling. Batman: Detective Comics: Arkham Knight is a second-rate origin story for a character blinded by revenge and ergo lacking in appeal. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  3. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    After the end of Rocksteady's fantastic Arkham video game series, we now finally have the Arkham Knight in comic book continuity! So little to say I was interested to see who was the Arkham Knight as he is a cool villain, even though if you played the game, it's very obvious who's under the mask; but since they announced the comic book version would be someone else, I was interested to see who it was. So what did I think? To start with the pros, this volume did provide a cool Batman & Robin stor After the end of Rocksteady's fantastic Arkham video game series, we now finally have the Arkham Knight in comic book continuity! So little to say I was interested to see who was the Arkham Knight as he is a cool villain, even though if you played the game, it's very obvious who's under the mask; but since they announced the comic book version would be someone else, I was interested to see who it was. So what did I think? To start with the pros, this volume did provide a cool Batman & Robin story as we haven't gotten a good one since Tomasi wrote Batman & Robin back in the day. Tomasi definitely knows how to write that father and son dynamic you need in a book like this and it's the only time when I really like Damian as a character. I won't spoil who the Arkham Knight is, but I overall found it a bit underwhelming. Tomasi does provide a good back story for the person behind the mask, but I don't know, the way DC was hyping it up, I was expecting a little more. The Arkham Knight's diabolical plan for Gotham in the finale also doesn't really make any sense. I will say the Arkham Knight's identity underwhelmed but did still surprise me and it wasn't obvious like it was in the game. Overall though this was an okay volume.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Stewart

    Ouch. Cringes abound in Arkham Knight, which manages to be more disappointing and anti-climactic than the incredibly predictable video game the “character” originated from. The only highlight of the volume is the Reaper “Black Casebook” story.

  5. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    While not as strong as volume 1 I'm still enjoying my time with Tomasi's Batman run. So the Arkham Knight from the video games was just the Red Hood. Here, they are a completely new character. They are hunting down Batman and trying to convince him the errors of his way. So Batman and Robin team up for some old time kickass adventure. The negative is the story of the Arkham Knight is far fetched and the idea of aging is thrown completely out of the window. As if Harley Quinn is somehow 20 someth While not as strong as volume 1 I'm still enjoying my time with Tomasi's Batman run. So the Arkham Knight from the video games was just the Red Hood. Here, they are a completely new character. They are hunting down Batman and trying to convince him the errors of his way. So Batman and Robin team up for some old time kickass adventure. The negative is the story of the Arkham Knight is far fetched and the idea of aging is thrown completely out of the window. As if Harley Quinn is somehow 20 something at one point and now over 40? No way. So that part annoyed me as well as the annual just being okay. But I love Tomasi's Bruce, and his relationship and Damien is perfect. I also dug the fights, fun and over the top. Oh and Batman ACTUALLY being a Detective is always nice. This was so damn fun Detective comics. Sure, it's not mind-blowing or as good as his Batman and Robin run but I'm enjoying it. A 3.5 out of 5.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brandon St Mark

    This was okay. The Black Case book issue at the end was more interesting than the entire Arkham Knight arc that made up the rest of this volume. I’ve seen Tomasi do better, and I’ve read better ‘Tec runs so this is just kinda meh to me. Hopefully the next volume will be better because I do see potential.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    Basic plot: The Arkham Knight seeks to eliminate the darkness of Gotham in a very literal sense. The Knight's background story was an interesting one, and her delusion is intense. The story was tightly woven, and it moved along well. It seemed like there was a lot more focus on the villain than the hero here, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. It was interesting and the ending indicates that this villain is nowhere near done. The art was good.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jesús

    A few too many groan-worthy twists send this arc spiraling into pointlessness. And when a villain’s only motivation is to eliminate the Batman, I’m not convinced that “justice” is at stake, nor am I necessarily on Batman’s side. It’s a narrative paradox that would only be interesting if Batman had some self awareness about what he’s doing and why. Tomasi avoids the problem entirely by focusing only on moving the plot forward rather than digging into character psychology or moral conflicts. [Read A few too many groan-worthy twists send this arc spiraling into pointlessness. And when a villain’s only motivation is to eliminate the Batman, I’m not convinced that “justice” is at stake, nor am I necessarily on Batman’s side. It’s a narrative paradox that would only be interesting if Batman had some self awareness about what he’s doing and why. Tomasi avoids the problem entirely by focusing only on moving the plot forward rather than digging into character psychology or moral conflicts. [Read in single issues]

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marco

    - You DO realize I was Batman for quite a while before you came along and held a sword to my throat. - Yeah, good times. So much better than the previous arc! Since Batman and Robin Tomasi is one of my favorite Batman writers and now he's again at those levels. He really loves and gets these characters, their interactions and dialogue are perfectly on point. Needless to say, Walker did a terrific job as he always does.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alí Flores

    Awful. The Arkham Knight was a great character back in the day, it was a brand new character with some true reasons to hate Batman. It should’ve stay that way but DC decided to make him a canon character and they really screwed up. First of all, the backstory is boring as hell, it doesn’t feel reasonable at all, next, Astrid´s next plans are really predictable.

  11. 4 out of 5

    RG

    Whats happened to detective comics :(

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    The Arkham Knight makes themselves known in the DC Universe proper as Peter Tomasi and Brad Walker's Detective Comics run continues. Opening with the teaser story from issue #1000, the Arkham Knight story runs through #1000-1005. It's not a bad idea in theory, but I definitely feel like it's something we've seen before. There are only so many random members of this specific family that we can see before it gets a bit wrote. I like that the Knight tries to drag Batman into the daylight, literally The Arkham Knight makes themselves known in the DC Universe proper as Peter Tomasi and Brad Walker's Detective Comics run continues. Opening with the teaser story from issue #1000, the Arkham Knight story runs through #1000-1005. It's not a bad idea in theory, but I definitely feel like it's something we've seen before. There are only so many random members of this specific family that we can see before it gets a bit wrote. I like that the Knight tries to drag Batman into the daylight, literally, and Damian's role in the book feels well earned given all the work Tomasi did with the pair of them back during the New 52. The annual included here is a bit more compelling, with the return of the Black Casebook and the Reaper as well. Possibly a little overlong (it is an annual after all), but a fun diversion, especially after the Arkham Knight main story. Brad Walker handles most of the Arkham Knight story with his super-detailed artwork; I've always been hyper critical of his faces when I've seen his art before, but he's definitely improving. Doug Mahnke handles the prologue story, which is mostly splash pages so he really gets to let loose, while personal favourite Travis Moore tagteams the annual with Max Raynor. This is a very good looking book, all else aside. Arkham Knight's alright (for fightin'), but not quite the big bombastic storyline that an issue 1000 deserved. The annual perks things up and saves the volume, as does the lovely artwork throughout.

  13. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    This Batman story was just bizarre with a character we've never heard of before being announced as having years of interaction with characters in the Batman mythos, and those same characters acting completely out of character. It honestly feels like a rejected story from the Silver Age.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    I love Peter Tomasi's writing and that Robin's in this story. What I don't love is the plot. Tell me if you've seen this one before: Some rando who we've never met before comes after Batman in an effort to bring him down as vengence for something that happened off-page. And Batman is nearly brought down, not by Joker or Two Face, but by some random dude or lady. It has been done over and over and over since DC Rebirth, and this book is just that same story again. Please stop. Thank you.

  15. 5 out of 5

    n

    As with the first volume, this is another volume of really disconnected stories that don't seem to have a coherent narrative among them other than "Batman good, fight bad men." This is a shame because it starts with what could easily be one of the most interesting discussions about Batman and could've easily set up a way for him to come to a reckoning. (Honestly, the book references 'Meghan and Harry's Wedding', so this set of comics is recent enough to come to terms with a billionaire playboy b As with the first volume, this is another volume of really disconnected stories that don't seem to have a coherent narrative among them other than "Batman good, fight bad men." This is a shame because it starts with what could easily be one of the most interesting discussions about Batman and could've easily set up a way for him to come to a reckoning. (Honestly, the book references 'Meghan and Harry's Wedding', so this set of comics is recent enough to come to terms with a billionaire playboy buying fancy toys and being a pretend cop when he could be giving his money to the city to invest. In the form of taxes.) The character I'm referring to is Arkham Knight, and she starts off the conversation about how Batman is actually... not as good as he seems. And I think this is a cool point to check out, especially since Batman keeps institutionalising people (and that institution, much like real institutions, doesn't help anyone). Instead, she's a villain working with other villains because she mistakenly thinks Batman killed her mother (when it was another villain who just used Batman's weapons, erm...). I feel like so many of the writers for Batman, especially in the present iterations, just side-step what could actually be interesting conversations to have? And so the stories are boring and fall flat. Maybe Batman should take at least one page out of the changes made by the Mask of Zorro: Zorro stops being billionaire playboy and passes the mask to an Every Man Character to take his place.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Stanley

    Dective Comics Vol. 2 Arkham Knight collects Detective Comics #1000-1005 and Detective Comics Annual #2 by Peter J. Tomasi and Brad Walker. A mysterious "star" appears in the lower atmosphere over Gotham City and is accompanied by the arrival of the Arkham Knight. The main continuity Arkham Knight is not to be confused with the videogame character of the same name (and interestingly enough, also written by Tomasi). The Arkham Knight leads a cult who will bring Gotham into the light and show the Dective Comics Vol. 2 Arkham Knight collects Detective Comics #1000-1005 and Detective Comics Annual #2 by Peter J. Tomasi and Brad Walker. A mysterious "star" appears in the lower atmosphere over Gotham City and is accompanied by the arrival of the Arkham Knight. The main continuity Arkham Knight is not to be confused with the videogame character of the same name (and interestingly enough, also written by Tomasi). The Arkham Knight leads a cult who will bring Gotham into the light and show the world that Batman is Gotham's enemy. Throughout the series you learn the Arkham Knight's identity and origin. I thought the identity would be dragged out for a few issues but they didn't beat around the bush. There is also an annual with the same creative team that is really good. It is a follow-up story to Year Two with a lot of connections to Morrison's run on Batman. I thought this second volume was a great improvement to Tomasi's first arc. I am curious how prevelant Arkham Knight will be going forward and how they will evolve as a character. I could definitely see them becoming a new recurring addition to the Rogues Gallery. I really like how much Tomasi references Morrison's mid-to-late 2000s run and Tomasi's Batman & Robin run (which is a particular favorite of mine). I thought the art is this volume was also a slight step up. I'm now very excited to continue reading Detective Comics and see where Tomasi takes Batman.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Detective Comics: Arkham Knight picks up where the previous volume left off and collecting the next five issues (Detective Comics #1001–1005) of the 2016 on-going series and covers one storyline: "Medieval". "Medieval" is a five-issue storyline (Detective Comics #1001–1005) has Bruce Wayne as Batman taking on the Astrid Arkham, daughter of Jeremiah Arkham, and her Knights of the Sun. Supporting Batman in this storyline is Damian Wayne as Robin. Peter Tomasi penned the entire trade paperback. For t Detective Comics: Arkham Knight picks up where the previous volume left off and collecting the next five issues (Detective Comics #1001–1005) of the 2016 on-going series and covers one storyline: "Medieval". "Medieval" is a five-issue storyline (Detective Comics #1001–1005) has Bruce Wayne as Batman taking on the Astrid Arkham, daughter of Jeremiah Arkham, and her Knights of the Sun. Supporting Batman in this storyline is Damian Wayne as Robin. Peter Tomasi penned the entire trade paperback. For the most part, it was written somewhat well, but was somewhat disappointed in the storyline. Granted going in, I knew that the Arkham Knight would not be Jason Todd like in the videogames, but was cautiously optimistic that Tomasi would give a good rendition of the character that fell a tad flat. However, I did like the interaction between with Batman and Robin. While I typically enjoy Tomasi's stories, this one seems a tad mediocre – still good, but I was expecting more from him. Brad Walker penciled the entire trade paperback. Since he was the main penciler, the artistic flow of the trade paperback flowed exceptionally well. For the most part, I enjoyed his penciling style it gives a wonderful steady feel for the trade paperback. All in all, Detective Comics: Arkham Knight is a mediocre continuation to what would hopefully be a wonderful series.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Bautista

    Happy 1000th issue Detective Comics! Ooo! The introduction of a new villain! Someone who has broken through Batman's usual defenses! And woah! All of Gotham is in danger due to this new threat! So why is that when we get the big reveal of who this new antagonist is... it took an entire issue for facial recognition to come up with nothing and an entire issue after that for the Arkham Knight's father to exposit all the backstory... And... I don't care. A disaffected young adult who thought Batman Happy 1000th issue Detective Comics! Ooo! The introduction of a new villain! Someone who has broken through Batman's usual defenses! And woah! All of Gotham is in danger due to this new threat! So why is that when we get the big reveal of who this new antagonist is... it took an entire issue for facial recognition to come up with nothing and an entire issue after that for the Arkham Knight's father to exposit all the backstory... And... I don't care. A disaffected young adult who thought Batman was the cause of their mother's death has a grand plan to purge the city from their reliance on Batman and exterminate him in the process. So bold. So driven. So boring. So oft-repeated. At least the revelation produced the best part of the whole book: Batman: So that explains why [spolier] sees me as a curse hanging over Gotham. Robin: (smiling) Haven't we all at some point? Batman: (glaring, looks away) Robin: *tt* Just kidding. And despite that brief moment of adolescent cluelessness, nothing of material changes... Well, except... Cool? A new character to add to the Rogues Gallery! Well, not really. This was a drag to read with very little reward to have slogged through it. So, Happy 1000th Issue, Batman! Maybe the Annual #2 will lead to a more interesting story...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    Taking the cue from the "Arkham Knight" videogame, DC finally decides to bring the character into the comic realm. Where as in the game the identity of the Knight is Jason Todd, here they establish a much stronger connection to Arkham Asylum and make the Knight Astrid Arkham, daughter of the head of the asylum. Having grown up amongst the inmates, she develops a hatred for Batman and wants to take everything away from him. The art is the star of this Volume. The story is good, but feels a bit for Taking the cue from the "Arkham Knight" videogame, DC finally decides to bring the character into the comic realm. Where as in the game the identity of the Knight is Jason Todd, here they establish a much stronger connection to Arkham Asylum and make the Knight Astrid Arkham, daughter of the head of the asylum. Having grown up amongst the inmates, she develops a hatred for Batman and wants to take everything away from him. The art is the star of this Volume. The story is good, but feels a bit forced as Astrid isn't a character we've ever seen before. She does escape captivity at the end, so hopefully we will see the development of the character go deeper the next time she shows up. The last issue has Batman facing off against "The Reaper", an old Bat-villain, returned through the inheritance of the original's son. We'll definitely be seeing more about this in the next Volume. Overall, this one was pretty good. Recommend.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I liked this, for the most part. I appreciate the effort involved in creating a new Batman villain. The origin for the Arkham Knight is fairly clever, though (of course) a bit far-fetched. There's some good dialog here, though it's a bit clunky in places. Alfred and Damian both get a few good lines in. (Tomasi seems to have inserted some rock music lyrics into the story at a few points, and that didn't work well for me. It just seemed awkward.) I also appreciate that the book had a consistent art I liked this, for the most part. I appreciate the effort involved in creating a new Batman villain. The origin for the Arkham Knight is fairly clever, though (of course) a bit far-fetched. There's some good dialog here, though it's a bit clunky in places. Alfred and Damian both get a few good lines in. (Tomasi seems to have inserted some rock music lyrics into the story at a few points, and that didn't work well for me. It just seemed awkward.) I also appreciate that the book had a consistent art team for this story, Brad Walker and Andrew Hennessy. I think they did an overall good job with it, moving the story along at a good pace and keeping things visually interesting.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Par-for-the-course Batman here. The Arkham Knight arrives on the scene with a vendetta against Batman. Who doesn't have one these days? The battle scenes are decent and the plot moves quickly. Nary a surprise here nor much big picture momentum, but it's hardly the worst Batman comic. The annual issue reads a bit like Batman as James Bond and features yet another villain with a Bat-detta and dead parents. Isn't there someone out there who's never encountered the Batman? I'd like to see that villai Par-for-the-course Batman here. The Arkham Knight arrives on the scene with a vendetta against Batman. Who doesn't have one these days? The battle scenes are decent and the plot moves quickly. Nary a surprise here nor much big picture momentum, but it's hardly the worst Batman comic. The annual issue reads a bit like Batman as James Bond and features yet another villain with a Bat-detta and dead parents. Isn't there someone out there who's never encountered the Batman? I'd like to see that villain.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Norman Cook

    I enjoyed the dynamics of the Batman and Robin relationship. The new villain left something to be desired, however. Arkham Knight was set up as a super-villain on par with Joker, et al, but Batman really didn't have much trouble defeating her. Yes, her. It's great to see a villain of this caliber be a woman. I just didn't buy her (very wordy) origin as very credible. The artwork is excellent, although some of the underwater scenes were a bit chaotic. The story from Annual #2 is just kind of avera I enjoyed the dynamics of the Batman and Robin relationship. The new villain left something to be desired, however. Arkham Knight was set up as a super-villain on par with Joker, et al, but Batman really didn't have much trouble defeating her. Yes, her. It's great to see a villain of this caliber be a woman. I just didn't buy her (very wordy) origin as very credible. The artwork is excellent, although some of the underwater scenes were a bit chaotic. The story from Annual #2 is just kind of average, and without much of a definite conclusion.

  23. 5 out of 5

    J A SPONG

    A mildly entertaining story totally ruined by issue #1004 which tells the Arkham Knights origin story. Totally unbelievable and this is a comic about a billionaire who dresses as a bat and punches people.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kris Ritchie

    2.5 rounded down. Another flip-and-skip volume, as the plot never really took off for me. My favorite part of this was the opening issue with the various splash pages of Batman fighting his rogues gallery.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    Coming out of Detective Comics issue 1,000 I had high hopes for this story line but while it started strong it never finds it's legs and really peters out quickly. Only the decent annual collected here as a separate story from the Arkham Knight arch saved this from a two star review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    Not as good as the last trade but still not as bad as some lately. But uh-oh the next trade has the Joker on it.....this does not bode well for the next one. I will give it a try but I may drop this from my read list if it goes the route of Death of the Family.

  27. 5 out of 5

    David Thomas

    Why add the Arkham Knight but make them nowhere near as menacing or cool as the videogame? For obvious reasons the character had to be changed a bit, but this take is disappointing. Weak character and weird confusing plot. Too bad as I was really looking forward to this.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Butcher

    I liked this idea of a committed "hero" looking to save Gotham from Batman the Villain.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Shaffer

    Awful Knight.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    A good solid Batman story. Nothing particularly special, but a lot of fun.

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