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She Votes: How U.S. Women Won Suffrage, and What Happened Next

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She Votes is an intersectional story of the women who won suffrage, and those who have continued to raise their voices for equality ever since. From the first female Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation to the first woman to wear pants on the Senate floor, author Bridget Quinn shines a spotlight on the women who broke down barriers. This deluxe book also honors the 100th She Votes is an intersectional story of the women who won suffrage, and those who have continued to raise their voices for equality ever since. From the first female Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation to the first woman to wear pants on the Senate floor, author Bridget Quinn shines a spotlight on the women who broke down barriers. This deluxe book also honors the 100th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment with illustrations by 100 women artists. • A colorful, intersectional account of the struggle for women's rights in the United States • Features heart-pounding scenes and keenly observed portraits • Includes dynamic women from Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Audre Lorde She Votes is a refreshing and illuminating book for feminists of all kinds. Each artist brings a unique perspective; together, they embody the multiplicity of women in the United States. • From the pen of rockstar author and historian Bridget Quinn, this book tells the story of women's suffrage. • Perfect gift for feminists of all ages and genders who want to learn more about the 19th amendment and the journey to equal representation • A visually gorgeous book that will be at home on the shelf or on the coffee table • Add it to the shelf with books like Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Irin Carmon and Shana Knizhnik; Rad American Women A-Z: Rebels, Trailblazers, and Visionaries who Shaped Our History . . . and Our Future! by Kate Schatz and Miriam Klein Stahl; and Why I March: Images from The Women's March Around the World by Abrams Books.


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She Votes is an intersectional story of the women who won suffrage, and those who have continued to raise their voices for equality ever since. From the first female Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation to the first woman to wear pants on the Senate floor, author Bridget Quinn shines a spotlight on the women who broke down barriers. This deluxe book also honors the 100th She Votes is an intersectional story of the women who won suffrage, and those who have continued to raise their voices for equality ever since. From the first female Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation to the first woman to wear pants on the Senate floor, author Bridget Quinn shines a spotlight on the women who broke down barriers. This deluxe book also honors the 100th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment with illustrations by 100 women artists. • A colorful, intersectional account of the struggle for women's rights in the United States • Features heart-pounding scenes and keenly observed portraits • Includes dynamic women from Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Audre Lorde She Votes is a refreshing and illuminating book for feminists of all kinds. Each artist brings a unique perspective; together, they embody the multiplicity of women in the United States. • From the pen of rockstar author and historian Bridget Quinn, this book tells the story of women's suffrage. • Perfect gift for feminists of all ages and genders who want to learn more about the 19th amendment and the journey to equal representation • A visually gorgeous book that will be at home on the shelf or on the coffee table • Add it to the shelf with books like Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Irin Carmon and Shana Knizhnik; Rad American Women A-Z: Rebels, Trailblazers, and Visionaries who Shaped Our History . . . and Our Future! by Kate Schatz and Miriam Klein Stahl; and Why I March: Images from The Women's March Around the World by Abrams Books.

30 review for She Votes: How U.S. Women Won Suffrage, and What Happened Next

  1. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    This is a well-researched, informative book about women’s suffrage, complete with beautiful illustrations throughout. I knew a bit about the history of women gaining the right to vote and their progress and setbacks in the political world since then, but I loved getting a more thorough overview of the topic highlighting many of the trailblazers over the course of the last century.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I was provided an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Such an important and informative read - especially this close to the election. It was well researched and I appreciated the gorgeous illustrations coupled with fascinating stories that have rarely come to the mainstream. While it chronicles suffrage from a historical perspective, it also includes stories of women living today who are dedicated to gender equality. In no way was this a dry history of women's suffrage, rath I was provided an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Such an important and informative read - especially this close to the election. It was well researched and I appreciated the gorgeous illustrations coupled with fascinating stories that have rarely come to the mainstream. While it chronicles suffrage from a historical perspective, it also includes stories of women living today who are dedicated to gender equality. In no way was this a dry history of women's suffrage, rather it was colorful, diverse, and accessible. Highly recommend.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jane Lancellotti

    She Votes sang a strong song to my old feminist heart. Friends, we are led by these stories. So important to know these women, to talk about them, and share. Smartly put together. A joy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    A Home Library

    𝙰𝚁𝙲 𝚁𝙴𝚅𝙸𝙴𝚆: “𝚂𝚑𝚎 𝚅𝚘𝚝𝚎𝚜: 𝙷𝚘𝚠 𝚄.𝚂. 𝚆𝚘𝚖𝚎𝚗 𝚆𝚘𝚗 𝚂𝚞𝚏𝚏𝚛𝚊𝚐𝚎, 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚆𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝙷𝚊𝚙𝚙𝚎𝚗𝚎𝚍 𝙽𝚎𝚡𝚝“ 𝚋𝚢 𝙱𝚛𝚒𝚍𝚐𝚎𝚝 𝚀𝚞𝚒𝚗𝚗 (𝙰𝚞𝚐𝚞𝚜𝚝 𝟸𝟶𝟸𝟶) . Thank you to @chroniclebooks and @netgalley for the opportunity to review this ARC copy ahead of publication this month. . Summary — As the title would suggest, this book is about women’s suffrage in the US. How does it differ from all the others on similar topics? It is intersectional, covering underrepresented figures and peoples in American history, and does so in an informal dialogue. Mo 𝙰𝚁𝙲 𝚁𝙴𝚅𝙸𝙴𝚆: “𝚂𝚑𝚎 𝚅𝚘𝚝𝚎𝚜: 𝙷𝚘𝚠 𝚄.𝚂. 𝚆𝚘𝚖𝚎𝚗 𝚆𝚘𝚗 𝚂𝚞𝚏𝚏𝚛𝚊𝚐𝚎, 𝚊𝚗𝚍 𝚆𝚑𝚊𝚝 𝙷𝚊𝚙𝚙𝚎𝚗𝚎𝚍 𝙽𝚎𝚡𝚝“ 𝚋𝚢 𝙱𝚛𝚒𝚍𝚐𝚎𝚝 𝚀𝚞𝚒𝚗𝚗 (𝙰𝚞𝚐𝚞𝚜𝚝 𝟸𝟶𝟸𝟶) . Thank you to @chroniclebooks and @netgalley for the opportunity to review this ARC copy ahead of publication this month. . Summary — As the title would suggest, this book is about women’s suffrage in the US. How does it differ from all the others on similar topics? It is intersectional, covering underrepresented figures and peoples in American history, and does so in an informal dialogue. More importantly (to me), the amazing (and I mean STUNNING) artistic designs by 100 women (meant to correspond with 100th anniversary of Nineteenth Amendment to US Constitution). . Review — While I can’t show the art ahead of its publication, let me tell you: this book will be gorgeous in print. A diverse collection of artists brought to life elements of history in a stunning and beautiful capacity. . As for the writing style, it is not 100% to my taste, but it is by no means bad. In fact, the writing is praised often as “accessible” meaning it’s not overly academic. It’s conversational, it’s got a curse word or two. Honestly, the art makes up for my lukewarm reaction to the text. At some points, I was bored; whereas, some portions had me captivated and amused (how could I be amused at such content?! Haha!). I do appreciate the conscious effort to include often “forgotten history.” Meaning, there are people, in this case BIPOC women, and events that are often glanced over in mainstream history discourse. Not currently, as there are now more resources and attention to this, hopefully ensuring that the whole story gets told. . Who’s It Good For? — All in all, this is worthy book for celebration. I am still LOVING all of the art. Just wow. And I think this would make an excellent read or gift for anyone, but especially: 1) feminists, 2) women, 3) fans of art, 4) fans of history, 5) younger readers who may not be keen on reading, 6) anyone who wants to know more about the struggle to gain suffrage.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Jack

    Suffragists Past and Feminists Present The first thing you notice about this book is how colorful it is. We don't normally think about colorful illustrations in a serious book meant for adults, but I think it adds a really nice touch. This book takes a look at the history of the suffragist movement from its earliest days, looking at key people that you have heard of and a few that you might not have associated with the suffragist movement, as well as how we carry on their spirit today. I like tha Suffragists Past and Feminists Present The first thing you notice about this book is how colorful it is. We don't normally think about colorful illustrations in a serious book meant for adults, but I think it adds a really nice touch. This book takes a look at the history of the suffragist movement from its earliest days, looking at key people that you have heard of and a few that you might not have associated with the suffragist movement, as well as how we carry on their spirit today. I like that the author added her own little commentary here and there. This is no dry history book. I particularly liked reading the story of Mary Cassatt as I had no idea of some details shared; I had always just been a fan of her artwork, as I am a big fan of the Impressionists in general and liked that she cracked the boys’ club, so to speak. I appreciated learning about not only the movers and shakers of feminism’s distant past but also ones who have lived (and are living) within my lifetime, women who are fully stuck into continuing the work of gender equality through to contemporary times. Given that it is an election year as I write this review, the choice of the title resonates with me. We need to remember how hard our foremothers (and even some forefathers) fought for our right to let our voices be heard in the political world, allowing us to help shape our country’s future. Let's make sure that we honor their struggle and sacrifice, and let our voices be heard, loud and proud, at this and every election. I received a free copy of this book, but that did not affect my review. My book blog: https://www.readingfanaticreviews.com

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    *A digital copy of She Votes was provided to me through NetGalley. Thank you to Chronicle Press and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book! **This book also marks 500 books read and logged on Goodreads. What a fantastic book to hit that milestone with! (I am also very aware that I am the first Goodreads reviewer for this book! Wild!) Having just graduated college, where I studied politics, history, and women's and gender studies, much of this history I knew or knew of through m *A digital copy of She Votes was provided to me through NetGalley. Thank you to Chronicle Press and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this book! **This book also marks 500 books read and logged on Goodreads. What a fantastic book to hit that milestone with! (I am also very aware that I am the first Goodreads reviewer for this book! Wild!) Having just graduated college, where I studied politics, history, and women's and gender studies, much of this history I knew or knew of through my studies. What is presented in this book is a well synthesized survey of suffrage and feminism in the United States. Quinn doesn't sugarcoat historical figures or paint them as saints, but rather takes the time to point out their flaws and where they were wrong (see: Alice Paul not wanting black women to march in her suffrage parade). Quinn also does a great job of spotlighting many different voices and women from completely different socioeconomic and professional backgrounds. There were a few times I wondered "oh, I hope she'll mention or discuss X" and it would always be on the next page! Quinn's language is accessible throughout, making this a great read for teens and young adults, but also adult readers wanting to celebrate the successes of women in the US. In addition to the narrative, the book is also full of gorgeous art by women artists. Each piece was beautiful and it was always exciting to turn the page and wonder what art would be next. This book concluded wonderfully, and it was exactly what I needed. I imagine it will be what other readers need as well. I'm really looking forward to see others reading this book!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Bridget Quinn writes in a very accessible way speaking directly to readers and using colorful language. So this is not your traditional dry history on a topic. She also makes sure to cover all the not great parts about Women's suffrage-racism being one of the biggest. Quinn dives deeper into the suffrage story that you already know, not just detailing the people we remember today like Susan B. Anthony, but all the other players as well. She also details fascinating facts like Oregon rejected wom Bridget Quinn writes in a very accessible way speaking directly to readers and using colorful language. So this is not your traditional dry history on a topic. She also makes sure to cover all the not great parts about Women's suffrage-racism being one of the biggest. Quinn dives deeper into the suffrage story that you already know, not just detailing the people we remember today like Susan B. Anthony, but all the other players as well. She also details fascinating facts like Oregon rejected women's right to vote 5 times! (58). The first woman was elected to Congress in 1917, which was before women in the entire US had the right to vote (95). Women were jailed for protesting at the White House, and then during a hunger strike force-feed, which is considered a form of torture (111). Sadly there was also a group of women against the vote, and Quinn points out, "it seems ironic today that there were women so determined not to vote that they protested the possibility, organized, and were in effect politically active in hopes of defeating political engagement by women" (78). The book ends with a look at how women continued to speak out from 1920s to the present day. The illustrations are lovely, and done by 100 female artists. This is a fantastic history of women's suffrage in the US. I received an advanced uncorrected digital galley from the publisher via Netgalley. Page numbers are from this galley and may not be the same in the final book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nan

    Bridget Quinn has complied an enlightening and even entertaining history of the fight for suffrage and what happened afterward. Intersectionality is well-represented, although a chapter devoted to the women and the 1965 Voting Rights Act would have been helpful. The timeline jumps around a bit, but the informal style of the book makes it easier to forgive. Beautifully packaged with 100 illustrations from current women artists. Actual rating: 3.75

  9. 4 out of 5

    Haley Chura

    Exactly the book I needed to read right now. SHE VOTES is an easy to read and well researched journey through 200 years of U.S. women’s voting history - a fight that continues today! I really appreciated the author’s care for the stories of these incredible women. The gorgeous illustrations make this an excellent gift. SHE VOTES is a book I’m proud to have on my bookshelf.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ietrio

    An exploitation book to ride the "Anniversary" wave. Nothing beyond Wikipedia, and any controversy left out so the Morning TV shows would feel great to invite the author no matter their political affiliation.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I received a digital review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie M.

    I love this book. The writing is as gorgeous as the artwork.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Debi G.

    Love the art!

  14. 4 out of 5

    E.J.

    My favorite thing about this book is the illustrations. They are a variety of styles of art, all very colorful and dramatic. My least favorite thing was the tone of the book. It was done very I'm-guessing-at-people's-thoughts-and-feelings. Author kept saying, "I imagine". And she may very well be right but it felt heavy handed. The book does talk about early suffragettes as well as abolitionist movements, and does touch on many historically important and historically forgotten women. The book wa My favorite thing about this book is the illustrations. They are a variety of styles of art, all very colorful and dramatic. My least favorite thing was the tone of the book. It was done very I'm-guessing-at-people's-thoughts-and-feelings. Author kept saying, "I imagine". And she may very well be right but it felt heavy handed. The book does talk about early suffragettes as well as abolitionist movements, and does touch on many historically important and historically forgotten women. The book was interesting at times and droned on at others. I had a hard time accepting it as fully factional since so much of it came across as supposition. Not a bad read. I would say worth checking out but consider other sources.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    This book was even better than I expected it to be. I loved the layout with the photos of the women that were being discussed. I found it pleasing to the eye. There is so much great information in this book. Despite having taken some women's history classes, I found a vast amount of knowledge in this book that I was not aware of. I wish everyone would read this book. I can't recommend it enough!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dawn Thomas

    She Votes by Bridget Quinn Book Review by Dawn Thomas 235 Pages Publisher: Chronicle Books Release Date August 11, 2020 History, Nonfiction (Adult) I love the three quotes at the beginning of the book. The forward of the book is written by Nell Irvin Painter. The book is described the book as an intersectional work. She talks about how she felt when the vote returns were coming in for the 2016 presidential election. I can relate to her level of anxiety. She discusses the roots of the Women’s March wit She Votes by Bridget Quinn Book Review by Dawn Thomas 235 Pages Publisher: Chronicle Books Release Date August 11, 2020 History, Nonfiction (Adult) I love the three quotes at the beginning of the book. The forward of the book is written by Nell Irvin Painter. The book is described the book as an intersectional work. She talks about how she felt when the vote returns were coming in for the 2016 presidential election. I can relate to her level of anxiety. She discusses the roots of the Women’s March with a nod to a previous march in 1913. It is inclusive and contains many voices on different topics. Chapter 1: Seneca Chapter 2: Voices Carry: Sojourner Truth Chapter 3: Enter Anthony Chapter 4: Winning the West: Sacajawea Chapter 5: Bloomers, Bicycles & Basketball Chapter 6: The Art of Protest: Mary Cassatt vs. The Antis Chapter 7: Deeds Not Words Chapter 8: Early Arrival: Jeannette Rankin Chapter 9: Law Breaking to Law Making Chapter 10: War of the Roses Chapter 11: Women Are People Too: Betty Friedan Chapter 12: Picture This Chapter 13: Running Strong: Patsy Matsu Takemoto Mink Chapter 14: Lesbians & Liberation: Audre Lorde Chapter 15: First Person Female Chapter 16: Represent: Guerrilla Girls Chapter 17: Year of the Woman Chapter 18: Third Wave: Riot Grrrl Chapter 19: Young Americans I was impressed with the vast amount of research done to create this book. The author did a wonderful job acknowledging all the women. The writing style was more like listening to a conversation instead of a dull reference book. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in learning more about women’s right to vote and the prominent women that pushed for it to pass. Hopefully, we will be celebrating the passing of the ERA in the upcoming years.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Meghna

    Thank you, Goodreads for letting me read this book it is a pleasure for you!🤣🤗😗

  18. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rhiannon

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kristin DiBum

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lora Goldenberg

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeanene

  23. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Sell

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stacy Stanford

  25. 5 out of 5

    Smiley

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Bristol

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laurel

  29. 4 out of 5

    Laura Joakimson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Whitney Stohr

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