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The Tale of the Devil: The Biography of Devil Anse Hatfield

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The first biography of Devil Anse Hatfield, written by great grandson Dr. Coleman Hatfield and noted historian Robert Y. Spence, will be published this summer. The Tale of the Devil is the story of Hatfield patriarch Devil Anse Hatfield, beginning with his childhood in frontier Appalachia; it also covers his Civil War days as a noted confederate soldier. The 320-pages will The first biography of Devil Anse Hatfield, written by great grandson Dr. Coleman Hatfield and noted historian Robert Y. Spence, will be published this summer. The Tale of the Devil is the story of Hatfield patriarch Devil Anse Hatfield, beginning with his childhood in frontier Appalachia; it also covers his Civil War days as a noted confederate soldier. The 320-pages will also enlighten the reader of the true story of the Hatfield-McCoy feud, the killings, and the post-feud years for this character of American History.


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The first biography of Devil Anse Hatfield, written by great grandson Dr. Coleman Hatfield and noted historian Robert Y. Spence, will be published this summer. The Tale of the Devil is the story of Hatfield patriarch Devil Anse Hatfield, beginning with his childhood in frontier Appalachia; it also covers his Civil War days as a noted confederate soldier. The 320-pages will The first biography of Devil Anse Hatfield, written by great grandson Dr. Coleman Hatfield and noted historian Robert Y. Spence, will be published this summer. The Tale of the Devil is the story of Hatfield patriarch Devil Anse Hatfield, beginning with his childhood in frontier Appalachia; it also covers his Civil War days as a noted confederate soldier. The 320-pages will also enlighten the reader of the true story of the Hatfield-McCoy feud, the killings, and the post-feud years for this character of American History.

30 review for The Tale of the Devil: The Biography of Devil Anse Hatfield

  1. 5 out of 5

    William

    Just finished reading this book this morning (7-22-2014) and I am convinced that Dr. Coleman C. Hatfield brings forth a very credible biography of his great grandfather Anderson (Devil Anse) Hatfield from research done by his father (Coleman A. Hatfield) son of Cap, who was a very prominent player in this feud. Prior to reading this book, I read Otis K. Rices' (The Hatfield's & The McCoys) which Dr. Coleman C. Hatfield claims (along with Altina L. Wallers book) are more factual about the feud tha Just finished reading this book this morning (7-22-2014) and I am convinced that Dr. Coleman C. Hatfield brings forth a very credible biography of his great grandfather Anderson (Devil Anse) Hatfield from research done by his father (Coleman A. Hatfield) son of Cap, who was a very prominent player in this feud. Prior to reading this book, I read Otis K. Rices' (The Hatfield's & The McCoys) which Dr. Coleman C. Hatfield claims (along with Altina L. Wallers book) are more factual about the feud than other published accounts. As some reviewers have noted, very little is actually written about Devil Anse prior to all this turmoil which I can understand (how many of you reading this can write a book about one of your grandparents, very few I think). Some bash what later Hatfield's made of themselves. Well yea, they probally wanted to forget this brutal part of their history and as every parent wants, a better life for their children. Another point I'd like to bring up is, I don't really think this was just a Hatfield, McCoy feud in the beginning. So many others were involved (non-relatives) prior to the three McCoy boys being executed, and the media at that time was looking to sensationalize the story for their benefit. How did this all happen. Remember, this was after the civil war, a sparsely inhabit part of the country that was being forgotten by modern America. Corruption in politics probably played a big part in it as well. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and heartily recommend it (along with Rices' book) to anyone interested in reading about this chapter in American history that will be with us for generations to come. And no, I'm not related to anyone mentioned in the conflict.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jill Crosby

    Instead of focusing on the life of Devil Anse Hatfield, "Father" of the Appalachain feud that still lives in the American conscience, this book seems like an apologetical approach to the life of the Hatfield family penned by 2 Hatfield descendants who are bound and determined that we gloss over events leading up to and occuring in the famous 14+-year feud, directing our attention instead to all the accomplishments of subsequent Hatfields and leading us to believe that, "Yeah, that feud wasn't a Instead of focusing on the life of Devil Anse Hatfield, "Father" of the Appalachain feud that still lives in the American conscience, this book seems like an apologetical approach to the life of the Hatfield family penned by 2 Hatfield descendants who are bound and determined that we gloss over events leading up to and occuring in the famous 14+-year feud, directing our attention instead to all the accomplishments of subsequent Hatfields and leading us to believe that, "Yeah, that feud wasn't a good thing, but dang, look at how we Hatfields have been instrumental in developing the great state of West Virginia." Evolving from a gun-toting clan that seemed to solve its problems via retrubutive shoot-outs (and, seemingly, being "in the wrong place at the wrong time" every time a conflict arose between the Hatfields and anyone else in their mountain homeland, the Hatfields went on to spawn generations of doctors, lawyers, judges, and politicians who were "instrumental" in turning West Virginia from its timbering/moonshining/feuding roots to a respectable state of the union where the coal industry has brought economic security, a high standard of living, and an enviable school system devoted to excellence in education (yes, this is sarcasm.) Not a good source of information on the actual feud (or, for that matter, on the life of the title character), but a somewhat readable attempt at tracing the development of West Virginia from Hillbilly Heaven to a state that actually contriubutes to the GNP of 21st century America. Also--a 40-page "about the author(s)" section was totally unnecessary.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Elliott

    This had all the potential to be a book that I wouldn't like. I was fairly familiar with the topic having read it several times before (usually means redundant information), it was written by a descendant of the subject (Anse's great-grandson) meaning a loss of objectivity (which he acknowledged several times and didn't really seem that biased to me) yet I found that I really liked this book. The author's forays into cultural background, economy and environmental changes could have been tedious This had all the potential to be a book that I wouldn't like. I was fairly familiar with the topic having read it several times before (usually means redundant information), it was written by a descendant of the subject (Anse's great-grandson) meaning a loss of objectivity (which he acknowledged several times and didn't really seem that biased to me) yet I found that I really liked this book. The author's forays into cultural background, economy and environmental changes could have been tedious but he tied them in so well that they were important. I can say that I did learn a little about Devil Anse outside of what I already knew and since the author was a Hatfield he ha good perspective to add to the story. However, if you are looking for the stories of the feud, you will find them to be brief since the story is genuinely a biography of Anse. Surprisingly to me, this book was much better than I expected. Well done!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I'm a Hatfield descendant and I've always been interested in learning about my cousins that were part of one of America's famous feuds. I grew up hearing the stories about Devil Anse, Johnse & Roseanna, Randall McCoy, and everyone involved. Luckily after the great History Channel miniseries my uncle gave me this book to read telling more about Anse and that side of our family. We all go back to the 1st Ephriam Hatfield but we're from Joseph's line, where Anse was from Valentine's. This book was I'm a Hatfield descendant and I've always been interested in learning about my cousins that were part of one of America's famous feuds. I grew up hearing the stories about Devil Anse, Johnse & Roseanna, Randall McCoy, and everyone involved. Luckily after the great History Channel miniseries my uncle gave me this book to read telling more about Anse and that side of our family. We all go back to the 1st Ephriam Hatfield but we're from Joseph's line, where Anse was from Valentine's. This book was written by Anse's great-grandson and it was great getting to know more about Anse's personality, other stories I hadn't heard, as well as learn about his parents and our common ancestors. It was really great too to see more focus on Anse's 2nd son Cap as until the History Channel miniseries I had always heard so much more about Johnse. This was really great to read more on my cousins and I feel like I know more of what really happened back then and what it was like to live back then.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    This book was extremely good at creating visualizations of the families, even before you looked at any of the actual photos.I felt as though I were watching a movie while I read it. My family on my Dad's side are all from eastern Ky, so this also gave me more insight on some of my own family history concerning these very clannish people. This book was extremely good at creating visualizations of the families, even before you looked at any of the actual photos.I felt as though I were watching a movie while I read it. My family on my Dad's side are all from eastern Ky, so this also gave me more insight on some of my own family history concerning these very clannish people.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Damon

    This book I would advise all readers to read this book.It tells the life of men who did god awful things but all over a misunderstanding.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Reads like genealogy lists. Kept my interest for a short while, then one day I just couldn't pick it up anymore. Reads like genealogy lists. Kept my interest for a short while, then one day I just couldn't pick it up anymore.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Fran

    Fascinating story of Devil Anse and the Hatfield-McCoy feud.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    I'm enjoying reading this because I am a direct descendant of Anse Hatfield. I'm enjoying reading this because I am a direct descendant of Anse Hatfield.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rex

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kris Scott

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Hart

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sheila Owens

  14. 5 out of 5

    F. Davis

  15. 5 out of 5

    Devan

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  17. 4 out of 5

    Patrice M. Kovacic

  18. 4 out of 5

    JoAnn

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ginger Lynch

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  21. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cyndi

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jason Cox

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Hoerner

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  26. 5 out of 5

    Denise

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rick Wilson

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ann

  29. 4 out of 5

    Janthe Patton Cogar

  30. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

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