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12: The Elements Of Great Managing (Unabridged) [Cd] [Audiobook]

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The Sequel to the Million-Copy Classic that Revolutionized Employee EngagementHow do great managers inspire top performance in employees? How do they generate enthusiasm, unite disparate personalities to focus on a common mission, and drive teams to achieve ever-higher goals? More than a decade ago, The Gallup Organization combed through its database of more than 1 million The Sequel to the Million-Copy Classic that Revolutionized Employee EngagementHow do great managers inspire top performance in employees? How do they generate enthusiasm, unite disparate personalities to focus on a common mission, and drive teams to achieve ever-higher goals? More than a decade ago, The Gallup Organization combed through its database of more than 1 million employee and manager interviews to identify the elements most important in sustaining workplace excellence. These elements were revealed in the 1999 bestseller "First, Break All the Rules." "12: The Elements of Great Managing" is that management classic's long-awaited sequel. It follows great managers as they implement the 12 elements to turn around a failing call center, save a struggling hotel, improve patient care in a hospital, maintain production through power outages, and successfully face a host of other challenges in settings around the world. Gallup's study now includes 10 million employee and manager interviews spanning 114 countries and conducted in 41 languages. In "12," authors Rodd Wagner and James K. Harter weave the latest Gallup insights with recent discoveries in the fields of neuroscience, game theory, psychology, sociology, and economics. Written for managers and employees of companies large and small, "12" explains what every company needs to know about creating and sustaining employee engagement.


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The Sequel to the Million-Copy Classic that Revolutionized Employee EngagementHow do great managers inspire top performance in employees? How do they generate enthusiasm, unite disparate personalities to focus on a common mission, and drive teams to achieve ever-higher goals? More than a decade ago, The Gallup Organization combed through its database of more than 1 million The Sequel to the Million-Copy Classic that Revolutionized Employee EngagementHow do great managers inspire top performance in employees? How do they generate enthusiasm, unite disparate personalities to focus on a common mission, and drive teams to achieve ever-higher goals? More than a decade ago, The Gallup Organization combed through its database of more than 1 million employee and manager interviews to identify the elements most important in sustaining workplace excellence. These elements were revealed in the 1999 bestseller "First, Break All the Rules." "12: The Elements of Great Managing" is that management classic's long-awaited sequel. It follows great managers as they implement the 12 elements to turn around a failing call center, save a struggling hotel, improve patient care in a hospital, maintain production through power outages, and successfully face a host of other challenges in settings around the world. Gallup's study now includes 10 million employee and manager interviews spanning 114 countries and conducted in 41 languages. In "12," authors Rodd Wagner and James K. Harter weave the latest Gallup insights with recent discoveries in the fields of neuroscience, game theory, psychology, sociology, and economics. Written for managers and employees of companies large and small, "12" explains what every company needs to know about creating and sustaining employee engagement.

30 review for 12: The Elements Of Great Managing (Unabridged) [Cd] [Audiobook]

  1. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    My company is SO obsessed with Gallup. It's like a cult! Learned some things from this, but I'm so over Gallup LOL My company is SO obsessed with Gallup. It's like a cult! Learned some things from this, but I'm so over Gallup LOL

  2. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Jill

    This is an excerpt from the blog post I wrote on this book: I was recently asked by a long-time friend to join a business book club and I jumped at the offer. I want to and NEED to read business books, so the added accountability was just what I needed to make sure I finish them when other, seemingly more urgent things on my to do list vie for my time. The three other women in the club are all entrepreneurs in other industries who live in other states, and just last week we had our first video ch This is an excerpt from the blog post I wrote on this book: I was recently asked by a long-time friend to join a business book club and I jumped at the offer. I want to and NEED to read business books, so the added accountability was just what I needed to make sure I finish them when other, seemingly more urgent things on my to do list vie for my time. The three other women in the club are all entrepreneurs in other industries who live in other states, and just last week we had our first video chat to discuss our first book-- 12: The Elements of Great Managing. Eleven years ago, when I started my photography business, I figured I'd stay small and run my business on my own for the rest of my career. Heck, all I cared about was creating something that WOULD run for the foreseeable future. I couldn't see beyond the end of my nose. But along my journey, in the process of just putting one foot in front of the other, I've ended up building five streams of income and now find myself managing 16 people! Yikes! Not what I signed up for. I'm not sure I thought this all through -- haha! I never set out to become a manager. But a manager is what I now am. In addition to being a photographer and entrepreneur, I am now responsible for mentoring, guiding and inspiring 16 other souls. Queue the cold sweats and hyperventilation. So when my friend suggested 12: The Elements of Great Managing as our first read, I knew this book club was God's provision of more than just accountability. Instead of hiring amazing people, setting up systems and then sitting back and expecting everything to just run, I needed to step up and own my newfound position as a manager with more intention and care. This book was just what I needed. 12 reviews a Gallup poll study of 10 million employee and manager interviews to discover the keys to sustaining employee engagement. In effect, millions of workers were saying, "If you do these things for us, we will do what the company needs of us." The 12 Elements of Great Managing that emerged from the research are as follows: 1. I know what is expected of me at work. 2. I have the materials and equipment I need to do my work right. 3. At work, I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day. 4. In the last seven days, I have received recognition or praise for doing good work. 5. My supervisor, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person. 6. There is someone at work who encourages my development. 7. At work, my opinions seem to count. 8. The mission or purpose of my company makes me feel my job is important. 9. My associates or fellow employees are committed to doing quality work. 10. I have a best friend at work. 11. In the last six months, someone at work has talked to me about my progress. 12. This last year, I have had opportunities at work to learn and grow. The book covers examples of managers who have harnessed the truths behind these statements to turn around their floundering workplaces. Some of my key take-aways were: - I need to be better with my teams at casting vision, setting goals and communicating them. - I am such a practical nuts and bolts type person, but I need to be better at sharing the greater purpose behind what we do. - Focus on building on the strengths of each worker rather than on "fixing" weaknesses - Create a system of recognition and praise (both individual and team) to make sure it happens regularly - We need to brainstorm ways to "post our results on the walls" to keep us motivated and goal-oriented - I need to work on our marketing messaging and not be afraid to infuse it with "large dollops of syrup." Sorry -- you might have to read the book to understand some of the above, but I wanted to post these thoughts here for my own reference. Plus, if I shared EVERYTHING I got out of this book here, this post would be book-sized!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Miles

    Less than a year and a half ago, I had absolutely no business experience. Today, I am part of the management team for a small but steadily growing business in the town where I grew up and hope to live for the rest of my life. This has been the most unexpected and dynamic development of my young adulthood––one I attribute more to favorable timing and luck than anything else. Although I work hard and possess some helpful traits (both innate and learned), I don’t kid myself: a lot of other people c Less than a year and a half ago, I had absolutely no business experience. Today, I am part of the management team for a small but steadily growing business in the town where I grew up and hope to live for the rest of my life. This has been the most unexpected and dynamic development of my young adulthood––one I attribute more to favorable timing and luck than anything else. Although I work hard and possess some helpful traits (both innate and learned), I don’t kid myself: a lot of other people could be doing my job just as well as I do, and plenty could do it better than I can. This realization generates a lot of gratitude; even on the toughest days, I strive to remember how fortunate I am to have the opportunity to help shape a new business in my community. Gratitude for my newfound vocation motivates me to learn more about the nature and history of business management. While my daily duties do not require me to manage anyone directly, I’m often involved in conflict resolution and in the crafting of management strategy, which usually amounts to building stronger communication between different departments and/or team members. After my wife read 12: The Elements of Great Managing for an online course, she thought it would be a good way for me to explore how other businesses view and execute management strategies. She was right. This book, while not intellectually stimulating in the way I usually expect from nonfiction, provided a host of interesting examples of how managers succeed and fail, all framed within an acceptable theory of what constitutes effective management. The titular twelve elements are the product of The Gallup Organization’s multi-decade quest to identify “the core of the unwritten social contract between employee and employer” (xi). They are as follows: 1. I know what is expected of me at work. 2. I have the materials and equipment I need to do my work right. 3. At work, I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day. 4. In the last seven days, I have received recognition or praise for doing good work. 5. My supervisor, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person. 6. There is someone at work who encourages my development. 7. At work, my opinions seem to count. 8. The mission or purpose of my company makes me feel my job is important. 9. My associates or fellow employees are committed to doing quality work. 10. I have a best friend at work. 11. In the last six months, someone at work has talked to me about my progress. 12. This last year, I have had opportunities at work to learn and grow. The first thing I noticed about this list is that all of these statements are true for me. But 12 is not a book about how to help managers feel that their work is meaningful and promoting personal growth; it is about how the relationship between managers and the employees they manage can make the above statements ring true for everyone at a company, regardless of position or duration of employment. This is an admittedly impossible goal to achieve, but also a good ideal to strive for. An overarching concern with the quality of emotional and interpersonal experience at work is the heart of what makes Wagner and Harter’s perspective a valuable one. The authors devote one chapter to each of the twelve elements, and also tack on a few extra chapters at the end (including a very insightful discourse on “The Problem of Pay”). Their method is accessible and engaging: each chapter introduces one of the twelve elements with a real-life example of a manager facing a particular problem, transitions to a general discussion of the theory(ies) underlying the element in question, and then returns to the initial example to show how the manager was able to succeed. The theoretical portions contain solid (if occasionally outdated) research from modern psychology and neuroscience; Wagner and Harter are particularly good at pointing out that human nature is not infinitely malleable and must be taken into consideration if practical solutions are to triumph over appealing but overly idealistic ones: "In the battle between company policy and human nature, human nature always wins. The evidence suggests people will fulfill their social needs, regardless of what is legislated. Companies do far better to harness the power of this kind of social capital than to fight against it." (141) This is absolutely true in my (limited) experience, and also accords with my educational background. People will almost always seek connection with their colleagues that exceeds the minimum job requirements, and will become unhappy if they cannot do so. Any company seeking to provide something more than “just a job” for its employees must foster social engagement and opportunities for personal growth. I think most managers understand this at an abstract level, but actually creating such a work environment proves much harder. Unlike profit margins and budgets, these are critical components of a company that can’t be easily quantified or measured with precision. Even the most fine-grained performance reviews can’t perfectly capture how an employee really feels about his or her work, and the innumerable daily/weekly/monthly interactions that occur between coworkers are impossible to track and analyze with any true rigor. A good manager, therefore, must be comfortable in the fuzzy spaces between people’s hearts and minds, and must relish the chance to root out and contravene our natural tendencies toward miscommunication, intolerance and impatience. 12 highlights and celebrates such managers, and effectively lifts the lid on what they do best. Most of the time, success boils down to a handful of commonsense directives: listen to your employees, care about their problems, compromise when necessary, be consistent, follow through, and don’t be a jerk. Following these directives can be difficult enough in normal life, but doing so can be even more challenging at work. This is because of a truth that Wagner and Harter readily acknowledge, one that brings us back to the issue of human nature: "The correlations between each element and better performance not only draw a roadmap to superior managing; they also reveal fascinating insights into how the human mind––molded by thousands of years of foraging, hunting, and cooperating within a close-knit and stable tribe––reacts in a relatively new, artificial world of cubicles, project timelines, corporate ambiguity, and constantly changing workgroup membership. People neither were created to fit corporate strategies nor have evolved to do so. Rather than contest these facts, the most successful managers harness the drive, virtuosity, and spirit that come with employing humans, even as they understand the inevitable chinks in their armor." (xii) Although Wagner and Harter do a great job of showing how this tricky landscape can be navigated by caring and intelligent managers, they don’t acknowledge the darker side of this picture, which is that modern economies (and perhaps all economies that take place in the context of resource scarcity) are essentially coercive. Yes, people want to work for all kinds of reasons, but most people work because they must, and not because they see their job as a “calling” or their “purpose in life.” A cynic would read this book as nothing more than a series of strategies for duping employees into thinking they are doing meaningful work, when really they are just cogs in an economic machine that neither cares for them nor will continue supporting them when the labor they offer becomes cheaper to acquire elsewhere or is rendered obsolete by automation. Ignoring this reality makes Wagner and Harter’s message more palatable but at least partially disingenuous. Still, it would be tough to argue that Wagner and Harter’s hearts aren’t in the right place. They do truly want to help managers create a better work-life––and a better life all around––for themselves and those they manage: "Great managers achieve sustained profitability because they make a connection to something beyond profit. They see the results of their work in the life of each person they manage. Their impact transcends mere business. For many it is an almost spiritual issue, no matter their particular faith. Their motivation stems from deeply held beliefs about their responsibility to those around them. Whether they believe it is Providence or pure chance that puts them in the same office or factory with their team, these managers understand viscerally the scientific truth that what they do will have a large effect––maybe a lifelong effect––on their colleagues… Those who create the greatest financial performance start with the least pecuniary motivations. They work hard to do the right thing for their people, and they end up doing well." (202-3) I’m not sure I’d characterize managing as a “spiritual issue,” but I do truly believe that trying to do the right thing can lead to success––financial and otherwise. I hope this belief is true now, and that it will remain true for as long as humans are expected to undertake the bizarre enterprise of “working for a living.” This review was originally published on my blog, words&dirt.

  4. 4 out of 5

    E

    A dozen helpful pointers on managing teams The Gallup Organization has studied employment and management issues for decades. Rodd Wagner and James Harter distill its findings into 12 pivotal concepts that managers can use to develop and keep great employees. These range from creating strong teams to managing them so that they support corporate goals. getAbstract lauds the way the authors illustrate their points with real-life examples. They show how and why managers implement each of the 12 fact A dozen helpful pointers on managing teams The Gallup Organization has studied employment and management issues for decades. Rodd Wagner and James Harter distill its findings into 12 pivotal concepts that managers can use to develop and keep great employees. These range from creating strong teams to managing them so that they support corporate goals. getAbstract lauds the way the authors illustrate their points with real-life examples. They show how and why managers implement each of the 12 factors, which are usefully broken down into business cases. The 12 principles are nicely interconnected. Each one explains a way to provide employees with direct management support. This means guaranteeing their loyalty to your firm by giving their jobs a context, providing a culture that supports their friendships, offering them clear career paths, and creating opportunities for them to grow and develop as people and employees. The authors explain why salary does matter, but also why it is not the most crucial aspect of employee management. They demonstrate how the worst managers view everything in financial terms, whereas the best managers give of themselves to support their people.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Belknap

    I listened to this on audio CD while going to and from work. This is one advantage of a long commute. I really loved the format because it cited lots of statistics interspersed with case histories so that it was never dull or hard to relate to. I had heard a lot of the themes before, but never knew so much research has tied productivity and profit margins to good management methods. The section on attitudes toward pay was also very revealing. All in all, solid advice.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    Fabulous book on creating and sustaining employee engagement!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lyn Christian

    This is a must read "Bible" for anyone who is a manager or leader. This is a must read "Bible" for anyone who is a manager or leader.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schiff

    This is a fine management book, with lots of examples from real-life workplaces to show how management strategies play out through tactical implementation. I found the book most helpful and insightful early on, before it became apparent that the 12 elements are basically all variations on the tenet, "Treat your employees like human beings." I will say that most of the workplaces described seem to share the common burden of being in dire straits before an energetic new manager comes in to shake th This is a fine management book, with lots of examples from real-life workplaces to show how management strategies play out through tactical implementation. I found the book most helpful and insightful early on, before it became apparent that the 12 elements are basically all variations on the tenet, "Treat your employees like human beings." I will say that most of the workplaces described seem to share the common burden of being in dire straits before an energetic new manager comes in to shake things up and illustrate one of the elements. In reality, most workplaces are kind of cruising in a middling state -- not so terrible that most employees are preparing to jump ship, but not so wonderful that everyone feels self-actualized and fully committed. In many ways, it's much harder to inspire buy-in for a new management direction when things are already kinda okay. But reality has much more shades of gray than the book illustrates. Also, the authors present a fairly narrow, corporate vision of business leadership, which I suppose is a function of the Gallup survey being limited mainly to large corporations. Example: "Maybe executives don't see the need because they tend to have more friendships at work than do front-line employees. It is especially ironic when senior teams gather for off-site retreats during which they golf, fly-fish, play tennis, and socialize together, but during the meetings at those retreats question the need to address friendships on their employee survey (from "The Tenth Element: A Best Friend at Work," p. 141). Maybe it's just me, but I've never worked in a place where senior leaders go off to fly-fish together, and I'm pretty sure most workers haven't, either.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cora

    I really liked this book but I think it helps if you're already familiar with the Gallup Q12 Employee Engagement survey. If you aren't familiar with it then this book probably won't be as meaningful though you could still understand the concepts and apply them. I'm actually not a manager but did feel like I gained a lot of insight into the survey from this book. I felt that some of the chapters didn't seem to flow that well, like they would jump from one example to another then go back to the fi I really liked this book but I think it helps if you're already familiar with the Gallup Q12 Employee Engagement survey. If you aren't familiar with it then this book probably won't be as meaningful though you could still understand the concepts and apply them. I'm actually not a manager but did feel like I gained a lot of insight into the survey from this book. I felt that some of the chapters didn't seem to flow that well, like they would jump from one example to another then go back to the first one without there really being a good connection between it all. However, I did find the examples and stories interesting especially because they were from various industries and fields that I am not too familiar with. I think managers and leaders can definitely learn a lot from this book regarding employee engagement and if your company has taken the Q12 Engagement survey then I would definitely recommend this book to give you more insight and ideas into how to create a more engaged population of employees.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Travis Wells

    Good points, but I think it's too many elements to actually be a useful tool when you're managing multiple people. It could be helpful to use during periodic performance reviews to make sure your people are happy, but on a day to day or even weekly basis, you can't think about all 12 elements for all of your employees if you have many people under you. If you do, you won't have time to get anything done other than manage your people, and most of the managers at my company can't spend that much t Good points, but I think it's too many elements to actually be a useful tool when you're managing multiple people. It could be helpful to use during periodic performance reviews to make sure your people are happy, but on a day to day or even weekly basis, you can't think about all 12 elements for all of your employees if you have many people under you. If you do, you won't have time to get anything done other than manage your people, and most of the managers at my company can't spend that much time worrying about their people because they're responsible for getting actual work done themselves as well. I think this is really helpful if you're trying to figure out why someone left your company.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Simple

    12: The Elements of Great Managing 1. I know what is expected of me at work. 2. I have the materials and equipment necessary to do my job. 3. At work, I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day. 4. In the last seven days, I have received recognition or praise for doing good work. 5. My supervisor, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person. 6. There is someone at work who encourages my development. 7. At work, my opinions seem to count. 8. The mission or purpose of my organization 12: The Elements of Great Managing 1. I know what is expected of me at work. 2. I have the materials and equipment necessary to do my job. 3. At work, I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day. 4. In the last seven days, I have received recognition or praise for doing good work. 5. My supervisor, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person. 6. There is someone at work who encourages my development. 7. At work, my opinions seem to count. 8. The mission or purpose of my organization makes me feel my job is important. 9. My associates or fellow employees are committed to doing quality work. 10. I have a best friend at work. 11. In the past six months, someone has talked to me about my progress. 12. In the last year, I’ve had opportunities at work to learn and grow.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mark Dellenbaugh

    Really enjoyed this one. Not as much as some of the other Gallup Press business titles such as StrengthsFinder 2.0 or First Break All the Rules but since it directly ties in with an employee engagement initiative my organization is in the thick of, it was worth reading every page! Really enjoyed this one. Not as much as some of the other Gallup Press business titles such as StrengthsFinder 2.0 or First Break All the Rules but since it directly ties in with an employee engagement initiative my organization is in the thick of, it was worth reading every page!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lance Willett

    From Gallup, the people behind Clifton StrengthsFinder, a broad look at core principles of people management. Recognition, safe environments, connecting with a mission, pay, and growth. My favorite takeaway is that for employees to focus on profitability of the business, their manager must connect them with something beyond just profits. The impact of a great manager transcends business and work.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    This is a sequel to the best-selling book "First, Break All The Rules". It covers more theoretical ground and also provides one case study for each of the 12 questions that are asked as part of the Gallup questionnaire. A good read with some interesting research experiments, but overall does not add that much value if you have already read the first book. This is a sequel to the best-selling book "First, Break All The Rules". It covers more theoretical ground and also provides one case study for each of the 12 questions that are asked as part of the Gallup questionnaire. A good read with some interesting research experiments, but overall does not add that much value if you have already read the first book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michael Belcher

    Excellent presentation of Gallup's' empirical evidence of which management methods produce highly engaged employees. While the evidence is compelling and the associated research well cited, the book would have benefited from focusing more on application and less on anecdotes. Excellent presentation of Gallup's' empirical evidence of which management methods produce highly engaged employees. While the evidence is compelling and the associated research well cited, the book would have benefited from focusing more on application and less on anecdotes.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emily Gros

    This book (and study) contains so much valuable information for not just managers but for anyone looking to approach life in a positive manner. Almost all of the information in this book can be implemented in everyday family life.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Easy to read format of relatively intuitive leadership principles to focus on.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Matt Rose

    Excellent book. Much better than the typical management book - the 12 elements are rooted in rigorous research, and communicated through both stories and analysis.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Juste

    Does not cover a lot of managers needs. Does not bring anything new, skip it to drucker.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    We'll researched, but not as relevant to put into practice as other recent books, like "Radical, Candor" We'll researched, but not as relevant to put into practice as other recent books, like "Radical, Candor"

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amr Swalha

    Really good book

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jayson Virissimo

    Actionable and terse.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    A research-backed descriptive Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs at engaged, effective, and productive workplaces. Plenty of examples to connect to.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hesham Jones

    Great science-based insight into what makes your employees tick. Full of anecdotal accounts that make it easier to commit the 21 elements to memory.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Beatrix

    Great book for managing teams. The 12 elements listed are helpful pointers to consider as a manager.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Omar Ortega

    Nice stories, very practical

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ň¥ΔǤΔĦƗΜΔ

    Great read by Wagner & Harter. A friendly summary for those already in management or moving into it. Even more consume worthy as an Audiobook.👌🏿👌🏿👌🏿

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    Much more useful than it's predecessor "First Break All the Rules", because it not only reinforces the validity of the initial research, it provides examples of real managers who generated real results by practicing the elements, and provides examples for how to implement the elements in practice. Here are some of my favorite quotes: "Customer surveys, resignations, accidents, productivity, sick days, creativity, sales, and profitability. When analyzed together, the 12 elements and the business m Much more useful than it's predecessor "First Break All the Rules", because it not only reinforces the validity of the initial research, it provides examples of real managers who generated real results by practicing the elements, and provides examples for how to implement the elements in practice. Here are some of my favorite quotes: "Customer surveys, resignations, accidents, productivity, sick days, creativity, sales, and profitability. When analyzed together, the 12 elements and the business metrics show that higher levels of [employee] engagement reduce accidents, decrease resignations, spur greater creativity, boost customer scores and productivity, and ultimately strengthen a team’s profitability. These various effects combine to create an appreciable competitive advantage." “One of the dumbest things companies do is to try to make their human resources more productive while fighting what makes them human. They also demonstrate that great managing is not some amorphous, difficult to quantify concept. The data give a clear image of what is most important for inspiring people to do what the company needs of them." "I’d like to follow you, but I don’t know where you’re going.” "Because so much of an enterprises efficiency depends on the seamless combination of personal responsibilities, the first element of great managing is job clarity." (1st Element) "One of the truly remarkable things about workgroups is that they can make 2 + 2 = 5. Of course, they also have the capability of making 2 + 2 = 3. If a team lacks a strong work ethic and sense of responsibility to each other, the group becomes a convenient place to hide a little slothfulness, to push some work the other guy, or to point fingers." (9th Element) “The majority of workers will meet cooperation with cooperation, and will meet selfishness with selfishness. Therefore, in the beginning, every team is poised to go into two vicious circles - one spirals downward into every man for himself, the other spirals upward into 'all for one and one for all’" (9th Element) “The dilemma is that some of the abilities that make a person good at performing a job are the same abilities needed to realize whether he is failing or succeeding. If an employee isn’t talented, knowledgeable, or skilled enough to do a good job, there’s a good chance he’s not talented, knowledgeable or skilled enough to know he’s blowing it." (11th Element) “Where a manager is regularly checking in with an employee, [the employee] is more likely to consider herself properly compensated for her work, more likely to plan on staying with the company, and more than twice as likely to recommend the company to others as a great place to work." (11th Element) "One of the best things a senior executive can do to motivate the entire population in a company is to first look out for the enterprises supervisors. Before a person can deliver what he should as a manager, he must first receive what he needs as an employee." "In our studies of hundreds of thousands of managers and work teams around the globe, it is very clear that great managers have an instinctive awareness that what they are doing is contributing more than profit. Great managers achieve sustained profitability because they make a connection to something beyond profit. They see the result of their work in the life of each person they manage."

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rowena Morais

    Title : 12. The Elements of Great Managing Author : Rodd Wagner and James K Harter PhD Produced by : Simon & Schuster Audio Year of production: 2007 ISBN-10: 0-7435-6861-3 ISBN-13: 978-0-7435-6861-6 Detail : 4 CD pack Price : RM124.90 The Gallup Organisation combed through its database of more than 1 million employee and manager interviews to identify the elements that were most important in sustaining workplace excellence. This was captured in their 1999 bestseller, First Break All the Rules. 12 is the Title : 12. The Elements of Great Managing Author : Rodd Wagner and James K Harter PhD Produced by : Simon & Schuster Audio Year of production: 2007 ISBN-10: 0-7435-6861-3 ISBN-13: 978-0-7435-6861-6 Detail : 4 CD pack Price : RM124.90 The Gallup Organisation combed through its database of more than 1 million employee and manager interviews to identify the elements that were most important in sustaining workplace excellence. This was captured in their 1999 bestseller, First Break All the Rules. 12 is the sequel and it follows great managers as they implement these 12 elements. Both Rodd and James are from Gallup Organisation, Rodd is a Principal and James is Chief Scientist. Points to note :- 1. Each of the 12 elements is presented in very distinct chapters. 2. All the information is backed by a wealth of research data. 3. Each element or truth is profiled via an actual manager’s situation and the book has a truly global feel to it, as there are tales from around the world – a benefit of having cross-industry research in 41 languages and 114 countries.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    A useful review of the twelve elements of successful management as codified by Gallup. Case studies are used to demonstrate how each element drives employee engagement. The case studies are helpful, however, the authors sometimes slip into boosterism as they rarely use employee comments that counter the effectiveness of the management practices profiled in the case studies, This book is a good complement to employee discussion groups at companies using the Gallup engagement survey. I recommend t A useful review of the twelve elements of successful management as codified by Gallup. Case studies are used to demonstrate how each element drives employee engagement. The case studies are helpful, however, the authors sometimes slip into boosterism as they rarely use employee comments that counter the effectiveness of the management practices profiled in the case studies, This book is a good complement to employee discussion groups at companies using the Gallup engagement survey. I recommend this book for those recently hired to manage a team of employees, or to those who aspire that role.

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