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Ari Goldman's best-selling book, The Search for God at Harvard, chronicled his search for signs of genuine religious faith at Harvard Divinity School. The New York Times reporter concluded that God was not very evident at the prestigious Ivy League campus. Kelly Monroe reveals another picture of Christian faith in a secular intellectual setting. In Finding God at Harvard, Ari Goldman's best-selling book, The Search for God at Harvard, chronicled his search for signs of genuine religious faith at Harvard Divinity School. The New York Times reporter concluded that God was not very evident at the prestigious Ivy League campus. Kelly Monroe reveals another picture of Christian faith in a secular intellectual setting. In Finding God at Harvard, she presents the compelling testimonies of forty-two of its faculty members, former students, and distinguished orators. Their candid reflections explode the myth that Christian faith cannot survive a rigorous intellectual atmosphere. Finding God at Harvard speaks to the emptiness that haunts college campuses across the country—an emptiness that only Truth can fill, as Monroe's contributors so vividly show that truth is available to everyone.


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Ari Goldman's best-selling book, The Search for God at Harvard, chronicled his search for signs of genuine religious faith at Harvard Divinity School. The New York Times reporter concluded that God was not very evident at the prestigious Ivy League campus. Kelly Monroe reveals another picture of Christian faith in a secular intellectual setting. In Finding God at Harvard, Ari Goldman's best-selling book, The Search for God at Harvard, chronicled his search for signs of genuine religious faith at Harvard Divinity School. The New York Times reporter concluded that God was not very evident at the prestigious Ivy League campus. Kelly Monroe reveals another picture of Christian faith in a secular intellectual setting. In Finding God at Harvard, she presents the compelling testimonies of forty-two of its faculty members, former students, and distinguished orators. Their candid reflections explode the myth that Christian faith cannot survive a rigorous intellectual atmosphere. Finding God at Harvard speaks to the emptiness that haunts college campuses across the country—an emptiness that only Truth can fill, as Monroe's contributors so vividly show that truth is available to everyone.

30 review for Finding God at Harvard: Spiritual Journeys of Thinking Christians

  1. 5 out of 5

    Trice

    1/18/2011 this is on my mental lists of books to return to - the level of writing and thought is a mix, but this helped to bring together the deeper thought-life and the daily life to which it should be applied. Contrast Charles Malik's essay, "The Wonder of Being," which addresses the person of being and the person of non-being inside each one of us, with Mother Theresa's "A Hunger for God," about seeking to love each person in front of us, and we see a great example of this. Definitely worth t 1/18/2011 this is on my mental lists of books to return to - the level of writing and thought is a mix, but this helped to bring together the deeper thought-life and the daily life to which it should be applied. Contrast Charles Malik's essay, "The Wonder of Being," which addresses the person of being and the person of non-being inside each one of us, with Mother Theresa's "A Hunger for God," about seeking to love each person in front of us, and we see a great example of this. Definitely worth the read. 12/14/2010 page 205 Some people have described this as simply a collection of stories, and, while I would mostly agree with that conclusion, there is a deeper aspect, in my view, of the stories being told. They speak to particular issues of faith and/or doctrine that these particular intellectuals, all associated in some way with Harvard University, were dealing with central to their faith journeys. What was the big thing, the big hurdle, they had to get over to come to or become solidly grounded in their faith? Or what was the central issue with which they identified their intellectual journey and the questions or problems that others around them were struggling with? What is their own approach to their faith and its surrounding intellectual discussions? So, while not a direct discussion of 'how intellectuals come to faith,' this book has so far been helpful, inspiring, challenging, and encouraging in the faith. It's interesting, too, that these essays are speaking to other books I'm reading. I'm in the middle of Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses in which, amongst many intertwinings and meanderings of plot/character/universal issue, they are facing issues of cultural and individual identity, and, though indirectly, Lamin Sanneh's essay, which deals toward the end with cultural pluralism, cultural purity and cultural identity, fed into my own mental wanderings on this novel. John Rankin's essay on Power & Gender grabbed my attention because of its central topic (wow - I needed that!) and because of his description of how he approaches his own faith, the big questions and dialoguing with others. The book is a real mix of style and voice and issue, however I am not finding this to be a difficulty, but rather an added interest.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    The subtitle of this book is "Spiritual Journeys of Thinking Christians." The implication that basically slaps you in the face is that many or most Christians do not think, at least not about their religion. I might agree with that, but I don't think it's the message the editor wanted to project. Anyway, this isn't a bad read. It's a collection of essays from Christians associated with Harvard, mostly about their personal experiences. We live in a culture that has to a large extent abandoned reli The subtitle of this book is "Spiritual Journeys of Thinking Christians." The implication that basically slaps you in the face is that many or most Christians do not think, at least not about their religion. I might agree with that, but I don't think it's the message the editor wanted to project. Anyway, this isn't a bad read. It's a collection of essays from Christians associated with Harvard, mostly about their personal experiences. We live in a culture that has to a large extent abandoned religion. Along the way, we've also decided that it's more important to avoid hurting people's feelings than to be honest, that values and even truth are relative, that sexual morality is an outdated concept, and so on. I happen to think that most of these changes are bogus, so I sympathize strongly with many of the authors here. I only wish there was a little more righteous anger. I get extremely irritated at people who insist that they are Christians but have no idea what exactly being a Christian might mean, or who reject parts X, Y, and Z of Christianity because they're just too icky. So do the authors here but they hold back too much. Apologetics is touched on. Here one author is correct in saying that the New Testament has been accurately preserved much better than is commonly believed, but another is insincere or misinformed when he claims that there is abundant evidence outside the NT for Jesus. The essays are not all great and towards the end they got really boring and started to run together in my mind. And, of course, the inane statements these people make to justify their beliefs can be infuriating.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Judy Cox

    Boy, am I glad I finished reading this book! A friend recommended it highly. Said it would change my life and strenghen my belief in God. It did neither. And that's what's disappointing about it. I am a believer, I think. But I have a lot of questions and my faith could use some strengthening. I thought this book, written by intellectuals who believe, would be more convincing. The book is a compilation of essays written by people who attended Harvard or taught at Harvard and felt that they could Boy, am I glad I finished reading this book! A friend recommended it highly. Said it would change my life and strenghen my belief in God. It did neither. And that's what's disappointing about it. I am a believer, I think. But I have a lot of questions and my faith could use some strengthening. I thought this book, written by intellectuals who believe, would be more convincing. The book is a compilation of essays written by people who attended Harvard or taught at Harvard and felt that they could not freely espouse their Christian beliefs there. They, however, found ways to form a community of believers on campus and to advocate for more acceptance of diversity of religious beliefs and a return to Harvard's Christian roots. There are a few good essays in the book but most of them to me, were very forgettable. That may be because I really had to struggle to keep my focus and had to re-read sentences several times. Perhaps one has to have a Ph.D to understand what these people are talking about. I will have to look elsewhere for my answers.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lily

    I read this years ago, added it on 12/19/2018, and only listed approximates dates as read. I remembered it when there was a mention of it in the book that I just finished--"Finding God in Silicon Valley". My son is working now in the Silicon Valley area; he gave me "Finding god at Harvard" years ago because he "found God at Harvard" and knew people focused upon in the book. He really came back to the Lord during this time when God spoke to him that he wasn't doing what he was supposed to be doi I read this years ago, added it on 12/19/2018, and only listed approximates dates as read. I remembered it when there was a mention of it in the book that I just finished--"Finding God in Silicon Valley". My son is working now in the Silicon Valley area; he gave me "Finding god at Harvard" years ago because he "found God at Harvard" and knew people focused upon in the book. He really came back to the Lord during this time when God spoke to him that he wasn't doing what he was supposed to be doing. He interpreted that to mean that he needed to give his life to Jesus. He did, got baptized, and became involved with other believers and fellowships--which continues to this day.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Crawford

    Our minister, Clay Stauffer, referred to Armand Nicholi Jr's essay, Hope in a Secular Age, in several sermons. That essay and several others in Finding God at Harvard are essays that I'll go back to again and again. Especially good were Mother Teresa's A Hunger for God and Elizabeth Dole's Crisis in Faith. I dog-eared and underlined in many essays and skimmed others. Overall, a book I'm glad I read for the ones that spoke into my life and faith. Our minister, Clay Stauffer, referred to Armand Nicholi Jr's essay, Hope in a Secular Age, in several sermons. That essay and several others in Finding God at Harvard are essays that I'll go back to again and again. Especially good were Mother Teresa's A Hunger for God and Elizabeth Dole's Crisis in Faith. I dog-eared and underlined in many essays and skimmed others. Overall, a book I'm glad I read for the ones that spoke into my life and faith.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    I very much enjoyed this read. It consists of a collection of Christian essays by folks who are or were associated with Harvard in some way. Many of the essays are narratives of religious experience in an extremely secular academic enviornment - one that mocks religious belief. I found it most interesting coming from a church school that is truly religious. Two major themes were most meaningful to me: First, I got a glimpse into the faith of people of many religions. This faith is as deep, active I very much enjoyed this read. It consists of a collection of Christian essays by folks who are or were associated with Harvard in some way. Many of the essays are narratives of religious experience in an extremely secular academic enviornment - one that mocks religious belief. I found it most interesting coming from a church school that is truly religious. Two major themes were most meaningful to me: First, I got a glimpse into the faith of people of many religions. This faith is as deep, active, and personally inspiring as any I've found. It's encouraging to me to find truth seekers and true believers in many religious contexts. Second, it gave me a deep appreciation for the truths that are found in the Bible. With modern revelation available, I tend to neglect the Bible's depth of meaning and inspiration. There's more there than I've given credit for! Many of the authors in this book pinpointed truths with a clarity that is seldom seen.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel-paul Israel

    This book is a group of wonderful essays. I, from time to time, that what I think and what I believe are in conflict. It was wonderful to read the conflicts that others had also had with their faith as they continued on in their journeys. I find that they are not necessarily in conflict, but what I find within the journeys of the thinking faithful are the actual warriors of God. They find themselves struggling for peace and love in their own lives. I think that the importance of the struggle is This book is a group of wonderful essays. I, from time to time, that what I think and what I believe are in conflict. It was wonderful to read the conflicts that others had also had with their faith as they continued on in their journeys. I find that they are not necessarily in conflict, but what I find within the journeys of the thinking faithful are the actual warriors of God. They find themselves struggling for peace and love in their own lives. I think that the importance of the struggle is paramount to finding a person's calling and is just as important as what the person is doing on a daily basis. From experience I know that when a personal spiritual life is out of sinc, the reast of their lives are out of sinc. Finding a return to the synchronization of the human being and God is the search of veritas.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Deanna

    If you think academia has abolished the idea of a God who is intimately involved in our lives, check out this jewel. This is a collection of essays written by scholars who have attended, taught at, or spoken at Harvard and believe that Jesus Christ is the son of God. The essays can be intellectually weighty, so if that's not your thing, just realize that even in academia God's Word is alive and active. If you think academia has abolished the idea of a God who is intimately involved in our lives, check out this jewel. This is a collection of essays written by scholars who have attended, taught at, or spoken at Harvard and believe that Jesus Christ is the son of God. The essays can be intellectually weighty, so if that's not your thing, just realize that even in academia God's Word is alive and active.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I'm really not sure what the point of this book is. It's a compilation of stories, almost in a "chicken soup for the soul" type fashion. Except the only thing in common is that each of the authors either attended Harvard, or taught at Harvard, or had some connection with Harvard. I thought it was going to be more about how intellectuals can embrace faith, but if that's what you're looking for you're better off find some apologetics book. Waste of time to read this one. I'm really not sure what the point of this book is. It's a compilation of stories, almost in a "chicken soup for the soul" type fashion. Except the only thing in common is that each of the authors either attended Harvard, or taught at Harvard, or had some connection with Harvard. I thought it was going to be more about how intellectuals can embrace faith, but if that's what you're looking for you're better off find some apologetics book. Waste of time to read this one.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Catie

    Very challenging read. It's a collection of essays from people somehow affiliated with Harvard, whether they attended as a student or taught as a professor. The book is not about Harvard, it's about people sharing their personal insights on God and how He is relevant to our culture and our lives today. Very challenging read. It's a collection of essays from people somehow affiliated with Harvard, whether they attended as a student or taught as a professor. The book is not about Harvard, it's about people sharing their personal insights on God and how He is relevant to our culture and our lives today.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vilo

    There are a wide variety of essays by individuals who have had something to do with Harvard University and some involvement in Christianity. There were some amazing essays and even the ones that did not make as much of an impact were thoughtful and interesting. The book reinforces my feeling and experience that God is involved in every life to the extent that we will allow.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    This collection of commentaries and stories provides beautiful insight into individual journeys with God. Some were quite poignant, making me examine my own understanding of my life with God. The one complaint I had was that they didn't always seem cohesive. Especially starting the book, I didn't know what I would be getting out of it. But finishing it, I felt like I'd learned a lot. This collection of commentaries and stories provides beautiful insight into individual journeys with God. Some were quite poignant, making me examine my own understanding of my life with God. The one complaint I had was that they didn't always seem cohesive. Especially starting the book, I didn't know what I would be getting out of it. But finishing it, I felt like I'd learned a lot.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mirah W

    I enjoyed reading the essays of Harvard students and how they grew spiritually while at Harvard. My favorite was the essay by Paul Wylie, Olympic figure skater.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Susie

    There is hope for our universities in this postmodern era.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Clinger

    Accessible arguments and investigations for the Christian faith are presented by the Harvard University community of scholars.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    A collection of essays. The quality is hit or miss, but mostly 'hits', from successful people whose faith matters to them. A collection of essays. The quality is hit or miss, but mostly 'hits', from successful people whose faith matters to them.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Encouraging stories of the faith stories of faculty at Harvard.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Hatch

  19. 5 out of 5

    Maryellen

  20. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Spencer

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dennis

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kristin Hallgren

  25. 5 out of 5

    Anastacia Hines

  26. 4 out of 5

    Barb Shillinger

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eilie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Tyson

  29. 4 out of 5

    Minnie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael Plewniak

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