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Dawn Volume 3: Three Tiers Limited Edition

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Here is the collection you've been waiting for! JOSEPH MICHAEL LINSNER has put three long years into creating this epic work - but you get to read it all at once! In a post-apocalyptic Europa, Dawn leads New York warrior Darrian Ashoka through wars, disasters and fire. His dangerous liaisons bring him up against the three faces of the Goddess. Is Dawn a virgin, a queen or Here is the collection you've been waiting for! JOSEPH MICHAEL LINSNER has put three long years into creating this epic work - but you get to read it all at once! In a post-apocalyptic Europa, Dawn leads New York warrior Darrian Ashoka through wars, disasters and fire. His dangerous liaisons bring him up against the three faces of the Goddess. Is Dawn a virgin, a queen or a whore? Is Darrian the earthly manifestation of Death, the Horned God? On his quest for Dawn, Darrian faces dragons, fights duels and shatters mirrors. Will Dawn ultimately make his dream come true, or his nightmares a reality? Collects DAWN: THREE TIERS #1-6. Signed and Numbered Limited Edition.


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Here is the collection you've been waiting for! JOSEPH MICHAEL LINSNER has put three long years into creating this epic work - but you get to read it all at once! In a post-apocalyptic Europa, Dawn leads New York warrior Darrian Ashoka through wars, disasters and fire. His dangerous liaisons bring him up against the three faces of the Goddess. Is Dawn a virgin, a queen or Here is the collection you've been waiting for! JOSEPH MICHAEL LINSNER has put three long years into creating this epic work - but you get to read it all at once! In a post-apocalyptic Europa, Dawn leads New York warrior Darrian Ashoka through wars, disasters and fire. His dangerous liaisons bring him up against the three faces of the Goddess. Is Dawn a virgin, a queen or a whore? Is Darrian the earthly manifestation of Death, the Horned God? On his quest for Dawn, Darrian faces dragons, fights duels and shatters mirrors. Will Dawn ultimately make his dream come true, or his nightmares a reality? Collects DAWN: THREE TIERS #1-6. Signed and Numbered Limited Edition.

30 review for Dawn Volume 3: Three Tiers Limited Edition

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam (Hissing Potatoes)

    If you were ever interested in seeing what it's like to live in the mind of a man who fantasizes himself as a broody perfect hero and objectifies women onto pedestals, look no further. The main character, Darrian, just wanders around killing everything and fucking every woman before becoming disappointed that she's not "his" Dawn. Supposedly he learns a few things along the way but hell if I know what they are. To sum up the book's attitude toward women (really, there's only one in the guise of m If you were ever interested in seeing what it's like to live in the mind of a man who fantasizes himself as a broody perfect hero and objectifies women onto pedestals, look no further. The main character, Darrian, just wanders around killing everything and fucking every woman before becoming disappointed that she's not "his" Dawn. Supposedly he learns a few things along the way but hell if I know what they are. To sum up the book's attitude toward women (really, there's only one in the guise of multiple individuals), here's a direct quote monologue from Darrian: "Oh Dawn. You are something I will never own or possess. Something I will never understand. Hahaha you whore! I love you! You have no idea how much I love you! You're not mine. You will never be mine. If I get lucky I can touch you. Know you. But you will never be mine." That possessive flip-flopping violent-undertone intensity makes my skin crawl. And then there's this gem of an eyeroll-worthy line showcasing how much of a hard-on the author has for himself/his self-insert Darrian: "I've met your kind before. Yes--men cursed by honest knowledge of their own true potential. It's quite a burden to bear." LOL WTF In case you might be thinking that the story's dynamics aren't tied into the author's massive self-indulgent gross ego, I refer you to his direct commentary on additional art pages at the back of the book: *picture depicting Darrian in an alternate fool/jester costume with mostly bare chest*: "I think his 'fool's t-shirt' works much better in the actual story. The bare chest thing looks kinda gay." *on next page, full beefcake picture of Darrian posing shirtless, muscled, in tight jeans*: "And speaking of gay...Hey, one for the ladies, alright? Fellas, scoff if you will, but lemme tell ya, this piece turns chicks on." *vomit noises* In two lines Linsner shows that his books are meant for the male gaze only and that his view of women is piggish. That last line is especially nauseating since it's so clear he fantasizes himself as Darrian. There's a supplemental volume 1.5 in the series that goes in depth into his commentary on the creation of volume 1, but after feeling like I need to shower reading only two lines of his commentary I wouldn't open 1.5 if someone paid me. The completionist in me felt obligated to finish the series with volume 3 even though I disliked volume 2, but ultimately I regret the money and time I spent on Dawn.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eduardo Villarraga Montes

    Sorprendente, una obra que va de menos a más, en un principio está situada lejos de lo que fue el libro anterior, se sale un poco de ese ambiente metafísico que nos ponía la obra antecesora y nos lleva a un lugar más "terrenal" y a una historia de amor y delirio que si bien no es una obra maestra si entretiene y el dibujo vale la pena porque el dibujo si es obra maestra más no la historia. Sorprendente, una obra que va de menos a más, en un principio está situada lejos de lo que fue el libro anterior, se sale un poco de ese ambiente metafísico que nos ponía la obra antecesora y nos lleva a un lugar más "terrenal" y a una historia de amor y delirio que si bien no es una obra maestra si entretiene y el dibujo vale la pena porque el dibujo si es obra maestra más no la historia.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Vincenzo Bilof

    First, I will start by saying that I am going to post this same review for two of the Dawn collections, because I think my thoughts on the pieces as a whole are interconnected. As a comic fan in the 90s, I, like a lot of readers, noticed the “bad girl” comics explosion, in which busy girls were used to sell comics. What a lot of readers don’t know is that many of those comics had legitimately strong stories, and the art was simply a way to entice readers to check out the work. Lady Death is one p First, I will start by saying that I am going to post this same review for two of the Dawn collections, because I think my thoughts on the pieces as a whole are interconnected. As a comic fan in the 90s, I, like a lot of readers, noticed the “bad girl” comics explosion, in which busy girls were used to sell comics. What a lot of readers don’t know is that many of those comics had legitimately strong stories, and the art was simply a way to entice readers to check out the work. Lady Death is one particular comic that comes to mind (RIP Steven Hughes). During the 90s, there was an influx of great stories from DC Vertigo, with Hellblazer, Sandman, and a lot of other great titles. Dawn, by Joseph Michael Linsner, seems to contain the bad girl aesthetic with Gaiman-esque storytelling. I completely missed out on Dawn. I don’t know how popular it was, but I think it probably got lost in the shuffle for me. Now that I have discovered it, I really, really wish there was more of it. As a poet and a publisher, I see that you can literally take a page out of each graphic novel and craft it into a poem. The myth concepts involved in the stories gave me a Sandman-vibe that I hadn’t felt from a graphic novel in years. Every page in the Dawn mythos screamed METAPHOR to me, as each panel was very deliberate, each word carefully chosen. When Three Tiers first arrived at my home, I flipped through it for pictures of Dawn. I had faith in Linsner, and knew the story had to be purposeful (there weren’t many pictures of Dawn). It’s not like Dawn is established as a likeable protagonist, but is more of a presence in the same vein that Morpheus in the Sandman comics did not even appear in some of the stories. As I reflect on this, I wonder if Linsner found some success in the comics industry, because it does seem like the character has a very cult-ish feel with a devoted, but small, following. If this is true, it’s unfortunate, and I blame the way the industry was during the 90s, because this is art that could have been regarded as a classic. I would beg Linsner to do more Dawn work, if I could. Reading these books makes me wish I could return to an era in which social justice warriors didn’t ruin the ability to tell a good story; I will not spoil some of the panels, but I know there has been a lot of outcry over the years about particular characters and their sexual orientation, their race, etc. A part of me feels that comics like Dawn and Sandman wouldn’t even be printed today, which is a shame. While I am not a female, and this will sound strange coming from me because it would be as if I am not credible, but there are strong feminist overtones in these stories, especially when you consider that Linsner seemed to illustrate women who were very realistic, as far as their body types. I know how that sounds, if you’re just looking at the covers of these books, but I will say that Linsner’s passion for his dreams is very much alive on the page. We sometimes forget that these stories are fantasy stories, and while the bad girl comics were seemingly marketed as boy fantasies, I think the Dawn books would resonate strongly with an audience that is completely the opposite of that, as far as reader expectations. Maybe that’s why Dawn does not seem as prominent in my own recollection; I know I probably would not have appreciated the aesthetic as much when I was reading Lady Death and Vampirella in the 90s (although Shi by Billy Tucci was amazing and also poetic). I can only imagine a reader who picked up a Dawn comic because of the cover and didn’t see what they wanted. I feel that when the bad girl craze was going on, readers flocked to some of these titles and found actual stories, and those were the titles that suffered most, in the long run (Lady Death actually had a very good mythos, too). So this wasn’t so much of a review as an overall tribute to art that I missed out on. If you are reading this, Mr. Linsner, PLEASE GIVE US MORE. We need work like this.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Reuter

    I love Linsner's work. He twists metaphor into a literal form, so that reading his version of reality is like paging through a sexier version of Lewis Carroll's Wonderland. Complete with beautiful, complex illustrations, I can read each book several times and find new hints and background details in the pictures each time. In Three Tiers obsessed warrior Darrian fights his way through several countries to find his true love, Dawn, and finds her somehow incorporated into several women he meets, a I love Linsner's work. He twists metaphor into a literal form, so that reading his version of reality is like paging through a sexier version of Lewis Carroll's Wonderland. Complete with beautiful, complex illustrations, I can read each book several times and find new hints and background details in the pictures each time. In Three Tiers obsessed warrior Darrian fights his way through several countries to find his true love, Dawn, and finds her somehow incorporated into several women he meets, and loves, during his search. The whole thing is so surreal it would be hard for me to be more specific than that, but it involves a lion fight, an aging prostitute, a sword fight between men in short shorts, and a seven-foot-tall queen with a ravenous appetite for death, little and big. This was the final published Dawn story, save for a one-shot comic a year or two ago. It, and other Dawn books, are still among the best for lovers of dreamlike fairy tales and sexy cheesecake art. -Elizabeth Reuter Author, The Demon of Renaissance Drive

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jarlos

    lacking the dvisiveness of heaven and hell, this story is an earthbound Dawn tale, which shouldn't have been as interesting as it was. the strength of it comes from the angst in Darrian's journey. and it is interesting to see what effect Dawn has on Darrian after the events of the first book. Epic in scope and emotions, i dug this book but definitely not as much as the first. lacking the dvisiveness of heaven and hell, this story is an earthbound Dawn tale, which shouldn't have been as interesting as it was. the strength of it comes from the angst in Darrian's journey. and it is interesting to see what effect Dawn has on Darrian after the events of the first book. Epic in scope and emotions, i dug this book but definitely not as much as the first.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Nuff said :> Nuff said :>

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    As always stunning artwork and story

  8. 5 out of 5

    Courtney (Pirogoeth)

    The Dawn books are a really good series. It’s quite deep and religious... The Dawn books are a really good series. It’s quite deep and religious...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andy Wisely

    I read this book expecting to see a lot of Dawn, her name being the main title. But nooo ... this book should have been titled "Darrian Ashoka" instead. I read this book expecting to see a lot of Dawn, her name being the main title. But nooo ... this book should have been titled "Darrian Ashoka" instead.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Giudy Giangi

  11. 4 out of 5

    diane

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anelis

  13. 5 out of 5

    Misty Crawford

  14. 5 out of 5

    May Elf

  15. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  16. 4 out of 5

    Crys Hedgecock giglio

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  18. 5 out of 5

    J.L. Byers

  19. 4 out of 5

    Corpus

  20. 5 out of 5

    The_Mad_Swede

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gary Makries

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bobbi

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  24. 4 out of 5

    Pia

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jared Millet

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Erskine

  28. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ben Fairchild

  30. 4 out of 5

    Phil

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