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Marching Toward Coverage: How Women Can Lead the Fight for Universal Healthcare

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A lively, clear explanation of the American healthcare reform movement from a noted expert--giving women the tools they need to demand fair and affordable coverage for all people Healthcare is one of America's most dysfunctional and confusing industries, and women bear the brunt of the problem when it comes to both access and treatment. Women, who make 80 percent of healthc A lively, clear explanation of the American healthcare reform movement from a noted expert--giving women the tools they need to demand fair and affordable coverage for all people Healthcare is one of America's most dysfunctional and confusing industries, and women bear the brunt of the problem when it comes to both access and treatment. Women, who make 80 percent of healthcare decisions for their families, are disproportionately impacted by the complex nature of our healthcare system--but are also uniquely poised to fix it. Founder and CEO of Day Health Strategies Rosemarie Day wants women to recognize their trouble with accessing affordable care as part of a national emergency. Day encourages women throughout the country to share their stories and get involved, and she illustrates how a groundswell of activism, led by everyday women, could create the incentives our political leaders need to change course. Marching Toward Coverage gives women the clear information they need to move this agenda forward by breaking down complicated topics in an accessible manner, like the ACA (Affordable Care Act), preexisting conditions, and employer-sponsored plans. With more than 25 years working in healthcare strategy and related fields, Day helps the average American understand the business of national health reform and lays out a pragmatic path forward, one that recognizes healthcare as a fundamental human right.


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A lively, clear explanation of the American healthcare reform movement from a noted expert--giving women the tools they need to demand fair and affordable coverage for all people Healthcare is one of America's most dysfunctional and confusing industries, and women bear the brunt of the problem when it comes to both access and treatment. Women, who make 80 percent of healthc A lively, clear explanation of the American healthcare reform movement from a noted expert--giving women the tools they need to demand fair and affordable coverage for all people Healthcare is one of America's most dysfunctional and confusing industries, and women bear the brunt of the problem when it comes to both access and treatment. Women, who make 80 percent of healthcare decisions for their families, are disproportionately impacted by the complex nature of our healthcare system--but are also uniquely poised to fix it. Founder and CEO of Day Health Strategies Rosemarie Day wants women to recognize their trouble with accessing affordable care as part of a national emergency. Day encourages women throughout the country to share their stories and get involved, and she illustrates how a groundswell of activism, led by everyday women, could create the incentives our political leaders need to change course. Marching Toward Coverage gives women the clear information they need to move this agenda forward by breaking down complicated topics in an accessible manner, like the ACA (Affordable Care Act), preexisting conditions, and employer-sponsored plans. With more than 25 years working in healthcare strategy and related fields, Day helps the average American understand the business of national health reform and lays out a pragmatic path forward, one that recognizes healthcare as a fundamental human right.

52 review for Marching Toward Coverage: How Women Can Lead the Fight for Universal Healthcare

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nenia ✨️ Socially Awkward Trash Panda ✨️ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest It's amazing how triggered some people get when you bring up healthcare. You would think any sensible person would want their fellow country-people to all be adequately covered, not only for immediate, life-threatening things, but also so they would feel comfortable checking out and getting affordable medication for things like STDs, flu vaccines, antibiotics for infectious but non-threatening diseases, as well as maternity and disabilit Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest It's amazing how triggered some people get when you bring up healthcare. You would think any sensible person would want their fellow country-people to all be adequately covered, not only for immediate, life-threatening things, but also so they would feel comfortable checking out and getting affordable medication for things like STDs, flu vaccines, antibiotics for infectious but non-threatening diseases, as well as maternity and disability care. ...But no. Apparently people don't want that-- or at least, they don't want to shell out a few more tax dollars to pay for it-- which leaves me to believe that my fellow country-people are perhaps not, shall we say, the most sensible. Look, I get it, socialism is bad, etc. etc. But MARCHING TOWARDS COVERAGE is not a "hey let's band together and embrace the proletariat" kind of book. It is not even what I would consider a typically feminist book. Instead it is a-- centrist and egalitarian-- look at how we, as a country, can and ought to make healthcare cheaper and more accessible for everyone. Countries that are comparable to the U.S. in terms of economy and wealth and also have some sort of "universal" or big government healthcare plan can expect their citizens to live about three years longer on average, while also preventing thousands of cases of infant mortality. Some of these countries even offer a blend of privatized and government healthcare, so it isn't even as if the government is fully expected to bear the brunt of all the burden in all of these cases. Day discusses how high premiums make healthcare more expensive to everyone, which is why it's imperative to get large amounts of healthy people on board. She talks about the importance of not discriminating against preexisting conditions because it can become a death sentence for someone trying to treat something like cancer or diabetes, and the stress of trying to get a job just to be insured (where roughly half of Americans get their health insurance-- through work). I'm giving it three stars because it's pretty dry, but I think it's helpful in understanding how the U.S. developed the healthcare system it did, what works, what doesn't, and why it's important to fix it. Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!    3 out of 5 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Rosadini

    Activism and healthcare education are coupled in this compelling argument for universal coverage. Built on the women’s momentum of 2016, the midterms wins and the collective reckoning of the modern woman, anyone who reads this will be inspired to take action.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I was lucky enough to get an early copy of this book, which is thoroughly researched and makes a reasonable case for providing healthcare coverage to ALL Americans. It's NOT a "Medicare for all" book. If you want an approachable way to get educated on our screwy system and some ways to fix it, check it out. I was lucky enough to get an early copy of this book, which is thoroughly researched and makes a reasonable case for providing healthcare coverage to ALL Americans. It's NOT a "Medicare for all" book. If you want an approachable way to get educated on our screwy system and some ways to fix it, check it out.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Kilcoyne

    Have you ever felt invisible, discriminated against because you couldn’t pay, or worse, suffering without hope? This is how people with no health insurance feel. In America twenty-eight million women, men and children experience this many days. And most are working! Rosemarie Day's first book thoroughly examines the political, operational, and financial costs of universal healthcare, along with the benefits. She explores the relationship between national values and healthcare as a human right in Have you ever felt invisible, discriminated against because you couldn’t pay, or worse, suffering without hope? This is how people with no health insurance feel. In America twenty-eight million women, men and children experience this many days. And most are working! Rosemarie Day's first book thoroughly examines the political, operational, and financial costs of universal healthcare, along with the benefits. She explores the relationship between national values and healthcare as a human right in the same way as education, housing, and food. Day advises the US to find a consensus that healthcare is a human right before beginning to discuss the specific details of a universal healthcare program. She asks, "Do we want to make healthcare a right like education? Or keep it as a commodity, like a car?" The history of health insurance in the US and other developed countries is reviewed and dispels the myth that other developed countries have only government-owned health systems. Most have a combination of employer-sponsored and public programs. Day proposes that since 49% of US residents are already covered by employer-sponsored health insurance, the combination of private and public coverage would make the most sense for the US. Medicare and Medicaid and other public programs cover 36%. Individual plans cover 6%, which leaves 9%, or twenty-eight million Americans who need health insurance. The US currently spends $3.65 trillion on healthcare. Day identifies three possible ways to fund universal healthcare: renegotiate pharmaceutical rates, increase tax rates on top earners and reevaluate defense and prison spending. These and other examples are priority spending discussions worth having. In a chapter called "Coverage Alone Isn't Enough," Day challenges the reader to consider the components of American lifestyle needed to support quality health. She calls these components social determinants: education, social supports, racism, pollution, and affordable housing. If your life has all of these components, take a minute and think about what life would be without one or two or all of them. According to the Department of Labor, women make 80% of the healthcare decisions in the family. They know first-hand the need for healthcare. When the Affordable Care Act was in danger of repeal in 2017, it was women who made 86% of the calls to Congress defending it, specifically they were concerned about losing family coverage for preexisting conditions. Day suggests that women can stand up again to support universal healthcare. Day is well-positioned to write a book on universal healthcare coverage. She is CEO of Day Health Care Strategies, former Chief Operating Officer for the MA Medicaid program and founding leader of the MA Health Connector. Day drives this book with facts (many facts), passion, and humor. She includes a comprehensive view of health and systems that keep someone healthy. She reminds us that our future depends on women who are "delivering 100% of the population," then goes on to discuss the underinsurance of maternity healthcare. Concerns for families without adequate maternity coverage are consistent with my daughter's experience. She had a $3,000 prenatal and maternity care deductible, which she kept up with paying during her pregnancy. The day her son was born, she was astounded to learn that his $3,000 deductible kicked in. Day is a pragmatist. She believes that even in this environment of political division in our country, there is hope that we will do the right thing. After all, the right for women to vote only passed by one "aye" in Tennessee 100 years ago. Day wrote this book to activate women to stand up for universal healthcare. "Women are an untapped resource of leadership, voices, donations, and very importantly, votes," she said. In the 2016 presidential election over one-third (42 million) of eligible women did not vote. The book includes a Personal Activism Assessment to determine where the reader falls on the activism wave. It starts with being informed, then to showing up, and finally running for office. Not everyone will take the last step, but supporting other women who run is activism! The bottom line says Day is, "No one's health is truly a right until everyone has access to good, affordable healthcare." When we prioritize the health of our citizens equal to the economy, twenty-eight million uninsured people become more productive contributors. I highly recommend this book for women and men. The pandemic is magnifying the need for universal healthcare. Together, we can make it a reality. This is still America, dammit! By Elizabeth Kilcoyne, April 19, 2020

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rod Wallace

    An entertaining, thought-provoking read In Marching Toward Coverage, Rosemarie Day powerfully integrates a passionate plea to extend healthcare coverage with a logical, fact-based analysis of our current healthcare system and potential paths forward. That combination of emotion and logic makes for entertaining reading that left me with a lot to think about. Officially, Marching focuses on the path towards universal healthcare coverage (which is different than 'Medicare for all'). While healthcare An entertaining, thought-provoking read In Marching Toward Coverage, Rosemarie Day powerfully integrates a passionate plea to extend healthcare coverage with a logical, fact-based analysis of our current healthcare system and potential paths forward. That combination of emotion and logic makes for entertaining reading that left me with a lot to think about. Officially, Marching focuses on the path towards universal healthcare coverage (which is different than 'Medicare for all'). While healthcare coverage is covered, the book goes further, approaching such questions as: Can we build a better healthcare system? What might such a better healthcare system look like, especially in terms of payer? How does American society need to change to deliver better health? And who is best positioned to lead us to such a promised land? In each area, Rosemarie articulates core elements of her own perspective while providing the reader enough facts to develop their own answers. Especially after reading Marching, I fully agree with Rosemarie Day that healthcare is a human right. That current health technology and workers are capable elements in a disintegrating, patchwork system with insufficient focus on many social health determinants. And that women are powerfully positioned to deliver improvements. While I disagree with some of the details, Rosemarie’s overall story is clear and compelling, and the text is worth reading. If you’re interested in a coherent overview of the current US healthcare system, the future of that system, or the role of women in delivering change, I strongly recommend Marching Toward Coverage by Rosemarie Day.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Romito

    A must read book, especially during this time of coronavirus pandemic. It's been too easy to fuss around the idea of basic healthcare for all for too long, getting stuck in political quagmires. Day gives us a nice balance of stories about real people with enough facts to keep us well informed, presenting a strong argument that the time for basic healthcare for all is now, and that women are well positioned to lead our country there. Her writing is accessible. Her chapter describing our historica A must read book, especially during this time of coronavirus pandemic. It's been too easy to fuss around the idea of basic healthcare for all for too long, getting stuck in political quagmires. Day gives us a nice balance of stories about real people with enough facts to keep us well informed, presenting a strong argument that the time for basic healthcare for all is now, and that women are well positioned to lead our country there. Her writing is accessible. Her chapter describing our historical lurches, forward and back, towards expanded health care access is concise and eye opening. Who knew Richard Nixon was a supporter of expanding health care access?! Her chapter on the social factors (or social determinants) that affect health is very well written and one of the best explanations I've seen relating social factors to the direct delivery of personal health care. Finally, her final chapter, urging us all to take the action that we are able to is, is passionate, clear, and moving. I can't wait to see what Day does next, in this time of rapid change.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Marlise Arellano

    A must read for those looking to understand the current state of our health care system, the case for universal coverage, and the activism that is needed to get there. It is digestible and easy to read, while still providing key history, data-driven evidence, and compelling personal accounts. As we continue to move through this COVID/pandemic era this book becomes even more pivotal when we think about who the healthcare system continues to leave behind (e.g., people of color, low-income folks, e A must read for those looking to understand the current state of our health care system, the case for universal coverage, and the activism that is needed to get there. It is digestible and easy to read, while still providing key history, data-driven evidence, and compelling personal accounts. As we continue to move through this COVID/pandemic era this book becomes even more pivotal when we think about who the healthcare system continues to leave behind (e.g., people of color, low-income folks, etc.). If you're thinking about reading just read it -- and share with your friends who may have animosity or confusion towards universal coverage!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Zachary W. Norris

    This book is phenomenal! Thank you so much Rosemarie Day for writing it! I learned a ton and found it super accessible and compelling. It's a primer on the merits of different universal healthcare. It shows how women have led and will lead the fight for universal healthcare. Yet, it also provides everyone everywhere with a pathway to participation. It shows how we can reach across the aisle (and pull people across it when necessary) to ensure that healthcare is treated as a human right. This book is phenomenal! Thank you so much Rosemarie Day for writing it! I learned a ton and found it super accessible and compelling. It's a primer on the merits of different universal healthcare. It shows how women have led and will lead the fight for universal healthcare. Yet, it also provides everyone everywhere with a pathway to participation. It shows how we can reach across the aisle (and pull people across it when necessary) to ensure that healthcare is treated as a human right.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Amaral

    This is a must read for anyone who is confused and frustrated by all of the rhetoric and politics surrounding healthcare. After reading this book, I have a clear understanding of the issues to feel comfortable participating in conversations, and I am inspired to make a difference. Thank you Rosemarie for writing this important book!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Maria Campbell

    A VERY timely read! Rosemarie Day's book provides an approachable way to learn about our broken healthcare system and how we got where we are today. Through personal narrative and a feminist lens, she provides pragmatic solutions to how we can make healthcare a right in this country. This is a great book for students, academics, healthcare professionals, and lay readers alike (this issue affects us ALL)! Universal health coverage and "Medicare for All" are NOT the same. We CAN achieve universal A VERY timely read! Rosemarie Day's book provides an approachable way to learn about our broken healthcare system and how we got where we are today. Through personal narrative and a feminist lens, she provides pragmatic solutions to how we can make healthcare a right in this country. This is a great book for students, academics, healthcare professionals, and lay readers alike (this issue affects us ALL)! Universal health coverage and "Medicare for All" are NOT the same. We CAN achieve universal coverage through other means. Find out how in "Marching Toward Coverage".

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    I won a copy of this book. I've had to deal with the American health system for too many of my years. Between an autoimmune disorder and fibroids (so.many.fibroids!) I've become a firm believer in: If you don't have your health, you don't have a life. And since life is one of the three big promises in the US, we really should have a basic healthcare system that covers everyone. Rosemary Day makes a very compelling argument for America to move to a Universal Healthcare. Day sets out with giving a I won a copy of this book. I've had to deal with the American health system for too many of my years. Between an autoimmune disorder and fibroids (so.many.fibroids!) I've become a firm believer in: If you don't have your health, you don't have a life. And since life is one of the three big promises in the US, we really should have a basic healthcare system that covers everyone. Rosemary Day makes a very compelling argument for America to move to a Universal Healthcare. Day sets out with giving a good basic idea of how we got to this point in our history. She argues that Women are the ones to get it done, as so many changes come about because of them.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Katie Gottung

  13. 5 out of 5

    Katline Craig

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Barker

  15. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Bianchi

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Sherman

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ahliah

  20. 5 out of 5

    Raven

  21. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maddie Issleib

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hilary Nelson

  24. 5 out of 5

    BMR, LCSW

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nell

  26. 5 out of 5

    Deni

  27. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  28. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Mena

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kay Card

  30. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

  31. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Day

  32. 5 out of 5

    Janet

  33. 4 out of 5

    Glass

  34. 5 out of 5

    Muffin

  35. 4 out of 5

    Angela

  36. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Gerhart

  37. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  38. 4 out of 5

    Kim Ellis

  39. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Maki

  40. 5 out of 5

    Nadine

  41. 5 out of 5

    ***Book Lady ***

  42. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

  43. 5 out of 5

    Traci

  44. 4 out of 5

    Brian Hart

  45. 4 out of 5

    Bettye Short

  46. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

  47. 5 out of 5

    Doris Moore

  48. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  49. 5 out of 5

    Natasha

  50. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  51. 5 out of 5

    Karyn Palmer

  52. 4 out of 5

    Sherri

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