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Mathematical Cryptology for Computer Scientists and Mathematicians

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The author includes not only information about the most important advances in the field of cryptology of the past decade-such as the Data Encryption Standard (DES), public-key cryptology, and the RSA algorithm-but also the research results of the last three years: the Shamir, the Lagarias-Odlyzko, and the Brickell attacks on the Knapsack methods; the new Knapsack method us The author includes not only information about the most important advances in the field of cryptology of the past decade-such as the Data Encryption Standard (DES), public-key cryptology, and the RSA algorithm-but also the research results of the last three years: the Shamir, the Lagarias-Odlyzko, and the Brickell attacks on the Knapsack methods; the new Knapsack method using Galois fields by Chor and Rivest; and the recent analysis by Kaliski, Rivest, and Sherman of group-theoretic properties of the Data Encryption Standard (DES).


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The author includes not only information about the most important advances in the field of cryptology of the past decade-such as the Data Encryption Standard (DES), public-key cryptology, and the RSA algorithm-but also the research results of the last three years: the Shamir, the Lagarias-Odlyzko, and the Brickell attacks on the Knapsack methods; the new Knapsack method us The author includes not only information about the most important advances in the field of cryptology of the past decade-such as the Data Encryption Standard (DES), public-key cryptology, and the RSA algorithm-but also the research results of the last three years: the Shamir, the Lagarias-Odlyzko, and the Brickell attacks on the Knapsack methods; the new Knapsack method using Galois fields by Chor and Rivest; and the recent analysis by Kaliski, Rivest, and Sherman of group-theoretic properties of the Data Encryption Standard (DES).

30 review for Mathematical Cryptology for Computer Scientists and Mathematicians

  1. 4 out of 5

    R P I

    Wayne Patterson was proven to have directly misquoted a student in a negative light by a Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab polygraph test with a .01 chance of error. This was the lowest possible rating, i.e, it is clear to all, including the expert that administered the test, that Wayne Patterson directly (in quotation marks) misquoted a student in a negative light. He was immediately informed that that he misrepresented the student’s position through omission and direct misquotes, but he refused Wayne Patterson was proven to have directly misquoted a student in a negative light by a Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab polygraph test with a .01 chance of error. This was the lowest possible rating, i.e, it is clear to all, including the expert that administered the test, that Wayne Patterson directly (in quotation marks) misquoted a student in a negative light. He was immediately informed that that he misrepresented the student’s position through omission and direct misquotes, but he refused to correct his writings. This error / tactic of Patterson’s was an apparent attempt to discredit a student’s claims of substandard teaching in a course at the College. While Shakespeare discussed the calumny of knaves, one has to appreciate the irony of a CS prof and administrator being outed by computer program. The results of the Polygraph test were sent to the President and administration of the College of Charleston. While one can dismiss Patterson’s actions and writings as those of a morbidly misshapen, disgusting knave, it is considered unacceptable to directly misquote others in a negative light in civilized society. Others in the administration had previously warned of the efficacy of the process, particularly with the players involved, and I declined further involvement. Another administrator at the college familiar with the issue expressed their displeasure with Patterson’s actions in the matter.

  2. 4 out of 5

    David

    Even though this 80s crypto book is dated (e.g. Knapsacks) and the examples are given in Pascal, I still have a soft spot for authors that make cryptography topics accessible from a coding perspective. Author has a good intuitive understand of many of the concepts, so this book is not just a topical rehash of what you may already have in other books.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Richard Pennock

  4. 4 out of 5

    Somesh kaashyap

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sam Kowash

  7. 4 out of 5

    Matt Salazar

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  9. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

  11. 4 out of 5

    Godfrey Waweru

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paola D

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mahesh Amaratunga

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ka Cheung

  15. 4 out of 5

    Margarita Keteva

  16. 4 out of 5

    Adarsh

  17. 5 out of 5

    Edwards Deming

  18. 5 out of 5

    Peach

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed Abdelmawla

  20. 4 out of 5

    Leo

  21. 4 out of 5

    BookDB

  22. 5 out of 5

    Betülözdemir

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tomisa Starr

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aanchal Agarwal

  25. 5 out of 5

    Makinde Okikiola

  26. 4 out of 5

    Merry

  27. 5 out of 5

    Duygu Özden

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bhabani

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jadwiga

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