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Not since the publication of Paul Auster's The Random House Book of 20th Century French Poetry (1984) has there been a significant and widely read anthology of modern French poetry in the English-speaking world. Here for the first time is a comprehensive bilingual representation of French poetic achievement in the twentieth century, from the turn-of-the-century poetry of G Not since the publication of Paul Auster's The Random House Book of 20th Century French Poetry (1984) has there been a significant and widely read anthology of modern French poetry in the English-speaking world. Here for the first time is a comprehensive bilingual representation of French poetic achievement in the twentieth century, from the turn-of-the-century poetry of Guillaume Apollinaire to the high modernist art of Samuel Beckett to the contemporary verse of scourge Michel Houellebecq. Many of the English translations (on facing pages) are justly celebrated, composed by eminent figures such as T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, and John Ashbery; many others are new and have been commissioned for this book. Distinguished scholar and editor Mary Ann Caws has chosen work by more than 100 poets. Her deliberately extensive, international selection includes work by Francophone poets, by writers better known for accomplishments in other genres (novelists, songwriters, performance artists), and by many more female poets than have typically been represented in past anthologies of modern French poetry. The editor has opted for a chronological organisation that highlights six crucial pressur


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Not since the publication of Paul Auster's The Random House Book of 20th Century French Poetry (1984) has there been a significant and widely read anthology of modern French poetry in the English-speaking world. Here for the first time is a comprehensive bilingual representation of French poetic achievement in the twentieth century, from the turn-of-the-century poetry of G Not since the publication of Paul Auster's The Random House Book of 20th Century French Poetry (1984) has there been a significant and widely read anthology of modern French poetry in the English-speaking world. Here for the first time is a comprehensive bilingual representation of French poetic achievement in the twentieth century, from the turn-of-the-century poetry of Guillaume Apollinaire to the high modernist art of Samuel Beckett to the contemporary verse of scourge Michel Houellebecq. Many of the English translations (on facing pages) are justly celebrated, composed by eminent figures such as T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, and John Ashbery; many others are new and have been commissioned for this book. Distinguished scholar and editor Mary Ann Caws has chosen work by more than 100 poets. Her deliberately extensive, international selection includes work by Francophone poets, by writers better known for accomplishments in other genres (novelists, songwriters, performance artists), and by many more female poets than have typically been represented in past anthologies of modern French poetry. The editor has opted for a chronological organisation that highlights six crucial pressur

30 review for The Yale Anthology of Twentieth-Century French Poetry

  1. 4 out of 5

    Edita

    I’ve decorated the day with the tattoos of my dreams my face has seen my other face I’ve not heard the voice calling me the hand seeking me hasn’t found me I’ve been born several times from each star I’ve died as often from the sun of days I’ve taken early boats to nowhere —Amina Saïd, from “Path of Light”

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hasan Makhzoum

    On the Road to San Romano André Breton Poetry is made in a bed like love Its rumpled sheets are the dawn of things Poetry is made in the woods It has the space it needs Not this one but the other whose form is lent it by The eye of the kite The dew on a horsetail The memory of a bottle frosted over on a silver tray A tall rod of tourmaline on the sea And the road of the mental adventure That climbs abruptly One stop and bushes cover it instantly That isn’t to be shouted on the rooftops It’s improper to leav On the Road to San Romano André Breton Poetry is made in a bed like love Its rumpled sheets are the dawn of things Poetry is made in the woods It has the space it needs Not this one but the other whose form is lent it by The eye of the kite The dew on a horsetail The memory of a bottle frosted over on a silver tray A tall rod of tourmaline on the sea And the road of the mental adventure That climbs abruptly One stop and bushes cover it instantly That isn’t to be shouted on the rooftops It’s improper to leave the door open Or to summon witnesses The shoals of fish the hedges of titmice The rails at the entrance of a great station The reflections of both riverbanks The crevices in the bread The bubbles of the stream The days of the calendar The St John’s wort The acts of love and poetry Are incompatible With reading the newspaper aloud The meaning of the sunbeam The blue light between the hatchet blows The bat’s thread shaped like a heart or a hoopnet The beavers’ tails beating in time The diligence of the flash The casting of candy from the old stairs The avalanche The room of marvels No dear sirs it isn’t the eighth Chamber Nor the vapours of the roomful some Sunday evening The figures danced transparent above the pools The outline on the wall of a woman’s body at daggerthrow The bright spirals of smoke The curls of your hair The curve of the Philippine sponge The swaying of the coral snake The ivy entrance in the ruins It has all the time ahead The embrace of poetry like that of the flesh As long as it lasts Shuts out any glimpse of the misery of the world *** What Would I Do Samuel Beckett what would I do without this world faceless incurious where to be lasts but an instant where every instant spills in the void the ignorance of having been without this wave where in the end body and shadow together are engulfed what would I do without this silence where the murmurs die the pantings the frenzies towards succour towards love without this sky that soars above its ballast dust what would I do what I did yesterday and the day before peering out of my deadlight looking for another wandering like me eddying far from all the living in a convulsive space among the voices voiceless that throng my hiddenness *** I Want to Sleep with You Joyce Mansour I want to sleep with you side by side Our hair intertwined Our sexes joined With your mouth for a pillow. I want to sleep with you back to back With no breath to part us No words to distract us No eyes to lie to us With no clothes on. To sleep with you breast to breast Tense and sweating Shining with a thousand quivers Consumed by ecstatic mad inertia Stretched out on your shadow Hammered by your tongue To die in a rabbit’s rotting teeth Happy. *** At Christmas Emmanuel Hocquard III Viviane is Viviane, yes. Tautology does not say all but yes. Yes and all are not equivalents. Every yes fills the space of language, which for all that does not form a whole. One would not obtain a sum by adding up these yeses. What if we subtracted all from our vocabulary. Those wolves do not sing in chorus. The space filled by their scraps of voices is a broken space. Heaps of little spaces in juxtaposition sing around the points. *** My Dance Blaise Cendrars Plato does not grant city rights to the poet Wandering Jew Metaphysical Don Juan Friends, close ones You don’t have customs anymore and no new habits yet We must be free of the tyranny of magazines Literature Poor life Misplaced pride Mask Woman, the dance Nietzsche wanted to teach us to dance Woman But irony? Continual coming and going Procuring in the street All men, all countries And so you are no longer a burden It’s like you’re not there anymore . . . I am a gentleman who in fabulous express trains crosses the same old Europe and gazes disheartened from the doorway The landscape doesn’t interest me anymore But the dance of the landscape The dance of the landscape Dance-landscape Paritatitata I all-turn ***

  3. 5 out of 5

    Wilum Pugmire

    I am writing a new collection of Sesqua Valley stories, BOHEMIANS OF SESQUA VALLEY, and I want it to wear a taint of French decadence. So I am returning to French works of symbolism and such, and of course Wilde's Salome will figure in the book as well. This is the only collection of French poetry that I have read (I have just ordered the Penguin Classics anthology of a similar theme), and I found it quite intoxicating. Edited by a woman, Mary Ann Caws, it comes to over 600 pages of verse. Highl I am writing a new collection of Sesqua Valley stories, BOHEMIANS OF SESQUA VALLEY, and I want it to wear a taint of French decadence. So I am returning to French works of symbolism and such, and of course Wilde's Salome will figure in the book as well. This is the only collection of French poetry that I have read (I have just ordered the Penguin Classics anthology of a similar theme), and I found it quite intoxicating. Edited by a woman, Mary Ann Caws, it comes to over 600 pages of verse. Highly recommended.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Víctor Bermúdez

    1 1897–1915: Symbolism, Post-Symbolism, Cubism, Simultanism Guillaume Apollinaire, Blaise Cendrars, Paul Claudel, Jean Cocteau, Léon-Paul Fargue, Max Jacob, Pierre-Jean Jouve, Valéry Larbaud, Saint-John Perse, Pablo Picasso, Catherine Pozzi, Pierre Reverdy, Saint- Pol Roux, Victor Segalen, Jules Supervielle, Paul Valéry, Renée Vivien 2 1916–1930: Dada and the Heroic Period of Surrealism Louis Aragon, Antonin Artaud, Georges Bataille, Samuel Beckett, Andrée Breton, Claude Cahun, Malcolm de Chazal, Robert Desn 1 1897–1915: Symbolism, Post-Symbolism, Cubism, Simultanism Guillaume Apollinaire, Blaise Cendrars, Paul Claudel, Jean Cocteau, Léon-Paul Fargue, Max Jacob, Pierre-Jean Jouve, Valéry Larbaud, Saint-John Perse, Pablo Picasso, Catherine Pozzi, Pierre Reverdy, Saint- Pol Roux, Victor Segalen, Jules Supervielle, Paul Valéry, Renée Vivien 2 1916–1930: Dada and the Heroic Period of Surrealism Louis Aragon, Antonin Artaud, Georges Bataille, Samuel Beckett, Andrée Breton, Claude Cahun, Malcolm de Chazal, Robert Desnos, Paul Éluard, Jean Follain, Greta Knutson, Michel Leiris, Henri Michaux, Benjamin PeÅLret, Francis Ponge, Jacques Prévert, Raymond Queneau, LeÅLopold SeÅLdar Senghor, Philippe Soupault, Jean Tardieu, Tristan Tzara, Marguerite Yourcenar 3 1931–1945: Prewar and War Poetry Claude de Burine, Aimé Césaire, ReneÅL Char, Andrée Chédid, Léon- Gontran Damas, René Daumal, Michel Deguy, ReneÅL Depestre, Mohammed Dib, Louis-ReneÅL des Forêts, Andrée Frénaud, Jean Grosjean, Euge`ne Guillevic, Anne Hébert, Radovan Ivsic, Edmond Jabe`s, Pierre-Albert Jourdan, Gherasim Luca, Dora Maar, Joyce Mansour, Meret Oppenheim, Valentine Penrose, Gise`le Prassinos, Boris Vian 4 1946–1966: The Death of André Breton, the Beginning of L’Éphémère Yves Bonnefoy, André du Bouchet, Bernard Collin, Jacques Dupin, Jacques Garelli, Lorand Gaspar, Édouard Glissant, Philippe Jaccottet, Claire Lejeune, Claire Malroux, Robert Marteau, Abdelwahab Meddeb, Gaston Miron, Bernard Noël, Anne Perrier, Anne Portugal, Jacques Réda, Jude SteÅLfan, Salah Stétié 5 1967–1980: The Explosion of the Next Generation Anne-Marie Albiach, Marie-Claire Bancquart, Silvia Baron Supervielle, Martine Broda, Nicole Brossard, Danielle Collobert, Claude Esteban, Marie Étienne, Dominique Fourcade, Michelle Grangaud, Emmanuel Hocquard, Hédi Kaddour, Vénus Khoury-Ghata, Abdellatif Laa^bi, Annie Le Brun, Marcelin Pleynet, Jacqueline Risset, Jacques Roubaud, Paul de Roux, Claude Royet-Journoud, Habib Tengour, Franck Venaille 6 1981–2002: Young Poetry at the End of the Millennium Pierre AlfeÅLri, Tahar Bekri, Olivier Cadiot, Jean Frémon, Liliane Giraudon, Guy Go√ette, Michel Houellebecq, Franck André Jamme, Jean-Michel Maulpoix, Robert Melancon, Pascalle Monnier, Nathalie Quintane, Valérie-Catherine Richez, Amina Saïd, Christophe Tarkos, André Velter

  5. 4 out of 5

    Professor Typewriter

    This book is a must have for serious poetry readers. It is one of the best poetry anthologies I have ever read. For me, what makes this collection of poetry superb is the vast range of poetry that this anthology consists of. I often read poetry by American poets. This book was a refreshing change. Every morning for seven months I read a selection from this book. You will enjoy this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    R.L. Swihart

    Overall a good read. Found some new poets to explore more in depth (e.g., Edmond Jabbes), found plenty to tacitly pass on.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mara

  8. 4 out of 5

    Joe

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bara

  10. 5 out of 5

    Johnathan

  11. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Piccinnini

  12. 5 out of 5

    Indigo Gabriel

  13. 5 out of 5

    John McGhee

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brady

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Holden

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy Sinclair

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nick Falkowski

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  19. 5 out of 5

    m

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mark Noack

  21. 4 out of 5

    Hoyadaisy

  22. 4 out of 5

    QUINCY PHAN

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tom Crathorne

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bob Cat

  26. 4 out of 5

    Angie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Vagt

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anwita Ghosh

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anna Harper

  30. 4 out of 5

    Two Readers in Love

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